China’s Xi issues a message for Trump: We’ve got to cooperate

In his message to Trump, Xi said China-U.S. relations have experienced ups and downs but have made historic progress over the past four decades, state news agency Xinhua said. This has brought huge benefits to the two peoples and has contributed greatly to world peace, stability and prosperity, Xi added. Trump sent his own congratulatory message in return, saying it was his priority to promote cooperative and constructive U.S.-China relations, Xinhua added. Trump said he had a “long and very goo


In his message to Trump, Xi said China-U.S. relations have experienced ups and downs but have made historic progress over the past four decades, state news agency Xinhua said. This has brought huge benefits to the two peoples and has contributed greatly to world peace, stability and prosperity, Xi added. Trump sent his own congratulatory message in return, saying it was his priority to promote cooperative and constructive U.S.-China relations, Xinhua added. Trump said he had a “long and very goo
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-01  Authors: saul loeb, afp, getty images
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China's Xi issues a message for Trump: We've got to cooperate

History shows that cooperation is the best choice for both China and the United States, Chinese President Xi Jinping told U.S. President Donald Trump in a congratulatory message on Tuesday to mark 40 years since the establishment of diplomatic relations.

The two countries agreed last month to a 90-day temporary ceasefire in their bitter trade war to give them time to hold fresh talks to try and end a dispute that has seen them level increasingly severe tariffs on each others’ goods.

In his message to Trump, Xi said China-U.S. relations have experienced ups and downs but have made historic progress over the past four decades, state news agency Xinhua said.

This has brought huge benefits to the two peoples and has contributed greatly to world peace, stability and prosperity, Xi added.

“History has proved that cooperation is the best choice for both sides,” Xi said.

Sino-U.S. relations are in an important stage, he added.

“I attach great importance to the development of China-U.S. relations and am willing to work with President Trump to summarise the experience of the development of China-U.S. relations and implement the consensus we have reached in a joint effort to advance China-U.S. relations featuring coordination, cooperation and stability so as to better benefit the two peoples as well as the people of the rest of the world,” he said.

Trump sent his own congratulatory message in return, saying it was his priority to promote cooperative and constructive U.S.-China relations, Xinhua added.

Xi and Trump also spoke by telephone over the weekend. Trump said he had a “long and very good call” with Xi and that a possible trade deal between the United States and China was progressing well.

China and the United States have made plans for face-to-face consultations over trade in January, China’s Commerce Ministry said last week.

Xinhua, in a commentary, said it was only natural the two countries would have disagreements and encounter problems, considering their “different social systems, development paths and historical and cultural backgrounds.”

“At a time when the world is undergoing unprecedentedly profound changes and is fraught with risks and uncertainties, the global community expects even closer collaboration between the two largest economies,” it said.

This year marks a series of sensitive anniversaries for China, including, in June, 30 years since the bloody crackdown on pro-democracy demonstrators in and around Beijing’s Tiananmen Square.

On Wednesday, Xi will make his first public appearance at an anniversary-related event, giving a speech about self-ruled Taiwan, which China claims as its sacred territory, on the 40th anniversary of a key policy statement that led to a thaw in relations with the island.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-01  Authors: saul loeb, afp, getty images
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Huawei is the ‘perfect microcosm’ of US-China relations: Professor

Huawei is the ‘perfect microcosm’ of US-China relations: Professor13 Hours AgoThere’s a “great deal” of uncertainty over U.S.-China relations and companies will have to learn to “live dangerously” when it comes to working with China, says Alex Capri of the National University of Singapore.


Huawei is the ‘perfect microcosm’ of US-China relations: Professor13 Hours AgoThere’s a “great deal” of uncertainty over U.S.-China relations and companies will have to learn to “live dangerously” when it comes to working with China, says Alex Capri of the National University of Singapore.
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Huawei is the 'perfect microcosm' of US-China relations: Professor

Huawei is the ‘perfect microcosm’ of US-China relations: Professor

13 Hours Ago

There’s a “great deal” of uncertainty over U.S.-China relations and companies will have to learn to “live dangerously” when it comes to working with China, says Alex Capri of the National University of Singapore.


