Amazon expands its online grocery business to India

Amazon is expanding its online grocery business to India as part of its plans for the fast-growing market, the company announced Thursday. The move comes one day after Amazon launched its biggest campus in the world in Hyderabad, India, according to Reuters. The company has invested roughly $5 billion in the first five years of its business there, according to BloombergQuint. Last year, CNBC affiliate CNBC TV-18 reported the company is set to invest another $2 billion in the country. While India


Amazon is expanding its online grocery business to India as part of its plans for the fast-growing market, the company announced Thursday. The move comes one day after Amazon launched its biggest campus in the world in Hyderabad, India, according to Reuters. The company has invested roughly $5 billion in the first five years of its business there, according to BloombergQuint. Last year, CNBC affiliate CNBC TV-18 reported the company is set to invest another $2 billion in the country. While India
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-22  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, region, invested, local, india, companies, according, grocery, expands, amazon, online, company, business, reported


Amazon expands its online grocery business to India

Amazon Founder and CEO Jeff Bezos addresses the audience during a keynote session at the Amazon Re:MARS conference on robotics and artificial intelligence at the Aria Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada on June 6, 2019.

Amazon is expanding its online grocery business to India as part of its plans for the fast-growing market, the company announced Thursday.

Amazon Fresh will be available to customers in some parts of Bengaluru through its main India website and app, the company said, and it will later be rolled out to other cities. The service will deliver groceries within two hours between 6 a.m. and midnight, according to a press release.

The move comes one day after Amazon launched its biggest campus in the world in Hyderabad, India, according to Reuters. The campus will serve as an outpost for 15,000 employees and sprawl over 9.5 acres, Reuters reported, saying the company currently has 62,000 employees in the country.

Amazon has already invested heavily in India, with hundreds of open positions listed in the region as of January, including in its retail and marketplace divisions. The company has invested roughly $5 billion in the first five years of its business there, according to BloombergQuint. Last year, CNBC affiliate CNBC TV-18 reported the company is set to invest another $2 billion in the country.

While India’s large population represents a huge opportunity for Amazon, local regulations could also slow down its growth in the region. India’s new e-commerce law came into effect in February, banning companies like Amazon and its local competitor Flipkart from selling products from companies in which they have an equity stake. Analysts estimated the rules would have a short-term impact on the e-commerce companies while they build new models to comply with the rules.

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WATCH: How America’s biggest grocer is fighting back against Amazon and Walmart


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-22  Authors: lauren feiner
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Hundreds chant anti-India slogans in seething Kashmir on eve of Muslim holy festival

Pakistani Christian shout slogans in support of Kashmiris at a rally in the connection of the country Independence Day in Quetta on August 11, 2019, after the Indian government stripped Jammu and Kashmir of its autonomy. Angry Kashmiris gathered at a mosque in Srinagar’s Soura neighborhood after afternoon prayers on Sunday and began shouting anti-India slogans, according to two Reuters witnesses. Protesters carried a large banner carrying the words “Save Article 35A,” referring to the constituti


Pakistani Christian shout slogans in support of Kashmiris at a rally in the connection of the country Independence Day in Quetta on August 11, 2019, after the Indian government stripped Jammu and Kashmir of its autonomy. Angry Kashmiris gathered at a mosque in Srinagar’s Soura neighborhood after afternoon prayers on Sunday and began shouting anti-India slogans, according to two Reuters witnesses. Protesters carried a large banner carrying the words “Save Article 35A,” referring to the constituti
Hundreds chant anti-India slogans in seething Kashmir on eve of Muslim holy festival Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12
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Hundreds chant anti-India slogans in seething Kashmir on eve of Muslim holy festival

Pakistani Christian shout slogans in support of Kashmiris at a rally in the connection of the country Independence Day in Quetta on August 11, 2019, after the Indian government stripped Jammu and Kashmir of its autonomy.

Hundreds of people protested in Kashmir’s main city of Srinagar on Sunday against India’s decision to curb its autonomy, despite new restrictions on travel and a seventh straight day of communications blackout.

Restrictions that had been temporarily eased on Friday and Saturday — allowing some bakeries, pharmacies and fruit shops to open ahead of the Muslim holy festival of Eid al-Adha — were reinstated in major parts of the city on Sunday afternoon.

