Amazon says punishing counterfeiters and regulating facial recognition technology are among its top issues

In a 1,300-word blog post on Thursday, Amazon laid out its position on 11 sensitive matters, where “there is much room for healthy debate and differing opinions.” The topics include minimum wage, climate change, workplace diversity, immigration, regulation, counterfeit sales and data privacy. Warren has lobbied for Amazon, and other big tech companies, to be broken up, and in Europe the company is being investigated to determine if its use of merchant data breaches competition rules. Amazon didn


In a 1,300-word blog post on Thursday, Amazon laid out its position on 11 sensitive matters, where “there is much room for healthy debate and differing opinions.” The topics include minimum wage, climate change, workplace diversity, immigration, regulation, counterfeit sales and data privacy. Warren has lobbied for Amazon, and other big tech companies, to be broken up, and in Europe the company is being investigated to determine if its use of merchant data breaches competition rules. Amazon didn
Amazon says punishing counterfeiters and regulating facial recognition technology are among its top issues Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: eugene kim
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facial, including, technology, data, used, post, rekognition, warren, issues, regulating, governments, counterfeiters, framework, amazon, punishing, recognition


Amazon says punishing counterfeiters and regulating facial recognition technology are among its top issues

As Amazon expands into a host of new markets and stares down regulators and lawmakers across the globe, the company is spelling out to investors and consumers that it’s well aware of the many controversial issues that lie ahead.

In a 1,300-word blog post on Thursday, Amazon laid out its position on 11 sensitive matters, where “there is much room for healthy debate and differing opinions.” The topics include minimum wage, climate change, workplace diversity, immigration, regulation, counterfeit sales and data privacy.

The post lands at a time when U.S. politicians on both sides of the aisle, including President Trump on the right and Democratic presidential candidates Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders on the left, are taking aim at Amazon for some combination of its size, market power, taxes paid and treatment of workers. Warren has lobbied for Amazon, and other big tech companies, to be broken up, and in Europe the company is being investigated to determine if its use of merchant data breaches competition rules.

Amazon didn’t address antitrust in Thursday’s blog post, but it did say that its facial recognition technology, Rekognition, which has been used to help locate missing children and identify child sex trafficking victims, can be misused and should be quickly put under a regulatory framework by governments.

“We provide guidance to all Rekognition customers, including law enforcement customers, on the technology’s proper use and have a clear Acceptable Use Policy,” Amazon said. “However, we think that governments should act to regulate the use of this technology to ensure it’s used appropriately, and we have proposed guidelines for an appropriate U.S. national legislative framework that protects individual civil rights and ensures that governments are transparent in their application of the technology.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: eugene kim
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facial, including, technology, data, used, post, rekognition, warren, issues, regulating, governments, counterfeiters, framework, amazon, punishing, recognition


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Goldman evaluating role in China’s Megvii IPO after US blacklist

Goldman Sachs said on Tuesday it was reviewing its involvement in Megvii Technology’s planned initial public offering (IPO) after the U.S. government placed the Chinese artificial intelligence firm on a human rights blacklist. In an emailed statement in response to a request for comment on the Alibaba-backed Megvii IPO, Goldman said it was “evaluating in light of the recent developments.” Goldman is a joint sponsor of the Megvii IPO, alongside Citigroup and JPMorgan Chase, which both declined to


Goldman Sachs said on Tuesday it was reviewing its involvement in Megvii Technology’s planned initial public offering (IPO) after the U.S. government placed the Chinese artificial intelligence firm on a human rights blacklist. In an emailed statement in response to a request for comment on the Alibaba-backed Megvii IPO, Goldman said it was “evaluating in light of the recent developments.” Goldman is a joint sponsor of the Megvii IPO, alongside Citigroup and JPMorgan Chase, which both declined to
Goldman evaluating role in China’s Megvii IPO after US blacklist Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, firm, goldman, intelligence, evaluating, chinas, recognition, blacklist, shanghai, facial, megvii, ipo, role, public, companies


Goldman evaluating role in China's Megvii IPO after US blacklist

An attendee uses his smartphone to record a facial-recognition demonstration on himself at the Beijing Megvii booth at the MWC Shanghai exhibition in Shanghai, China, on June 27, 2019.

