U.S. commander says American forces face ‘imminent’ threat from Iran

BAGHDAD — The top commander of U.S. forces in the Middle East says he believes the Iranians or their proxies may orchestrate an attack at any moment. “I think the threat is imminent,” Marine Gen. Frank McKenzie said in an exclusive broadcast interview with NBC News in the Iraqi capital. The U.S. has beefed up its military presence in the region in an effort to deter Iran and protect American forces and allies. McKenzie said he was “heartened” by the efforts of the Iraqi government to protect Ame


BAGHDAD — The top commander of U.S. forces in the Middle East says he believes the Iranians or their proxies may orchestrate an attack at any moment. “I think the threat is imminent,” Marine Gen. Frank McKenzie said in an exclusive broadcast interview with NBC News in the Iraqi capital. The U.S. has beefed up its military presence in the region in an effort to deter Iran and protect American forces and allies. McKenzie said he was “heartened” by the efforts of the Iraqi government to protect Ame
U.S. commander says American forces face ‘imminent’ threat from Iran Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-07  Authors: courtney kube, amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, american, imminent, think, threat, posture, region, iraqi, forces, middle, iran, commander, protect, mckenzie, face


U.S. commander says American forces face 'imminent' threat from Iran

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani (L) attends the 21st Nationwide Assembly of the Islamic Revolution Guards Corps (IRGC) Commanders in Tehran, Iran on September 15, 2015.

BAGHDAD — The top commander of U.S. forces in the Middle East says he believes the Iranians or their proxies may orchestrate an attack at any moment.

“I think the threat is imminent,” Marine Gen. Frank McKenzie said in an exclusive broadcast interview with NBC News in the Iraqi capital. “We continually evaluate our force posture in the region.”

The U.S. has beefed up its military presence in the region in an effort to deter Iran and protect American forces and allies.

Over the last month, the Trump administration announced that it was sending an aircraft carrier strike group and Air Force bombers to the Middle East, as well as Patriot missiles and additional troops, amid heightened concerns of an Iranian attack.

McKenzie stressed that tensions remain high.

“I don’t actually believe the threat has diminished,” McKenzie said after holding a series of meetings with the Iraqi prime minister and defense chief. “…I believe the threat is still very real.”

McKenzie said he was “heartened” by the efforts of the Iraqi government to protect American forces and its allies in the region. Roadside bombs have posed the major danger to American forces in Iraq, McKenzie added, but he said the threat from the Iranians is evolving.

“They probe for weakness all the times,” McKenzie said. “I would say the threat has probably evolved in certain ways even as our defensive posture has changed and become more aggressive, and we certainly thank our Iraqi partners for many of the things they’ve done.”

“I think we’re still in the period of what I would call tactical warning,” he said. “The threat is very real. ”

McKenzie declined to go into specifics on the nature of the threats.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-07  Authors: courtney kube, amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, american, imminent, think, threat, posture, region, iraqi, forces, middle, iran, commander, protect, mckenzie, face


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Oil at $100? Experts predict where crude could go if an Iran conflict breaks out

Oil is in the crosshairs as the prospect of confrontation brews between the U.S. and Iran. A top military aide to Iran’s supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Yahya Rahim Safavi, warned over the weekend that “The first bullet fired in the Persian Gulf will push oil prices above $100.” In an area responsible for the shipment of one-third of the world’s seaborne oil, just how high could military confrontation — or indeed, an outright war — send the price of crude? “I think that $100 per barrel is


Oil is in the crosshairs as the prospect of confrontation brews between the U.S. and Iran. A top military aide to Iran’s supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Yahya Rahim Safavi, warned over the weekend that “The first bullet fired in the Persian Gulf will push oil prices above $100.” In an area responsible for the shipment of one-third of the world’s seaborne oil, just how high could military confrontation — or indeed, an outright war — send the price of crude? “I think that $100 per barrel is
Oil at $100? Experts predict where crude could go if an Iran conflict breaks out Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-06  Authors: natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, breaks, iranian, think, crude, experts, oil, predict, 100, sanctions, military, irans, region, conflict, nuclear, iran, market


Oil at $100? Experts predict where crude could go if an Iran conflict breaks out

Oil is in the crosshairs as the prospect of confrontation brews between the U.S. and Iran. At least, that’s how Iranian officials would have it.

