The DUP has been ‘thrown under the bus’: Professor

The DUP has been ‘thrown under the bus’: Professor5 Hours AgoMarc Stears of The University of Sydney says the Brexit deal is “really on a knife edge” and anything could happen.


The DUP has been ‘thrown under the bus’: Professor5 Hours AgoMarc Stears of The University of Sydney says the Brexit deal is “really on a knife edge” and anything could happen.
The DUP has been ‘thrown under the bus’: Professor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bus, hours, knife, happen, professor5, edge, sydney, university, stears, dup, really, thrown, professor


The DUP has been 'thrown under the bus': Professor

The DUP has been ‘thrown under the bus’: Professor

5 Hours Ago

Marc Stears of The University of Sydney says the Brexit deal is “really on a knife edge” and anything could happen.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bus, hours, knife, happen, professor5, edge, sydney, university, stears, dup, really, thrown, professor


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Economists say this is the minimum amount of money you need in an emergency fund

Money experts generally encourage you to set aside three to six months’ worth of living expenses in an emergency fund. If you have that much saved, your probability of falling into financial hardship (not being able to pay rent, bills or medical care) is low. They found that if you have very little saved — say $200 to $500 — each additional dollar you set aside dramatically reduces your likelihood of falling into financial hardship. $2,467 is a good ‘minimum savings rule’Most money experts agree


Money experts generally encourage you to set aside three to six months’ worth of living expenses in an emergency fund.
If you have that much saved, your probability of falling into financial hardship (not being able to pay rent, bills or medical care) is low.
They found that if you have very little saved — say $200 to $500 — each additional dollar you set aside dramatically reduces your likelihood of falling into financial hardship.
$2,467 is a good ‘minimum savings rule’Most money experts agree
Economists say this is the minimum amount of money you need in an emergency fund Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fund, money, savings, gallagher, hardship, households, worth, say, really, save, minimum, months, need, emergency, economists, income, financial


Economists say this is the minimum amount of money you need in an emergency fund

Money experts generally encourage you to set aside three to six months’ worth of living expenses in an emergency fund. Some even want you to stash away a year’s worth. After all, life doesn’t usually go as planned: There could be another recession, you could lose your job, have a medical emergency or have to deal with a car breaking down. That’s why, when it comes to emergency savings, “more is always better,” personal finance author David Bach says. But economists Emily Gallagher and Jorge Sabat challenge the oft-cited savings rules in their 2019 report, “Rules of Thumb in Household Savings Decisions.” “People are usually given really high savings thresholds, like you should be saving six months’ worth of income or you should have $15,000 squirreled away,” Gallagher tells CNBC Make It. But those numbers aren’t “based on much,” she adds. After crunching the numbers, Gallagher and Sabat found a more realistic amount for low-income households, specifically, to aim for: $2,467. If you have that much saved, your probability of falling into financial hardship (not being able to pay rent, bills or medical care) is low.

To get to that number, Gallagher and Sabat, who are also assistant professors of finance, used data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) to graph the relationship between falling into hardship in the next six months and how much you have saved as a buffer. They looked at financial information on more than 70,000 lower-income households, which the report defines as those earning under 200% of the poverty line. To put that into context, that’s up to about $30,000 a year for a family of four, says Gallagher. This group represents “about 30% of the U.S. working-age population,” she adds. They found that if you have very little saved — say $200 to $500 — each additional dollar you set aside dramatically reduces your likelihood of falling into financial hardship. But once you have at least $2,467, “all of a sudden, saving an additional dollar didn’t seem to be that helpful anymore,” says Gallagher. “It still reduced your probability of falling into hardship a little bit, but it wasn’t nearly as effective as when you were at low levels of savings.”

$2,467 is a good ‘minimum savings rule’

Most money experts agree that the more you can save, the better off you’ll be. “We’re not saying that $2,467 is the optimal savings level,” Gallagher emphasizes. “Our results don’t speak at all to achieving longer term financial goals, like paying for college or affording a house.” Especially if you’re planning ahead for bigger expenses in the future, you’ll want to aim to save much more. For people who struggle to set aside a portion of their income, though, $2,467 represents a good “minimum savings rule that you should be working toward,” says Gallagher. “Our data doesn’t speak to middle- or higher-income people, but if this rule works for lower-income people, it should also work for middle- and higher-income people,” she adds. It’s more important, though, for low-income households to build a buffer. “If middle- and higher-income people get hit with a major expense shock, like a car repair that costs $2,000, they might have enough discretionary income coming in that they could use to absorb the shock,” Gallagher says. “The problem for lower income people is that the majority of their income needs to cover everyday expenses. They don’t have much discretionary income to work with and that’s why having a savings buffer becomes particularly important.”