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Trump spends Christmas Eve attacking enemies, blasting the Fed

President Donald Trump spent the early hours of Christmas Eve attacking his political enemies and criticizing the Federal Reserve, as the government entered its third day of partial shutdown and markets tanked yet again. “It was only when I made it an important part of my campaign, because people and drugs were pouring into our Country unchecked, that they turned against it,” the president wrote. “I never ‘lashed out’ at the Acting Attorney General of the U.S., a man for whom I have great respec


President Donald Trump spent the early hours of Christmas Eve attacking his political enemies and criticizing the Federal Reserve, as the government entered its third day of partial shutdown and markets tanked yet again. “It was only when I made it an important part of my campaign, because people and drugs were pouring into our Country unchecked, that they turned against it,” the president wrote. “I never ‘lashed out’ at the Acting Attorney General of the U.S., a man for whom I have great respec
Trump spends Christmas Eve attacking enemies, blasting the Fed Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-24  Authors: tucker higgins, tom dichristopher, oliver contreras, pool, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, relations, foreign, trump, interest, deal, attacking, fed, eve, enemies, spends, christmas, blasting, iran, wrote, federal, president


Trump spends Christmas Eve attacking enemies, blasting the Fed

President Donald Trump spent the early hours of Christmas Eve attacking his political enemies and criticizing the Federal Reserve, as the government entered its third day of partial shutdown and markets tanked yet again.

“I am all alone (poor me) in the White House waiting for the Democrats to come back and make a deal on desperately needed Border Security,” the president wrote in a post on Twitter.

The tweet came minutes after the president posted attacks on the Fed, Democrats, the top Republican lawmaker on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and the special envoy in charge of combatting ISIS, who announced over the weekend that he would be resigning at the end of the month after Trump decided to pull American troops from Syria.

Trump, who canceled a planned vacation to Florida as 800,000 federal employees remain without pay, spent the morning posting his grievances on Twitter.

The president’s posts come amid growing uncertainty in Washington. The shutdown continued without a resolution in sight. Meanwhile the administration itself remains in a state of flux after the surprise departure of Defense Secretary James Mattis, which Trump accelerated by two months over the weekend.

As stocks tumbled following the worst week for markets since the 2008 financial crisis, the president wrote on Twitter that the “only problem our economy has” is the Fed, accusing the central bank of not having “a feel for the Market, they don’t understand necessary Trade Wars or Strong Dollars or even Democrat Shutdowns over Borders.”

The Federal Reserve has a dual mandate to keep prices stable and achieve maximum employment. The Fed aims to accomplish those goals primarily by setting interest rates at a level that will prevent runaway inflation or deflation.

Last week, the Fed raised its benchmark interest rate for the fourth time this year and signaled it would hike rates twice in 2019.

The president’s tirade stretched beyond the economy though, which he has touted as a symbol of his agenda’s success two years into his presidency. Trump also blasted unnamed U.S. senators who he said misunderstood his foreign policy, and “Virtually every Democrat” whose motives for opposing funding for his proposed border wall he called into question.

“It was only when I made it an important part of my campaign, because people and drugs were pouring into our Country unchecked, that they turned against it,” the president wrote.

He said that Brett McGurk, the U.S. special envoy for the coalition to defeat ISIS, “was the Obama appointee who was responsible for loading up airplanes with 1.8 Billion Dollars in CASH & sending it to Iran as part of the horrific Iran Nuclear Deal (now terminated) approved by Little Bob Corker.”

McGurk served as an advisor on Middle East issues under President George W. Bush before President Barack Obama appointed him to his present role in 2015.

The cash Trump is referring to is money owed to Iran for U.S. arms purchased prior to the 1979 revolution but never delivered in light of the break in U.S.-Iran relations. Of the total $1.7 billion paid to Iran in 2016, $1.3 billion was accrued interest, according to the Congressional Research Service.

The criticism of Corker, the Tennessee Republican who heads the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, is a return to an old and misleading critique: that Corker is soft on Iran and backed the 2015 nuclear deal with the Islamic Republic. In fact, Corker led GOP opposition to the accord and is a prominent Iran hawk.

