Generali beats 2018 targets despite ‘challenging’ Italian market, raises dividend

“But when people do not invest because the economy is not growing, the life insurance business and asset management is growing.” Donnet also claimed that Generali’s 59 billion euros in Italian BTPs was not a concern to investors. Generali has reserved up to 4 billion euros for acquisitions and growth as it looks to asset management and high-margin business in Latin America and Asia. Clarification: This story has been updated to reflect that Donnet claimed that Generali’s 59 billion euros in Ital


“But when people do not invest because the economy is not growing, the life insurance business and asset management is growing.” Donnet also claimed that Generali’s 59 billion euros in Italian BTPs was not a concern to investors. Generali has reserved up to 4 billion euros for acquisitions and growth as it looks to asset management and high-margin business in Latin America and Asia. Clarification: This story has been updated to reflect that Donnet claimed that Generali’s 59 billion euros in Ital
Generali beats 2018 targets despite ‘challenging’ Italian market, raises dividend Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: reuters with cnbccom, pier marco tacca, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, management, euros, despite, 2018, generalis, growing, targets, dividend, billion, market, business, beats, reflect, raises, generali, challenging, btps, economy, italian


Generali beats 2018 targets despite 'challenging' Italian market, raises dividend

Europe’s third-largest insurer said it would pay a dividend of 0.90 euros per share, up from the previous year’s 0.85 euros.

When it came to a potential European slowdown in 2019, however, Donnet said Generali was not concerned. He explained that people sought out the solutions Generali provided whether the economy was booming or lagging.

“Our business is very resilient, because when people do invest and the economy is growing, the property and casualty business is growing,” he said. “But when people do not invest because the economy is not growing, the life insurance business and asset management is growing.”

However he noted heavy competition in its domestic market, especially with motor insurance, adding that it was “challenging.”

“In Italy and France, by the way, we had to face very important claims … which obviously had a significant impact on the operating result,” he added.

Donnet also claimed that Generali’s 59 billion euros in Italian BTPs was not a concern to investors.

“(Investors) do not struggle any more on this — we have demonstrated that we have a strong capital position. We have further increased our solvency ratio by 9 percentage points, so our exposure to BTPs is no longer an issue,” he told CNBC.

Generali has reserved up to 4 billion euros for acquisitions and growth as it looks to asset management and high-margin business in Latin America and Asia.

Clarification: This story has been updated to reflect that Donnet claimed that Generali’s 59 billion euros in Italian BTPs was not a concern to investors. The headline has also been changed on this story to more accurately reflect Generali’s earnings release.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: reuters with cnbccom, pier marco tacca, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, management, euros, despite, 2018, generalis, growing, targets, dividend, billion, market, business, beats, reflect, raises, generali, challenging, btps, economy, italian


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IBM hopes 1 million faces will help fight bias in facial recognition

IBM thinks the data being used to train facial recognition systems isn’t diverse enough. The tech giant released a trove of data containing 1 million images of faces taken from a Flickr dataset with 100 million photos and videos. Researchers at the company hope that these specific details will help developers train their artificial intelligence-powered facial recognition systems to identify faces more fairly and accurately. “Facial recognition technology should be fair and accurate,” John Smith,


IBM thinks the data being used to train facial recognition systems isn’t diverse enough. The tech giant released a trove of data containing 1 million images of faces taken from a Flickr dataset with 100 million photos and videos. Researchers at the company hope that these specific details will help developers train their artificial intelligence-powered facial recognition systems to identify faces more fairly and accurately. “Facial recognition technology should be fair and accurate,” John Smith,
IBM hopes 1 million faces will help fight bias in facial recognition Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: ryan browne, janhvi bhojwani
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facial, faces, data, bias, systems, ibm, fight, technology, recognition, hopes, reflect, million, used, help, train


IBM hopes 1 million faces will help fight bias in facial recognition

IBM thinks the data being used to train facial recognition systems isn’t diverse enough.