Goldman Sachs said on Tuesday it was reviewing its involvement in Megvii Technology’s planned initial public offering (IPO) after the U.S. government placed the Chinese artificial intelligence firm on a human rights blacklist.

The Trump administration said on Monday that Megvii and seven other Chinese companies were targeted because they were implicated in Beijing’s repression of Muslim minority populations in the Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region in the far west of the country.

In an emailed statement in response to a request for comment on the Alibaba-backed Megvii IPO, Goldman said it was “evaluating in light of the recent developments.” Sources had previously told Reuters the listing was scheduled for Hong Kong in the fourth quarter and might raise as much as $1 billion.

Risk consultants and Silicon Valley lawyers said that other U.S. companies involved with the blacklisted Chinese firms, whether as investors or as underwriters, are also likely to reevaluate their relationships.

Goldman is a joint sponsor of the Megvii IPO, alongside Citigroup and JPMorgan Chase, which both declined to comment.

Goldman had thoroughly evaluated the Megvii deal before initially signing onto it using its usual due diligence process, a person familiar with the matter said.

Known in the artificial intelligence business for its facial recognition platform Face++, Megvii will become the first Chinese AI firm to go public if the deal goes ahead. The company provides facial recognition and other AI technology to governments and companies including Alibaba, Ant Financial, Lenovo Group and Huawei.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, firm, goldman, intelligence, evaluating, chinas, recognition, blacklist, shanghai, facial, megvii, ipo, role, public, companies


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China’s surveillance tech is spreading globally, raising concerns about Beijing’s influence

I think we don’t even quite understand the full scale of the problem that we are dealing with when it comes to Chinese surveillance technology when it is exported. “I think we don’t even quite understand the full scale of the problem that we are dealing with when it comes to Chinese surveillance technology when it is exported. Maya Wang China researcher at Human Rights WatchNowhere is China’s surveillance state more visible than in Xinjiang, home to China’s Uighur minority. She warned of the dan


I think we don’t even quite understand the full scale of the problem that we are dealing with when it comes to Chinese surveillance technology when it is exported. “I think we don’t even quite understand the full scale of the problem that we are dealing with when it comes to Chinese surveillance technology when it is exported. Maya Wang China researcher at Human Rights WatchNowhere is China’s surveillance state more visible than in Xinjiang, home to China’s Uighur minority. She warned of the dan
China’s surveillance tech is spreading globally, raising concerns about Beijing’s influence Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, huawei, think, spreading, told, technology, way, raising, surveillance, globally, concerns, china, recognition, influence, chinas, chinese, beijings, data, tech


China's surveillance tech is spreading globally, raising concerns about Beijing's influence

Surveillance cameras are mounted on a post at Tiananmen Square as snow falls in Beijing, China, on Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019. Qilai Shen | Bloomberg | Getty Images

China’s push to export its surveillance technology via some of its biggest companies, including to liberal democracies, has raised concerns because of the risk of data being siphoned back to Beijing and the growing influence of the Communist Party, experts told CNBC. The world’s second-largest economy has built a vast surveillance state comprised of millions of cameras powered by facial recognition software. The devices, perched on lamp posts and outside buildings and streets, are able to recognize individuals. Some of China’s most valuable technology firms have been involved in such projects across the country. But this technology is now being exported as the nation’s technology firms expand their global footprint.

Chinese tech companies — particularly Huawei, Hikvision, Dahua, and ZTE — supply artificial intelligence surveillance technology in 63 countries, according to a September report by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace think tank. Of those nations, 36 have signed onto China’s massive infrastructure project, the Belt and Road Initiative, the report said, adding that Huawei supplies technology to the highest number of countries. Some of these so-called “smart city” projects, which include surveillance technologies, are underway in Western countries, particularly in Europe, including Germany, Spain and France, according to analysis by the Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI).

