If you invested $1,000 in Tesla in 2010, here’s how much you’d have now

If you invested in Tesla in 2010, when it made its initial public offering, that investment would definitely have paid off. A $1,000 investment would be worth more than $21,000 as of Dec. 12, according to CNBC calculations, including price appreciation and dividend gains reinvested. While the company’s stock has performed well over the years, though, any individual stock can over- or under-perform and past returns do not predict future results. CNBC: Tesla stock as of Dec. 12, 2018In an intervie


If you invested in Tesla in 2010, when it made its initial public offering, that investment would definitely have paid off. A $1,000 investment would be worth more than $21,000 as of Dec. 12, according to CNBC calculations, including price appreciation and dividend gains reinvested. While the company’s stock has performed well over the years, though, any individual stock can over- or under-perform and past returns do not predict future results. CNBC: Tesla stock as of Dec. 12, 2018In an intervie
If you invested $1,000 in Tesla in 2010, here’s how much you’d have now Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-12  Authors: shawn m carter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, musk, stock, tesla, recent, past, including, 2010, hes, investment, 1000, sec, invested, heres, youd, teslas


If you invested $1,000 in Tesla in 2010, here's how much you'd have now

Despite some lingering controversy around Tesla’s co-founder and chief executive officer Elon Musk, the automaker’s shares are up 37 percent in the past three months, and the company was a top performer in the Nasdaq 100 on Monday, even amid steep stock market dips.

If you invested in Tesla in 2010, when it made its initial public offering, that investment would definitely have paid off. A $1,000 investment would be worth more than $21,000 as of Dec. 12, according to CNBC calculations, including price appreciation and dividend gains reinvested.

While the company’s stock has performed well over the years, though, any individual stock can over- or under-perform and past returns do not predict future results.

In September, Musk was forced to step down as chairman of Tesla’s board of directors for three years in a deal with the Securities and Exchange Commission after he wrote on Twitter that he was considering taking the company private, and he remains a polarizing figure.

CNBC: Tesla stock as of Dec. 12, 2018

In an interview on CBS’ “60 Minutes,” Musk said that, while he plans to comply with the settlement, he does not respect the SEC itself. He made no apologies for his recent behavior, including one incident where he appeared to smoke marijuana and drink whiskey on comedian Joe Rogan’s podcast, and another where he suggested that a diver in the Thailand cave rescue was a “pedo.”

Musk said that he sees himself as “somewhat impulsive” and that he doesn’t want to “try to adhere to some CEO template.” “I’m just being me,” he told CBS. “I was certainly under insane stress and crazy, crazy hours. But the system would have failed if I was truly erratic.”

In response to both Musk’s behavior andhis comments about the SEC, on a recent episode of CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street,” Jim Cramer, host of “Mad Money,” said, “This man plays by no rules. He’s his own worst enemy. I don’t understand why anyone would do this. He clearly thinks he’s above the law or he would not ‘diss’ the agency that he has a plea deal [with].”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-12  Authors: shawn m carter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, musk, stock, tesla, recent, past, including, 2010, hes, investment, 1000, sec, invested, heres, youd, teslas


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‘The rules of engagement have broken’ in cyberspace, says CEO of cybersecurity giant FireEye

‘The rules of engagement have broken’ in cyberspace, says CEO of cybersecurity giant FireEye11 Hours AgoJim Cramer sits down with FireEye CEO Kevin Mandia to discuss how the global rules of engagement in cyberspace have eroded in recent years.