The tech giant released a trove of data containing 1 million images of faces taken from a Flickr dataset with 100 million photos and videos.

The images are annotated with tags related to features including craniofacial measurements, facial symmetry, age and gender.

Researchers at the company hope that these specific details will help developers train their artificial intelligence-powered facial recognition systems to identify faces more fairly and accurately.

“Facial recognition technology should be fair and accurate,” John Smith, a fellow and lead scientist at IBM, told CNBC by email. “In order for the technology to advance it needs to be built on diverse training data.”

Smith stressed the importance of variety in datasets for facial recognition systems to reflect real-world diversity and reduce the rate of error in matching a face to a person.

“Many prominent datasets used in the field are too narrow and fall short in coverage and balance,” he said. “The data does not reflect the faces we see in the world.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: ryan browne, janhvi bhojwani
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facial, faces, data, bias, systems, ibm, fight, technology, recognition, hopes, reflect, million, used, help, train


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Investors are hiding out in cash: Assets in money market funds surge past $3 trillion

Cash is becoming the king as investors flee volatile stock markets. Assets in money market mutual funds have swollen to $3.066 trillion, their highest level since March 2010, driven by retail investors. Money market funds have long been considered as safe as cash savings accounts at banks. But Stoltzfus said the money flows more likely reflect the whim of skittish investors reacting to the markets on their own. Nearly three-quarters of the $183 billion that has flowed into money market funds sin


Cash is becoming the king as investors flee volatile stock markets. Assets in money market mutual funds have swollen to $3.066 trillion, their highest level since March 2010, driven by retail investors. Money market funds have long been considered as safe as cash savings accounts at banks. But Stoltzfus said the money flows more likely reflect the whim of skittish investors reacting to the markets on their own. Nearly three-quarters of the $183 billion that has flowed into money market funds sin
Investors are hiding out in cash: Assets in money market funds surge past $3 trillion Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-14  Authors: liz moyer, marcos brindicci
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cash, investors, retail, hiding, trillion, shortterm, stoltzfus, funds, reflect, surge, stock, past, market, money, assets


Investors are hiding out in cash: Assets in money market funds surge past $3 trillion

Cash is becoming the king as investors flee volatile stock markets.

Assets in money market mutual funds have swollen to $3.066 trillion, their highest level since March 2010, driven by retail investors. The money fund assets had spent much of the last decade in the $2 trillion range but tracked above $3 trillion again in mid-December, coinciding with a late-2018 market downturn that resulted in the S&P 500 posting a 6.2 percent drop for the year, it’s worst showing in a decade.

Mom and pop investors “blinked,” said John Stoltzfus, chief investment strategist at Oppenheimer, who pointed to the trend in a note Monday.

Sean Collins, chief economist at the Investment Company Institute, which tracks the data, said the move could reflect a combination of factors: Investors are wary about the stock market volatility, but higher short-term interest rates are also making money market funds more attractive for those who want a short-term asset. Money market funds have long been considered as safe as cash savings accounts at banks.

But Stoltzfus said the money flows more likely reflect the whim of skittish investors reacting to the markets on their own. Nearly three-quarters of the $183 billion that has flowed into money market funds since the end of the third quarter of last year was to retail funds, not institutional, according to ICI data.

WATCH: How to invest in bear market


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-14  Authors: liz moyer, marcos brindicci
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cash, investors, retail, hiding, trillion, shortterm, stoltzfus, funds, reflect, surge, stock, past, market, money, assets


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David Tepper’s Appaloosa sold its Apple position after the end of the third quarter, sources say

David Tepper’s Appaloosa Management sold its Apple position after the end of the third quarter, according to sources familiar with the matter. The stake was just a small trading position, the sources said. Appaloosa’s 13-F filing released this week showed a new position in Apple of 100,000 shares worth just $22.3 million. Shares of Apple inched lower following news of Appaloosa’s exit but remained up more than 1.4 percent on Thursday. The fund manager also cut its exposure to Facebook to 3.3 mil