A top military aide to Iran’s supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Yahya Rahim Safavi, warned over the weekend that “The first bullet fired in the Persian Gulf will push oil prices above $100.” He added, “This would be unbearable to America, Europe and the U.S. allies like Japan and South Korea.”

More than a million barrels of oil per day have been wiped off the market as U.S. sanctions, imposed after the Donald Trump administration withdrew from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal last year, endeavor to bring the exports of OPEC’s third-largest producer to zero. This has contributed to the crippling of Iran’s economy, which the U.S. administration says will continue unless Iran “acts like a normal country” and ceases its support of terrorist proxies in the region and ballistic missile testing.

Iran has responded to the sanctions by threatening to ditch its obligations under the nuclear deal — which had promised economic relief in exchange for limits to its nuclear development — and return to higher levels of uranium enrichment.

A series of attacks in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Saudi Arabia that are being blamed on Iran have now pushed tensions to new highs, and prompted the U.S. to deploy more troops and military hardware to the region. In an area responsible for the shipment of one-third of the world’s seaborne oil, just how high could military confrontation — or indeed, an outright war — send the price of crude?

Not as high as you might think, according to some experts.

“I think that $100 per barrel is ambitious,” Stephen Brennock, an oil analyst at PVM Oil Associates in London, told CNBC via email on Tuesday. He pointed out that the oil market has “more or less shrugged off” the disappearance of a further 500,000 barrels per day of Iranian oil since Washington terminated its sanctions waivers in May.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-06  Authors: natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, breaks, iranian, think, crude, experts, oil, predict, 100, sanctions, military, irans, region, conflict, nuclear, iran, market


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The US-China rivalry could become dangerous, Asian leaders and experts warn

The U.S. flag flies at a welcoming ceremony between Chinese President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump in 2017. “We are now entering into a period of great power rivalry. That was the warning on Thursday from Singapore’s Heng Swee Keat, the man set to be the city-state’s next prime minister. The Singaporean deputy prime minister’s sentiment was echoed by other political figures and experts gathered in Tokyo for a conference on the future of the region. And, under President Donald Trump


The U.S. flag flies at a welcoming ceremony between Chinese President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump in 2017. “We are now entering into a period of great power rivalry. That was the warning on Thursday from Singapore’s Heng Swee Keat, the man set to be the city-state’s next prime minister. The Singaporean deputy prime minister’s sentiment was echoed by other political figures and experts gathered in Tokyo for a conference on the future of the region. And, under President Donald Trump
The US-China rivalry could become dangerous, Asian leaders and experts warn Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: kelly olsen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dangerous, asian, trade, region, washington, military, leaders, president, uschina, trump, prime, rivalry, warn, need, china, experts, south


The US-China rivalry could become dangerous, Asian leaders and experts warn

The U.S. flag flies at a welcoming ceremony between Chinese President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump in 2017.

“We are now entering into a period of great power rivalry. The outcome is unclear, but it is critical that we stabilize the system.”

That was the warning on Thursday from Singapore’s Heng Swee Keat, the man set to be the city-state’s next prime minister. China’s rapid ascent over the past decade, he said, has caused a clear shift in global politics, and those changes need to be addressed.

The Singaporean deputy prime minister’s sentiment was echoed by other political figures and experts gathered in Tokyo for a conference on the future of the region. At the event, which was sponsored by Japanese media group Nikkei, one of the repeated messages was meant for both Washington and Beijing: The world’s economic and military powerhouses need to find ways to coexist before things spiral out of control.

The U.S. and China are increasingly jostling for influence in Asia.

China is the region’s biggest economy and is boldly pursuing its geopolitical interests. That includes asserting territorial claims with increasing military muscle in the South China Sea and championing its Belt and Road Initiative — a massive investment program that aims to create infrastructure and transportation networks linking China to much of the world.

The U.S., meanwhile, maintains decades-old security alliances with Japan and South Korea. And, under President Donald Trump, Washington is now taking a more offensive economic approach to Beijing.

“U.S.-China trade tension is a source of concern for everybody in the region,” Yoichi Suzuki, an adjunct fellow at the Japan Institute of International Affairs and former chief negotiator for the country’s free trade agreement with the European Union, said Friday.