Trump also blasted news reports that he had vented at his acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker his frustration with the federal investigation into Trump’s former lawyer Michael Cohen.

Cohen has pleaded guilty to lying to Congress about Trump’s business dealings with Russia during the 2016 election, and told federal prosecutors that the president directed him to commit campaign finance violations, which the president has denied.

Trump said the reports about his conversations with Whitaker were incorrect.

“I never ‘lashed out’ at the Acting Attorney General of the U.S., a man for whom I have great respect,” Trump wrote. “This is a made up story, one of many, by the Fake News Media!”

In between his tweets criticizing “sympathizers” of McGurk and challenging the Fed, Trump delivered a statement in all capital letters.

“AMERICA IS RESPECTED AGAIN!” the president wrote.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-24  Authors: tucker higgins, tom dichristopher, oliver contreras, pool, getty images
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Japan’s trade deal with the US is a $50 billion question

A more balanced trade in motor vehicles — which account for 75 percent of the U.S. trade deficit with Japan — is also being sought. The United Auto Workers union is calling for quotas on Japanese vehicles and parts, with any quota increases subject to the growth of U.S.-made automobile exports to Japan. Nearly 40 percent thought the relations were “bad,” which was almost double from last year’s 23 percent. Schroeder then recalled, as an apparent badge of honor, his refusal to follow the U.S. in


A more balanced trade in motor vehicles — which account for 75 percent of the U.S. trade deficit with Japan — is also being sought. The United Auto Workers union is calling for quotas on Japanese vehicles and parts, with any quota increases subject to the growth of U.S.-made automobile exports to Japan. Nearly 40 percent thought the relations were “bad,” which was almost double from last year’s 23 percent. Schroeder then recalled, as an apparent badge of honor, his refusal to follow the U.S. in
Japan’s trade deal with the US is a $50 billion question Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-23  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, japans, 50, japan, american, schroeder, question, poll, vehicles, thought, relations, security, trade, billion, united, deal


Japan's trade deal with the US is a $50 billion question

A more balanced trade in motor vehicles — which account for 75 percent of the U.S. trade deficit with Japan — is also being sought. The United Auto Workers union is calling for quotas on Japanese vehicles and parts, with any quota increases subject to the growth of U.S.-made automobile exports to Japan.

The writing, finally, may be on the wall, even though Japan could be allowed some time to adjust to the new trading regime, especially in agricultural matters. But the Democrats are already warning the U.S. negotiators to tighten up the enforcement instruments and procedures.

And here is an interesting aside to the trade story from President Donald Trump’s administration: Results of an opinion poll in Japan, published last Wednesday, showed that only 39 percent of respondents thought that the U.S.-Japan relations were “good” — down from 56 percent in last year’s poll. Nearly 40 percent thought the relations were “bad,” which was almost double from last year’s 23 percent.

There is an unmistakable moral to those findings for America’s worldly pundits, including some of those in the highest offices, calling for commitment and respect to friends and allies. Yes, but a rising hostility is what America is getting from a country whose security is unconditionally underwritten by the United States, and whose economy has flourished, and continues to grow, thanks to unlimited access to American wallets.

Still, what we are seeing in Japan now is a Kinderspiel, child’s play, compared to Germany’s extraordinary vilification of America and its leadership — another country that freeloads under the American security umbrella and continues to accumulate huge amounts of wealth as a result of $50 billion to $60 billion in annual trade surpluses with the U.S.

And here is what America’s benevolence is getting in return: Former German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder asked the government, in a Sunday interview, not to take American advice about with whom it should not trade. Schroeder then recalled, as an apparent badge of honor, his refusal to follow the U.S. in its invasion of Iraq in 2003.

There is no need to take partisan or bipartisan sides in the ongoing trade debate. The simple truth is that U.S. friends and allies are questioning Washington ties as soon as the issues are raised about defense burden sharing and squaring their systematically and outrageously unbalanced trade accounts with the U.S.