David Tepper’s Appaloosa Management sold its Apple position after the end of the third quarter, according to sources familiar with the matter. The stake was just a small trading position, the sources said. Appaloosa’s 13-F filing released this week showed a new position in Apple of 100,000 shares worth just $22.3 million. Shares of Apple inched lower following news of Appaloosa’s exit but remained up more than 1.4 percent on Thursday. The fund manager also cut its exposure to Facebook to 3.3 mil
David Tepper’s Appaloosa sold its Apple position after the end of the third quarter, sources say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: scott wapner, thomas franck, david orrell
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reflect, sold, quarter, showed, say, david, end, apple, sources, stake, shares, position, teppers, appaloosa, funds


David Tepper's Appaloosa sold its Apple position after the end of the third quarter, sources say

David Tepper’s Appaloosa Management sold its Apple position after the end of the third quarter, according to sources familiar with the matter.

The stake was just a small trading position, the sources said. Appaloosa’s 13-F filing released this week showed a new position in Apple of 100,000 shares worth just $22.3 million. The filings reflect positions of funds through Sept. 30.

Shares of Apple inched lower following news of Appaloosa’s exit but remained up more than 1.4 percent on Thursday.

The 13-F filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission also showed that Appaloosa added a new stake in State Street and had doubled its position in PG&E. The fund manager also cut its exposure to Facebook to 3.3 million shares by the end of September.

Appaloosa Management has approximately $14 billion of assets under management.

Hedge funds are required to report their holdings 45 days after the end of each quarter. The filings often do not reflect their current holdings of the funds because the managers may have sold or bought stock in that 45-day window.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: scott wapner, thomas franck, david orrell
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reflect, sold, quarter, showed, say, david, end, apple, sources, stake, shares, position, teppers, appaloosa, funds


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Brexit is turning into a ‘lose-lose situation’: Partners Group

Brexit is turning into a ‘lose-lose situation’: Partners Group20 Hours AgoCharles Dallara of Partners Group says one would hope that Britain will pause “halfway out the gang plank” before they jump into the “ocean full of crocodiles” to reflect on the decision making process.


Brexit is turning into a ‘lose-lose situation’: Partners Group20 Hours AgoCharles Dallara of Partners Group says one would hope that Britain will pause “halfway out the gang plank” before they jump into the “ocean full of crocodiles” to reflect on the decision making process.
Brexit is turning into a ‘lose-lose situation’: Partners Group Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plank, situation, loselose, reflect, pause, group, brexit, making, ocean, turning, partners, process


Brexit is turning into a 'lose-lose situation': Partners Group

Brexit is turning into a ‘lose-lose situation’: Partners Group

20 Hours Ago

Charles Dallara of Partners Group says one would hope that Britain will pause “halfway out the gang plank” before they jump into the “ocean full of crocodiles” to reflect on the decision making process.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plank, situation, loselose, reflect, pause, group, brexit, making, ocean, turning, partners, process


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This powerful formula helped Ray Dalio build his $18 billion fortune

Billionaire financier Ray Dalio grew Bridgewater Associates from an operation run out of his two-bedroom New York apartment to one of the world’s largest hedge funds. Pain can shape us, and build our characters, Dalio explained in a LinkedIn post last week, but only if we let it. It’s common, says Dalio, to resist reflecting on your pain. Also painful for Dalio was receiving a memo in 1993 while chairman at Bridgewater providing some harsh feedback about his management style. Embracing this pain


Billionaire financier Ray Dalio grew Bridgewater Associates from an operation run out of his two-bedroom New York apartment to one of the world’s largest hedge funds. Pain can shape us, and build our characters, Dalio explained in a LinkedIn post last week, but only if we let it. It’s common, says Dalio, to resist reflecting on your pain. Also painful for Dalio was receiving a memo in 1993 while chairman at Bridgewater providing some harsh feedback about his management style. Embracing this pain
This powerful formula helped Ray Dalio build his $18 billion fortune Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: sarah berger, j countess, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ray, helped, powerful, formula, fortune, dalio, build, 18, painful, resist, process, youll, billion, pain, reflect, reflecting, bridgewater, receiving


This powerful formula helped Ray Dalio build his $18 billion fortune

Billionaire financier Ray Dalio grew Bridgewater Associates from an operation run out of his two-bedroom New York apartment to one of the world’s largest hedge funds. Today, Forbes pegs Dalio’s net worth at slightly more than $18 billion.

