Five of YouTube’s biggest markets in the world are in Asia

Each morning, the “Beyond the Valley” newsletter brings you all the latest from the vast, dynamic world of tech – outside the Silicon Valley. According to Vidyasagar, the first two markets in the world that turned to mobile ahead of desktop consumption of videos were actually Japan and South Korea. “Over the last few years, what we’ve seen in markets like India is truly astounding,” he said. We, last year, saw nearly a very, very high triple digit growth on mobile — on top of that very high volu


Each morning, the “Beyond the Valley” newsletter brings you all the latest from the vast, dynamic world of tech – outside the Silicon Valley. According to Vidyasagar, the first two markets in the world that turned to mobile ahead of desktop consumption of videos were actually Japan and South Korea. “Over the last few years, what we’ve seen in markets like India is truly astounding,” he said. We, last year, saw nearly a very, very high triple digit growth on mobile — on top of that very high volu
Five of YouTube’s biggest markets in the world are in Asia Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, regulatory, mobile, biggest, youtube, markets, nearly, users, tools, india, world, youtubes, tiktok, asia


Five of YouTube's biggest markets in the world are in Asia

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Each morning, the “Beyond the Valley” newsletter brings you all the latest from the vast, dynamic world of tech – outside the Silicon Valley.

YouTube has more than a billion users worldwide.

According to Vidyasagar, the first two markets in the world that turned to mobile ahead of desktop consumption of videos were actually Japan and South Korea. But others are catching up, he added.

“Over the last few years, what we’ve seen in markets like India is truly astounding,” he said. “India today has nearly 85% of its volume consumed through mobile devices. We, last year, saw nearly a very, very high triple digit growth on mobile — on top of that very high volume.”

The same is true for Southeast Asia, in markets like Thailand and Indonesia, he added.

That said, in recent years, social platforms like YouTube and others have come under regulatory scrutiny to monitor the spread of hate speech, misinformation and other kinds of banned content on their platforms.

In India, for example, a state court ordered the federal government to ban the popular Chinese video sharing app TikTok, saying it was encouraging pornography, Reuters reported. TikTok has been downloaded by nearly 300 million users so far in India, and the ban puts more than 250 jobs at risk, according to the news agency.

To live up to regulatory standards, companies like YouTube and social networking giant Facebook use a variety of tools, including artificial intelligence, to detect the presence of controversial materials on their sites.

Vidyasagar said both YouTube and Google have invested extensively in technologies like machine learning and in people, as well as implemented tools and policies, to meet regulatory standards.

“We need a mix of both machine and human interference to come together here,” he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, regulatory, mobile, biggest, youtube, markets, nearly, users, tools, india, world, youtubes, tiktok, asia


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Road to approval for US biotech crops in China beset with massive delays, costing industry billions

China’s approval process for biotech crops is beset by regulatory hurdles and delays that have cost U.S. companies billions of dollars and added to challenges for American farmers. Industry groups and members of Congress have been urging the Trump administration to press China to make its regulatory process for approving agricultural biotech products more transparent and timely. Chinese regulatory policies on genetically modified organism seeds are seen as protectionist and favoring domestic dev


China’s approval process for biotech crops is beset by regulatory hurdles and delays that have cost U.S. companies billions of dollars and added to challenges for American farmers. Industry groups and members of Congress have been urging the Trump administration to press China to make its regulatory process for approving agricultural biotech products more transparent and timely. Chinese regulatory policies on genetically modified organism seeds are seen as protectionist and favoring domestic dev
Road to approval for US biotech crops in China beset with massive delays, costing industry billions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: jeff daniels, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billions, companies, industry, biotech, process, chinese, chinas, beset, predictable, costing, road, china, research, regulatory, massive, crops, talks, delays


Road to approval for US biotech crops in China beset with massive delays, costing industry billions

China’s approval process for biotech crops is beset by regulatory hurdles and delays that have cost U.S. companies billions of dollars and added to challenges for American farmers.

Industry groups and members of Congress have been urging the Trump administration to press China to make its regulatory process for approving agricultural biotech products more transparent and timely.