Having made that long detour, let’s go back to Japan’s export problem.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-23  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch, getty images news, getty images
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Taiwan ruling party suffers major defeat in local elections

Taiwan’s ruling party was handed a major defeat in local elections Saturday that were seen as a referendum on the administration of the island’s independence-leaning president amid growing economic and political pressure from China. Soon after the results came in, President Tsai Ing-wen resigned as head of the Democratic Progressive Party. In another victory for China, voters rejected a proposal to change the name of its Olympic team to Taiwan from the current Chinese Taipei. They also approved


Taiwan’s ruling party was handed a major defeat in local elections Saturday that were seen as a referendum on the administration of the island’s independence-leaning president amid growing economic and political pressure from China. Soon after the results came in, President Tsai Ing-wen resigned as head of the Democratic Progressive Party. In another victory for China, voters rejected a proposal to change the name of its Olympic team to Taiwan from the current Chinese Taipei. They also approved
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Taiwan ruling party suffers major defeat in local elections

Taiwan’s ruling party was handed a major defeat in local elections Saturday that were seen as a referendum on the administration of the island’s independence-leaning president amid growing economic and political pressure from China.

Soon after the results came in, President Tsai Ing-wen resigned as head of the Democratic Progressive Party. She will remain as president and her resignation will have no direct effect on the business of government, although the results bode ill for her re-election chances in two years.

Rival China said the results reflected a desire of Taiwanese for better relations with the mainland. Ma Xiaoguang, the spokesman for Beijing’s Taiwan Affairs Office, said his government will continue to treat Taiwan as part of China and “resolutely oppose separatist elements advocating ‘Taiwan independence’ and their activities,” according to the official Xinhua news agency.

In another victory for China, voters rejected a proposal to change the name of its Olympic team to Taiwan from the current Chinese Taipei. They also approved a referendum opposing same-sex marriage in a setback to LGBT couples, though ballot initiatives in Taiwan are non-binding.

The DPP lost the mayoral election to the Nationalist party in the southern port city of Kaohsiung, where it had held power for 20 years. The Nationalists also defeated the DPP in the central city of Taichung, home to much of Taiwan’s light industry, while Ko Wen-je, the independent mayor of Taipei, the capital, narrowly won a second term. The Nationalist candidate in Taipei has asked for a recount.

At a brief news conference at DPP headquarters late Saturday, Tsai announced she was stepping down as DPP chair and said she had refused Premier William Lai’s resignation, saying she wanted him to continue her reform agenda.

“Today, democracy taught us a lesson,” Tsai said. “We must study and accept the higher expectations of the people.”

The elections for mayors and thousands of local posts were seen as a key test for Tsai’s 2-year-old administration, which has been under relentless attack from Beijing over her refusal to endorse its claim that Taiwan is a part of China.

Tsai and the DPP won a landslide victory in 2016, but China swiftly responded by cutting all links with her government. Beijing has been ratcheting up pressure on the island it claims as its own territory by poaching its diplomatic partners and barring its representatives from international gatherings, while staging threatening military exercises and limiting the numbers of Chinese tourists visiting Taiwan.

The Nationalists, known also as the KMT, had campaigned on their pro-business image and more accommodating line toward Beijing.

Since her election, Tsai has walked a fine line on relations with China, maintaining Taiwan’s de facto independent status that the vast majority of Taiwanese support, while avoiding calls from the more radical elements of her party for moves to declare formal separation from the mainland.

Taiwanese officials had warned that Beijing was seeking to sway voters through the spread of disinformation online similar to how Russia was accused of interfering in U.S. elections.

Although domestic concerns were in the foreground, China played a major factor in voter sentiment, analysts said.

“I think part of the reason for the vote on Saturday was concern about relations between Taiwan and mainland China,” said Huang Kwei-bo, vice dean of the international affairs college at National Chengchi University in Taipei. “Their relations have slid backward.”

Saturday’s results also throw Tsai’s political future into question. While the DPP still controls the national legislature, local politicians are crucial in mobilizing support among grass-roots supporters.