He built this success, in part, thanks to a simple formula he uses to harness the power of challenging situations: Pain + Reflection = Progress.

Pain can shape us, and build our characters, Dalio explained in a LinkedIn post last week, but only if we let it. Key to this process, he says, is developing an important routine where one goes “to the pain” in difficult situations.

You must routinely analyze the reasons behind the emotions you’re experiencing, Dalio has said. “With practice the pain won’t be as painful,” said Dalio, “and you will begin to see the pleasures of the successes so that going to the pain will make you feel good rather than bad.”

It’s common, says Dalio, to resist reflecting on your pain. It’s ok to want to pay attention to other things, but know that you’ll miss out on the growth and change that pain brings, Dalio wrote this past July. But whether you reflect in the moment or later, you’ll find value.

Dalio himself has benefited from embracing his own personal pain. Nearly 40 years ago, Dalio had misjudged the market — a mistake that caused him to lose money and even let clients go. He was so broke he had to borrow $4,000 from his father to help pay for family bills.

“That was extremely painful — and it turned out to be terrific,” Dalio said on a podcast. “I was absolutely miserable. But it gave me the humility that I needed to deal with my audacity. It made me want to find the smartest people I could find who disagreed with me so that I could understand their perspectives.”

Ultimately, that painful bad bet shaped Dalio’s policy of “radical transparency,” or extreme honesty, at Bridgewater. Through this process, people are encouraged to point out key blindspots and what anyone — including Dalio — could be overlooking. This approach contributes to a culture at Bridgewater where the best idea wins, Dalio says.

Also painful for Dalio was receiving a memo in 1993 while chairman at Bridgewater providing some harsh feedback about his management style. After receiving it, Dalio was hurt and surprised. However, that painful experience led Dalio to re-think how he approached people, as well as Bridgewater’s culture.

By reflecting on his feelings in these tough moments, Dalio learned to resist running away from difficult times and emotions. “If you can develop a reflexive reaction to physical pain that causes you to reflect on it rather than avoid it, it will lead to your rapid learning and evolving.”

Embracing this pain, says Dalio, will “strengthen you which will give you the power you need to be more successful.”

Don’t miss: Wharton’s top professor says America should shorten the work day by 2 hours

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: sarah berger, j countess, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ray, helped, powerful, formula, fortune, dalio, build, 18, painful, resist, process, youll, billion, pain, reflect, reflecting, bridgewater, receiving


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Why the drop in China’s stock market might not reflect its economic reality

China’s stock market is in terrible shape, but it may not reflect the state of the Chinese economy. Kudlow simply may have looked at the Chinese stock market. “In highly efficient full-production places like the U.S., the stock market is reflective somewhat to what the economy is doing. The Shanghai market staged a huge rally from 2014 into 2015, more than doubling in value, but again collapsed and is trading 45 percent lower since 2015. He agreed with Cashin’s point that the Chinese stock marke


China’s stock market is in terrible shape, but it may not reflect the state of the Chinese economy. Kudlow simply may have looked at the Chinese stock market. “In highly efficient full-production places like the U.S., the stock market is reflective somewhat to what the economy is doing. The Shanghai market staged a huge rally from 2014 into 2015, more than doubling in value, but again collapsed and is trading 45 percent lower since 2015. He agreed with Cashin’s point that the Chinese stock marke
Why the drop in China’s stock market might not reflect its economic reality Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-17  Authors: bob pisani, zhang peng, lightrocket via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, does, reality, colas, market, china, economic, reflect, chinas, drop, versus, shanghai, chinese, stock


Why the drop in China's stock market might not reflect its economic reality

China’s stock market is in terrible shape, but it may not reflect the state of the Chinese economy.