Why the data matters

“The basic genesis of this research came from looking around at the types of financial advice that people are given about how much to save,” says Gallagher. “Households are given really lofty savings goals. If you’re only making $25,000, someone telling you that you have to save six months’ worth of income is really hard.” Even if you’re making more than $25,000, building a substantial rainy day fund is difficult. In fact, nearly half of U.S. households can’t cover a $400 unexpected expense. “Our concern was that giving people really lofty savings goals might actually be discouraging them from saving,” Gallagher adds.

There’s something about getting close to achieving a goal that often makes people work harder. Emily Gallagher Economist and assistant professor of finance at University of Colorado at Boulder


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fund, money, savings, gallagher, hardship, households, worth, say, really, save, minimum, months, need, emergency, economists, income, financial


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Stations wagons struggle for a comeback in the US as European automakers add luxury touches

The wagon is a piece of automotive Americana, but these days it has almost entirely vanished from U.S. roads. Some European automakers, however, still roll the dice on U.S. buyers with high-end wagons wrapped in leather and, in some cases, boasting big engines with more than 400 horsepower. But in terms of choice, most U.S. wagons are from European automakers, such as Audi, Mercedes-Benz, and Volvo. Wagons sell far better in Europe than they do in the U.S., where buyers value the combination of


The wagon is a piece of automotive Americana, but these days it has almost entirely vanished from U.S. roads.
Some European automakers, however, still roll the dice on U.S. buyers with high-end wagons wrapped in leather and, in some cases, boasting big engines with more than 400 horsepower.
But in terms of choice, most U.S. wagons are from European automakers, such as Audi, Mercedes-Benz, and Volvo.
Wagons sell far better in Europe than they do in the U.S., where buyers value the combination of
Stations wagons struggle for a comeback in the US as European automakers add luxury touches Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: robert ferris
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, automakers, really, wrapped, touches, luxury, comeback, european, buyers, sell, add, wagon, struggle, audi, europe, wagons, stations


Stations wagons struggle for a comeback in the US as European automakers add luxury touches

The wagon is a piece of automotive Americana, but these days it has almost entirely vanished from U.S. roads.

Some European automakers, however, still roll the dice on U.S. buyers with high-end wagons wrapped in leather and, in some cases, boasting big engines with more than 400 horsepower.

The only wagon that really sells any meaningful volume is the Subaru Outback, which many people say has really become more of an SUV during its more than 20 year lifespan.

But in terms of choice, most U.S. wagons are from European automakers, such as Audi, Mercedes-Benz, and Volvo. Wagons sell far better in Europe than they do in the U.S., where buyers value the combination of sedan-like driving dynamics and the added space.

The wagons these companies do sell in the U.S. make up a fraction of a percent of U.S. new car sales. But the high prices they command make it worth shipping them from Europe. A significant portion of Volvo’s U.S. lineup is still in wagons, and Audi said in 2019 it will be bringing two wagon models back to the US: the high-performance Audi RS6 Avant, and the A6 Allroad.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: robert ferris
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, automakers, really, wrapped, touches, luxury, comeback, european, buyers, sell, add, wagon, struggle, audi, europe, wagons, stations


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Here’s what could push Netflix higher in the next year, and other expert takes

The thing that’s going to move the stock over the next 12 months is do they start to see a reacceleration in global subscribers?” I think that’s the big thing. I think the Street is going to make finer granularity about what kind of quality subs offshore Netflix is adding. I don’t really think they’re competing with Fortnite, as was indicated a few quarters ago. If they can … find a way to keep the sub growth going while they’re burning cash and keep investors along for the ride, then they’ll be


The thing that’s going to move the stock over the next 12 months is do they start to see a reacceleration in global subscribers?”
I think that’s the big thing.
I think the Street is going to make finer granularity about what kind of quality subs offshore Netflix is adding.
I don’t really think they’re competing with Fortnite, as was indicated a few quarters ago.
If they can … find a way to keep the sub growth going while they’re burning cash and keep investors along for the ride, then they’ll be
Here’s what could push Netflix higher in the next year, and other expert takes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, going, expert, takes, netflix, think, thing, subscribers, theyre, push, heres, growth, higher, really, stock, thats


Here's what could push Netflix higher in the next year, and other expert takes

Netflix has gotten a new lease on life — or perhaps just renewed its subscription.

