Walmart earnings, housing data, manufacturing read: 3 things to watch for Tuesday

Walmart is set to report fourth quarter earnings on Tuesday before the market opens. The Street is expecting the big-box retailer to earn $1.44 per share on $142.54 billion in revenue, according to estimates from FactSet. This represents 2.7% year-over-year revenue growth, and would be 11.4% higher than the $127.99 billion Walmart earned in the prior quarter. Investors will be watching the retailer’s report closely, since it will include sales from the all-important holiday season. In January co


Walmart is set to report fourth quarter earnings on Tuesday before the market opens.
The Street is expecting the big-box retailer to earn $1.44 per share on $142.54 billion in revenue, according to estimates from FactSet.
This represents 2.7% year-over-year revenue growth, and would be 11.4% higher than the $127.99 billion Walmart earned in the prior quarter.
Investors will be watching the retailer’s report closely, since it will include sales from the all-important holiday season.
In January co
Walmart earnings, housing data, manufacturing read: 3 things to watch for Tuesday Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-14  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, manufacturing, watch, holiday, data, yearoveryear, billion, report, fell, market, revenue, sales, walmart, read, things, earnings, estimates, housing


Walmart earnings, housing data, manufacturing read: 3 things to watch for Tuesday

Here’s what investors need to know about Tuesday before hitting the door. (The market will be closed Monday in observance of the Washington’s Birthday holiday.)

Walmart is set to report fourth quarter earnings on Tuesday before the market opens. The Street is expecting the big-box retailer to earn $1.44 per share on $142.54 billion in revenue, according to estimates from FactSet. This represents 2.7% year-over-year revenue growth, and would be 11.4% higher than the $127.99 billion Walmart earned in the prior quarter.

Investors will be watching the retailer’s report closely, since it will include sales from the all-important holiday season.

In January competitor Target said its holiday sales fell short of estimates following softness in the company’s toys and electronics divisions.

Shares of Walmart slid alongside the broader S&P Retail ETF on Friday after the U.S. Commerce Department said that clothing store sales in January fell the most since 2009.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-14  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, manufacturing, watch, holiday, data, yearoveryear, billion, report, fell, market, revenue, sales, walmart, read, things, earnings, estimates, housing


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

6 brilliant strategies that helped these people pay off more than $800,000 in debt

The couple, who live in Exeter, Rhode Island, say they used this simple tool to help them tackle student loan debt. “I’m a very visual person, and my wife is very visual,” David told Grow earlier this year. Read more: How tidying up her life and her money helped a 34-year-old pay off $43,500 in debt in 3 years3. Using a cash-only spending strategy, Epperson was able to pay off $20,000 in student loan and auto loan debt in just one year. “I would look at my credit card bill and not even remember


The couple, who live in Exeter, Rhode Island, say they used this simple tool to help them tackle student loan debt.
“I’m a very visual person, and my wife is very visual,” David told Grow earlier this year.
Read more: How tidying up her life and her money helped a 34-year-old pay off $43,500 in debt in 3 years3.
Using a cash-only spending strategy, Epperson was able to pay off $20,000 in student loan and auto loan debt in just one year.
“I would look at my credit card bill and not even remember
6 brilliant strategies that helped these people pay off more than $800,000 in debt Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-06  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brilliant, helped, read, pay, told, loan, 800000, strategies, grow, student, money, debt, things


6 brilliant strategies that helped these people pay off more than $800,000 in debt

Getting out of debt isn’t easy. It usually requires a lot of time and sacrifice. But having a game plan can make the process easier no matter how much you owe. If you’re not sure where to start, consider these six success stories about paying off debt with the help of simple tricks, tools, and strategies. All told, these people have paid off, collectively, more than $800,000 in debt.

1. Visualize your debt

An $18 dry-erase board proved to be a good investment for David and Alana Almonte. The couple, who live in Exeter, Rhode Island, say they used this simple tool to help them tackle student loan debt. “I’m a very visual person, and my wife is very visual,” David told Grow earlier this year. So he decided that a good method to help them ditch their debt was to track the total on a board in their kitchen. That daily reminder nudged them to spend less, helping them pay off $18,000 from 2016 to 2018. More from Grow:

How someone just out of college saved $100,000 in 3 years

Suze Orman: ‘Tell everybody how much money you’re making’

9 highest-paying health-care jobs that don’t require an MD

David and Alana Almonte. Courtesy David Almonte

2. Organize your home

Abigail Ness, a 34-year-old research analyst from Nampa, Idaho, took inspiration from decluttering guru Marie Kondo and used home organization as a way to improve her finances. She made an inventory of her belongings, which led her to change her shopping habits and reduce unnecessary purchases. “I made it my mission to be resourceful with the things I already own,” Ness told Grow earlier this year. Getting organized helped her pay off $43,500 in debt over three years. Read more: How tidying up her life and her money helped a 34-year-old pay off $43,500 in debt in 3 years

3. Adopt a one-income lifestyle

Bernadette and AJ Maulion of Charlotte, North Carolina, realized they would need to cut their spending significantly to quickly pay off their more than $300,000 in student loan and mortgage debt. So they made a plan to only live off of one income — AJ’s $91,000 salary. To keep their bills in line with that single-income strategy, they sold many of their possessions, including one of their two cars and unneeded furniture and clothing. “Seeing how much I was paid for things [I sold] and how much they depreciated deterred me from wanting to buy things,” Bernadette told Grow earlier this year. Read more: How a one-income, minimalist lifestyle helped a couple pay off $300,000 in debt in 3 years

Courtesy Bernadette Joy Maulion and AJ Maulion

4. Use cash — and only cash

Cash is king for 23-year-old Kristy Epperson of Dayton, Ohio. Using a cash-only spending strategy, Epperson was able to pay off $20,000 in student loan and auto loan debt in just one year. By ditching plastic, Epperson found that she was more mindful about where and when she spent money. That helped her avoid online shopping and ordering takeout. “I would look at my credit card bill and not even remember some of the charges,” she told Grow. Read more: How going cash-only helped this 23-year-old pay off $20,000 in debt in one year