‘The rules of engagement have broken’ in cyberspace, says CEO of cybersecurity giant FireEye11 Hours AgoJim Cramer sits down with FireEye CEO Kevin Mandia to discuss how the global rules of engagement in cyberspace have eroded in recent years.
‘The rules of engagement have broken’ in cyberspace, says CEO of cybersecurity giant FireEye Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, giant, cyberspace, broken, sits, recent, global, ceo, hours, engagement, mandia, cybersecurity, rules, kevin, fireeye


'The rules of engagement have broken' in cyberspace, says CEO of cybersecurity giant FireEye

‘The rules of engagement have broken’ in cyberspace, says CEO of cybersecurity giant FireEye

11 Hours Ago

Jim Cramer sits down with FireEye CEO Kevin Mandia to discuss how the global rules of engagement in cyberspace have eroded in recent years.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, giant, cyberspace, broken, sits, recent, global, ceo, hours, engagement, mandia, cybersecurity, rules, kevin, fireeye


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FireEye CEO: ‘The rules of engagement have broken’ in cyberspace

FireEye CEO: ‘The rules of engagement have broken’ in cyberspace11 Hours AgoJim Cramer sits down with FireEye CEO Kevin Mandia to discuss how the global rules of engagement in cyberspace have eroded in recent years.


FireEye CEO: ‘The rules of engagement have broken’ in cyberspace11 Hours AgoJim Cramer sits down with FireEye CEO Kevin Mandia to discuss how the global rules of engagement in cyberspace have eroded in recent years.
FireEye CEO: ‘The rules of engagement have broken’ in cyberspace Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, broken, cyberspace, sits, recent, ceo, hours, engagement, mandia, global, rules, kevin, fireeye


FireEye CEO: 'The rules of engagement have broken' in cyberspace

FireEye CEO: ‘The rules of engagement have broken’ in cyberspace

11 Hours Ago

Jim Cramer sits down with FireEye CEO Kevin Mandia to discuss how the global rules of engagement in cyberspace have eroded in recent years.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, broken, cyberspace, sits, recent, ceo, hours, engagement, mandia, global, rules, kevin, fireeye


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Goldman Sachs: As long as consumers keep shopping, there’s hope for the economy

For a market that’s become increasingly jittery over the U.S. economy, Goldman Sachs has a message: All is not lost. “Three of the key drivers of consumer spending send a positive message for the near-term outlook,” the bank’s analysts wrote. November’s jobs data released on Friday showed lower-than-expected payrolls growth but wages growing at the fastest rate in nearly a decade. “Second, the saving rate looks elevated relative to the high level of household wealth, even after the recent sell-o


For a market that’s become increasingly jittery over the U.S. economy, Goldman Sachs has a message: All is not lost. “Three of the key drivers of consumer spending send a positive message for the near-term outlook,” the bank’s analysts wrote. November’s jobs data released on Friday showed lower-than-expected payrolls growth but wages growing at the fastest rate in nearly a decade. “Second, the saving rate looks elevated relative to the high level of household wealth, even after the recent sell-o
Goldman Sachs: As long as consumers keep shopping, there’s hope for the economy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-09  Authors: javier e david, david goldman, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theres, goldman, long, strong, economy, consumer, wages, sentiment, consumers, stocks, hope, recent, sachs, spending, shopping, growth, likely


Goldman Sachs: As long as consumers keep shopping, there's hope for the economy

For a market that’s become increasingly jittery over the U.S. economy, Goldman Sachs has a message: All is not lost.

Wall Street’s head-spinning volatility, which last week shaved more than 1,000 points off the Dow Jones Industrial Average, has pushed stocks into correction territory and raised fears for 2019. Although falling stocks and rising interest rates will continue to weigh on sentiment, those negatives are likely to be offset by higher wages and oil prices in retreat, Goldman said in a research note to clients Saturday.

“Three of the key drivers of consumer spending send a positive message for the near-term outlook,” the bank’s analysts wrote.

“First, real disposable income is likely to continue its strong growth due to accelerating wage growth, and recent declines in the oil price are likely to be a significant tailwind to spending in 2019,” Goldman said. November’s jobs data released on Friday showed lower-than-expected payrolls growth but wages growing at the fastest rate in nearly a decade.