The stock stayed in the green Thursday after an 8% post-earnings move, ending the trading session with a more than 2% gain. The move was a welcome reprieve from a few painful months for Netflix shares, which are up just under 10% year to date.

But concerns around the streaming giant’s growth prospects — and encroaching competition — still linger.

Here’s what four experts see ahead for the stock:

Rich Greenfield, co-founding partner of technology, media and telecommunications analysis firm LightShed Partners, said Netflix has a lot to prove after “a major miss in Q2”:

“The international number was disastrous, and I think you had a lot of investors fearful that the international story was over, because remember: as you think about the next five years for Netflix, the next 10 years, 90%-95% of the growth was coming from overseas. And so when the international story hit a wall last quarter, people panicked. And you look at what happened to the stock on the chart. That was fear of international. So, coming in and actually exceeding expectations for Q3 was a really big sign. … When you look at a company that’s got almost 160 million subscribers, given the size now that they’re at, I think forecasting subscribers on a quarterly basis is really hard. The thing that’s going to move the stock over the next 12 months is do they start to see a reacceleration in global subscribers?”

Michael Graham, head of U.S. equity research and an internet analyst at Canaccord Genuity, said this quarter may have marked a turning point for the company:

“I think the biggest thing is last quarter, domestic subscribers declined sequentially, and they returned to growth this quarter. I think that’s the big thing. … The big point that the company was trying to make last night is that all those streaming packages are trying to take share away from the typical cable subscription, which is robust. I mean, Netflix at $12, 13 a month is a small amount compared to what most households pay for a cable bill.”

Laura Martin, senior analyst at Needham, said the next thing Wall Street needs to focus on is revenue per user, or RPU — and that it could spell trouble for Netflix’s stock:

“The issue’s going to be that RPU is going to come more into focus as you start adding $3 mobile-only subs[cribers] in these developing countries. I think the Street is going to make finer granularity about what kind of quality subs offshore Netflix is adding. And I think a stock that trades at seven times revenue, which is where Netflix is down to, can’t sustain a negative sub growth anywhere in the world, and that includes the U.S. So, I think as you get increasingly bundled sub adds from Amazon and Apple and Disney, it’s going to be harder for Netflix to maintain a positive subscriber growth in the U.S. … I sort of think it’s going to get worse and worse as you get more and more competitors with double-A balance sheets and huge cash hoards that Netflix is required to compete against now.”

Brian Wieser, global president of business intelligence at media investment giant GroupM, warned that rivals may have a difficult time catching up to Netflix on content because “if you’re not in with, like, $5 billion, you’re not really a player”:

“At least in the United States, I think that the amount of time people can devote to what we call television is relatively limited, and Netflix and all of the new services are going to be competing for that time. I don’t really think they’re competing with Fortnite, as was indicated a few quarters ago. … The cash burn issue is the point. If they can … find a way to keep the sub growth going while they’re burning cash and keep investors along for the ride, then they’ll be fine. But the reality is that … everyone else is coming up, if they’re willing to step up with money to pay for content. That’s not a given. Apple had $1 billion of content. That’s a nice kind of entry point, [but] it’s not clear that everyone else that’s playing will show up.”

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, going, expert, takes, netflix, think, thing, subscribers, theyre, push, heres, growth, higher, really, stock, thats


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Here’s a first look at Google’s Pixel 4, which you can control by waving your hand over the screen

Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL: Nice phones with a ‘radar’ gimmickGoogle’s Pixel phones haven’t sold as well as many other Android devices, but it’s time people take notice. The Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL are really nice high-end phones that start at $799. Nest Wi-Fi merges a hotspot with a smart speakerThe new Nest Wi-Fi, which doubles as a smart speaker with Google Assistant. The new Nest Wi-Fi succeeds Google Wi-Fi and adds a really awesome new function: support for Google Assistant and the ability to do


Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL: Nice phones with a ‘radar’ gimmickGoogle’s Pixel phones haven’t sold as well as many other Android devices, but it’s time people take notice.
The Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL are really nice high-end phones that start at $799.
Nest Wi-Fi merges a hotspot with a smart speakerThe new Nest Wi-Fi, which doubles as a smart speaker with Google Assistant.
The new Nest Wi-Fi succeeds Google Wi-Fi and adds a really awesome new function: support for Google Assistant and the ability to do
Here’s a first look at Google’s Pixel 4, which you can control by waving your hand over the screen Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, screen, pixelbook, waving, heres, nest, pixel, wifi, laptop, googles, really, google, look, nice, phones, hand, control


Here's a first look at Google's Pixel 4, which you can control by waving your hand over the screen

Google announced a bunch of new gadgets at a press event in New York City on Tuesday, including the Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL phones, a new Nest Wi-Fi system that doubles as a smart home speaker, Pixel Buds to compete with AirPods and a laptop called the Chromebook Go. I had a chance to check them out briefly at the event. Here are my first impressions.

Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL: Nice phones with a ‘radar’ gimmick

Google’s Pixel phones haven’t sold as well as many other Android devices, but it’s time people take notice. The Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL are really nice high-end phones that start at $799. The new Soli “radar” technology, which lets you make swiping gestures over the screen to dismiss alarms or skip music on Spotify, felt like a gimmick in my quick hands-on. It’s not something I plan to use, but maybe if more apps support it I’ll find a reason to try. I was more impressed how the radar was able to detect my hand moving toward the phone. When it did, the screen lit up and then unlocked when I looked at it. It felt as fast as Apple’s Face ID, if not faster, and is a nice security bump for Android users who have had to rely on fingerprint recognition for more secure unlocking until now. I like big screens so I’m most excited for the larger Pixel 4 XL, but most people will probably find the smaller Pixel 4 good enough. My only complaint is that both phones start with 64GB of storage, which just isn’t enough for storing lots of apps and high-def movies these days.

The Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL Todd Haselton | CNBC

The phone felt light, maybe because I’m so used to the heavy iPhone 11 Pro Max. I like the soft-touch rubber back, but worry it might get dirty over time. The new 90hz display is impressive, and means there’s no sort of jitter or lag when you’re scrolling through pictures, websites or Twitter. It’s one of those things you really only notice once you see it. I’m looking forward to reviewing it. Google made a lot of promises about the cameras, specifically the ability to capture stars at night and to zoom clearly. But my first impressions are really positive.

Nest Wi-Fi merges a hotspot with a smart speaker

The new Nest Wi-Fi, which doubles as a smart speaker with Google Assistant. Todd Haselton | CNBC

Google was one of the first companies to adopt mesh networking, which covers your house in a Wi-Fi blanket using several Wi-Fi points instead of just one. It was quick to the market after start-up Eero pioneered the technology; Eero was acquired by Amazon and now forms the basis of Amazon’s home Wi-Fi products. The new Nest Wi-Fi succeeds Google Wi-Fi and adds a really awesome new function: support for Google Assistant and the ability to double as a speaker. Since you have all these pucks spread around your house anyway, now they can give you information, like traffic or the weather or sports scores, and also play music — while still serving as a hotspot for improving your Wi-Fi. It’s clever, and it makes a lot of sense for Google. It also makes me wonder why Amazon hasn’t added Alexa to Eero. I didn’t get to test the Nest Wi-Fi yet, but I like the size of it. It kind of feels like an oversized egg. And Google says it’s made out of recycled plastic bottles, which is nice if you care about how much waste your gadgets create.

Google Pixelbook Go: A $650 laptop

Google’s Pixelbook Go laptop. Todd Haselton | CNBC

Google also introduced the new Pixelbook Go, a laptop that starts at $650. I haven’t been really bullish on Chromebooks in the past since they just feel like I’m using a laptop with a Chrome web browser and not much else (OK, some Android apps.) I’ve had trouble connecting to my work VPN in the past, too, so I can’t really do work on them the way I can on a MacBook or Windows laptop. But the Pixelbook Go feels and looks nice. The bottom feels like a Ruffles potato chip, with a nice textured grip. And the keyboard seemed really easy to type on, which is more than I can say for Apple’s latest MacBooks. It has a sharp and colorful display and Intel processors, but I still can’t quite understand why it costs so much. I feel like people are used to spend $300 to $400 on really good Chromebooks, and enthusiasts might buy the far more expensive $999 Pixelbook. Anyway, if you spend most of your time in Chrome, and you don’t have limitations at work, this seems like a pretty good laptop. Just don’t expect to get all the apps you do from Windows or Mac machines.