Police vans drove around some areas ordering people to shut shop and go home, and most streets were silent by evening, as thousands of troops kept vigil, witnesses said.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government locked down the Muslim-majority region last Sunday, cutting off communications, detaining more than 300 political leaders and activists, and putting a “virtual curfew” into force with numerous roadblocks stopping movement.

Seeking to tighten its grip on the region also claimed by neighboring Pakistan, India announced last Monday that it was scrapping Jammu and Kashmir’s right to frame its own laws and allowed non-residents to buy property there.

Angry Kashmiris gathered at a mosque in Srinagar’s Soura neighborhood after afternoon prayers on Sunday and began shouting anti-India slogans, according to two Reuters witnesses.

Protesters carried a large banner carrying the words “Save Article 35A,” referring to the constitutional provision that India revoked last week. A swarm of women and girls in colourful headscarves followed the marching men.

“What do we want? Freedom! When do we want it? Now!” the crowd shouted, marching around the neighborhood.

Some of them held up paper banners, including one that read: “Modi, Kashmir is not your father’s property.”

India’s Home Ministry did not immediately respond to a request for comment. The demonstration in Soura followed a much larger protest in the same area on Friday, when pro-independence youths marched before being repelled by tear gas and pellets.

Leaders in Kashmir had warned of a backlash against the stripping of autonomy in a territory where militants have been fighting Indian rule for nearly 30 years, resulting in the deaths of more than 50,000 people.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12
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Pakistan reacts to India’s revoking of Kashmir’s special status amid rising tensions

Pilgrims with their luggage seen going to the railway station during restrictions on Aug. 5, 2019 in Jammu, India. Nitin Kanotra | Hindustan Times | Getty ImagesPakistan has blamed India for illegally scrapping Kashmir’s special status, as tensions rise between the two nations. On Monday, Pakistan government said that New Delhi’s move to revoke a special status granted to the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir was in breach of international law. Jammu and Kashmir is India’s only Muslim-majority s


Pilgrims with their luggage seen going to the railway station during restrictions on Aug. 5, 2019 in Jammu, India. Nitin Kanotra | Hindustan Times | Getty ImagesPakistan has blamed India for illegally scrapping Kashmir’s special status, as tensions rise between the two nations. On Monday, Pakistan government said that New Delhi’s move to revoke a special status granted to the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir was in breach of international law. Jammu and Kashmir is India’s only Muslim-majority s
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
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Pakistan reacts to India's revoking of Kashmir's special status amid rising tensions

Pilgrims with their luggage seen going to the railway station during restrictions on Aug. 5, 2019 in Jammu, India. Nitin Kanotra | Hindustan Times | Getty Images

Pakistan has blamed India for illegally scrapping Kashmir’s special status, as tensions rise between the two nations. On Monday, Pakistan government said that New Delhi’s move to revoke a special status granted to the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir was in breach of international law. The Indian High Commissioner to Pakistan, Ajay Bisaria, was summoned by Islamabad’s ministry of foreign affairs. During that meeting, “the Foreign Secretary conveyed Pakistan’s unequivocal rejection of these illegal actions as they are in breach of international law and several UN Security Council resolutions,” Pakistan’s foreign ministry said in a statement. On Monday, Interior Minister Amit Shah told India’s parliament that the central government would scrap Article 370, a constitutional provision that allows Jammu and Kashmir to make its own laws and grants special rights and privileges to permanent residents of the state. The order was subsequently approved by the Indian president. Jammu and Kashmir is India’s only Muslim-majority state and is part of the broader disputed Kashmir region. Pakistan called for a joint session of its parliament on Tuesday while the country’s army chief summoned an important conference to discuss regional security, local media reported. Analysts told CNBC that Monday’s move in New Delhi will likely intensify the animosity between the nuclear-powered rivals who’ve fought multiple wars over Kashmir.

International pressure

Pakistan will likely increase diplomatic pressure on India by turning to the international community, experts said. “They will continue to raise this at multilateral forums, including the UN General Assembly, to bring diplomatic attention back to India’s actions,” Akhil Bery, South Asia analyst at risk consultancy Eurasia Group, told CNBC. India deployed tens of thousands of troops across the Kashmir Valley in anticipation of a backlash. Authorities also banned public movements, shut down schools and colleges indefinitely and put two former chief ministers of the state under house arrest ahead of the announcement. Moeed Yusuf, associate vice president of the Asia Center at the U.S. Institute of Peace, told CNBC that there will likely be “strong resistance” from locals inside India-controlled Kashmir. “If that happens, Pakistan is surely going to up the diplomatic temperature to raise UN concerns about the human rights aspects of the Indian crackdown,” he said. Bery added that many Kashmiris believe the special provisions are crucial to their identity and they have “long been weary of a strong influence from Delhi.”