National Economic Council director Larry Kudlow raised eyebrows Thursday when he said in a Cabinet meeting with President Donald Trump that China’s economy “looks terrible.”

But does it really? Most estimates for China’s 2018 economic growth remain near 6.5 percent. That doesn’t mean there aren’t concerns. New U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods are making it more costly for companies there to operate, and China’s central bank has recently been pumping money into its economy.

Kudlow simply may have looked at the Chinese stock market. The Shanghai exchange is down 25 percent from the high it hit at the end of January. He may have assumed that the decline reflects a dramatic deterioration in the Chinese economy.

That, some traders said, would be a mistake.

“I think our dear friend Larry Kudlow is off the mark,” UBS’ Art Cashin said on CNBC on Thursday. “In highly efficient full-production places like the U.S., the stock market is reflective somewhat to what the economy is doing. But there’s almost a total disconnect in China,” he said.

Nick Colas, who runs market analysis firm DataTrek Research, agreed. “The Chinese stock market actually tells us very little about the country’s economic welfare and doesn’t play anywhere near as dominant a role in the lives of its citizens as the US equity market does in America,” he wrote in a recent note to clients.

Colas backed up his assertion by noting that the Shanghai Composite trades for less than half its October 2007 peak, yet China’s economy in the 11 years since then has more than tripled to $13 trillion.

The Shanghai market staged a huge rally from 2014 into 2015, more than doubling in value, but again collapsed and is trading 45 percent lower since 2015.

“This decline has had no discernible impact on consumer spending or business investment over the last 3 years,” Colas said.

Colas also cited a September 2017 Bloomberg article noting that retail investors account for 80 percent of the trading volume on the Shanghai exchange. Colas said those traders can cause individual stock prices to swing wildly on arbitrary and noneconomic information.

He agreed with Cashin’s point that the Chinese stock market is not very efficient and does not necessarily reflect underlying economic realities.

Finally, Colas noted that the allocation of household wealth to stocks in China is relatively minuscule: 4 percent versus 23 percent in the U.S.

In China, households have far more of their wealth in cash (20 percent versus 4 percent in the U.S.) and real estate (65 percent versus 45 percent).

And what about the super rich? Colas noted that they tend to invest in private equity and venture capital rather than having their core holdings in stocks.

The fact that China’s stock market does not necessarily reflect the state of China economy’s has important policy implications: “Further declines in Chinese equities are unlikely to push the country’s leaders into an unfavorable trade deal with the US,” Colas said. “Stocks are just not a large enough part of household net worth there, and the country has a long history of growth despite equity market volatility.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-17  Authors: bob pisani, zhang peng, lightrocket via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, does, reality, colas, market, china, economic, reflect, chinas, drop, versus, shanghai, chinese, stock


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‘Shark Tank’ entrepreneurs from ‘Getaway’ reflect on their time in the tank

According to Staff, “Everything was moving so fast that it was hard to keep our thoughts straight. The Getaway team might have received a grilling, but they didn’t walk away defeated. Staff and Davis ended up walking away from an low-ball offer from billionaire Shark Chris Sacca. That said, the exposure Getaway received on Shark Tank has helped them grow exponentially within their current markets. See Getaway’s full pitch on Shark Tank, airing Sunday at 9P ET on CNBC.