A wireless sequel to the troubled Pixel Buds

Google’s new Pixel Buds headphones Magdalena Petrova | CNBC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, screen, pixelbook, waving, heres, nest, pixel, wifi, laptop, googles, really, google, look, nice, phones, hand, control


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We really don’t know where the US is on Syria, Saudi prince says

ABU DHABI — The foreign policy of the United States in places like Syria has been “contradictory” for several years, according to the former chief of Saudi Arabia’s intelligence services. Speaking to CNBC’s Hadley Gamble in Abu Dhabi Saturday, Saudi Arabian Prince Turki Al-Faisal said: “The situation in Syria, we really don’t know where the United States is, for example, is it in or is it out?” Trump recently announced that U.S. forces in northeastern Syria would move aside, clearing the way for


ABU DHABI — The foreign policy of the United States in places like Syria has been “contradictory” for several years, according to the former chief of Saudi Arabia’s intelligence services. Speaking to CNBC’s Hadley Gamble in Abu Dhabi Saturday, Saudi Arabian Prince Turki Al-Faisal said: “The situation in Syria, we really don’t know where the United States is, for example, is it in or is it out?” Trump recently announced that U.S. forces in northeastern Syria would move aside, clearing the way for
We really don’t know where the US is on Syria, Saudi prince says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: emma graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, states, dont, kurdish, united, syria, militia, group, forces, turkey, know, really, saudi, turkish, prince


We really don't know where the US is on Syria, Saudi prince says

ABU DHABI — The foreign policy of the United States in places like Syria has been “contradictory” for several years, according to the former chief of Saudi Arabia’s intelligence services.

Speaking to CNBC’s Hadley Gamble in Abu Dhabi Saturday, Saudi Arabian Prince Turki Al-Faisal said: “The situation in Syria, we really don’t know where the United States is, for example, is it in or is it out?”

Trump recently announced that U.S. forces in northeastern Syria would move aside, clearing the way for a Turkish offensive that is now in its fourth day. The Turkish operation is aimed at moving the U.S.-backed Kurdish militia, the People’s Protection Units (YPG), away from its southern border with Syria.

Ankara views the group as terrorists and stresses the YPG’s ties to a separatist Kurdish group in Turkey, the PKK, which has carried out a decades-long violent insurgency against the Turkish state. Nonetheless, Kurdish forces were a strategic partner to the U.S. and played a crucial role in defeating the so-called Islamic State.

Trump’s controversial move has received widespread criticism in the international community. The U.S. administration has also been accused of sending mixed messages by, at times, distancing itself from the Kurdish militia but also preparing sanctions on Turkey if it steps over the line.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: emma graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, states, dont, kurdish, united, syria, militia, group, forces, turkey, know, really, saudi, turkish, prince


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‘Our medical bills were 2 feet high’: How families grapple with medical debt

ERproductions Ltd | Getty ImagesDemocratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is proposing to wipe out an estimated $81 billion in past-due medical debt. “People definitely need to have their debt either forgiven or negotiated lower, so they can afford it without a hardship,” said Craig Antico, the co-founder of RIP Medical Debt, which buys and forgives medical debt. CNBC spoke to people about how they fell into medical debt and how it shapes their lives. Kathleen Herzig Source: Kathleen Herz


ERproductions Ltd | Getty ImagesDemocratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is proposing to wipe out an estimated $81 billion in past-due medical debt. “People definitely need to have their debt either forgiven or negotiated lower, so they can afford it without a hardship,” said Craig Antico, the co-founder of RIP Medical Debt, which buys and forgives medical debt. CNBC spoke to people about how they fell into medical debt and how it shapes their lives. Kathleen Herzig Source: Kathleen Herz
‘Our medical bills were 2 feet high’: How families grapple with medical debt Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, feet, herzig, source, grapple, doesnt, bills, families, debt, high, job, insurance, really, health, medical, sanders


'Our medical bills were 2 feet high': How families grapple with medical debt

ERproductions Ltd | Getty Images

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is proposing to wipe out an estimated $81 billion in past-due medical debt. Up to 80 million Americans could be impacted. “People definitely need to have their debt either forgiven or negotiated lower, so they can afford it without a hardship,” said Craig Antico, the co-founder of RIP Medical Debt, which buys and forgives medical debt. Two-thirds of people who file for bankruptcy each year blame their health-care costs, according to one study. “People are one illness or accident away from financial ruin in this country,” Antico said. Sanders’ announcement on medical debt builds on his Medicare for All plan, and would likely be paid for with a tax on corporations based on their CEO compensation. In a recent town hall, a military veteran from Nevada told Sanders he was considering suicide due to his $139,000 in medical debt. CNBC spoke to people about how they fell into medical debt and how it shapes their lives.