5. Communicate about money with your partner

After their honeymoon in 2014, Michael and Taylor Lacy of Houston, Texas, realized they were $61,000 in debt. That didn’t sit well with the newlyweds, who became motivated to pay it off as efficiently as possible. The couple made a budget and had monthly money meetings to discuss their saving and spending habits. They credit their candid conversations with helping them stay on track even through setbacks like a job loss. Read more: How marrying their finances helped newlyweds pay off $61,000 in under 2 years

Taylor and Michael Lacy. Courtesy Michael Lacy

6. Account for every dollar you spend


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-06  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brilliant, helped, read, pay, told, loan, 800000, strategies, grow, student, money, debt, things


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

From ‘The Alchemist’ to ‘Blink’: Books that Kobe Bryant loved to read

To honor Bryant, Los Angeles Public Libary compiled a list of books Bryant has recommended over the years. Los Angeles librarian Keith Kesler says he combed through old interviews and social posts from the basketball legend to find the list. Bryant read the book so many times he recommended it to other NBA players, according to The Athletic.com, and set up a meeting with Coelho to collaborate on a children’s book. “Team of Rivals” by Doris Kearns Goodwin”I loved TEAM OF RIVALS,” Kobe told The Am


To honor Bryant, Los Angeles Public Libary compiled a list of books Bryant has recommended over the years.
Los Angeles librarian Keith Kesler says he combed through old interviews and social posts from the basketball legend to find the list.
Bryant read the book so many times he recommended it to other NBA players, according to The Athletic.com, and set up a meeting with Coelho to collaborate on a children’s book.
“Team of Rivals” by Doris Kearns Goodwin”I loved TEAM OF RIVALS,” Kobe told The Am
From ‘The Alchemist’ to ‘Blink’: Books that Kobe Bryant loved to read Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-03  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, books, read, tipping, angeles, bryant, loved, blink, los, team, told, seagull, life, alchemist, kobe, book


From 'The Alchemist' to 'Blink': Books that Kobe Bryant loved to read

Kobe Bryant #24 of the Los Angeles Lakers celebrates after defeating the Orlando Magic 99-86 in Game Five of the 2009 NBA Finals on June 14, 2009 at Amway Arena in Orlando, Florida.

In addition to his basketball career, which includes five NBA titles, Kobe Bryant wanted to be remembered as a storyteller and as a businessman. Bryant told The Washington Post in November, just months before his death on Jan. 26, that he wanted to be known “as a person that was able to create stories that inspired their children and families to bond together.” Bryant also loved to read others’ storytelling. Throughout his career, he referenced books that had made an impact on him. To honor Bryant, Los Angeles Public Libary compiled a list of books Bryant has recommended over the years. Los Angeles librarian Keith Kesler says he combed through old interviews and social posts from the basketball legend to find the list. Here are some of those books:

“The Alchemist” by Paulo Coelho

“The Alchemist” tells the magical story of Santiago, a shepherd boy in search of a treasure buried near the pyramids, who along the way, discovers the power of listening to one’s heart and following their dreams. Bryant read the book so many times he recommended it to other NBA players, according to The Athletic.com, and set up a meeting with Coelho to collaborate on a children’s book.

Coelho and Bryant were in the process of working on a draft of a book to inspire underprivileged children to over overcome adversity through sports. However, Coelho told the Associated Press, “I deleted the draft because it didn’t make any sense to publish without him.” Pharrell Williams and Oprah Winfrey are also big fans of the book.

“Blink” by Malcolm Gladwell

Los Angeles Lakers head coach Phil Jackson reportedly gave Bryant a copy of “Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking,” about 15 years ago. In the book, Gladwell discusses why some people are good at making decisions while others are not, as well as why some people follow their instincts and win while others stumble.

“Children of Blood and Bone” By Tomi Adeyemi

This New York Times best-seller novel was “the first installment in a YA West African Fantasy trilogy about a girl who must fight against the monarchy to bring magic back to her people,” according to Adeyemi’s website. Bryant tweeted Adeyemi in 2018 that he read the book in a day.

“The Hero’s Journey” by Joseph Campbell

Campbell was the first to trademark the phrase “follow your bliss,” and in “The Hero’s Journey: Joseph Campbell on His Life and Work,” Campbell chronicles his personal and spiritual journey through life and all the obstacles he had to overcome to reach his goals. One of Bryant’s teachers, Jeanne Mastriano, introduced him to the book his sophomore year of high school. In one of his last interviews, Bryant credited Mastriano for his love of reading.

“Jonathan Livingston Seagull” by Richard Bach

When Bryant was asked by a Los Angeles Chargers player what his favorite book was in 2017, he said “Jonathan Livingston Seagull,” according to NBC Sports’ Peter King. The book is about a seagull who wants more out of life than fighting other seagulls for food and is trying to pursue other passions. “I think half the team went out and bought ‘Jonathan Livingston Seagull’ that day,” Chargers VP of Communications Josh Rupprecht, who was there when Bryant spoke, said.

“Relentless” by Tim Grover

In “Relentless: From Good to Great to Unstoppable,” fitness trainer Tim Grover, who worked with Bryant and Michael Jordan, reveals what it takes to achieve total mental and physical dominance. In the forward, Bryant wrote that the book is “the blueprint for discovering what you are capable of achieving, getting results you never imagined, reaching the highest level of success—and then going even higher.”

“Shoe Dog” by Philip Knight

In 2017, Bryant posted a Phil Knight quote on Facebook: “There comes a time in every life where the past recedes and the future opens. It’s that moment when you turn to face the unknown. Some will turn back to what they already know. Some will walk straight ahead into uncertainty. I can’t tell you which one is right. But I can tell you which one is more fun,” with the hashtags #MondayMuse and #MambaMentality. In his book “Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of Nike,” founder and former CEO Knight shares his personal story of building the shoe and apparel company from a start-up into one of the world’s most iconic brands.

“Sunny” by Jason Reynolds

Bryant actually recommended all four novels in Reynold’s “Track Series”: “Ghost,” “Patina,” “Sunny” and “Lu” on Facebook in 2019. “Sunny” chronicles the life of a 13-year-old African-American boy by the same name who is torn between his father’s expectations for him to become a marathon runner and his passion for dance.