Greater military activity along the border

Analysts said they expect greater military activity along the so-called Line of Control, which is the de facto border between the Indian and Pakistani parts of Kashmir, and more unrest in the region. Islamabad said Monday it would “exercise all possible options” to counter the move.

“It’s important to keep in mind that in Kashmir, there’s actually two levels — there’s a domestic level, which is between the central government and the state of (Jammu and) Kashmir. Then, there’s an international component between India and Pakistan,” Faisel Pervaiz, South Asia analyst at Stratfor, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box ” on Tuesday. Both Pakistan and India lay claim to the region in full but control only parts of it. Within the India-controlled region of Kashmir, an insurgency began in the late 1980s when some fought to join Pakistan and some fought for independence. India has accused Pakistan of backing separatists by arming and training them. Islamabad denies that and says it only offers political support to the Kashmiri people, according to Reuters. International agencies have raised concerns over violence and human rights in India-controlled Jammu and Kashmir, as well as in the Pakistan-controlled regions of Azad Kashmir and Gilgit-Baltistan. “There is a long-running insurgency in Kashmir and the question is that is there going to be an uptick in attacks?” Pervaiz said. “Because as we saw back in February, when an uptick in attack happens, that can rapidly escalate tensions.” In February, India and Pakistan carried out air strikes in each others’ territories after a terrorist attack in India-controlled Kashmir killed more than 40 security officers.

The US position


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
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Trump says US Navy destroys Iranian drone in ‘defensive action,’ escalating tensions in Gulf region

President Donald Trump said Thursday that a U.S. Navy ship had destroyed an Iranian drone in a “defensive action,” escalating already high tensions in the oil-rich Gulf region. The USS Boxer, an amphibious assault ship, took down the drone in the Strait of Hormuz earlier Thursday, Trump said. The USS Boxer is equipped with the Phalanx CIWS — close-in weapon system — for defense against threats including anti-ship missiles and helicopters. The ship also is armed with short-range anti-ship missile


President Donald Trump said Thursday that a U.S. Navy ship had destroyed an Iranian drone in a “defensive action,” escalating already high tensions in the oil-rich Gulf region. The USS Boxer, an amphibious assault ship, took down the drone in the Strait of Hormuz earlier Thursday, Trump said. The USS Boxer is equipped with the Phalanx CIWS — close-in weapon system — for defense against threats including anti-ship missiles and helicopters. The ship also is armed with short-range anti-ship missile
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: dan mangan amanda macias, dan mangan, amanda macias
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Trump says US Navy destroys Iranian drone in 'defensive action,' escalating tensions in Gulf region

President Donald Trump said Thursday that a U.S. Navy ship had destroyed an Iranian drone in a “defensive action,” escalating already high tensions in the oil-rich Gulf region.

The USS Boxer, an amphibious assault ship, took down the drone in the Strait of Hormuz earlier Thursday, Trump said.

The Boxer is part of a group of Navy ships that was in the strait, located between the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman, as part of an increased U.S. military presence in the region.

Twenty percent of the world’s crude oil passes through the Strait of Hormuz.

The incident came four weeks after Iran shot down a U.S. surveillance drone flying over international airspace the same area, in what American officials at the time called an “unprovoked attack.”

And it came hours after Iran’s Revolutionary Guard seized a foreign tanker it accused of smuggling oil.

During an event at the White House, Trump said, “The Boxer took defensive action against an Iranian drone, which had closed into a very, very near distance, approximately 1000 yards, ignoring multiple calls to stand down and was threatening the safety of the ship and the ship’s crew.”

“The drone was immediately destroyed,” Trump said.

The president called the drone’s approach toward the Boxer “the latest of many provocative and hostile actions against vessels operating in international waters.”

He said the United States “reserves [the] right to defend our personnel, our facilities, and interests and calls upon all nations to condemn Iran’s attempts to disrupt freedom of navigation and global commerce.”

“I also call on other nations to protect their ships as they go through the Strait and to work with us in the future,” Trump said.