Kathleen Herzig Source: Kathleen Herzig

KATHLEEN HERZIG couldn’t walk 10 feet without becoming breathless. The 58-year-old blackjack dealer from Primm, Nevada, needed an aortic valve replacement in 2017 and wound end up staying in the hospital for over a month. Herzig didn’t have health insurance through her job, and now she has over $600,000 in medical debt. “It’s horrible,” she said. “I’ve never been in debt.” She said her only way out is bankruptcy, but, she said, “I can’t even afford to file at this point in time.” She earns around $8 an hour, before tips. She’s also worried that having a bankruptcy on her record would make it hard to get a higher-paying job. In the meantime, she’s harassed by debt collectors and has become depressed, she said. She still doesn’t have health insurance, and said she knows she should be going to a cardiologist but doesn’t want to go deeper into debt. “There’s no way I can get that done,” she said. “I’m jeopardizing my life.”

Diane Denton with her son and husband. Source: Diane Dent

Steve Aquino with his son and daughter. Source: Steve Aquino

STEVE AQUINO had always been healthy. The York, Pennsylvania, resident wasn’t too worried, then, when one evening his right foot began to really hurt. Then other areas of his body — his shoulders, neck and back — began to really hurt, too. Soon he could barely turn his head. Even walking was hard. “It felt like someone was sticking a knife between my vertebrae and then twisting it,” Aquino, 31, said. The software developer eventually lost his job, and had to go on disability insurance. Five years later, he still doesn’t have a diagnosis. What he does have: thousands of dollars in medical debt from the flurry of tests and treatments he’s needed. “I’ve been slammed with bills,” he said. He’s around $2,500 in the red, he said, and expects to rack up only more debt. “It’s getting harder and harder to do normal things,” he said. He has health insurance though his remote job, but his out-of-pocket expenses are still high. “It’s just really depressing.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, feet, herzig, source, grapple, doesnt, bills, families, debt, high, job, insurance, really, health, medical, sanders


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Four experts on what to watch on Wall Street next week

With earnings season kicking off in the coming days, four experts weigh in on what is on their watch list this week. We’re going to go through a pretty weak corporate earnings season starting next week. Byron Wien of Blackstone Private Wealth says earnings have to improve before the market can see a stronger leg up. I don’t think earnings are going to be strong. So I think the market has limited upside, but it does have some upside.”


With earnings season kicking off in the coming days, four experts weigh in on what is on their watch list this week. We’re going to go through a pretty weak corporate earnings season starting next week. Byron Wien of Blackstone Private Wealth says earnings have to improve before the market can see a stronger leg up. I don’t think earnings are going to be strong. So I think the market has limited upside, but it does have some upside.”
Four experts on what to watch on Wall Street next week Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, wall, experts, important, going, tariffs, week, market, thats, think, really, markets, earnings, street, watch


Four experts on what to watch on Wall Street next week

The markets wrapped a wild week with massive gains.

The announcement of a “phase-one” trade deal between the U.S. and China sent the Dow up nearly 319.92 points on Friday, while the S&P 500 rose 1.1% higher.

With earnings season kicking off in the coming days, four experts weigh in on what is on their watch list this week.

Alec Young, managing director of global markets research at FTSE Russell, says the U.S. needs to do away with tariffs for the markets to break out.

“We’ve been in kind of a trading range, but I think in order to break out of it and make new highs, you really need an end to the existing tariffs. That would be like a tax cut, basically something that’s weighing on corporate earnings. We’re going to go through a pretty weak corporate earnings season starting next week. The reason trade is so important is without a deal that ends existing tariffs, it’s very hard to believe that the forecast for 10% profit growth for 2020 are realistic.”

Jay Jacobs, head of research and strategy at Global X Funds, says investors are reaching their limits when it comes to volatility.

“Every day we see these two heavyweight forces duking it out in the markets. We see the Fed and central bank policy trying to support the markets and we see the trade wars; and you know sometimes negative, sometimes positive news as the other force. And what we’re seeing from our clients is people are really losing patience with this kind of volatility. We see a lot of people looking for yield from any source because that’s the way to get return in a flat or volatile market.”

Clete Willems of Akin Gump says the United States–Mexico–Canada Agreement could have an even great impact than a China deal.