“It is not only affecting these two countries but it’s affecting everybody,” he told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” As you see, the stock market is going down, the economy is slowing. So we need to see a solution as soon as possible.”

Singapore’s Heng said that competition between the U.S. and China can’t be avoided and they each have legitimate concerns, but that is all the more reason for both to make compromises and “accept new realities” to manage relations.

“The U.S. has to accept that it has no better option but to work with China because trying to contain it will result in worse outcomes,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: kelly olsen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dangerous, asian, trade, region, washington, military, leaders, president, uschina, trump, prime, rivalry, warn, need, china, experts, south


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IBM study: 77% of firms don’t have cyber resiliency plans

IBM study: 77% of firms don’t have cyber resiliency plans10 Hours AgoHarriet Green of IBM Asia Pacific says it’s “alarming” that many firms don’t have cybersecurity plans. She also discusses the company’s strategy in Singapore and the region.


IBM study: 77% of firms don’t have cyber resiliency plans10 Hours AgoHarriet Green of IBM Asia Pacific says it’s “alarming” that many firms don’t have cybersecurity plans. She also discusses the company’s strategy in Singapore and the region.
IBM study: 77% of firms don’t have cyber resiliency plans Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cyber, strategy, 77, plans10, ibm, plans, resiliency, firms, region, dont, singapore, study


IBM study: 77% of firms don't have cyber resiliency plans

IBM study: 77% of firms don’t have cyber resiliency plans

10 Hours Ago

Harriet Green of IBM Asia Pacific says it’s “alarming” that many firms don’t have cybersecurity plans. She also discusses the company’s strategy in Singapore and the region.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cyber, strategy, 77, plans10, ibm, plans, resiliency, firms, region, dont, singapore, study


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IBM study: 77% of firms don’t have cyber resiliency plans

IBM study: 77% of firms don’t have cyber resiliency plans3:27 AM ET Mon, 29 April 2019Harriet Green of IBM Asia Pacific says it’s “alarming” that many firms don’t have cybersecurity plans. She also discusses the company’s strategy in Singapore and the region.


IBM study: 77% of firms don’t have cyber resiliency plans3:27 AM ET Mon, 29 April 2019Harriet Green of IBM Asia Pacific says it’s “alarming” that many firms don’t have cybersecurity plans. She also discusses the company’s strategy in Singapore and the region.
IBM study: 77% of firms don’t have cyber resiliency plans Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dont, study, region, 77, firms, ibm, resiliency, cyber, plans327, singapore, strategy, plans


IBM study: 77% of firms don't have cyber resiliency plans

IBM study: 77% of firms don’t have cyber resiliency plans

3:27 AM ET Mon, 29 April 2019

Harriet Green of IBM Asia Pacific says it’s “alarming” that many firms don’t have cybersecurity plans. She also discusses the company’s strategy in Singapore and the region.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dont, study, region, 77, firms, ibm, resiliency, cyber, plans327, singapore, strategy, plans


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Los Angeles population shrinking, even as larger region still grows

The County of Los Angeles’ population fell last year, even as other major counties in the state added residents. “Los Angeles is just not growing,” said Richard Green, director of the University of Southern California’s Lusk Center for Real Estate. Los Angeles and other California metros increased in population in the 1980s due in part to international immigration from Latin America and Asia. About 7.5 million people live in poverty in California, including about 15% of the population of Los Ang


The County of Los Angeles’ population fell last year, even as other major counties in the state added residents. “Los Angeles is just not growing,” said Richard Green, director of the University of Southern California’s Lusk Center for Real Estate. Los Angeles and other California metros increased in population in the 1980s due in part to international immigration from Latin America and Asia. About 7.5 million people live in poverty in California, including about 15% of the population of Los Ang
Los Angeles population shrinking, even as larger region still grows Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: jeff daniels, frederic j brown, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, residents, added, larger, region, counties, housing, 2018, shrinking, los, population, grows, county, angeles, san


Los Angeles population shrinking, even as larger region still grows

The County of Los Angeles’ population fell last year, even as other major counties in the state added residents.

“Los Angeles is just not growing,” said Richard Green, director of the University of Southern California’s Lusk Center for Real Estate. “A lot of [the reason] is housing, and not just the cost of housing but the number of houses that are available. Vacancy is incredibly low.”