“Second, the saving rate looks elevated relative to the high level of household wealth, even after the recent sell-off,” the analysts wrote. And with consumer spending — which comprises 2/3rd of the vast U.S. economy — still strong, “consumer sentiment is likely to stay elevated, reflecting strong underlying economic fundamentals as well as optimism about the labor market and income growth,” the firm said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-09  Authors: javier e david, david goldman, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theres, goldman, long, strong, economy, consumer, wages, sentiment, consumers, stocks, hope, recent, sachs, spending, shopping, growth, likely


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Cramer calls a bottom on Facebook’s stock, which has fallen nearly 24% since mid-March

His charitable trust, which still owns Facebook shares, has trimmed its position in recent months. Facebook shares closed March 16 at about $185, a day before news broke of Cambridge Analytica’s data misuse. Under scrutiny over data privacy from Washington and Wall Street, Facebook clawed its way to an all-time high during the July 25 trading of over $218 per share. Facebook’s 52-week low on Wall Street was $126.85 on Nov. 20. About two weeks ago, Cramer said Facebook’s stock could rise if Sandb


His charitable trust, which still owns Facebook shares, has trimmed its position in recent months. Facebook shares closed March 16 at about $185, a day before news broke of Cambridge Analytica’s data misuse. Under scrutiny over data privacy from Washington and Wall Street, Facebook clawed its way to an all-time high during the July 25 trading of over $218 per share. Facebook’s 52-week low on Wall Street was $126.85 on Nov. 20. About two weeks ago, Cramer said Facebook’s stock could rise if Sandb
Cramer calls a bottom on Facebook’s stock, which has fallen nearly 24% since mid-March Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-04  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr, scott mlyn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stock, midmarch, fallen, shares, sandberg, wall, low, 24, calls, cramer, recent, facebook, facebooks, nearly, street, months


Cramer calls a bottom on Facebook's stock, which has fallen nearly 24% since mid-March

Facebook may have finally reached a bottom after a tumultuous eight months that saw the stock lose nearly a quarter of its value, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Tuesday.

Shares of Facebook, as of Monday’s $141 close, slumped 23.8 percent since mid-March when the Cambridge Analytica scandal came to light. The embattled social media giant was down fractionally on Tuesday.

“I think Facebook, which is an unmitigated disaster, is bottoming,” Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street.” His charitable trust, which still owns Facebook shares, has trimmed its position in recent months.

Facebook shares closed March 16 at about $185, a day before news broke of Cambridge Analytica’s data misuse. Ten days after that, Facebook hit a then-intraday low of around $149, which represented a 19 percent decline.

Under scrutiny over data privacy from Washington and Wall Street, Facebook clawed its way to an all-time high during the July 25 trading of over $218 per share. But since then, Facebook lost 35 percent as of Monday, firmly in a bear market as defined by an asset or index decline of 20 percent or more from recent highs.

Facebook’s 52-week low on Wall Street was $126.85 on Nov. 20.

For months, Cramer has been critical of Facebook and most recently its Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg, who was reportedly blamed by Facebook co-founder, chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg for the company’s problems.

About two weeks ago, Cramer said Facebook’s stock could rise if Sandberg were to resign or be ousted. Then on Friday, a day after an expose by The New York Times, the “Mad Money” host questioned how Sandberg could possibly stay.

WATCH: Why Facebook’s business model is only now coming under fire


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-04  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr, scott mlyn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stock, midmarch, fallen, shares, sandberg, wall, low, 24, calls, cramer, recent, facebook, facebooks, nearly, street, months


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Fed’s Quarles: Fed watching data but will not react to ‘every wavering’

Federal Reserve vice chairman Randal Quarles said the Fed’s increasing “data dependence” does not mean it will react to every rise or fall in economic statistics or markets, but only to “significant changes in direction.” After a week in which markets have swung in their interpretation of where the Fed is heading, Quarles appeared to anchor the Fed’s move towards slowly but steadily continuing to raise interest rates. “We should be data dependent but not reacting to every wavering of the needle


Federal Reserve vice chairman Randal Quarles said the Fed’s increasing “data dependence” does not mean it will react to every rise or fall in economic statistics or markets, but only to “significant changes in direction.” After a week in which markets have swung in their interpretation of where the Fed is heading, Quarles appeared to anchor the Fed’s move towards slowly but steadily continuing to raise interest rates. “We should be data dependent but not reacting to every wavering of the needle
Fed’s Quarles: Fed watching data but will not react to ‘every wavering’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-03  Authors: brendan mcdermid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, week, feds, significant, thought, markets, watching, react, quarles, fed, policy, rates, data, wavering, recent


Fed's Quarles: Fed watching data but will not react to 'every wavering'

Federal Reserve vice chairman Randal Quarles said the Fed’s increasing “data dependence” does not mean it will react to every rise or fall in economic statistics or markets, but only to “significant changes in direction.”