“Team of Rivals” by Doris Kearns Goodwin

“I loved TEAM OF RIVALS,” Kobe told The Amazon Book Review in April. In “Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln,” author and historian Doris Kearns Goodwin writes about the rise of President Abraham Lincoln, focusing in on Lincoln’s uncanny ability to lead and bring his disgruntled opponents together. President Barack Obama has called the book a “remarkable study in leadership.”

“The Tipping Point” by Malcolm Gladwell

Before Bryant read “Blink,” he read “The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference.” The book explains how some ideas spread like viruses while others don’t. Gladwell says the best way to understand “The Tipping Point” is to understand “the emergence of fashion trends, the ebb and flow of crime waves, or, for that matter, the transformation of unknown books into bestsellers, or the rise of teenage smoking.”

“Thirty Rooms to Hide in” by Luke Sullivan

“I’m lovin this one,” Bryant posted on Facebook about “Thirty Rooms to Hide: Insanity, Addiction, and Rock ‘n’ Roll in the Shadow of the Mayo Clinic.” Sullivan’s memoir about is about public success coupled with private dysfunction and the personal resilience that Sullivan found growing up with an abusive father, who was one of the world’s top orthopedic surgeons at the Mayo Clinic.

“Tuff Juice” by Caron Bulter


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-03  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, books, read, tipping, angeles, bryant, loved, blink, los, team, told, seagull, life, alchemist, kobe, book


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Read the transcript of CNBC’s interview with President Trump in Davos

PRESIDENT TRUMP: –I really don’t know. ‘Cause it– a lotta people don’t think it’s a great thing, and it hasn’t worked well in other places. JOE KERNEN: –as– I– heard this was just going to be–PRESIDENT TRUMP: FarmsJOE KERNEN: –ag guysPRESIDENT TRUMP: Yeah. You’re– friends—with TimPRESIDENT TRUMP: I am–JOE KERNEN: –I– think youPRESIDENT TRUMP: I like them a lot. He’s getting a lot of flackPRESIDENT TRUMP: I’d rather him just do whatever he’s going to do.


PRESIDENT TRUMP: –I really don’t know.
‘Cause it– a lotta people don’t think it’s a great thing, and it hasn’t worked well in other places.
JOE KERNEN: –as– I– heard this was just going to be–PRESIDENT TRUMP: FarmsJOE KERNEN: –ag guysPRESIDENT TRUMP: Yeah.
You’re– friends—with TimPRESIDENT TRUMP: I am–JOE KERNEN: –I– think youPRESIDENT TRUMP: I like them a lot.
He’s getting a lot of flackPRESIDENT TRUMP: I’d rather him just do whatever he’s going to do.
Read the transcript of CNBC’s interview with President Trump in Davos Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: mike calia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, davos, kernen, think, deal, going, things, hes, interview, trump, dont, read, know, transcript, president, weve, cnbcs


Read the transcript of CNBC's interview with President Trump in Davos

President Donald Trump returned to the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, touting sustained growth in the American economy as well as his his recent trade agreements with Mexico and Canada, and China.

On Wednesday, the president, who is undergoing an impeachment trial in the Senate, sat down with CNBC’s Joe Kernen to discuss trade, the U.S. economy and much more, including the president’s persistent complaints about the Federal Reserve’s rate policy.

Read the transcript:

JOE KERNEN: Good morning, Mr. President.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Morning.

JOE KERNEN: It’s great to see you. Thank you for joining us, again, in Davos. We’ve done this before.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: That’s right.

JOE KERNEN: It was a couple of years ago. Before we get started– with- we’re going talk about the economy and a lot of other things–the CDC– has identified a case of coronavirus– in Washington state. The Wuhan strain of this. If you remember SARS, that affected GDP. Travel-related effects. Do you– have you been briefed by the CDC? And–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: I have, and–

JOE KERNEN: –are there worries about a pandemic at this point?

PRESIDENT TRUMP: No. Not at all. And– we’re– we have it totally under control. It’s one person coming in from China, and we have it under control. It’s—going to be just fine.

JOE KERNEN: Okay. And President Xi– there’s just some– talk in China that maybe the transparency isn’t everything that it’s going to be. Do you trust that we’re going to know everything we need to know from China?

PRESIDENT TRUMP: I do. I do. I have a great relationship with President Xi. We just signed probably the biggest deal ever made. It certainly has the potential to be the biggest deal ever made. And– it was a very interesting period of time time.

JOE KERNEN: Yeah. Let’s get into that–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: But we got it done, and– no, I do. I think– the relationship is very, very good.

JOE KERNEN: Let’s talk about Davos, cause– you were here two years ago. Even The New York Times at this point, your favorite, acknowledges that the Davos elite are accepting that your policies are working and the U.S. economy is the envy of the world. In fact, the press coverage here is very favorable. You know what’s going on back in– back at home. It’s all impeachment all the time. Did you watch any of it? Were you–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: I did. I did. I watched some of it last night

JOE KERNEN: What did you make of it

PRESIDENT TRUMP: I got– I had a busy day yesterday, as you know. You were there. And we had the speech and we had lots of meetings with different leaders, including Pakistan and others. Other countries. In addition to businessmen all over the place. But I did get to see some of it. It’s a hoax. It’s a total hoax. It’s a perfect conversation

JOE KERNEN: How do you think—-your team performed?

PRESIDENT TRUMP: I think the team was really good. And– the facts are all on our side. The Republican party has never been this unified. You saw that. 195 to nothing. I guess twice. In fact we got three Democrats voting for us. That was with the House. I think–

JOE KERNEN: You think there’ll be witnesses, Mr. President, or do–you have–?

PRESIDENT TRUMP: –I really don’t know. I think that– if everybody tells the truth, it’s perfect. All you have to do is read the transcript. Read– if you take a look at the transcript– and it’s really two transcripts. It’s– you know, I had a first call which was perfect, and I had a second call which was perfect. You notice they don’t mention the calls, though. They never mention the calls. They talk about everything but the calls. All they have to do is read the transcripts. I put it out all the time. The other thing is speak to the president of Ukraine. He’s been great, I have to tell you. And his foreign minister’s been great.