“I’m still hearing good things. In spite of everything going on with the impeachment proceedings and everything else, I’m still hearing good things about the engagement between the administration and the Hill. So USMCA though is important. In a lot of ways, the substance of that actually is going to be more economically meaningful in the short term than China and so that’s an important one too. So, I hope we can get both of these in a more stable place, a little more certainty for our businesses and that will help the economy going into 2020.”

Byron Wien of Blackstone Private Wealth says earnings have to improve before the market can see a stronger leg up.

“Look the market is always vulnerable to a 10% correction. But I don’t think the market is overvalued here. At these interest rates, I think the [S&P 500] can comfortably trade above 3000. How much more above 3000 it can get to really depends on earnings. Earnings have been disappointing. I don’t think earnings are going to be strong. I think we’ll be lucky to get a 5% earnings improvement in 2020. So I think the market has limited upside, but it does have some upside.”

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, wall, experts, important, going, tariffs, week, market, thats, think, really, markets, earnings, street, watch


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SAP’s new CEOs shake off recession and trade war risks as Bill McDermott departs

SAP’s new chief executives told CNBC they do not see a slowdown in any of the regions they operate in and dismissed fears of a recession and the risks associated with the U.S.-China trade war. Board members Jennifer Morgan and Christian Klein were appointed co-CEOs with immediate effect as the software giant announced Thursday that Bill McDermott was stepping down. In an interview with CNBC, both CEOs pointed to SAP’s third quarter numbers, which saw revenue up 13% year-on-year, to highlight the


SAP’s new chief executives told CNBC they do not see a slowdown in any of the regions they operate in and dismissed fears of a recession and the risks associated with the U.S.-China trade war. Board members Jennifer Morgan and Christian Klein were appointed co-CEOs with immediate effect as the software giant announced Thursday that Bill McDermott was stepping down. In an interview with CNBC, both CEOs pointed to SAP’s third quarter numbers, which saw revenue up 13% year-on-year, to highlight the
SAP’s new CEOs shake off recession and trade war risks as Bill McDermott departs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, uschina, risks, yearonyear, recession, numbers, really, warboard, departs, klein, trade, shake, mcdermott, ceos, war, growth, saps, geographies, bill


SAP's new CEOs shake off recession and trade war risks as Bill McDermott departs

SAP’s new chief executives told CNBC they do not see a slowdown in any of the regions they operate in and dismissed fears of a recession and the risks associated with the U.S.-China trade war.

Board members Jennifer Morgan and Christian Klein were appointed co-CEOs with immediate effect as the software giant announced Thursday that Bill McDermott was stepping down.

In an interview with CNBC, both CEOs pointed to SAP’s third quarter numbers, which saw revenue up 13% year-on-year, to highlight the strength of the company.

“First of all, when you look at our numbers … you will see a really decent growth across all geographies. SAP is doing really well both in North America as well as in Europe, and of course high growth also in Asia,” Klein said.

“So we are also very confident also for the quarters to come. We see an extremely strong pipeline in all geographies and we don’t see any downturn in one of our geographies.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, uschina, risks, yearonyear, recession, numbers, really, warboard, departs, klein, trade, shake, mcdermott, ceos, war, growth, saps, geographies, bill


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How one woman went from feeling ‘paralyzed’ by her student loans to paying off over $100,000 in 6 years

Dulaney finished school with about $105,000 in student loans, but with interest she paid back around $120,000 in total, she tells CNBC Make It. And despite graduating in 2010, it wasn’t until 2014 that Dulaney got serious about ridding herself of student debt. “I didn’t even want to do a joint checking account together until I paid off my student loans,” she says. How small changes can make a big differenceDulaney’s success in paying off her loans didn’t come without sacrifice. 1 piece of advice


Dulaney finished school with about $105,000 in student loans, but with interest she paid back around $120,000 in total, she tells CNBC Make It. And despite graduating in 2010, it wasn’t until 2014 that Dulaney got serious about ridding herself of student debt. “I didn’t even want to do a joint checking account together until I paid off my student loans,” she says. How small changes can make a big differenceDulaney’s success in paying off her loans didn’t come without sacrifice. 1 piece of advice
How one woman went from feeling ‘paralyzed’ by her student loans to paying off over $100,000 in 6 years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, feeling, student, going, paralyzed, shes, owed, 100000, paying, didnt, woman, loans, really, debt, dulaney, went


How one woman went from feeling 'paralyzed' by her student loans to paying off over $100,000 in 6 years

In July 2019, Nichol Dulaney made the final payment on her student loans. It took her under six years to eliminate more than $100,000 in debt — a significantly shorter period than the 21-plus years it takes the average American to pay off their bachelor’s degree. Dulaney, 32, is a pharmaceutical research professional and lives in Centerville, Ohio, with her husband, William, 36. Just weeks ago, Dulaney gave birth to the couple’s first son, and they recently bought their dream home — an accomplishment Dulaney says they could have done “a lot sooner” if she hadn’t felt “paralyzed” by her debilitating debt for so long.