After a week in which markets have swung in their interpretation of where the Fed is heading, Quarles appeared to anchor the Fed’s move towards slowly but steadily continuing to raise interest rates.

“We should be data dependent but not reacting to every wavering of the needle across the dial…We have described in all the communications tools a path that is pretty clear,” Quarles said. “We are following a strategy and taking account of data over time as it comes in and in response to significant changes in direction.”

That path currently has the Fed raising rates later this month and throughout 2019, an interpretation some investors have called into question given the recent focus of policymakers on weakening global growth and other recent data.

Stock markets in particular rose dramatically last week after construing remarks by Fed chair Jerome Powell to mean that the central bank may be nearer than thought to pausing the cycle of rate increases it began in late 2015.

But Quarles, repeating what has become a theme of the Powell Fed, emphasized that discussion of a possible stopping point puts too much emphasis around the concept of the “neutral” rate of interest, a notion he feels is not useful as a precise guide to appropriate policy as economic conditions become more normal.

It cannot be precise, may be changing over time, and “its utility as the central organizing thought around how you are conducting monetary policy becomes less,” Quarles said.

His comments, after weeks in which markets have both dropped dramatically and climbed based on perceptions of where rates are in comparison to “neutral,” are part of Powell’s so far choppy effort to downplay the concept — discounting its usefulness but continuing to refer to where policy stands in relation to it.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-03  Authors: brendan mcdermid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, week, feds, significant, thought, markets, watching, react, quarles, fed, policy, rates, data, wavering, recent


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Treasury yields lower amid dovish Fed comments; G-20 summit in focus

U.S. government debt yields fell on Friday as world leaders convened at a Group of 20 summit in Buenos Aires and investors adjusted portfolios after dovish comments from Federal Reserve officials earlier in the week. The G-20 meeting in Argentina was in focus on the week’s final day of trading as investors around the globe awaited a dinner between President Donald Trump and China President Xi Jinping. As of the latest reading, the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note dipped to around 3.0


U.S. government debt yields fell on Friday as world leaders convened at a Group of 20 summit in Buenos Aires and investors adjusted portfolios after dovish comments from Federal Reserve officials earlier in the week. The G-20 meeting in Argentina was in focus on the week’s final day of trading as investors around the globe awaited a dinner between President Donald Trump and China President Xi Jinping. As of the latest reading, the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note dipped to around 3.0
Treasury yields lower amid dovish Fed comments; G-20 summit in focus Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-30  Authors: thomas franck, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, summit, trade, trumps, dovish, amid, lower, trump, comments, treasury, federal, yield, g20, recent, xi, focus, president, yields, fed


Treasury yields lower amid dovish Fed comments; G-20 summit in focus

U.S. government debt yields fell on Friday as world leaders convened at a Group of 20 summit in Buenos Aires and investors adjusted portfolios after dovish comments from Federal Reserve officials earlier in the week.

The G-20 meeting in Argentina was in focus on the week’s final day of trading as investors around the globe awaited a dinner between President Donald Trump and China President Xi Jinping. A growing trade dispute between the globe’s two largest economies has been one of many factors roiling fixed-income and equity markets over the past year.

As of the latest reading, the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note dipped to around 3.013 percent, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond fell to 3.306 percent. The 2-year Treasury yield, meanwhile, held steady around 2.813 percent. Bond yields move inversely to prices.