JOE KERNEN: Right.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: They constantly–say there was no pressure. They don’t even know what we’re doing. They think it’s crazy. So they got the money. In fact they got it very early. President Obama gave them nothing. He gave them pillows and sheets and things like that, and I gave them tank busters. You know, it’s a disgraceful hoax.

JOE KERNEN: Well, what–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: But we do it.

JOE KERNEN: We had a four hour show–four hour show yesterday. Didn’t– I don’t even think the I-word came up at all. What the CEOs are talking about

PRESIDENT TRUMP: But no, you asked me- the question.

JOE KERNEN: No, I know I did. I know—I did

PRESIDENT TRUMP: And I have to answer it—you are my friend–for too long.

JOE KERNEN: –and I needed to ask it. And I needed to–ask it. That’s why I did. But I really want to talk about– what we’re seeing over here. We came–to Davos expecting to hear about this ESG, Environmental, Social and Governmental issues. We expected to hear about stakeholders versus shareholders.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Right.

JOE KERNEN: We expected to hear about climate change. In four hours yesterday, with the CEO of Bank of America, and Schwartzman with Blackstone, all we talked about, and all they wanted to talk about, was the strength of the U.S. economy. It’s the envy of the world. And I think if you have a strong economy, all these ancillary issues become easier to deal with. And I think even the Europeans, even the plutocrats of Davos, are now acknowledging that.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Well, I appreciate that very much. We do. We have an incredible economy. The consumer has never been so rich. They– you know, they’re– between the tax cuts and the regulation cuts– people forget about regulation. I think it might have been more important than the tax cuts. But we have– a consumer in the United States that has never done so well. And I think we’re really poised to have I think we have tremendous potential. You know, we’re at a point where we’ve done so well, I think we’re going do much better. We have tremendous potential.

JOE KERNEN: So the market’s up 50%, and we’ve talked about this before. November 9th is the date–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Right, right thank you–

JOE KERNEN: –that you need to do it. Not–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Thank you.

JOE KERNEN: –not the inauguration. I just want to ask you, because we’re starting to see this– the– bandied about that–the re-expansion of the Fed’s balance sheet. Somehow correlates with the movement in the stock market. Do you think there’s anything to that? That– that the– they’ve primed the pump and some of the gains are– not warranted by the underlying economy–?

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Well, I think it’s the opposite, actually. The Fed raised too fast interest. They brought up the rate too fast, and they didn’t drop it fast enough. And that was very– you know, that was a lot of increases, and it was a lot of increase. And I think it’s really the opposite of what you’re saying. Now they’ve dropped it, but it was very late. And you look at other countries where they actually have negative interest rates, negative in a positive way. I mean they’re actually getting paid– they make a loan and they end up–

JOE KERNEN: Well, let’s– talk–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: –getting paid.

JOE KERNEN: –about that. You don’t– are you hoping that it comes to that in the United States? That we get negative rates? ‘Cause it– a lotta people don’t think it’s a great thing, and it hasn’t worked well in other places. You–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Well, they don’t know yet. It’s so new. I want to know who are the people that buy. Okay? Who are the people that buy and they invest in Germany and end up getting, you know, less money at the period of time -so I– have to find these people. But– no, if Germany– and– we’re the most prime in the world. We’re the leader in the world. We have the dollar, and the dollar’s very strong. A lotta– a lotta things are happening. But, you know, we’re paying higher interest than other countries because of the Fed. If we were paying less, I would do it, and I’d pay off a lot of debt.

JOE KERNEN: Right.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: I’d do a lot of things.

JOE KERNEN: Is Chairman Powell out of the doghouse? Is he– are rates where they should be? Are you satisfied with the situation–?

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Well, I don’t want talk doghouse. I wish he didn’t raise the rates. That was not what I thought would happen

JOE KERNEN: Are we at a good–level now, do you feel?

PRESIDENT TRUMP: I think the rate should go down.

JOE KERNEN: Should go down further.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: No, because I think the dollar’s very, very strong. And I think the rate should go down. We have a very strong dollar, and that sounds good, and it is good in many ways, but it’s very bad in terms of manufacturing. I’ve created almost 700,000 manufacturing jobs. The past administration said manufacturing is dead, which I said, “Tell me about that. How do you– you can’t do that.” And we have had a tremendous success, but it’s harder with a strong dollar. And– I want this dollar to be strong. I want it to be so powerful. I want it to be great. But if you lower the interest rates, so many good things would happen.

JOE KERNEN: Right.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: And one of the things I do want to do is pay off debt, and we’re poised for tremendous growth. It’ll really kick in toward the end of this year. But–

JOE KERNEN: Okay.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: we’re poised for tremendous growth.

JOE KERNEN: Let me ask you about that. We– came close to 3% last year. This year lower, but we’ve had obviously the– China trade war, which has been–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: We had many things.

JOE KERNEN: We did. Do you– do you attribute the–GDP at 2% to– the Fed being– tight for too long? Do acknowledge that maybe some of the tariffs or some of the— uncertainty engendered by the China trade war affected GDP?

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Well, it’ll be higher than 2%. A lotta people are very thrilled with that. Me, I’m not, but we had a lot of bad things happen. Number one, the Fed was not good.

JOE KERNEN: Okay.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: As far as I’m concerned. And that was a big blip that should not have taken place. It should not have happened. But it’s one of those things. But we had Boeing. We had the big strike with General Motors. We had things happen that are very unusual to happen.

JOE KERNEN: Could–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Including some unbelievably powerful storms. You know, we were hit with storms. Now, with all of that, had we not done the big raise on interest, I think we would have been close to 4%, and I– could see 5,000 to 10,000 points more on the Dow. But that was a killer when they raised the rate. It was just a big mistake. And they admit to it. They admit to it. I was right. I don’t wanna be right, but I was right.