“I’m afraid it will be a big challenge for her in 2020,” said Gratiana Jung, senior political researcher with the Yuanta-Polaris Research Institute think tank in Taipei.

Economic growth, employment and pension reforms were among key issues in the elections, which drew high turnout from the island’s 19 million voters. Government employees who feel slighted by pension cuts that took effect in July probably mobilized against Tsai’s party, Jung said.

Nationalist Party Chairman Wu Den-yih told reporters Saturday that his party would keep trying to avoid diplomatic friction with China and ensure smooth two-way trade.

“We hope the two sides will soon go back to a peaceful and stable trend in relations,” he said.

Chiang Kai-shek’s Nationalists rebased their government to Taiwan in 1949 amid the civil war with Mao Zedong’s Communists. They ruled under martial law until the late 1980s, when the native Taiwanese population began to take political office, mostly through the DPP.

The vote against changing the name used in international sporting events to Taiwan was seen as a test of support for independence. It was symbolic in nature, as the International Olympic Committee had ruled out a name change, which would be opposed by China.

Though referendums are only advisory, the vote in favor of restricting marriage to male-female couples will likely put lawmakers in a difficult position. They face both a court order to make same-sex marriage legal by 2019 and elections in 2020.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-25  Authors: ashley pon, getty images news, getty images
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Asia markets mostly slip amid fresh uncertainties on Brexit and US-China relations

Stocks in Asia mostly slipped on Friday morning as investors remained wary about uncertainties surrounding the U.K.’s divorce negotiations with the European Union, as well as heightened tensions between the United States and China. The mainland Chinese markets, closely watched by investors as a result of Beijing’s ongoing trade spat with Washington, were lower in early trade. The Shanghai composite slipped 0.75 percent while the Shenzhen composite declined by 1.4 percent. South Korea’s Kospi was


Stocks in Asia mostly slipped on Friday morning as investors remained wary about uncertainties surrounding the U.K.’s divorce negotiations with the European Union, as well as heightened tensions between the United States and China. The mainland Chinese markets, closely watched by investors as a result of Beijing’s ongoing trade spat with Washington, were lower in early trade. The Shanghai composite slipped 0.75 percent while the Shenzhen composite declined by 1.4 percent. South Korea’s Kospi was
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Asia markets mostly slip amid fresh uncertainties on Brexit and US-China relations

Stocks in Asia mostly slipped on Friday morning as investors remained wary about uncertainties surrounding the U.K.’s divorce negotiations with the European Union, as well as heightened tensions between the United States and China.

The mainland Chinese markets, closely watched by investors as a result of Beijing’s ongoing trade spat with Washington, were lower in early trade. The Shanghai composite slipped 0.75 percent while the Shenzhen composite declined by 1.4 percent.

Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index also shed 0.42 percent.

“Concerns over trade tensions continue to build up ahead of the meeting between Donald Trump and Xi Jinping that is to happen on the side-lines of the G-20 meeting next week,” said OCBC Treasury Research in a note.

South Korea’s Kospi was lower by 0.65 percent in morning trade, with shares of industry heavyweight Samsung Electronics falling 0.7 percent while chipmaker SK Hynix declined 1.15 percent.

Australia’s benchmark ASX 200 extended its recovery to see gains of 0.36 percent in afternoon trade, with the heavily weighted financial subindex gaining 0.92 percent.

Shares of major mining stocks Down Under were mostly down: Rio Tinto fell 0.52 percent and BHP declined 0.5 percent. Fortescue, on the other hand, was higher by 0.38 percent after slipping earlier.