Dulaney’s “dream home” located in Centerville, Ohio.

Like a lot of students, when Dulaney graduated from Kettering College of Medical Arts in Ohio in 2010, she didn’t have a firm grasp on just how much debt she’d be paying off. Dulaney finished school with about $105,000 in student loans, but with interest she paid back around $120,000 in total, she tells CNBC Make It. And despite graduating in 2010, it wasn’t until 2014 that Dulaney got serious about ridding herself of student debt. With the help of her husband, who has a degree in finance, Dulaney finally found the motivation to stop ignoring her situation and face her loans head-on. “I think that having someone there to give another level of accountability was really helpful,” she says. While Dulaney’s husband provided her the support she needed, he didn’t contribute to her monthly payments, other than a small gift to finish off the last few thousand dollars she owed. “I didn’t even want to do a joint checking account together until I paid off my student loans,” she says. “He didn’t pay my loans for me, but he was really proud of me in the end.”

‘Writing it all down’ gave Dulaney a reality check

Dulaney’s first step toward tackling her debt was calling her student loan providers to confirm how much she owed. Then, she created an Excel spreadsheet so that she could write down everything in one place, including the name of each lender with each respective account number, amount of principle owed, monthly payment cost and interest rate. It was a wake-up call. “Tracking my debt down and listing it out was really helpful for me,” Dulaney says. “Once I found out exactly how much interest I was paying each month, I calculated how much [money] I’d need to cover the higher interest loans and started knocking those out first.” However, taking that first step wasn’t easy. “It’s hard to do, because when you see the numbers all together, it makes everything more overwhelming,” she says. “But the reality is, your debt isn’t going anywhere and it’s only going to get worse if not handled.”

I was working at a call center, and I knew that I owed all these people all of this money. And I thought, ‘I don’t have enough money. I have to get moving. This is not a drill.’ Nichol Dulaney Pharmaceutical research professional

Not only did creating a spreadsheet give Dulaney an aerial view of everything she owed and when, it also helped her to realize that her salary at the time wasn’t going to cut it. “I was working at a call center, and I knew that I owed all these people all of this money. And I thought, ‘I don’t have enough money. I have to get moving. This is not a drill,'” Dulaney says. “I started looking for job postings every morning before I got of bed and eventually I found my career.” Today, Dulaney makes close to six figures, a major jump from her days working at the Bath & Body Works call center, where she earned $13 an hour. From there, she took a job with a private pharmaceutical research organization, where she made close to $36,000 per year. “It wasn’t a huge leap pay-wise, but it started me on the path toward my next role,” which eventually led to the one she’s in now, she says.

How small changes can make a big difference

Dulaney’s success in paying off her loans didn’t come without sacrifice. In order to conserve her money, she started passing on small expenses she could do without, such as shopping for clothes or coloring her hair. “At first it was hard, but then I realized that I don’t need these things,” she says. “I was able to get more enjoyment and fulfillment out of seeing my loans going down.” Dulaney also kept the same car she had from college — a 2005 Toyota Corolla with windows that “won’t roll down” — rather than buying a new one. “I have a really decent salary and I have a great house, but I can’t go through the drive-thru,” Dulaney jokes. She’s finally at the point where she’s thinking about getting a new car, but is glad she didn’t rush to upgrade.

Dulaney’s 2005 Toyota Corolla she’s had since college.

Aside from buying the house, Dulaney says she hasn’t yet rewarded herself for becoming debt-free. She’s taking things one step at a time: Although she has her sights set on buying a designer bag to celebrate, right now she’s prioritizing taking care of her son. “I was going to get a really nice handbag, but I think I’d already found out that I was pregnant. So, things have kind of shifted, but I’m not counting it out. I’m hoping to have a splurge at some point for that,” she jokes.

Dulaney’s No. 1 piece of advice for paying off student loans


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, feeling, student, going, paralyzed, shes, owed, 100000, paying, didnt, woman, loans, really, debt, dulaney, went


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