Los Angeles ranked fourth in terms of the nation’s most populous counties losing people in 2018, according to new estimates by the U.S. Census Bureau. It comes as the Los Angeles basin struggles with housing affordability and the lack of new home construction.

The government’s data, released April 18, shows the population in the County of Los Angeles decreased by 13,241 residents as of July 1, 2018, to 10.104 million people. Counties that lost more people in 2018 were Cook County/Chicago in Illinois as well as Queens and Kings counties in New York.

“There are big urban core counties across the country that are either losing population or gaining fewer people than they had 3 or 4 years ago,” said William Frey, a demographer for the Brookings Institution. He said that’s a reversal from earlier in the 2010 decade when big cities and large metropolitan areas were growing faster than suburbs.

According to Census data, just over 26% of the 360 metro areas within the U.S. showed population declines in 2018. It said areas with the fastest decreases were due mostly to negative net domestic migration.

Even though Los Angeles County lost residents, the new Census data shows California added 157,696 residents statewide in 2018, reaching a population of 39.557 million.

San Diego County — California’s second-largest county, with a population of 3.34 million people — added nearly 17,896 people in 2018, according to new Census data. Also, major counties in the San Francisco Bay region grew slightly in population in 2018, including Alameda (8,622 new residents), Contra Costa (5,352) and San Francisco (4,139).

Los Angeles and other California metros increased in population in the 1980s due in part to international immigration from Latin America and Asia. Even though that growth slowed substantially by 2000, new arrivals in the past five years have only added pressure to the state’s tight housing market.

The housing situation in Southern California is especially tough for lower-income residents. About 7.5 million people live in poverty in California, including about 15% of the population of Los Angeles County.

USC’s Green said there has been a spillover of Los Angeles residents moving into nearby Inland Empire counties, such as Riverside and San Bernardino. “You have all these people competing for housing, and there’s just not enough of it,” said Green.

Census data shows the Inland Empire region added more than 50,000 residents in 2018.

According to Rentcafe, average rents in Los Angeles County are $2,371 a month, up 7% from a year ago. That compares with average rents of $1,229 in San Bernardino County and $1,528 in Riverside County.

Also, Riverside and San Bernardino counties have become distribution hubs and locations for large fulfillment centers operated by Amazon and other companies. They have added thousands of new jobs in the past decade to the Inland Empire area and fueled more housing development.

“We’ve seen more jobs move east to Riverside and San Bernardino counties,” said Green. “They will become increasingly more important centers of the regional economy.”

— Graphic by CNBC’s John Schoen.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: jeff daniels, frederic j brown, afp, getty images
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BlackRock’s Larry Fink says Middle East must avoid other regional investing mistakes

BlackRock CEO: We will play a role in working with domestic investors in Middle East 39 Mins Ago | 03:29The Middle East must tread carefully to ensure it does not make the same investment mistakes as Europe, according to the CEO of the world’s largest asset manager. “The region should not make the mistakes that so many other regions (have made), like in Europe, where there is such shallow participation by locals in investing in their own capital markets,” he added. International investors flocke


BlackRock CEO: We will play a role in working with domestic investors in Middle East 39 Mins Ago | 03:29The Middle East must tread carefully to ensure it does not make the same investment mistakes as Europe, according to the CEO of the world’s largest asset manager. “The region should not make the mistakes that so many other regions (have made), like in Europe, where there is such shallow participation by locals in investing in their own capital markets,” he added. International investors flocke
BlackRock’s Larry Fink says Middle East must avoid other regional investing mistakes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worlds, blackrock, east, investing, domestic, fink, avoid, blackrocks, saudi, mistakes, middle, region, working, investors, larry, regional


BlackRock's Larry Fink says Middle East must avoid other regional investing mistakes

BlackRock CEO: We will play a role in working with domestic investors in Middle East 39 Mins Ago | 03:29

The Middle East must tread carefully to ensure it does not make the same investment mistakes as Europe, according to the CEO of the world’s largest asset manager.

“The only way to get more financial inclusion in this region and every region is to have greater participation in the capital market through equities in their retirement plans,” BlackRock Chief Executive Larry Fink told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble during a panel session in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on Wednesday.

“The region should not make the mistakes that so many other regions (have made), like in Europe, where there is such shallow participation by locals in investing in their own capital markets,” he added.