A U.S. defense official would not say how the drone was brought down when asked by CNBC.

The USS Boxer is equipped with the Phalanx CIWS — close-in weapon system — for defense against threats including anti-ship missiles and helicopters.

The ship also is armed with short-range anti-ship missiles and non-kinetic systems that could be capable of targeting a drone.

The Pentagon, in a statement issued after the president spoke, said, “At approximately 10 a.m. local time, the amphibious ship USS Boxer was in international waters conducting a planned inbound transit of the Strait of Hormuz.”

“A fixed wing unmanned aerial system (UAS) approached Boxer and closed within a threatening range. The ship took defensive action against the UAS to ensure the safety of the ship and its crew,” the Pentagon said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: dan mangan amanda macias, dan mangan, amanda macias
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Pentagon condemns ‘truly disturbing’ Chinese missile tests in South China Sea

WASHINGTON — The Pentagon this week slammed the continued Chinese militarization of the South China Sea on the heels of a CNBC and NBC News report that Beijing was conducting anti-ship ballistic missile tests in the disputed waters. “Of course the Pentagon was aware of the Chinese missile launch from the man-made structures in the South China Sea near the Spratly Islands,” Pentagon spokesman Lt. Col. Dave Eastburn wrote in an emailed statement in response to CNBC and NBC News’ inquiry about the


WASHINGTON — The Pentagon this week slammed the continued Chinese militarization of the South China Sea on the heels of a CNBC and NBC News report that Beijing was conducting anti-ship ballistic missile tests in the disputed waters. “Of course the Pentagon was aware of the Chinese missile launch from the man-made structures in the South China Sea near the Spratly Islands,” Pentagon spokesman Lt. Col. Dave Eastburn wrote in an emailed statement in response to CNBC and NBC News’ inquiry about the
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Pentagon condemns 'truly disturbing' Chinese missile tests in South China Sea

A Chinese sailor stands guard on the deck of the naval training ship Qi Jiguang during a naval parade to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the founding of China’s PLA Navy in the sea near Qingdao in the eastern China’s Shandong province on April 23, 2019.

WASHINGTON — The Pentagon this week slammed the continued Chinese militarization of the South China Sea on the heels of a CNBC and NBC News report that Beijing was conducting anti-ship ballistic missile tests in the disputed waters.

“Of course the Pentagon was aware of the Chinese missile launch from the man-made structures in the South China Sea near the Spratly Islands,” Pentagon spokesman Lt. Col. Dave Eastburn wrote in an emailed statement in response to CNBC and NBC News’ inquiry about the tests.

“What’s truly disturbing about this act is that it’s in direct contradiction to President Xi’s statement in the Rose Garden in 2015 when he pledged to the U.S., the Asia-Pacific region, and the world, that he would not militarize those man-made outposts, ” Eastburn added.

Over the weekend, the Chinese carried out an anti-ship ballistic missile test and fired at least one missile into the South China Sea, according to a U.S. official who spoke on the condition of anonymity in order to discuss the sensitive intelligence. The window for testing remains open until Wednesday, and the official was expecting the Chinese military to test again before it closes.

The development came as the U.S. and China had just paused trade tensions. During the G-20 summit over the weekend in Japan, U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping agreed to restart talks and not impose new tariffs on each other’s goods.

Home to more than 200 specks of land, the South China Sea serves as a gateway to global shipping routes where $3.4 trillion of trade passes annually.

The numerous overlapping sovereign claims to islands, reefs and rocks have turned the waters into an armed camp. Beijing holds the lion’s share of these features with approximately 27 outposts peppered throughout.

“I’m not going to speak on behalf of all the sovereign nations in the region, but I’m sure they agree that [China’s] behavior is contrary to its claim to want to bring peace to the region and obviously actions like this are coercive acts meant to intimidate other South China Sea claimants,” Eastburn said in the emailed statement.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-03  Authors: amanda macias
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The Middle East and Africa have ‘huge upside’ in digital transformation: Abu Dhabi Global Market

The Middle East and Africa have seen many changes in terms of digital transformation, but there’s still “huge upside,” and financial technology firms are looking for opportunities there, according to a financial services regulator in the region. “Compared to a few years ago, now, we have a very vibrant marketplace,” said Richard Teng, chief executive officer of Abu Dhabi Global Market’s Financial Services Regulatory Authority. Different forms of financing could “work very well” and represent a n