Japan’s markets are closed today for a public holiday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-23  Authors: eustance huang
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To counter China, Australia plans $1.5 billion Pacific infrastructure fund

Australia will create a A$2 billion ($1.46 billion) fund to provide loans to Pacific nations to build infrastructure, Prime Minister Scott Morrison is expected to announce on Thursday, as Canberra seeks to counter China’s influence in the region. Australia and China have been vying for influence in sparsely populated Pacific island countries that control vast swathes of resource-rich oceans. To counter, Morrison plans to announce that Australia will renew its focus on the Pacific, primarily thro


Australia will create a A$2 billion ($1.46 billion) fund to provide loans to Pacific nations to build infrastructure, Prime Minister Scott Morrison is expected to announce on Thursday, as Canberra seeks to counter China’s influence in the region. Australia and China have been vying for influence in sparsely populated Pacific island countries that control vast swathes of resource-rich oceans. To counter, Morrison plans to announce that Australia will renew its focus on the Pacific, primarily thro
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To counter China, Australia plans $1.5 billion Pacific infrastructure fund

Australia will create a A$2 billion ($1.46 billion) fund to provide loans to Pacific nations to build infrastructure, Prime Minister Scott Morrison is expected to announce on Thursday, as Canberra seeks to counter China’s influence in the region.

Australia and China have been vying for influence in sparsely populated Pacific island countries that control vast swathes of resource-rich oceans.

China has spent $1.3 billion on confessional loans and gifts since 2011 to become the Pacific’s second-largest donor after Australia, stoking concern in the West that several tiny nations could end up overburdened and in debt to Beijing.

To counter, Morrison plans to announce that Australia will renew its focus on the Pacific, primarily through a new infrastructure fund.

“This $2 billion infrastructure initiative will significantly boost Australia’s support for infrastructure development in Pacific countries and Timor Leste,” according to a speech Morrison is due to deliver in the state of Queensland and seen by Reuters.

“It will invest in essential infrastructure such as telecommunications, energy, transport, water, and it will stretch our aid dollars further.”

Foreign policy analysts say Australia’s new infrastructure fund will test Australia’s already cool relations with China, its largest trading partner.

“This announcement will be a gauge of whether Australia can improve relations with Beijing while doing things that would have previously annoyed China,” said Nick Bisley, professor of international relations at Melbourne’s La Trobe University.

Ties between the two countries have been strained since Australia accused China of meddling in its domestic affairs late last year.

Australia’s Foreign Minister Marise Payne will on Thursday meet her Chinese counterpart in Beijing, the first visit by a senior Canberra in two years after bilateral relations soured.

Australia has already this year pledged to develop several infrastructure projects in the Pacific but it has been forced to raid its aid budget to fund the projects.

In May, Australia said it would spend about A$200 million to develop an undersea internet cables to Papua New Guinea (PNG) and the Solomon Islands amid national security concerns about China’s Huawei Technologies.

Earlier this month, Australia said it would help PNG develop a naval base, beating out China as a possible partner for the port development.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: brendon thorne, bloomberg, getty images
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Cramer: ‘Thaw’ in US-China relations and weak data sent stocks higher

Data on U.S. manufacturing growth and President Donald Trump’s tweet about speaking with the Chinese president paved the way for stocks to continue climbingin Thursday’s trading session, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said. “I’ve been saying that we need to see the Fed or the president blink in their respective battles against inflation and China. The Manufacturing Index, which tracks national factory activity, was at its lowest level since April. “Remember, weaker data gives Fed Chair Jerome Powell some wig


Data on U.S. manufacturing growth and President Donald Trump’s tweet about speaking with the Chinese president paved the way for stocks to continue climbingin Thursday’s trading session, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said. “I’ve been saying that we need to see the Fed or the president blink in their respective battles against inflation and China. The Manufacturing Index, which tracks national factory activity, was at its lowest level since April. “Remember, weaker data gives Fed Chair Jerome Powell some wig
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Cramer: 'Thaw' in US-China relations and weak data sent stocks higher

Data on U.S. manufacturing growth and President Donald Trump’s tweet about speaking with the Chinese president paved the way for stocks to continue climbingin Thursday’s trading session, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said.

Between a report that showed “a real slowdown” in manufacturing growth in October — a sign that could lead the Federal Reserve to pause its interest rate hikes — and “a thaw” in U.S.-China relations, much of the stock market managed to mount a recovery from its October lows, Cramer said.

“I’ve been saying that we need to see the Fed or the president blink in their respective battles against inflation and China. Neither one blinked today, but … we got a glimpse of how things could go right and it sent stocks flying,” the “Mad Money” host said.