His comments come at a time when some of the world’s leading financiers are returning to Saudi Arabia after the oil-rich kingdom held some of the year’s largest merger and bond deals.

International investors flocked to lend money to Saudi Arabia’s hugely profitable state-owned oil company earlier this month.

Demand for Saudi Aramco’s bonds surged above $100 billion, according to a source familiar with the situation, more than 10 times the $10 billion that had been expected.

Nonetheless, BlackRock’s Fink said it would be “essential” for Middle East governments to drum up support from domestic investors too.

“I think that’s going to be one of the critical characteristics to build and BlackRock will play a big role in both working with the domestic savers and building their retirement, plus bringing in international investing to invest side by side,” Fink said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worlds, blackrock, east, investing, domestic, fink, avoid, blackrocks, saudi, mistakes, middle, region, working, investors, larry, regional


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Bad press about the Middle East won’t stop me investing there, BlackRock’s Fink says

“The fact that there are issues in the press does not tell me I must run away from a place. Fink said he felt the power of the press was playing a good role in addressing issues in the Middle East and he was witnessing continued reform. And that is why long-term optimism is generally the right strategy for most investing over a long horizon,” Fink said. Nonetheless, BlackRock’s Fink said changes he had witnessed in the kingdom over the past few years had been “pretty amazing” and that a moderniz


“The fact that there are issues in the press does not tell me I must run away from a place. Fink said he felt the power of the press was playing a good role in addressing issues in the Middle East and he was witnessing continued reform. And that is why long-term optimism is generally the right strategy for most investing over a long horizon,” Fink said. Nonetheless, BlackRock’s Fink said changes he had witnessed in the kingdom over the past few years had been “pretty amazing” and that a moderniz
Bad press about the Middle East won’t stop me investing there, BlackRock’s Fink says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bad, east, investing, issues, fink, press, wont, inclusion, stop, blackrocks, region, run, middle, media, role


Bad press about the Middle East won't stop me investing there, BlackRock's Fink says

BlackRock CEO: We will play a role in working with domestic investors in Middle East 53 Mins Ago | 03:29

Negative media reports about the Middle East and the ruling authorities in the region are not a reason to end investment plans, according to the CEO of BlackRock.

“The fact that there are issues in the press does not tell me I must run away from a place. In many cases it tells me I should run to and invest because what we are most frightened of are things that we don’t talk about,” BlackRock Chief Executive Larry Fink told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble during a panel session in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on Wednesday.

Fink said he felt the power of the press was playing a good role in addressing issues in the Middle East and he was witnessing continued reform.

“Most issues that are being addressed in the media are (being) mitigated. And that is why long-term optimism is generally the right strategy for most investing over a long horizon,” Fink said.

Saudi Arabia has come in for renewed criticism after it introduced an antiterrorism law in November 2017 that laid out lengthy prison terms for offenses linked to political and religious speech.

Authorities there have reportedly used the legislation to jail prominent women’s rights activists, journalists, and other government critics.

Nonetheless, BlackRock’s Fink said changes he had witnessed in the kingdom over the past few years had been “pretty amazing” and that a modernization across the wider Middle East was in place.

“I see governments willing to move forward. I see governments in the region focusing on how to widen financial inclusion and increase social inclusion,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bad, east, investing, issues, fink, press, wont, inclusion, stop, blackrocks, region, run, middle, media, role


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Larry Fink isn’t concerned about Iran sanctions’ impact on the price of oil

BlackRock’s billionaire chief executive isn’t too worried about the oil price despite a recent spike brought on by Iran sanctions news. “Related to the sanctions on Iran … the delta is much smaller than people think,” Fink told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble during a panel at the inaugural Financial Sector Conference in Riyadh Wednesday. Iranian exports dropped to 1.4 million barrels per day (bpd) in March, according to the Energy Information Administration, down from 2.8 million bpd in May of the previ


BlackRock’s billionaire chief executive isn’t too worried about the oil price despite a recent spike brought on by Iran sanctions news. “Related to the sanctions on Iran … the delta is much smaller than people think,” Fink told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble during a panel at the inaugural Financial Sector Conference in Riyadh Wednesday. Iranian exports dropped to 1.4 million barrels per day (bpd) in March, according to the Energy Information Administration, down from 2.8 million bpd in May of the previ
Larry Fink isn’t concerned about Iran sanctions’ impact on the price of oil Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: natasha turak, anjali sundaram
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, impact, concerned, region, larry, bpd, crude, million, saudi, fink, isnt, price, oil, iran, sanctions


Larry Fink isn't concerned about Iran sanctions' impact on the price of oil

BlackRock’s billionaire chief executive isn’t too worried about the oil price despite a recent spike brought on by Iran sanctions news.