JOE KERNEN: There– are some that say that the uncertainty for CEOs in dealing with China and making plans for the future may have hurt capital spending. Do you expect it to come back now the we’ve had a phase one– agreement? And– let’s talk about phase two, if we get a chance, and–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Okay, I think the biggest thing about getting the deal with China– number one, it’s a great deal for us. It’s an important deal for China, because they were– you know, their supply chains were breaking. It was– you know, it’s been tough for them. The best thing that happened is we have two countries that like each other again, because it was getting pretty nasty. And, you know, they have taken advantage of our country for 30 years and we– I was not going let it happen. And– we’ve taken in billions and billions of dollars. The tariffs are still on, so I still have that negotiating chip. I have 25% tariffs on, and that’s a great negotiating chip. And yes, we’re starting phase two very soon. But the relationship that we have now with China is probably better than it’s ever been. The relationship I have with President Xi, president for life. Okay? It’s not bad. But the relationship I have with President Xi is, you know, I think extraordinary, considering he’s for China, I’m for us.

JOE KERNEN: Right.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: But– the deal is a phenomenal deal. We will take in $250 billion– they’re going to be buying $250 billion, and it could go a lot higher than that.

JOE KERNEN: And– real IP– progress made with the IP theft

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Oh yeah. Oh yeah.

JOE KERNEN: –and enforcement and–watching–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Absolutely.

JOE KERNEN: –and–the tariffs stay on.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: You– I know I was watching you and you were really surprised that so many of these other things, the intellectual property, so many of these other things were–

JOE KERNEN: I read the same newspapers—

PRESIDENT TRUMP: –were part of the deal.

JOE KERNEN: –as– I– heard this was just going to be–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Farms

JOE KERNEN: –ag guys

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Yeah.

JOE KERNEN: Yeah, and– it was a lot more.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: And this is—-manufacturing. This is– technology. This– phase one is a massive deal. And in the end, it’s probably $250 billion, but it could go much higher than that. And just that alone, not even talking about the USMCA, which now we just got passed. In fact, when I go back I’ll be signing it. It’s all passed. And we had I believe 89 votes in the Senate, which is tremendous.

JOE KERNEN: The UK next with Boris Johnson?

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Yeah. Boris and I are friends and he wants to make a deal, and that’s okay with me.

JOE KERNEN: So that could start–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: I think they want it, they need it.

JOE KERNEN: That could start soon?

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Oh yeah. We’re starting. We’ve already started negotiating. And frankly, we’re starting with Europe too. Europe is– to be honest with you, Europe has been very, very tough to deal with. They’ve taken advantage of our country, the European Union, for many, many years. And I told them, we can’t do it anymore. I met with them yesterday. I wanted to wait till I finished China, to be honest with you. I’m– always like to be very transparent. I wanted to wait till I finished China. I didn’t want to go with China and Europe at the same time. Now China’s done, and I met with the new head of the European Commission, who’s terrific. And had a great talk. But I said, look, if we don’t get something, I’m going to have to take action, and the action will be a very high tariffs on their cars and other things that come into our country. Now, saying that, I don’t want your audience to get nervous. They’re going to make a deal, because they have to. They have to. They have no choice. But we’ve had a tremendous deficit for many, many years. Over $150 billion with Europe. And they are– frankly, Jean-Claude was a friend of mine, but he was impossible to deal with. And I think it’s going to be a lot better for Boris now too. You couldn’t make a deal. It was very hard to make a deal. Now, I never played my cards, because I didn’t want to do that again while I was doing China. I wanted to do China first. I wanted to do Mexico and Canada first. But now that we’re all done– and now what we do is we are going to do Europe. And I had a very good conversation. And I would be very surprised if I had to implement the tariffs.

JOE KERNEN: We had– one of your guys, the NEC– director– Lawrence Kudlow, on yesterday. We asked him about deficits, and we asked him– I mean I– we acknowledged that you wanted to rebuild the defense industry, and you had to agreed to—certain things with– the Demos– in the second term, will you look at–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Big focus.

JOE KERNEN: –will you look at–will– do you need to raise taxes or do you need to cut spending?

PRESIDENT TRUMP: We’re going to actually probably lower taxes, if you want to know the truth. You know, if you take a look at what we’ve done, we’ve cut taxes in half. And we’ve taken in more revenue substantially than we did when the taxes were high. Nobody can even believe it. But we take in more revenue with the big tax cuts– I mean you were paying really 41% and we brought it down to 21%, and it’s sort of lower than that–

JOE KERNEN: So the– that will—-be a priority?

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Oh, absolutely. And–

JOE KERNEN: For– cutting taxes.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: And one of the reasons I’d like to see the interest rates lowered, frankly, is because I’d like to refinance the debt and pay off the debt.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: We’re going have tremendous growth. Joe, when you have all of these trade deals the I’ve made– don’t forget, I made a $40 billion deal with Japan. I made a massive deal with South Korea. Nobody even knows what the number is, but, you know, it was a horrible deal, now it’s a great deal. And then you add Mexico, you add China, you add Canada. You add all of these other countries. And we have about ten countries that we’re dealing with. These deals were horrible. In many cases we didn’t even have a deal. They just came in here and took advantage of our country. So– we have massive potential, massive growth, and you’ll see that toward the middle to the end of next year–

JOE KERNEN: Right. I’m going to go through, like, 10 things, cause–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Go ahead, Joe. They–

JOE KERNEN: All right, let’s talk about what– if there is a second term– do you have– a preference for an opponent– I came up with the three Bs. Biden, Bernie and Bloomberg.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: All very different. You have Mini Mike is spending a lot of money. He’s got no chance. But he’s got a tremendous– you know, he used to be a friend of mine until I ran for politics, and then– he went a little off. You should see some of the nice things he said about me before I ran. They’re like the nicest. But he had a deal with Hillary Clinton that he was going to become secretary of State. It was very simple. People know that. And he– wasn’t going to happen. It was going to go to Terry McAuliffe. I mean so they were playing with Michael. And– it’s too bad, but he’s spending a fortune. He’s making a lot of broadcasters wealthy. And he’s getting nowhere. His ratings are terrible. His– you look at his numbers. I don’t know if Joe’s going to limp across the line, but you– I watch him. I s– watch him speaking. He can’t put together a sentence, but it could be him. And it could be Crazy Bernie. I don’t know who it’s going to be. Whoever it is, I’m ready.

JOE KERNEN: I just want to ask you some rapid-fire questions. Just– to get your clear comments.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Go ahead.

JOE KERNEN: So– Boeing. Yesterday in the news– and it hit the Dow–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Yeah, I know

JOE KERNEN: –yesterday. And the news is-this summer, perhaps, before–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Yeah.