According to Staff, “Everything was moving so fast that it was hard to keep our thoughts straight. The Getaway team might have received a grilling, but they didn’t walk away defeated. Staff and Davis ended up walking away from an low-ball offer from billionaire Shark Chris Sacca. That said, the exposure Getaway received on Shark Tank has helped them grow exponentially within their current markets. See Getaway’s full pitch on Shark Tank, airing Sunday at 9P ET on CNBC.
‘Shark Tank’ entrepreneurs from ‘Getaway’ reflect on their time in the tank Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-25  Authors: sophia fraioli, brianna jacobson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, way, away, tiny, getaway, shark, tank, staff, lot, reflect, entrepreneurs, team, york


'Shark Tank' entrepreneurs from ‘Getaway’ reflect on their time in the tank

Staff said before facing the panel, his team “put in a lot of work in an attempt to not embarrass ourselves on national television.” But when the Sharks started questioning Getaway’s $10 million valuation price, their pitch got away from them.

According to Staff, “Everything was moving so fast that it was hard to keep our thoughts straight. The result was an easy opening for Chris and the others to (rightfully!) give us grief.”

The Getaway team might have received a grilling, but they didn’t walk away defeated. If anything, the Sharks’ skepticism taught them a valuable lesson about “being a weird business that not everyone gets.” Staff says, “For innovative ideas, fundraising and picking partners, it’s a lot more about finding people who connect to the common vision than about how much money they can bring to the table.”

Once they meet their financial goals, Getaway has big dreams for its business. They’re aiming to expand to six markets across the United States, but don’t want to rush it.

“It takes a lot of time to make sure we’re picking good locations, to build our tiny cabins and to make sure our experience as a whole is just the way we want them,” Staff explained.

Staff and Davis ended up walking away from an low-ball offer from billionaire Shark Chris Sacca. That said, the exposure Getaway received on Shark Tank has helped them grow exponentially within their current markets.

“When we did the show, we had ten tiny cabins outside of Boston and New York. Today we have 75 combined in New York, Boston, and DC. And we are well on our way to more,” he added.

See Getaway’s full pitch on Shark Tank, airing Sunday at 9P ET on CNBC.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-25  Authors: sophia fraioli, brianna jacobson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, way, away, tiny, getaway, shark, tank, staff, lot, reflect, entrepreneurs, team, york


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Spain’s economy minister says he’s not concerned about Italian bond market contagion

Spanish Economy Minister Roman Escolano is not concerned about the recent sell-off in the Italian bond markets, saying there is little contagion to other European markets like Spain. Lower sovereign bond yields in Spain, compared to a spike in Italy, reflect the “good fundamentals of the Spanish economy,” he said. The Italian bond market has recorded one of its worst weeks since the euro zone crisis with the 10-year yield more than 50 basis points higher in the last week of trading. The differen


Spanish Economy Minister Roman Escolano is not concerned about the recent sell-off in the Italian bond markets, saying there is little contagion to other European markets like Spain. Lower sovereign bond yields in Spain, compared to a spike in Italy, reflect the “good fundamentals of the Spanish economy,” he said. The Italian bond market has recorded one of its worst weeks since the euro zone crisis with the 10-year yield more than 50 basis points higher in the last week of trading. The differen
Spain’s economy minister says he’s not concerned about Italian bond market contagion Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-24  Authors: joumanna bercetche
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, concerned, spanish, bond, zone, stability, italian, escolano, minister, contagion, yields, market, european, hes, spains, reflect, economy, italy


Spain's economy minister says he's not concerned about Italian bond market contagion

Spanish Economy Minister Roman Escolano is not concerned about the recent sell-off in the Italian bond markets, saying there is little contagion to other European markets like Spain.

Lower sovereign bond yields in Spain, compared to a spike in Italy, reflect the “good fundamentals of the Spanish economy,” he said. A rise in yields — borrowing costs — can reflect that a country’s government has become more risky to lend to in the eyes of international investors.

“We have been producing good economic results with the situation in the banking sector and public finances,” Escolano said in Brussels, adding that on Wednesday Spain made a repayment to the European Stability Mechanism reinforcing confidence in the “evolution of the Spanish economy.”

The Italian bond market has recorded one of its worst weeks since the euro zone crisis with the 10-year yield more than 50 basis points higher in the last week of trading.