Last week’s high-level talks in Washington between Chinese and U.S. negotiators touched on a variety of nontariff barrier issues. A spokesman for China’s Ministry of Commerce, Gao Feng, told reporters Thursday the talks achieved “new progress,” adding that technology transfer and intellectual property were among the issues discussed.

Chinese regulatory policies on genetically modified organism seeds are seen as protectionist and favoring domestic development and commercialization of agricultural biotechnology, according to industry observers. Beijing is believed to have spent over $3.5 billion on biotech crop research to help develop its domestic industry.

“The GMO approvals protocols are very oblique and yet have been a huge problem for the U.S.,” said Joseph Glauber, a former U.S. Department of Agriculture chief economist and now a senior research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute in Washington.

The financial impact of delays in Chinese approval of U.S. biotech crops is estimated to have resulted in direct impact of nearly $5 billion over five years, according to a study commissioned by the industry trade group CropLife International. When including the “ripple effects” to the overall U.S. economy, the report by researcher Informa estimated impacts topping $14 billion.

In January, China’s Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs approved five new biotech traits for imported crops, including varieties of soybeans from Bayer and DowDuPont. It was agency’s first approvals since mid-2017 and came during a round of trade talks in Beijing between U.S. and Chinese officials.

“We are encouraged that systemic improvements in the regulatory process in China remain an important focus in ongoing negotiations,” said Christi Dixon, a spokesperson for Bayer, which last year completed the acquisition of U.S. seed giant Monsanto. “We support the goal of these negotiations — enabling a predictable, timely, transparent and science-based process that fuels both global innovation and trade.”

Added Dixon, “A predictable global regulatory system is essential in ensuring companies can continue to deliver new innovations to farmers around the world in a predictable and timely way.”

Genetic traits in seeds have been developed to improve yields and be more resistant to pests, diseases and adverse weather conditions such as drought. Seed companies also have engineered crops to be resistant to weedkillers or herbicides.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: jeff daniels, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billions, companies, industry, biotech, process, chinese, chinas, beset, predictable, costing, road, china, research, regulatory, massive, crops, talks, delays


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Amazon is trying to soften its image as regulatory scrutiny of Big Tech grows

But rather than fiercely fighting every battle, Amazon looks like its ready to play nice. In March, Amazon dropped a policy that prevented merchants from offering lower prices on other websites following an investigation request by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.). Last month, the company scaled back some of its most aggressive promotion tactics after Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) And late last year Amazon raised its minimum wage to $15 following criticism of the company’s working conditions


But rather than fiercely fighting every battle, Amazon looks like its ready to play nice. In March, Amazon dropped a policy that prevented merchants from offering lower prices on other websites following an investigation request by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.). Last month, the company scaled back some of its most aggressive promotion tactics after Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) And late last year Amazon raised its minimum wage to $15 following criticism of the company’s working conditions
Amazon is trying to soften its image as regulatory scrutiny of Big Tech grows Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: eugene kim, brent lewis, denver post, getty images, david ryder
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, big, growing, tech, soften, sen, stores, scrutiny, amazon, trying, business, winatallcost, regulatory, image, following, working, looks, grows, company


Amazon is trying to soften its image as regulatory scrutiny of Big Tech grows

Amazon’s relentless pursuit of growth in retail, cloud computing, advertising and consumer devices has put the company squarely in the sights of Washington lawmakers who are concerned about Big Tech’s growing influence over consumers. But rather than fiercely fighting every battle, Amazon looks like its ready to play nice.

In March, Amazon dropped a policy that prevented merchants from offering lower prices on other websites following an investigation request by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.). Last month, the company scaled back some of its most aggressive promotion tactics after Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) called out abusive business practices. And late last year Amazon raised its minimum wage to $15 following criticism of the company’s working conditions by Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-VT).

Amazon also confirmed to CNBC that it would soon start accepting cash at the Amazon Go cashierless stores as a growing number of cities and states push for laws that require all stores to serve the unbanked. It’s all part of a strategy to be more likable at a time when tech companies are drawing heat for behavior that looks increasingly anti-competitive.