JOE KERNEN: –we see—the 737

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Very disappointing company. This is one of the great companies of the world, let’s say as of a year ago, and then all of a sudden things happen. I am so disappointed in Boeing– had a tremendous impact. You know, when you talk about growth, it’s so big that some people say it’s more than a half a point of GDP. So Boeing– big, big disappointment to me. Big disappointment.

JOE KERNEN: Right. Apple. What do you think? You’re– friends—with Tim

PRESIDENT TRUMP: I am–

JOE KERNEN: –I– think you

PRESIDENT TRUMP: I like them a lot. I think we should do some encryption. I think we should– we should start finding some of the bad people out there that we can do with Apple. I think it’s very important. Frankly, I’ve helped them a lot. I’ve given them waivers, because I want them– it’s a great company, but it made a big difference. Now, you know, they compete against Samsung. Mostly Samsung. I guess that would be their number one competitor. That’s from South Korea. It’s not fair, because we have a trade deal with South Korea, so Samsung would get the no waiver. And they would– they would have to pay– tariffs. So I did waivers, but I want them to help us a little bit. They– you know, Apple has to help us. And I’m very strong on it. They have the keys to so many criminals and criminal minds, and we can do things. When they had the problem with the– recently in Florida. I won’t go into it, because it’s so horrible.

JOE KERNEN: Right.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: But they could have given us that information. It would have been very helpful.

JOE KERNEN: Well, we don’t need a back door– way in getting into the wrong hands either. You– do you–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: No, no. I understand–

JOE KERNEN: –you–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: –you know what, I understand both sides of the argument.

JOE KERNEN: And this won’t–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: But if you’re dealing with drug lords–

JOE KERNEN: –this won’t hurt your relationship– with Tim?

PRESIDENT TRUMP: You’re dealing with drug lords and you’re dealing with terrorists, and if you’re dealing with murderers, I don’t care. We have to get–

JOE KERNEN: Okay.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: –we have to find out what’s going on.

JOE KERNEN: Can– Facebook. Zuckerberg–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Well, I met him– and he told me that I’m number one in the world in Facebook. He sat down. He said, “Congratulations. You’re number one.” Now, I wouldn’t be able to say that unless it was–

JOE KERNEN: Should he stick to his guns with the political ads? He’s getting a lot of flack

PRESIDENT TRUMP: I’d rather him just do whatever he’s going to do. You know, he’s done– he’s done a hell of a job, when you think of it. And– he’s going to do what he has to do. I heard he was going to run for president. That wouldn’t be too frightening, I don’t think. But he does have that monster behind him. He said, “You’re number one,” and I said, “That’s really nice.” It’s always nice to be number one. You know who number two is?

JOE KERNEN: No?

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Modi of India. But he has 1.5 billion people. I have 350. So– Modi. And we’re going there very soon, too–

JOE KERNEN: All right. Last but not least, you–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: And by the way, our relationship with India, and again with China and with Japan and with so many countries, is better than it’s ever been. Literally better than it’s ever been.

JOE KERNEN: Tesla’s now worth more than GM and Ford. Do you have comes on Elon Musk?

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Well– you have to give him credit. I spoke to him very recently, and he’s also doing the rockets. He likes rockets. And– he does good at rockets too, by the way. I never saw where the engines come down with no wings, no anything, and they’re landing. I said I’ve never seen that before. And I was worried about him, because he’s one of our great geniuses, and we have to protect our genius. You know, we have to protect Thomas Edison and we have to protect all of these people that– came up with originally the light bulb and– the wheel and all of these things. And he’s one of our very smart people and we want to– we want to cherish those people. That’s very important. But he’s done a very good job. Shocking how well– you know, how it’s come so fast. I mean you go back a year and they were talking about the end of the company. And now all of a sudden they’re talking about these great things. He’s going to be building a very big plant in the United States. He has to, because we help him, so he has to help us.

JOE KERNEN: Do I dare– one last question.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Go ahead.

JOE KERNEN: Entitlements ever be on your plate?

PRESIDENT TRUMP: At some point they will be. We have tremendous growth. We’re going to have tremendous growth. This next year I– it’ll be toward the end of the year. The growth is going to be incredible. And at the right time, we will take a look at that. You know, that’s actually the easiest of all things, if you look, cause it’s such a–

JOE KERNEN: If you’re willing–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: –big percentage.

JOE KERNEN: –to do some of the things that you said you wouldn’t do in the past, though, in terms of Medicare–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Well, we’re going– we’re going look. We also have– assets that we’ve never had. I mean we’ve never had growth like this. We never had a consumer that was taking in, through– different means, over $10,000 a family. We never had the kind of– the kind of things that we have. Look, our country is the hottest in the world. We have the hottest economy in the world. We have the best unemployment numbers we’ve ever had. African American, Asian American. Hispanics are doing so incredibly. Best they’ve ever done. Black. Best they’ve ever done. African American. The numbers are incredible. The poverty numbers. The unemployment and the employment. There’s– there is a difference, actually. But the unemployment and employment numbers for African Americans are the best we’ve ever had. You know, we just– came up with a chart, and it was a very important to number to me. African American youth has the highest, by far, unemployment. The best unemployment numbers that they’ve ever had. And the best employment numbers. Right now we have almost 160 million people working in the United States, and we’ve never even been close to that, Joe.

JOE KERNEN: All right. Safe travels–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Thank you.

JOE KERNEN: –on your way back. Thank you once again for– –meeting with us–

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Thank you very much.

JOE KERNEN: –Mr. President. Thank you.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Appreciate it.

JOE KERNEN: Appreciate it.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Great Joe.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: mike calia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, davos, kernen, think, deal, going, things, hes, interview, trump, dont, read, know, transcript, president, weve, cnbcs


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

News

CNBC Select may receive an affiliate commission when you click on the links for products from our partners. Click here to read our full advertiser disclosure.


CNBC Select may receive an affiliate commission when you click on the links for products from our partners.
Click here to read our full advertiser disclosure.
News Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, partners, click, receive, select, disclosure, commission, products, links, read


News

CNBC Select may receive an affiliate commission when you click on the links for products from our partners. Click here to read our full advertiser disclosure.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, partners, click, receive, select, disclosure, commission, products, links, read


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

News

CNBC Select may receive an affiliate commission when you click on the links for products from our partners. Click here to read our full advertiser disclosure.