The Middle East and Africa have seen many changes in terms of digital transformation, but there’s still “huge upside,” and financial technology firms are looking for opportunities there, according to a financial services regulator in the region. “Compared to a few years ago, now, we have a very vibrant marketplace,” said Richard Teng, chief executive officer of Abu Dhabi Global Market’s Financial Services Regulatory Authority. Different forms of financing could “work very well” and represent a n
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: abigail ng, blanche lim
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financial, market, upside, africa, global, huge, terms, transformation, valley, region, opportunities, looking, east, services, dhabi, middle, digital, teng


The Middle East and Africa have 'huge upside' in digital transformation: Abu Dhabi Global Market

The Middle East and Africa have seen many changes in terms of digital transformation, but there’s still “huge upside,” and financial technology firms are looking for opportunities there, according to a financial services regulator in the region. “Compared to a few years ago, now, we have a very vibrant marketplace,” said Richard Teng, chief executive officer of Abu Dhabi Global Market’s Financial Services Regulatory Authority. However, the “very sizable” market is still “underserved,” he added. Different forms of financing could “work very well” and represent a new engine of growth, Teng said. “We are seeing a lot of fintech companies, looking at the opportunities that I mentioned — 1.6 billion people — which have huge upside in terms of digital transformation, wishing to make a difference in that region,” he said.

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Regulators need to do ‘much more’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: abigail ng, blanche lim
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EU top diplomat says Europe will try to make sure ‘escalation is avoided’ between US, Iran

Federica Mogherini, the EU’s High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, told CNBC ahead of a gathering of European leaders in Brussels Thursday afternoon that Europe will try to “open channels of communication and make sure that an escalation is avoided,” as oil prices spiked significantly over widespread supply fears. This followed an earlier claim from Iranian state-run broadcaster Press TV that the country’s Revolutionary Guard had successfully brought down an “intruding Ame


Federica Mogherini, the EU’s High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, told CNBC ahead of a gathering of European leaders in Brussels Thursday afternoon that Europe will try to “open channels of communication and make sure that an escalation is avoided,” as oil prices spiked significantly over widespread supply fears. This followed an earlier claim from Iranian state-run broadcaster Press TV that the country’s Revolutionary Guard had successfully brought down an “intruding Ame
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: willem marx, natasha turak
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EU top diplomat says Europe will try to make sure 'escalation is avoided' between US, Iran

The European Union has a crucial role to play in diffusing military tensions between the United States and Iran, the bloc’s top diplomat said, after the U.S. Defense Department insisted that an American surveillance drone shot down by an Iranian projectile in the Gulf region on Wednesday was operating over international waters.

Federica Mogherini, the EU’s High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, told CNBC ahead of a gathering of European leaders in Brussels Thursday afternoon that Europe will try to “open channels of communication and make sure that an escalation is avoided,” as oil prices spiked significantly over widespread supply fears.

President Trump said in a Twitter post that Iran had made a “very big mistake” in its decision to shoot down the RQ-4A Global Hawk, an unarmed, unmanned but highly advanced high-altitude surveillance aircraft. Later Thursday, Trump seemed to downplay the incident, suggesting that it may have been unintentional.

This followed an earlier claim from Iranian state-run broadcaster Press TV that the country’s Revolutionary Guard had successfully brought down an “intruding American spy drone.”

But according to Navy Capt. Bill Urban, a spokesman for the U.S. military’s Middle East regional command known as Centcom, Iran’s use of a surface-to-air missile on the Global Hawk represented an “unprovoked attack on a U.S. surveillance asset in international airspace.”

In a sign of the seriousness with which the U.S. military is treating this latest incident, the top U.S. Air Force commander in the region, Lt. Gen. Joseph T. Guastella, spoke to Pentagon journalists from the Al Udeid Air Base in Qatar, where around 10,000 US military personnel are permanently stationed.

The United States last week announced it would send an additional 1,000 troops to the Middle East, in addition to the 1,500 extra personnel it promised to dispatch in May.

And senior military commanders have previously warned that Iranian attacks on U.S. forces or interests in the region would prompt a response.

Mogherini, the European diplomat, told CNBC she had agreed with her American counterpart Secretary of State Mike Pompeo earlier this week at a meeting in Washington D.C. that it was not in anybody’s interest “to see a military escalation,” and her focus remained on keeping Iran compliant with its obligations under the nuclear deal she helped broker, formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action or JCPOA.