“I believe Amazon has made the connection between likability and immunity from regulation,” said NYU business professor Scott Galloway, author of “The Four: The Hidden DNA of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google.”

This is a different company from the vigorously defensive, win-at-all-cost Amazon we’re used to seeing.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: eugene kim, brent lewis, denver post, getty images, david ryder
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, big, growing, tech, soften, sen, stores, scrutiny, amazon, trying, business, winatallcost, regulatory, image, following, working, looks, grows, company


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Twitter paid CEO Jack Dorsey $1.40 in 2018 — a nod to its old 140-character limit

Twitter says it paid co-founder Jack Dorsey a salary last year for the first time since he returned to his post as CEO in 2015. The billionaire was paid a symbolic sum of $1.40 in 2018, the firm said in a regulatory filing Monday, a nod to Twitter’s old 140-character tweet limit. Twitter’s reasoning? It’s “a testament to his commitment to and belief in Twitter’s long-term value creation potential.”


Twitter says it paid co-founder Jack Dorsey a salary last year for the first time since he returned to his post as CEO in 2015. The billionaire was paid a symbolic sum of $1.40 in 2018, the firm said in a regulatory filing Monday, a nod to Twitter’s old 140-character tweet limit. Twitter’s reasoning? It’s “a testament to his commitment to and belief in Twitter’s long-term value creation potential.”
Twitter paid CEO Jack Dorsey $1.40 in 2018 — a nod to its old 140-character limit Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: ryan browne, david becker, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, jack, 140character, paid, symbolic, 2018, nod, old, twitter, returned, regulatory, salary, limit, dorsey, testament, sum, value, twitters


Twitter paid CEO Jack Dorsey $1.40 in 2018 — a nod to its old 140-character limit

Twitter says it paid co-founder Jack Dorsey a salary last year for the first time since he returned to his post as CEO in 2015.

The billionaire was paid a symbolic sum of $1.40 in 2018, the firm said in a regulatory filing Monday, a nod to Twitter’s old 140-character tweet limit.

Twitter’s reasoning? It’s “a testament to his commitment to and belief in Twitter’s long-term value creation potential.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: ryan browne, david becker, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, jack, 140character, paid, symbolic, 2018, nod, old, twitter, returned, regulatory, salary, limit, dorsey, testament, sum, value, twitters


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Facebook downgraded as analyst says its executive exodus is contagious

Facebook dropped Monday after a Wall Street brokerage downgraded the stock to a hold rating and warned clients that the recent departure of 11 senior managers could spark further flights from the social media giant. Needham analyst Laura Martin wrote that Facebook’s pivot toward privacy and encrypted messaging, rising regulatory risk and the upload of disturbing content will accelerate the management exodus in what she called a “Negative Network Effect.” “A Negative Network Effect suggests that


Facebook dropped Monday after a Wall Street brokerage downgraded the stock to a hold rating and warned clients that the recent departure of 11 senior managers could spark further flights from the social media giant. Needham analyst Laura Martin wrote that Facebook’s pivot toward privacy and encrypted messaging, rising regulatory risk and the upload of disturbing content will accelerate the management exodus in what she called a “Negative Network Effect.” “A Negative Network Effect suggests that
Facebook downgraded as analyst says its executive exodus is contagious Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, analyst, facebook, recent, contagious, wrote, negative, martin, pivot, senior, executive, social, network, regulatory, exodus, media, downgraded


Facebook downgraded as analyst says its executive exodus is contagious

Facebook dropped Monday after a Wall Street brokerage downgraded the stock to a hold rating and warned clients that the recent departure of 11 senior managers could spark further flights from the social media giant.

Needham analyst Laura Martin wrote that Facebook’s pivot toward privacy and encrypted messaging, rising regulatory risk and the upload of disturbing content will accelerate the management exodus in what she called a “Negative Network Effect.”