CNBC Select may receive an affiliate commission when you click on the links for products from our partners.
Click here to read our full advertiser disclosure.
News Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, partners, click, receive, select, disclosure, commission, products, links, read


News

CNBC Select may receive an affiliate commission when you click on the links for products from our partners. Click here to read our full advertiser disclosure.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, partners, click, receive, select, disclosure, commission, products, links, read


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

ZipRecruiter CEO says one move will make your job application 50% more likely to be read

Ian Siegel is the CEO of ZipRecruiter, which has helped over 120 million job seekers look for work online. He says one of the biggest factors in getting a new job is timing. “Applications to jobs within the first seven days have a 50% higher likelihood of being read by the employer,” said Siegel, and having your application read gives you a much better chance of landing the job. But there’s more to getting the job than applying early. You’ll need an application that stands out and, hopefully, an


Ian Siegel is the CEO of ZipRecruiter, which has helped over 120 million job seekers look for work online.
He says one of the biggest factors in getting a new job is timing.
“Applications to jobs within the first seven days have a 50% higher likelihood of being read by the employer,” said Siegel, and having your application read gives you a much better chance of landing the job.
But there’s more to getting the job than applying early.
You’ll need an application that stands out and, hopefully, an
ZipRecruiter CEO says one move will make your job application 50% more likely to be read Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: robert exley jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jobs, ziprecruiter, siegel, applying, need, job, application, read, getting, likely, work, ceo


ZipRecruiter CEO says one move will make your job application 50% more likely to be read

January is the busiest month of the year for job postings.

However, more openings also means more people are applying, and it can be hard to get your application to stand out in a sea of applicants.

Ian Siegel is the CEO of ZipRecruiter, which has helped over 120 million job seekers look for work online. He says one of the biggest factors in getting a new job is timing.

“Applications to jobs within the first seven days have a 50% higher likelihood of being read by the employer,” said Siegel, and having your application read gives you a much better chance of landing the job.

But there’s more to getting the job than applying early. You’ll need an application that stands out and, hopefully, an interview that leads to an offer.

Check out this video to see Siegel’s tips for applying to jobs as well as the one thing he says you need to do in every job interview.

More from Invest in You:

How Walmart and other big firms try to recruit more teenage employees

Indeed and Monster — how job sites work, and why they may not be as important as you think


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: robert exley jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jobs, ziprecruiter, siegel, applying, need, job, application, read, getting, likely, work, ceo


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

This app can read your vital signs through your smartphone’s camera

Tel Aviv-based startup Binah.ai is showing off its app, Bvue – an Innovation Award honoree – at CES 2020. It uses light reflecting from the user’s cheeks to read their heart rate, oxygen saturation, respiration, mental stress, and heart rate variability, with more to come. CNBC was not able to measure how accurate these readings are, but Binah.ai says the app provides “medical-grade accuracy proven against medical equipment.” Watch CNBC demo the app on the CES floor.


Tel Aviv-based startup Binah.ai is showing off its app, Bvue – an Innovation Award honoree – at CES 2020.
It uses light reflecting from the user’s cheeks to read their heart rate, oxygen saturation, respiration, mental stress, and heart rate variability, with more to come.
CNBC was not able to measure how accurate these readings are, but Binah.ai says the app provides “medical-grade accuracy proven against medical equipment.”
Watch CNBC demo the app on the CES floor.
This app can read your vital signs through your smartphone’s camera Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: dain evans
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, variability, binahai, uses, users, vital, camera, smartphones, ces, app, watch, signs, heart, read, rate


This app can read your vital signs through your smartphone's camera

Tel Aviv-based startup Binah.ai is showing off its app, Bvue – an Innovation Award honoree – at CES 2020. It uses light reflecting from the user’s cheeks to read their heart rate, oxygen saturation, respiration, mental stress, and heart rate variability, with more to come. CNBC was not able to measure how accurate these readings are, but Binah.ai says the app provides “medical-grade accuracy proven against medical equipment.” Watch CNBC demo the app on the CES floor.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: dain evans
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, variability, binahai, uses, users, vital, camera, smartphones, ces, app, watch, signs, heart, read, rate


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Google will soon read websites to you

Google on Tuesday announced during CES 2020 that Google Assistant will soon be able to read websites to you. Even cooler: it’ll translate the text from one of 42 languages before reading it if the content is written in a language you don’t understand. All you’ll have to do is load up a site on an Android phone and then say “Hey Google, read it” or “Hey Google, read this page.” Then, Google Assistant will read it back to you. The feature will roll out later this year and, since it relies on Googl


Google on Tuesday announced during CES 2020 that Google Assistant will soon be able to read websites to you.
Even cooler: it’ll translate the text from one of 42 languages before reading it if the content is written in a language you don’t understand.
All you’ll have to do is load up a site on an Android phone and then say “Hey Google, read it” or “Hey Google, read this page.”
Then, Google Assistant will read it back to you.
The feature will roll out later this year and, since it relies on Googl
Google will soon read websites to you Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, android, text, sound, hey, websites, soon, google, itll, read, robotic, voice, assistant


Google will soon read websites to you

Google on Tuesday announced during CES 2020 that Google Assistant will soon be able to read websites to you. This could offer easier access to information for people who are visually impaired.

Even cooler: it’ll translate the text from one of 42 languages before reading it if the content is written in a language you don’t understand.

All you’ll have to do is load up a site on an Android phone and then say “Hey Google, read it” or “Hey Google, read this page.” Then, Google Assistant will read it back to you.

Google Assistant’s voice has started to sound a bit less robotic thanks to improvements it has made to its voice datasets, but it seems like it’ll still sound kind of funky hearing a whole news article or story in a robotic voice.

Google says it’s working to “include auto-scroll and text highlighting capabilities” so that you can follow along with the text as it reads to you, though it doesn’t seem that like that will be ready at launch.