I think we don’t even quite understand the full scale of the problem that we are dealing with when it comes to Chinese surveillance technology when it is exported. Samantha Hoffman fellow at Australian Strategic Policy Institute’s Cyber Centre

Experts warned of a number of risks including potential access to data by the Chinese government. “I think that sometimes there is an assumption that ‘oh well when we roll out this technology we aren’t going to use it in a negative way, we are using it to provide services or we are using it in a way that is seen as acceptable, socially acceptable in our society,'” Samantha Hoffman, a fellow at ASPI’s Cyber Centre, told CNBC’s “Beyond the Valley” podcast. “But actually (we) can’t be sure of that because the difference isn’t necessarily how the technology is being deployed, but who has access to the data it’s collecting,” she said. “If it’s a Chinese company like Huawei, and that … data goes back to China and can be used by the party in whatever way that it chooses.”

Chinese laws and regulations

Hoffman cited laws in China that appear to compel Chinese firms to hand over data to the government, if asked. She did not accuse Huawei of wrongdoing, but just used the company as an example. Earlier this year, Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei said he would “definitely say no” to any request for customer data from Beijing. “I think we don’t even quite understand the full scale of the problem that we are dealing with when it comes to Chinese surveillance technology when it is exported. It’s not just that other regimes can use it in similar ways, it’s that when it’s exported the (Chinese Communist) Party can attach its interests as well,” Hoffman added.

I think the worse future could be these governments adopting these technologies and adding that arsenal to the existing ones for the control of people. Maya Wang China researcher at Human Rights Watch

Nowhere is China’s surveillance state more visible than in Xinjiang, home to China’s Uighur minority. The territory has made headlines for its detention and “re-education” camps that hold an estimated 1.5 million Muslims, many of them for violating what Amnesty International describes as a “highly restrictive and discriminatory” law that China says is designed to combat extremism. Maya Wang, a China researcher at Human Rights Watch, focuses on Xinjiang and the surveillance activities there. She warned of the dangers of China’s surveillance technology going to authoritarian states. “I think the worse future could be these governments adopting these technologies and adding that arsenal to the existing ones for the control of people,” Wang told CNBC. Earlier this year, an ASPI report highlighted other concerns from China exporting its surveillance tech, including being able to undermine democracies, get an edge on new technologies and in military areas. “You know, domestically and globally, it (Chinese Communist Party) plans to use technology as (a) way to both protect and expand its power,” Hoffman said. “Globally, the implications of that are that the party is trying to reshape global governance in a way that … will ensure the party’s power.”

Privacy backlash

Facial recognition technology has already faced backlash around the world. Last month in the U.S., California lawmakers banned local police from using facial-recognition software in body cameras. The current ban is temporary. Earlier this year, the Financial Times reported that the European Commission, the European Union’s executive arm, was looking at drafting new regulation on the technology. Microsoft CEO also said in January that he would welcome new rules on the use facial recognition. The FT also discovered that a developer involved in London’s King’s Cross area had deployed facial recognition cameras without people’s knowledge. This drew criticism from Britain’s data protection watchdog which said it was “deeply concerned about the growing use of facial recognition technology in public spaces.” Also in the U.K., Liberty — a human rights advocacy group on behalf of a person called Ed Bridges — brought a case against South Wales Police regarding the use of facial recognition. It was seen as one of the first cases of its kind in the world. Bridges claimed to have his face scanned by the police force and argued there were no legal safeguards in place for the use of the tech. “That struck me as being an infringement of my privacy,” Bridges told CNBC’s “Beyond the Valley” podcast. “I am a law-abiding citizen, I was doing nothing wrong, I was just going about my business, and yet here the police were in my home city taking my data.” The judges in the case ruled against Liberty and Bridges, and said they were “satisfied that the current legal regime is adequate,” and that the use of the technology did not violate the Human Rights Act. Bridges told CNBC he would appeal and that he’s concerned about the lack of consent from the public. “The issue this comes back to is around consent … When I’m walking through what is a public space … how many of us have that sort of option to stop and go … ‘hang on my face is being scanned, who is doing this, for what purposes?’ We’ve all got lives to lead and I think that’s why it’s important to challenge the use of technology in the way that we are,” he said.