“We are concerned that regulatory, headline, and strategic pivot risks will negatively impact Facebook’s valuation more than investors currently believe due to the negative flywheel created by Network Effects,” Martin wrote. “A Negative Network Effect suggests that departures will continue, and since we believe that people are a key competitive advantage of FAANG companies, this implies accelerating value destruction until senior executive turnover ends.”

Facebook has seen the departures of several top managers in recent months, including Chief Product Officer Chris Cox and Instagram co-founders Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger. Cox left last week.

Facebook also drew criticism last week after an alleged white supremacist terrorist in New Zealand livestreamed his attack, which killed 50 people, on the social media site. Google’s YouTube and Twitter also struggled to track down and remove the disturbing content.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, analyst, facebook, recent, contagious, wrote, negative, martin, pivot, senior, executive, social, network, regulatory, exodus, media, downgraded


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Davos: Microsoft’s Nadella says facial recognition needs regulation

Microsoft Chief Executive Satya Nadella on Thursday welcomed regulation of facial recognition technology, as concerns about its ability to be used for surveillance and intrusions of privacy grow. Nadella suggested that, as facial recognition becomes increasingly prevalent, self-regulation among tech companies might not be enough to deal with the societal challenges it represents. “One of the things that I feel today is, in the marketplace, there’s competition; there’s no discrimination between t


Microsoft Chief Executive Satya Nadella on Thursday welcomed regulation of facial recognition technology, as concerns about its ability to be used for surveillance and intrusions of privacy grow. Nadella suggested that, as facial recognition becomes increasingly prevalent, self-regulation among tech companies might not be enough to deal with the societal challenges it represents. “One of the things that I feel today is, in the marketplace, there’s competition; there’s no discrimination between t
Davos: Microsoft’s Nadella says facial recognition needs regulation Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-24  Authors: ryan browne, jason alden, bloomberg via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, selfregulation, race, facial, nadella, davos, regulatory, recognition, technology, needs, rules, theres, regulation, microsofts


Davos: Microsoft's Nadella says facial recognition needs regulation

Microsoft Chief Executive Satya Nadella on Thursday welcomed regulation of facial recognition technology, as concerns about its ability to be used for surveillance and intrusions of privacy grow.

Nadella suggested that, as facial recognition becomes increasingly prevalent, self-regulation among tech companies might not be enough to deal with the societal challenges it represents.

“One of the things that I feel today is, in the marketplace, there’s competition; there’s no discrimination between the right use and the wrong use of facial recognition,” Nadella told an audience at the World Economic Forum in Davos.

He said that, while self-regulation is important to ensure use of facial recognition is “fair and robust,” government rules may be needed to prevent harmful consequences.

“At the same time we also welcome any regulation that helps the marketplace not be a race to the bottom,” Nadella said.

Such a “race to the bottom” could in fact lead to “even more heavy-handed regulatory regimes,” he added.

The software giant has been at the forefront of raising concerns about the potential misuse of facial recognition. It has been increasingly calling for rules to be established to prevent human rights violations and discrimination.

The technology is included in many new smartphones including Apple’s new iPhone models and Samsung’s latest Galaxy phones. A primary purpose of facial recognition so far has been to identify users with biometric authentication to bolster the security of devices.

But growing worries over the ability of countries like China to use it to spy on citizens have led to increasing calls for regulatory oversight.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-24  Authors: ryan browne, jason alden, bloomberg via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, selfregulation, race, facial, nadella, davos, regulatory, recognition, technology, needs, rules, theres, regulation, microsofts


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Elon Musk: Tesla Summon auto-parking upgrade probably available soon

A Tesla feature that gets your car to follow you around like a pet and auto-park is undergoing regulatory approval and will “probably” be available for some customers soon, CEO Elon Musk said on Twitter on Thursday. “Going through final validation & regulatory approval,” Musk said of Summon+, a planned upgrade to Tesla’s Summon auto-parking feature. “Probably releases to early access program owners in a few weeks. However, the auto executive added the caveat that the firm might not be able to ro