While hopes are high that Washington and Beijing can broker a truce, U.S. complaints over intellectual property theft and a yawning trade deficit have not appeared to deter a Chinese government often involved in the country’s largest businesses on a granular level.

Investor angst also rose after CNBC reported that White House trade advisor and China trade hawk Peter Navarro will attend the sit-down between Trump and Xi. Navarro, a proponent of the Trump administration’s use of tariffs said earlier this month that any agreement between the two countries will be on Trump’s terms and not subject to Wall Street influence.

“I have no idea what to expect this weekend, frankly. It’s in both Trump’s and Xi’s interest to come up with a deal, but Trump will want a deal he’ll be happy with,” said Arthur Bass, managing director of fixed income financing, futures, and rates at Wedbush Securities. “If we do get an agreement, you could see a sigh of relief in equities, but it’s uncertain what fixed income does with all the comments from the Fed this week.”

Yields have dipped in recent days amid more dovish commentary from the Fed officials. Chairman Jerome Powell, Vice Chair Richard Clarida and minutes from the Federal Open Market Committee’s most recent meeting all suggested greater uncertainty around maintaining quarterly hikes to the federal funds rate.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-30  Authors: thomas franck, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, summit, trade, trumps, dovish, amid, lower, trump, comments, treasury, federal, yield, g20, recent, xi, focus, president, yields, fed


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Here’s how Chinese tech companies began to go global

China’s tech barriers have come down in recent years, especially for homegrown companies expanding abroad. That’s about the same we send to Costa Rica every year,” Harburg said. “This is the world’s second largest market and will soon be the world’s largest market. According to Harburg, China’s global tech growth to boils down to three stages. First, when Chinese public tech companies, such as Alibaba and Tencent, went public.


China’s tech barriers have come down in recent years, especially for homegrown companies expanding abroad. That’s about the same we send to Costa Rica every year,” Harburg said. “This is the world’s second largest market and will soon be the world’s largest market. According to Harburg, China’s global tech growth to boils down to three stages. First, when Chinese public tech companies, such as Alibaba and Tencent, went public.
Here’s how Chinese tech companies began to go global Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-30  Authors: uptin saiidi, nicolas asfouri, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, global, harburg, worlds, public, market, sends, companies, began, largest, growth, tech, heres, recent


Here's how Chinese tech companies began to go global

China’s tech barriers have come down in recent years, especially for homegrown companies expanding abroad.

Benjamin Harburg, managing partner of MSA, a Beijing-based Venture Capital firm, and an investor in Uber, Didi Chuxing and Mobike, has been seeing tech’s growth evolve over recent years and has several possible explanations.

“China sends 350,000 students to America every year. America sends about 9,000 to China every year. That’s about the same we send to Costa Rica every year,” Harburg said.

“This is the world’s second largest market and will soon be the world’s largest market. Americans on average just do not know China.”

According to Harburg, China’s global tech growth to boils down to three stages. First, when Chinese public tech companies, such as Alibaba and Tencent, went public.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-30  Authors: uptin saiidi, nicolas asfouri, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, global, harburg, worlds, public, market, sends, companies, began, largest, growth, tech, heres, recent


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Fed points to December rate hike but is worried about tariffs and debt

Federal Reserve officials teed up a December rate hike at their most recent meeting, but not without misgivings about how trade tensions and corporate debt could impact growth. However, the meeting summary also noted some concern about the “timing” of rate hikes. Current projections indicate that in addition to the December move, the FOMC is likely to approve three more hikes in 2019. Moreover, officials indicated that further post-meeting statements might be altered to remove the reference to “


Federal Reserve officials teed up a December rate hike at their most recent meeting, but not without misgivings about how trade tensions and corporate debt could impact growth. However, the meeting summary also noted some concern about the “timing” of rate hikes. Current projections indicate that in addition to the December move, the FOMC is likely to approve three more hikes in 2019. Moreover, officials indicated that further post-meeting statements might be altered to remove the reference to “
Fed points to December rate hike but is worried about tariffs and debt Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-29  Authors: jeff cox, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images, adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hike, federal, current, market, meeting, target, officials, rate, debt, fed, rates, recent, tariffs, points, worried, range


Fed points to December rate hike but is worried about tariffs and debt

Federal Reserve officials teed up a December rate hike at their most recent meeting, but not without misgivings about how trade tensions and corporate debt could impact growth.