Surveillance and trade war

Chinese technology firms have been the caught in the crosshairs of the U.S.-China trade war. Huawei, the world’s largest telecoms equipment maker, has been blacklisted by the U.S., restricting its access to American technology. Washington has dubbed Huawei a national security risk, saying its gear could be used by Beijing for espionage. The Chinese tech giant has repeatedly denied those allegations. On Monday, the U.S. government widened its net to add another 28 Chinese entities to a blacklist called the Entity List. Hikvision, a firm that makes surveillance products, is one of those companies. Dahua, which deals with surveillance equipment, was also added to the list.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, huawei, think, spreading, told, technology, way, raising, surveillance, globally, concerns, china, recognition, influence, chinas, chinese, beijings, data, tech


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Alibaba: China’s FlyZoo hotel uses facial recognition tech and robots

Alibaba is well known for its e-commerce platforms, but the Chinese tech giant has branched into fintech, film, new retail and now, hospitality. I recently stayed at Alibaba’s futuristic FlyZoo hotel, which is adjacent to its headquarters in Hangzhou, China. It features facial recognition doors, robotic arms at the bar and even robots that deliver items to guest rooms. Alibaba hopes the property will be a model for what a hotel of the future may look like. Andy Wang, CEO of Alibaba Future Hotel,


Alibaba is well known for its e-commerce platforms, but the Chinese tech giant has branched into fintech, film, new retail and now, hospitality. I recently stayed at Alibaba’s futuristic FlyZoo hotel, which is adjacent to its headquarters in Hangzhou, China. It features facial recognition doors, robotic arms at the bar and even robots that deliver items to guest rooms. Alibaba hopes the property will be a model for what a hotel of the future may look like. Andy Wang, CEO of Alibaba Future Hotel,
Alibaba: China’s FlyZoo hotel uses facial recognition tech and robots Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: uptin saiidi, saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stayed, kept, chinas, future, recognition, flyzoo, used, tech, robots, uses, wang, alibaba, told, facial, hotel


Alibaba: China's FlyZoo hotel uses facial recognition tech and robots

Alibaba is well known for its e-commerce platforms, but the Chinese tech giant has branched into fintech, film, new retail and now, hospitality.

I recently stayed at Alibaba’s futuristic FlyZoo hotel, which is adjacent to its headquarters in Hangzhou, China.

Here, there are no keycards and everything is cashless. It features facial recognition doors, robotic arms at the bar and even robots that deliver items to guest rooms.

Alibaba hopes the property will be a model for what a hotel of the future may look like.

Upon arrival, I noticed the lobby was completely bare: no check-in counters, no concierge, and no receptionists.

As a foreigner, however, I was quickly greeted by a staff member, who used a mobile device to take a photo of my passport and my face. Then she told me my room number and offered to email the receipt.

Andy Wang, CEO of Alibaba Future Hotel, claims the data recognition information is only kept during the duration of the guests’ stay and is not kept on record.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: uptin saiidi, saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stayed, kept, chinas, future, recognition, flyzoo, used, tech, robots, uses, wang, alibaba, told, facial, hotel


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Facial recognition technology needs controls on its use, World Economic Forum says

Dan Kitwood | Getty ImagesNEW DELHI — Governments need to take people’s privacy into account as more and more countries consider using facial recognition technology to beef up security, said an expert at the World Economic Forum. Facial recognition software is powerful biometric technology that can identify individuals based on digital images or video frames. “Firstly, with the government use of facial recognition technology and then also with the company use of facial recognition.” It’s about a