“We’ll try to do what we can to diffuse tensions,” she said.

But Sanam Vakil, who heads the Iran forum at the London-based think tank Chatham House, said the drone shooting was the latest in a “cascading series of attacks,” which included several that damaged oil tankers in the stretch of water that separates Iran from the Arabian peninsula.

“Iran is increasing its leverage for future negotiations” over sanctions relief and its nuclear capabilities, Vakil told CNBC via email.

“Without dialogue, diplomacy and serious de-escalation, the risk of action and reaction and a slide into a wider regional conflict is significant.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: willem marx, natasha turak
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ECB vice president says another bond-buying program could be part of new stimulus

The European Central Bank’s (ECB) vice president said another large bond-buying program could be an option if inflation in the region doesn’t reach its intended target. Market players are keeping a close eye on the ECB amid concerns about growth in the 19-member region. ECB President Mario Draghi said Tuesday, with a defiantly dovish tone, that if the economic situation deteriorates in the coming months the bank would announce new stimulus. Speaking to CNBC Wednesday, ECB Vice President Luis de


The European Central Bank’s (ECB) vice president said another large bond-buying program could be an option if inflation in the region doesn’t reach its intended target. Market players are keeping a close eye on the ECB amid concerns about growth in the 19-member region. ECB President Mario Draghi said Tuesday, with a defiantly dovish tone, that if the economic situation deteriorates in the coming months the bank would announce new stimulus. Speaking to CNBC Wednesday, ECB Vice President Luis de
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ECB vice president says another bond-buying program could be part of new stimulus

The European Central Bank’s (ECB) vice president said another large bond-buying program could be an option if inflation in the region doesn’t reach its intended target.

Market players are keeping a close eye on the ECB amid concerns about growth in the 19-member region. ECB President Mario Draghi said Tuesday, with a defiantly dovish tone, that if the economic situation deteriorates in the coming months the bank would announce new stimulus.

Speaking to CNBC Wednesday, ECB Vice President Luis de Guindos added to Draghi’s comments and outlined some possible measures the central bank could implement. “We have a wide range of instruments available: We have forward guidance, we have TLTRO (targeted longer-term refinancing operations), we have the reinvestment of the maturities of our balance sheets — so there is an ample, you know, range of instruments that we could use, and QE (quantitative easing) is one of them,” De Guindos told CNBC’s Annette Weisbach in Sintra, Portugal.

The ECB foresees “lingering softness” in the short term, in particular due to geopolitical factors and trade conflicts, which have weighed on exports and on the manufacturing sector — two important drivers of economic growth in the euro zone.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: silvia amaro
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U.S. commander says American forces face ‘imminent’ threat from Iran

BAGHDAD — The top commander of U.S. forces in the Middle East says he believes the Iranians or their proxies may orchestrate an attack at any moment. “I think the threat is imminent,” Marine Gen. Frank McKenzie said in an exclusive broadcast interview with NBC News in the Iraqi capital. The U.S. has beefed up its military presence in the region in an effort to deter Iran and protect American forces and allies. McKenzie said he was “heartened” by the efforts of the Iraqi government to protect Ame


BAGHDAD — The top commander of U.S. forces in the Middle East says he believes the Iranians or their proxies may orchestrate an attack at any moment. “I think the threat is imminent,” Marine Gen. Frank McKenzie said in an exclusive broadcast interview with NBC News in the Iraqi capital. The U.S. has beefed up its military presence in the region in an effort to deter Iran and protect American forces and allies. McKenzie said he was “heartened” by the efforts of the Iraqi government to protect Ame
U.S. commander says American forces face ‘imminent’ threat from Iran Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-07  Authors: courtney kube, amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, american, imminent, think, threat, posture, region, iraqi, forces, middle, iran, commander, protect, mckenzie, face


U.S. commander says American forces face 'imminent' threat from Iran

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani (L) attends the 21st Nationwide Assembly of the Islamic Revolution Guards Corps (IRGC) Commanders in Tehran, Iran on September 15, 2015.

BAGHDAD — The top commander of U.S. forces in the Middle East says he believes the Iranians or their proxies may orchestrate an attack at any moment.