Minutes released Thursday from the Nov. 7-8 meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee, which sets interest rates, pointed toward the strong likelihood of another quarter-point adjustment in the central bank’s benchmark rate target next month.

That’s in line with market thinking despite the recent volatility.

“Consistent with their judgment that a gradual approach to policy normalization remained appropriate, almost all participants expressed the view that another increase in the target range for the federal funds rate was likely to be warranted fairly soon if incoming information on the labor market and inflation was in line with or stronger than their current expectations,” the minutes stated.

However, the meeting summary also noted some concern about the “timing” of rate hikes. Current projections indicate that in addition to the December move, the FOMC is likely to approve three more hikes in 2019.

Moreover, officials indicated that further post-meeting statements might be altered to remove the reference to “further gradual increases” in the target range as long as current conditions persist. The reason for doing that is to stress that the committee is not on a preset course with rates and instead will be evaluating future decisions based on incoming economic data.

“Such a change would help to convey the Committee’s flexible approach in responding to changing economic circumstances,” the minutes said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-29  Authors: jeff cox, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images, adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hike, federal, current, market, meeting, target, officials, rate, debt, fed, rates, recent, tariffs, points, worried, range


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Trump could reportedly seek trade truce with China at G-20 despite tough rhetoric

President Donald Trump could push for a compromise on trade with China at this weekend’s G-20 summit in Argentina even after his recent tough talk, The New York Times reported, citing several U.S. officials. This could lead Trump to seek an agreement with China that would delay new tariffs on Chinese goods while the two countries work to resolve their issues. This would be a departure from Trump’s most recent comments on U.S.-China trade relations. The increasingly protectionist stance on U.S-Ch


President Donald Trump could push for a compromise on trade with China at this weekend’s G-20 summit in Argentina even after his recent tough talk, The New York Times reported, citing several U.S. officials. This could lead Trump to seek an agreement with China that would delay new tariffs on Chinese goods while the two countries work to resolve their issues. This would be a departure from Trump’s most recent comments on U.S.-China trade relations. The increasingly protectionist stance on U.S-Ch
Trump could reportedly seek trade truce with China at G-20 despite tough rhetoric Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-28  Authors: fred imbert, qilai shen, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, trade, times, g20, chinese, tough, tariffs, recent, goods, rhetoric, york, uschina, trump, reportedly, seek, truce, despite


Trump could reportedly seek trade truce with China at G-20 despite tough rhetoric

President Donald Trump could push for a compromise on trade with China at this weekend’s G-20 summit in Argentina even after his recent tough talk, The New York Times reported, citing several U.S. officials.

The report said Trump is increasingly anxious about the impact of a long trade war on financial markets and the economy. This could lead Trump to seek an agreement with China that would delay new tariffs on Chinese goods while the two countries work to resolve their issues.

This would be a departure from Trump’s most recent comments on U.S.-China trade relations. In an interview with The Wall Street Journal, Trump said it is “highly unlikely” that the U.S. would hold off on increasing tariffs on $200 billion of Chinese goods to 25 percent. He also said the U.S. would slap charges on the remaining $267 billion worth of goods from China that are not yet subject to tariffs.

Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping are scheduled to meet for dinner at the G-20 on Saturday. The two leaders are expected to discuss trade, among other issues.

The increasingly protectionist stance on U.S-China trade has rattled investors all year as they gauge how tougher trade conditions will impact corporate earnings as well as the global economy. Any progress or resolution on the matter would be seen as a positive by investors for the market.

Click here to read the full New York Times story.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-28  Authors: fred imbert, qilai shen, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, trade, times, g20, chinese, tough, tariffs, recent, goods, rhetoric, york, uschina, trump, reportedly, seek, truce, despite


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