Dan Kitwood | Getty ImagesNEW DELHI — Governments need to take people’s privacy into account as more and more countries consider using facial recognition technology to beef up security, said an expert at the World Economic Forum. Facial recognition software is powerful biometric technology that can identify individuals based on digital images or video frames. “Firstly, with the government use of facial recognition technology and then also with the company use of facial recognition.” It’s about a
Facial recognition technology needs controls on its use, World Economic Forum says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, needs, world, forum, data, privacy, controls, recognition, protection, security, india, facial, technology, economic


Facial recognition technology needs controls on its use, World Economic Forum says

A CCTV camera is seen at King’s Cross on August 16, 2019 in London. CCTV cameras using facial recognition are being investigated by the UK’s data protection watchdog. Dan Kitwood | Getty Images

NEW DELHI — Governments need to take people’s privacy into account as more and more countries consider using facial recognition technology to beef up security, said an expert at the World Economic Forum. Facial recognition software is powerful biometric technology that can identify individuals based on digital images or video frames. Artificial intelligence, high-definition surveillance cameras, and remote sensors have made the technology more powerful and expanded the ways it can be used. “The problem’s really two-fold,” Kay Firth-Butterfield, head of artificial intelligence at WEF, told CNBC at the India Economic Summit. “Firstly, with the government use of facial recognition technology and then also with the company use of facial recognition.”

Security or invasion?

The amount of data that can be collected on an individual is massive, and that raises privacy concerns. But there’s also a bigger issue, Firth-Butterfield said. It’s about asking, “when does use (of facial recognition technology) by the government amount to security compared to the invasion of our civil liberties.” She added that governments may argue for the use of facial recognition in airports to stop security risks, but questioned: “Do they need it to, for example, follow us from our house to a street demonstration?”

In a report released Friday, WEF said governments have to act to ensure fair and transparent use of facial recognition systems. They must also include policies that can safeguard individual rights and guide the socially beneficial development of the technology it said. “India has an important role to play to show its political willingness and impetus in doing so.”

Bias in facial recognition

Unlike other types of biometric data collection, such as fingerprints and iris scanning, facial recognition technology can collect information on people without them being aware of it. In some instances, people have been wrongly identified and the World Economic Forum says studies have shown facial recognition to be biased and “performing more poorly on people with darker skin tones and on women.”

Facial recognition technologies are here to stay, and they will get used. Deepankar Sanwalka advisory leader at PwC India

This week, the World Economic Forum was invited to work with India in answering some of those questions around privacy and the use of facial recognition technology.

India’s laws and regulations

In June, India’s Ministry of Home Affairs, through the National Crime Records Bureau, invited bids to build an automated facial recognition system. The system would allow police to match people’s faces — captured on closed circuit cameras — against an existing image database and “generate alerts if a blacklist match is found.” That could help to identify criminals, missing persons or even dead bodies. But the move is said to have angered privacy campaigners because the country’s personal data protection laws are not yet up to par with regulation in other regions, such as the General Data Protection Regulation in Europe.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, needs, world, forum, data, privacy, controls, recognition, protection, security, india, facial, technology, economic


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Treasury yields fall ahead of nonfarm payrolls

Facial recognition technology needs controls on its use, World… Unlike other types of biometric data collection, such as fingerprints and iris scanning, facial recognition technology can collect information on people without them being…Technologyread more


Facial recognition technology needs controls on its use, World… Unlike other types of biometric data collection, such as fingerprints and iris scanning, facial recognition technology can collect information on people without them being…Technologyread more
Treasury yields fall ahead of nonfarm payrolls Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fall, needs, nonfarm, types, iris, recognition, ahead, fingerprints, payrolls, yields, facial, worldunlike, information, technology, scanning, treasury