A Tesla feature that gets your car to follow you around like a pet and auto-park is undergoing regulatory approval and will “probably” be available for some customers soon, CEO Elon Musk said on Twitter on Thursday. “Going through final validation & regulatory approval,” Musk said of Summon+, a planned upgrade to Tesla’s Summon auto-parking feature. “Probably releases to early access program owners in a few weeks. However, the auto executive added the caveat that the firm might not be able to ro
Elon Musk: Tesla Summon auto-parking upgrade probably available soon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-10  Authors: ryan browne, spencer platt, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, car, feature, regulatory, tesla, soon, upgrade, musk, autoparking, available, able, elon, pet, follow, summon, approval, probably


Elon Musk: Tesla Summon auto-parking upgrade probably available soon

A Tesla feature that gets your car to follow you around like a pet and auto-park is undergoing regulatory approval and will “probably” be available for some customers soon, CEO Elon Musk said on Twitter on Thursday.

“Going through final validation & regulatory approval,” Musk said of Summon+, a planned upgrade to Tesla’s Summon auto-parking feature. “Probably releases to early access program owners in a few weeks. It’s trippy!”

However, the auto executive added the caveat that the firm might not be able to roll out Summon+ in all of the markets it operates in, saying it was “getting some regulatory pushback.” He didn’t elaborate on those regulatory hurdles.

Musk said back in November that cars operating with Summon+ will be able to “drive to your phone location & follow you like a pet,” and that users will be able to control their car remotely “like a big RC car.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-10  Authors: ryan browne, spencer platt, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, car, feature, regulatory, tesla, soon, upgrade, musk, autoparking, available, able, elon, pet, follow, summon, approval, probably


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Why airports can’t stop drones from causing chaos

The CEO of Dedrone, Joerg Lamprecht, said all players in the air travel industry are still grappling with the question of authority. Brian Wynne, president and CEO of the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International, wants to see the drone industry and aviation authorities around the world agree to “remote identification,” something like digital license plates, for drones. With remote identification, he believes, airports could easily identify a drone’s owner and contact them to land t


The CEO of Dedrone, Joerg Lamprecht, said all players in the air travel industry are still grappling with the question of authority. Brian Wynne, president and CEO of the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International, wants to see the drone industry and aviation authorities around the world agree to “remote identification,” something like digital license plates, for drones. With remote identification, he believes, airports could easily identify a drone’s owner and contact them to land t
Why airports can’t stop drones from causing chaos Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-08  Authors: lora kolodny
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, causing, heathrow, airports, drones, drone, stop, regulatory, land, chaos, remote, identification, gatwick, industry, cant, air


Why airports can't stop drones from causing chaos

Examples of counter-drone companies range from newer start-ups like Dedrone in San Francisco, to larger defense firms like the $2 billion Israeli company Rafael and Rome-based Leonardo.

The CEO of Dedrone, Joerg Lamprecht, said all players in the air travel industry are still grappling with the question of authority.

“Airports have a lot of red tape,” he said. “This is a new issue. Who is in charge, who controls the airspace, who is the one that should be providing drone detection? Who has the authority to manage this and to intervene – is it federal police, local police, someone who owns the airspace?”

Interdictions are allowed at military bases in the United States and some fixed sites that are owned by federal agencies. But authority hasn’t been determined at every commercial airport.

Brian Wynne, president and CEO of the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International, wants to see the drone industry and aviation authorities around the world agree to “remote identification,” something like digital license plates, for drones. With remote identification, he believes, airports could easily identify a drone’s owner and contact them to land the drone if it’s flying where it shouldn’t.

No matter how the laws shape up and counter-drone technology evolves, Sherry said the disruptions at Heathrow and Gatwick should serve as a wake-up call.

“If you look at the industry as a whole, the way it works the airports, airlines, air traffic controllers, aircraft makers, and fuel companies all have to cooperate to provide air service. Everyone’s objectives are different. And it’s sort of a ‘tombstone’ industry, where it takes an accident to get funding to flow and people working on a problem. Until just now? There has been nothing dramatic enough to make them work on this. We should all be thankful that these incidents were not more severe, there were no injuries or fatalities.”