Citing robust crude inventories beyond hotspots like Venezuela and Iran, where civil conflict and U.S. sanctions have taken millions of barrels of oil off the market, Larry Fink espoused an optimistic approach to markets and the Gulf region in the medium and long term.

“Related to the sanctions on Iran … the delta is much smaller than people think,” Fink told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble during a panel at the inaugural Financial Sector Conference in Riyadh Wednesday.

The asset manager was likely referencing the now four-year low in the Islamic Republic’s crude exports, hit by U.S. sanctions as a result of the President Donald Trump administration’s withdrawal from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal in May last year.

Iranian exports dropped to 1.4 million barrels per day (bpd) in March, according to the Energy Information Administration, down from 2.8 million bpd in May of the previous year. The figure represents just over half of the country’s current total production, which OPEC reports sat at 2.6 million bpd in March, down from 3.6 million bpd in the third quarter of last year.

The State Department announced on Monday its intention to deny further sanctions waivers to countries that import Iranian crude, immediately sending the oil price up about 3%. In response, Iranian officials threatened to close the Strait of Hormuz, the conduit route for about 20% of all seaborne trade in crude and condensates.

But Fink, as well as Saudi Energy Minister Khalid al Falih, pointed to a rise in inventories in the Arab Gulf states as well as in the U.S. that they believe will offset the tightening supply from Iran.

“As the (Saudi) oil minister suggested, there is greater inventory, so if there’s a time to be moving forward and make the region even more secure, it looks like this is probably a very good time to do that,” Fink said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: natasha turak, anjali sundaram
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, impact, concerned, region, larry, bpd, crude, million, saudi, fink, isnt, price, oil, iran, sanctions


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JP Morgan says gains in Asian stocks are ‘already behind us’

Stock markets in Asia have already given investors most of the returns they can get this year — and shares prices in the region may struggle to grow much more for the rest of 2019, J.P. Morgan said on Tuesday. Asian stocks have had a strong start to the year after ending 2018 in negative territory. The MSCI Asia ex-Japan index — a widely followed benchmark for stocks in the region — has grown by around 13.68 percent so far this year. “We’ve been a bit more on the cautious side since … the seco


Stock markets in Asia have already given investors most of the returns they can get this year — and shares prices in the region may struggle to grow much more for the rest of 2019, J.P. Morgan said on Tuesday. Asian stocks have had a strong start to the year after ending 2018 in negative territory. The MSCI Asia ex-Japan index — a widely followed benchmark for stocks in the region — has grown by around 13.68 percent so far this year. “We’ve been a bit more on the cautious side since … the seco
JP Morgan says gains in Asian stocks are ‘already behind us’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gains, markets, morgan, region, stocks, asian, jp, investors, index, grow, prices, asia


JP Morgan says gains in Asian stocks are 'already behind us'

Stock markets in Asia have already given investors most of the returns they can get this year — and shares prices in the region may struggle to grow much more for the rest of 2019, J.P. Morgan said on Tuesday.

Asian stocks have had a strong start to the year after ending 2018 in negative territory. The MSCI Asia ex-Japan index — a widely followed benchmark for stocks in the region — has grown by around 13.68 percent so far this year. The index fell by 16.24 percent last year.

“We’ve been a bit more on the cautious side since … the second week of March,” Mixo Das, Asia equity strategist at J.P. Morgan, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.”

“I think most of the gains for this year in Chinese as well as Asian equity markets are already behind us. From here, it’s going to be more of a difficult slog. We still see gains but it’s going to be a much more volatile process,” he added.

Asked how Asian share prices will likely perform between now till the end of the year, Das responded that they could grow by a low single-digit, or remain largely flat.

He explained that valuations have become stretched compared to projections on where earnings are headed in the coming months. In addition, he said sentiment among investors have become “overextended” and “overheated.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gains, markets, morgan, region, stocks, asian, jp, investors, index, grow, prices, asia


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