Treasury yields fall ahead of nonfarm payrolls

Facial recognition technology needs controls on its use, World…

Unlike other types of biometric data collection, such as fingerprints and iris scanning, facial recognition technology can collect information on people without them being…

Technology

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: elliot smith
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US futures point to slightly higher open

Facial recognition technology needs controls on its use, World… Unlike other types of biometric data collection, such as fingerprints and iris scanning, facial recognition technology can collect information on people without them being…Technologyread more


Facial recognition technology needs controls on its use, World… Unlike other types of biometric data collection, such as fingerprints and iris scanning, facial recognition technology can collect information on people without them being…Technologyread more
US futures point to slightly higher open Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, needs, open, types, iris, recognition, higher, fingerprints, slightly, information, facial, worldunlike, point, technology, scanning, futures


US futures point to slightly higher open

Facial recognition technology needs controls on its use, World…

Unlike other types of biometric data collection, such as fingerprints and iris scanning, facial recognition technology can collect information on people without them being…

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: silvia amaro
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Tim Cook weighs in against launching an Apple cryptocurrency

Facial recognition technology needs controls on its use, World… Unlike other types of biometric data collection, such as fingerprints and iris scanning, facial recognition technology can collect information on people without them being…Technologyread more


Facial recognition technology needs controls on its use, World… Unlike other types of biometric data collection, such as fingerprints and iris scanning, facial recognition technology can collect information on people without them being…Technologyread more
Tim Cook weighs in against launching an Apple cryptocurrency Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, needs, tim, types, iris, apple, recognition, fingerprints, cryptocurrency, weighs, information, launching, facial, worldunlike, technology, scanning, cook


Tim Cook weighs in against launching an Apple cryptocurrency

Facial recognition technology needs controls on its use, World…

Unlike other types of biometric data collection, such as fingerprints and iris scanning, facial recognition technology can collect information on people without them being…

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Morgan Stanley bets big on Disney+ subscribers, says company is ‘preparing for liftoff’

Facial recognition technology needs controls on its use, World… Unlike other types of biometric data collection, such as fingerprints and iris scanning, facial recognition technology can collect information on people without them being…Technologyread more


Facial recognition technology needs controls on its use, World… Unlike other types of biometric data collection, such as fingerprints and iris scanning, facial recognition technology can collect information on people without them being…Technologyread more
Morgan Stanley bets big on Disney+ subscribers, says company is ‘preparing for liftoff’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, needs, morgan, bets, types, disney, liftoff, big, recognition, iris, preparing, fingerprints, stanley, information, facial, worldunlike, subscribers, technology, scanning, company


Morgan Stanley bets big on Disney+ subscribers, says company is 'preparing for liftoff'

Facial recognition technology needs controls on its use, World…

Unlike other types of biometric data collection, such as fingerprints and iris scanning, facial recognition technology can collect information on people without them being…

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
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Disney and these two other stocks are Bank of America’s best ideas for the fourth quarter

Facial recognition technology needs controls on its use, World… Unlike other types of biometric data collection, such as fingerprints and iris scanning, facial recognition technology can collect information on people without them being…Technologyread more


Facial recognition technology needs controls on its use, World… Unlike other types of biometric data collection, such as fingerprints and iris scanning, facial recognition technology can collect information on people without them being…Technologyread more
Disney and these two other stocks are Bank of America’s best ideas for the fourth quarter Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ideas, needs, fourth, best, americas, types, disney, iris, bank, recognition, fingerprints, quarter, stocks, information, facial, worldunlike, technology, scanning


Disney and these two other stocks are Bank of America's best ideas for the fourth quarter

Facial recognition technology needs controls on its use, World…

Unlike other types of biometric data collection, such as fingerprints and iris scanning, facial recognition technology can collect information on people without them being…

Technology

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ideas, needs, fourth, best, americas, types, disney, iris, bank, recognition, fingerprints, quarter, stocks, information, facial, worldunlike, technology, scanning


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