The drone sightings at Heathrow and Gatwick prompted quick regulatory changes. Law enforcement in the U.K. is now permitted to land, seize and search drones, and to fine operators who fail to comply with orders to land their small drones, or fine those who fly without properly registering their drones as well.

Wynne said he’s hoping for similar advances on the regulatory front in the U.S. soon.

WATCH: This drone attacks and captures rogue drones


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-08  Authors: lora kolodny
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, causing, heathrow, airports, drones, drone, stop, regulatory, land, chaos, remote, identification, gatwick, industry, cant, air


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Tencent shares jump after China watchdog flags video game approvals

Tencent Holdings shares jumped by as much as 4.2 percent on Friday after a regulatory official said that some new games have been cleared for sale after a lengthy freeze in approvals. The freeze on new approvals has pressured gaming-related stocks and clouded the outlook for mobile games, rattling industry leader Tencent and smaller peers. Earlier this month, state media reported that Chinese regulators set up an online video games ethics committee, raising hopes the government was preparing to


Tencent Holdings shares jumped by as much as 4.2 percent on Friday after a regulatory official said that some new games have been cleared for sale after a lengthy freeze in approvals. The freeze on new approvals has pressured gaming-related stocks and clouded the outlook for mobile games, rattling industry leader Tencent and smaller peers. Earlier this month, state media reported that Chinese regulators set up an online video games ethics committee, raising hopes the government was preparing to
Tencent shares jump after China watchdog flags video game approvals Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, official, freeze, video, speech, approvals, game, shares, gaming, better, regulatory, jump, flags, watchdog, china, tencent, games


Tencent shares jump after China watchdog flags video game approvals

Tencent Holdings shares jumped by as much as 4.2 percent on Friday after a regulatory official said that some new games have been cleared for sale after a lengthy freeze in approvals.

Feng Shixin, a senior official of the ruling Communist Party’s Propaganda department, said in a speech at a gaming conference in Haikou on Friday that a first batch of approvals for games had been completed, according a transcript of the speech and the organizers of the event.

China, the world’s biggest gaming market, stopped approving new titles from March amid a regulatory overhaul triggered by growing criticism of video games for being violent and leading to myopia as well as addiction among young users.

The freeze on new approvals has pressured gaming-related stocks and clouded the outlook for mobile games, rattling industry leader Tencent and smaller peers.

“We hope through new system design and strong implementation we could guide game companies to better present mainstream values, strengthen a cultural sense of duty and mission, and better satisfy the public need for a better life,” Feng said.

Earlier this month, state media reported that Chinese regulators set up an online video games ethics committee, raising hopes the government was preparing to resume an approval process that has been frozen for most of this year.

“This is clearly exciting news for China’s gaming industry,” a Tencent spokesman said in written comments.

“We’re confident that after the publishing license approval, we will provide more compliant, high-quality cultural works to society and the public.”

The gaming freeze in China has dragged down Tencent’s shares this year and wiped billions of dollars of its market value. The Hong Kong-listed firm’s stock is down around 23 percent this year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, official, freeze, video, speech, approvals, game, shares, gaming, better, regulatory, jump, flags, watchdog, china, tencent, games


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Australian Banks have gone ‘too far the other way’: SQM Research

Australian Banks have gone ‘too far the other way’: SQM Research8 Hours AgoLouis Christopher of SQM Research weighs in on the regulatory picture for banks in Australia.


Australian Banks have gone ‘too far the other way’: SQM Research8 Hours AgoLouis Christopher of SQM Research weighs in on the regulatory picture for banks in Australia.
Australian Banks have gone ‘too far the other way’: SQM Research Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-19
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, banks, hours, sqm, research8, gone, australian, regulatory, picture, research, way, far, weighs


Australian Banks have gone 'too far the other way': SQM Research

Australian Banks have gone ‘too far the other way’: SQM Research

8 Hours Ago

Louis Christopher of SQM Research weighs in on the regulatory picture for banks in Australia.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-19
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, banks, hours, sqm, research8, gone, australian, regulatory, picture, research, way, far, weighs


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