“I think the threat is imminent,” Marine Gen. Frank McKenzie said in an exclusive broadcast interview with NBC News in the Iraqi capital. “We continually evaluate our force posture in the region.”

The U.S. has beefed up its military presence in the region in an effort to deter Iran and protect American forces and allies.

Over the last month, the Trump administration announced that it was sending an aircraft carrier strike group and Air Force bombers to the Middle East, as well as Patriot missiles and additional troops, amid heightened concerns of an Iranian attack.

McKenzie stressed that tensions remain high.

“I don’t actually believe the threat has diminished,” McKenzie said after holding a series of meetings with the Iraqi prime minister and defense chief. “…I believe the threat is still very real.”

McKenzie said he was “heartened” by the efforts of the Iraqi government to protect American forces and its allies in the region. Roadside bombs have posed the major danger to American forces in Iraq, McKenzie added, but he said the threat from the Iranians is evolving.

“They probe for weakness all the times,” McKenzie said. “I would say the threat has probably evolved in certain ways even as our defensive posture has changed and become more aggressive, and we certainly thank our Iraqi partners for many of the things they’ve done.”

“I think we’re still in the period of what I would call tactical warning,” he said. “The threat is very real. ”

McKenzie declined to go into specifics on the nature of the threats.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-07  Authors: courtney kube, amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, american, imminent, think, threat, posture, region, iraqi, forces, middle, iran, commander, protect, mckenzie, face


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Oil at $100? Experts predict where crude could go if an Iran conflict breaks out

Oil is in the crosshairs as the prospect of confrontation brews between the U.S. and Iran. A top military aide to Iran’s supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Yahya Rahim Safavi, warned over the weekend that “The first bullet fired in the Persian Gulf will push oil prices above $100.” In an area responsible for the shipment of one-third of the world’s seaborne oil, just how high could military confrontation — or indeed, an outright war — send the price of crude? “I think that $100 per barrel is


Oil is in the crosshairs as the prospect of confrontation brews between the U.S. and Iran. A top military aide to Iran’s supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Yahya Rahim Safavi, warned over the weekend that “The first bullet fired in the Persian Gulf will push oil prices above $100.” In an area responsible for the shipment of one-third of the world’s seaborne oil, just how high could military confrontation — or indeed, an outright war — send the price of crude? “I think that $100 per barrel is
Oil at $100? Experts predict where crude could go if an Iran conflict breaks out Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-06  Authors: natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, breaks, iranian, think, crude, experts, oil, predict, 100, sanctions, military, irans, region, conflict, nuclear, iran, market


Oil at $100? Experts predict where crude could go if an Iran conflict breaks out

Oil is in the crosshairs as the prospect of confrontation brews between the U.S. and Iran. At least, that’s how Iranian officials would have it.

A top military aide to Iran’s supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Yahya Rahim Safavi, warned over the weekend that “The first bullet fired in the Persian Gulf will push oil prices above $100.” He added, “This would be unbearable to America, Europe and the U.S. allies like Japan and South Korea.”

More than a million barrels of oil per day have been wiped off the market as U.S. sanctions, imposed after the Donald Trump administration withdrew from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal last year, endeavor to bring the exports of OPEC’s third-largest producer to zero. This has contributed to the crippling of Iran’s economy, which the U.S. administration says will continue unless Iran “acts like a normal country” and ceases its support of terrorist proxies in the region and ballistic missile testing.

Iran has responded to the sanctions by threatening to ditch its obligations under the nuclear deal — which had promised economic relief in exchange for limits to its nuclear development — and return to higher levels of uranium enrichment.

A series of attacks in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Saudi Arabia that are being blamed on Iran have now pushed tensions to new highs, and prompted the U.S. to deploy more troops and military hardware to the region. In an area responsible for the shipment of one-third of the world’s seaborne oil, just how high could military confrontation — or indeed, an outright war — send the price of crude?

Not as high as you might think, according to some experts.

“I think that $100 per barrel is ambitious,” Stephen Brennock, an oil analyst at PVM Oil Associates in London, told CNBC via email on Tuesday. He pointed out that the oil market has “more or less shrugged off” the disappearance of a further 500,000 barrels per day of Iranian oil since Washington terminated its sanctions waivers in May.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-06  Authors: natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, breaks, iranian, think, crude, experts, oil, predict, 100, sanctions, military, irans, region, conflict, nuclear, iran, market


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