The feature will roll out later this year and, since it relies on Google Assistant, it’ll be exclusive to Android phones.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, android, text, sound, hey, websites, soon, google, itll, read, robotic, voice, assistant


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

4 books about success and failure everyone should read, according to a founder who sold her company for millions

“I didn’t quit with the intention of starting this company,” she says, referring to her skin care company Tatcha, which she founded in 2009. And in doing so, I ended up finding something that inspired me, and that led to me creating the company.” During the decade-plus period of building her company, Tsai says she turned everywhere for guidance, including books from people who’d done it before. “When they started Patagonia, they started growing really quickly, and at some point they felt it was


“I didn’t quit with the intention of starting this company,” she says, referring to her skin care company Tatcha, which she founded in 2009.
And in doing so, I ended up finding something that inspired me, and that led to me creating the company.”
During the decade-plus period of building her company, Tsai says she turned everywhere for guidance, including books from people who’d done it before.
“When they started Patagonia, they started growing really quickly, and at some point they felt it was
4 books about success and failure everyone should read, according to a founder who sold her company for millions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-03  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sold, according, working, founder, failure, patagonia, culture, millions, tsai, tatcha, business, focus, building, success, company, read, books, started


4 books about success and failure everyone should read, according to a founder who sold her company for millions

Vicky Tsai never thought of herself as an entrepreneur. She earned an economics degree from Wellesley College before becoming a credit derivatives trader at Merrill Lynch, where she was working in one of the World Financial Center buildings the morning of September 11, 2001, near the Twin Towers. The events of 9/11 propelled Tsai to recognize a life working in finance wouldn’t make her happy, so she attended Harvard Business School to help her figure out what would come next. After stints working for both international brands and Silicon Valley start-ups, “I felt morally bankrupt,” Tsai tells CNBC Make It. So she left. “I didn’t quit with the intention of starting this company,” she says, referring to her skin care company Tatcha, which she founded in 2009. “I quit with the intention of trying to figure out how to be happy. And in doing so, I ended up finding something that inspired me, and that led to me creating the company.” Tsai came up with the idea for Tatcha during a layover in Japan. At the time, she was suffering from acute dermatitis and was drawn to the generations-old beauty rituals of geishas, which focus on a straightforward routine with simple ingredients. Tsai set out to create a direct-to-consumer line of similar products free of parabens, synthetic fragrances, mineral oil and other potentially irritating ingredients. The luxury skin care brand with fans in Kim Kardashian and Meghan Markle would go on to make an estimated $70 million in sales in 2018, according to investment bank Bryan, Garnier & Co., and reported by Bloomberg. It was acquired by Unilever during summer of 2019, for a deal approaching $500 million, WWD reported citing industry sources. (The company declined to comment on the terms of the sale or its annual sales figures.) During the decade-plus period of building her company, Tsai says she turned everywhere for guidance, including books from people who’d done it before. “I love reading about the real stories of other entrepreneurs,” she says. “Not the glossy version you get sometimes in short form, but the truth of what happened. Then you realize it’s hard for everybody, but it’s worth it.” Here are her four favorites that she recommends.

1. “Shoe Dog,” by Phil Knight

“The best one I’ve read is Phil Knight’s ‘Shoe Dog,'” Tsai says of the memoir by the Nike co-founder. The book covers Knight’s experience launching Nike under the name Blue Ribbon Sports in 1963 with a $500 investment from his former track coach, Bill Bowerman. Eventually, Nike became the No. 1 athletic brand, with an estimated $15 trillion brand value. But throughout the decades, Knight writes, his business moves always attracted naysayers. “We knew we could fail, we just didn’t think we would,” Knight told CNBC’s Jim Cramer in 2016. “We loved doing what we were doing, and we loved each other.” Bill Gates even recommended the memoir as one of the best books of 2016, and described it as “a refreshingly honest reminder of what the path to business success really looks like: messy, precarious and riddled with mistakes,” Gates wrote in a review. Tsai says she prefers reading about the messiness of starting a business. Her own journey launching Tatcha includes selling her engagement ring, moving back home with her mom, barely affording groceries and racking up close to $1 million in debt across student loans and credit cards used to float the company. The founder didn’t take a salary for the first nine years of running Tatcha and chose to instead reinvest earnings back into the company, she says. She only recently started paying herself. “Every time I get a paycheck, it feels like I’ve won the lottery,” she says. “It’s amazing.”

2. “Let My People Go Surfing,” by Yvon Chouinard

Tsai credits “Let My People Go Surfing” by Patagonia founder Yvon Chouinard for guiding how she approached building her own beauty company. “When they started Patagonia, they started growing really quickly, and at some point they felt it was coming at the expense of what made them Patagonia,” Tsai says. As a result, Chouinard made the decision to slow the expansion of his business and pull the growth rate down. “I think they’re going to outlast the other brands in their industry because of that maniacal focus on controlled growth,” Tsai adds. Patagonia did not immediately return a request for comment. Tsai says these lessons from the outdoor clothing company informed her decision to expand Tatcha’s reach gradually, which is why their only retail partner is Sephora. Chouinard’s book also focuses on Patagonia’s philosophy to give employees freedom to set their own work schedule, and outlines the founder’s belief in building an authentic business and becoming a socially-conscious entrepreneur.

3. “Delivering Happiness,” by Tony Hsieh

Another book Tsai recommends is Zappos founder Tony Hsieh’s “Delivering Happiness.” The online retailer is known for its focus on company culture, which translates both to the customer experience and the employee experience. Tsai says paying attention to culture fit has been crucial to growing Tatcha and building its products with customers in mind. It’s her biggest priority when she’s interviewing executive-level candidates to join the company. “We’ve had a lot of people with great skills come to the company but not make it very long,” Tsai says, adding that employees who focus on office politics or their own career narrative over the needs of the company and its customers don’t succeed within the organization. “On one hand, we’re of course hiring for skill sets, but I’ve learned my lessons hiring for skill sets without prioritizing culture fit as much,” she adds. “And for us culture fit is about humility, pursuit of excellence, teamwork and authenticity as a human being.”

4. “Pour Your Heart Into It,” by Howard Schultz


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-03  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sold, according, working, founder, failure, patagonia, culture, millions, tsai, tatcha, business, focus, building, success, company, read, books, started


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post