The difference between Italian and Spanish 10-year bond yields is now at 100 basis points, the widest it has been since 2012. However, Escolano ruled out contagion saying “we are pretty confident on the stability, soundness and robustness of the Spanish economy.”

He added that the remarks Thursday from new Italian prime minister elect, Giuseppe Conte, reflect a “commitment to the European tradition of Italy” and that he hopes the new Italian government will “contribute decisively” as there are “big debates about the future of the euro zone and Italy will and has always been a big part of that.”

Italy has a debt pile of more than 2 trillion euros and a debt-to-gdp ratio of over 130 percent. Bond market investors have become increasingly concerned with the Lega and Five Star Movement’s economic program that entails repealing existing labor reforms and a fiscal loosening. The fear is that it might lead to confrontation with European policymakers if it leads to a breach of the Maastricht Treaty fiscal rules.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-24  Authors: joumanna bercetche
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, concerned, spanish, bond, zone, stability, italian, escolano, minister, contagion, yields, market, european, hes, spains, reflect, economy, italy


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Nike executives’ departures reflect a larger cultural issue in Me Too era: Retail analyst

The departure of two top executives at Nike speaks to a larger cultural issue, said Liz Dunn, founder and chief executive officer of Pro4ma, a forecasting and analytics firm for retailers. “We’re seeing it all over corporate America,” Dunn told CNBC on Friday, referring to issues of workplace misconduct in the era of the Me Too and Times Up movements. On Friday, The Wall Street Journal reported that Jayme Martin, vice president and general manager of global categories for Nike, was removed from


The departure of two top executives at Nike speaks to a larger cultural issue, said Liz Dunn, founder and chief executive officer of Pro4ma, a forecasting and analytics firm for retailers. “We’re seeing it all over corporate America,” Dunn told CNBC on Friday, referring to issues of workplace misconduct in the era of the Me Too and Times Up movements. On Friday, The Wall Street Journal reported that Jayme Martin, vice president and general manager of global categories for Nike, was removed from
Nike executives’ departures reflect a larger cultural issue in Me Too era: Retail analyst Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-16  Authors: kellie ell, dhiraj singh, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nike, dunn, speaks, issue, misconduct, executives, larger, era, retail, reflect, reported, removed, departures, martin, way, analyst, cultural, company, workplace


Nike executives' departures reflect a larger cultural issue in Me Too era: Retail analyst

The departure of two top executives at Nike speaks to a larger cultural issue, said Liz Dunn, founder and chief executive officer of Pro4ma, a forecasting and analytics firm for retailers.

“We’re seeing it all over corporate America,” Dunn told CNBC on Friday, referring to issues of workplace misconduct in the era of the Me Too and Times Up movements. “In some instances it seems it’s almost part of the culture.”

On Friday, The Wall Street Journal reported that Jayme Martin, vice president and general manager of global categories for Nike, was removed from his post. Martin has been with the company since 1997. The news came only a day after Nike President Trevor Edwards announced he was resigning and would retire in August.

While Nike has been hush-hush about the details surrounding the two top executives’ departures, in a statement the company said it is looking into workplace behavioral issues but that it was not implicating any one person or department. The company did not confirm or deny whether Edwards and Martin were removed from their posts because of misconduct. The internal employee memo went on to say that inappropriate workplace behavior does not reflect Nike’s values.

Dunn, who is also an operating partner at Consumer Growth Partners, called the news “troubling.”

The Journal reported that the two men apparently protected employees that exhibited demeaning behavior toward female and foreign colleagues.

“This speaks to the culture at Nike, that two individuals looked the other way,” said Dunn, who said she does not have any insider information on the company. “It says something if [the company is] elevating people who kind of look the other way if there’s misconduct going on,” Dunn said on “Power Lunch.”

“Culture and people are enormously important,” she said of any organization.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-16  Authors: kellie ell, dhiraj singh, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nike, dunn, speaks, issue, misconduct, executives, larger, era, retail, reflect, reported, removed, departures, martin, way, analyst, cultural, company, workplace


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