Cramer found the manufacturing report from The Institute for Supply Management especially interesting. The Manufacturing Index, which tracks national factory activity, was at its lowest level since April. New orders, production and the employment index all fell since last month.

“Now, I’m not saying they need to stop tightening immediately,” he said. “I am absolutely fine with another rate hike next month because I want to ensure that the economy won’t overheat, just like the Fed. After all, the ISM purchases index, which measures prices for raw materials, jumped from 66 to 71. That’s too hot.”

But with wood, metal and oil prices declining, Cramer suspected companies would find a way to offset price increases with lower fuel costs to save U.S. consumers from tariff-related pain.

“I think those lower [commodity] prices will work their way through the system in a positive way, which means the inflation problem will solve itself,” he said. “Remember, weaker data gives Fed Chair Jerome Powell some wiggle room to pause his plans for three more rate hikes next year, rate hikes that I think could really hurt the economy if the data continues to show deceleration.”

Paired with Trump’s tweet, which sent stocks of companies that build their products in China higher, it was the “one-two punch” the stock market needed coming out of October, the “Mad Money” host said.

“If the Fed or the president blink for real, … we could have more upside,” he said. “But after this remarkable run indeed, let’s not get too greedy.”

Stocks ended the trading session mostly higher, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average capping off a more than 900-point gain over the last three days. The S&P 500 rose by 1 percent and the Nasdaq Composite climbed 1.7 percent.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-01  Authors: elizabeth gurdus
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Japan needs China’s business and pacified US-China relations

China is now testing how far a more constructive relation with Japan may go in the context of a rapidly changing geopolitical landscape. And beware this red herring: The idea that Beijing suddenly warmed up to closer relations with Japan as a result of China’s weakening economy and a trade dispute with the U.S. is arrant nonsense. China, clearly, does not need Japan for the steady growth of its huge and rapidly expanding domestic market. Japan’s $206.1 billion in bilateral trade with China durin


China is now testing how far a more constructive relation with Japan may go in the context of a rapidly changing geopolitical landscape. And beware this red herring: The idea that Beijing suddenly warmed up to closer relations with Japan as a result of China’s weakening economy and a trade dispute with the U.S. is arrant nonsense. China, clearly, does not need Japan for the steady growth of its huge and rapidly expanding domestic market. Japan’s $206.1 billion in bilateral trade with China durin
Japan needs China’s business and pacified US-China relations Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-29  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch, kim kyung-hoon-pool, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, state, china, pacified, billion, trade, needs, chinas, japan, growth, foreign, uschina, trillion, rapidly, business, relations


Japan needs China's business and pacified US-China relations

The Japanese prime minister’s state visit to China last week was therefore a triumph of persistence — six years of an incredible political tour de force.

Careful, though. Abe is on probation (just take a look at that handshake at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse). China is now testing how far a more constructive relation with Japan may go in the context of a rapidly changing geopolitical landscape. The Chinese know that Abe flunked a similar test with Russia, which will probably cost him one of the apparently dearest objectives of his political career.

And beware this red herring: The idea that Beijing suddenly warmed up to closer relations with Japan as a result of China’s weakening economy and a trade dispute with the U.S. is arrant nonsense.

In fact, China’s economy is in good shape. The gross domestic product growth was 6.7 percent in the first three quarters of this year. Inflation is stable (2.5 percent in September), public finances are sound (a budget deficit of 3 percent of GDP and public debt of $5.2 trillion, or 47.6 percent of GDP), and there is a trade surplus on goods and services of $70 billion, with a whopping $3 trillion stashed in foreign exchange reserves.

China, clearly, does not need Japan for the steady growth of its huge and rapidly expanding domestic market. And neither is China desperate for Japanese investments. According to the latest United Nations numbers, China was the world’s largest recipient of foreign direct investments in the first half of this year. During that period, China got $70 billion in FDI inflows, a 6 percent increase from the year-earlier, despite a 41 percent global decline for trans-border direct investments.

It is also ridiculous to think that China needed Japan as an ally in its trade dispute with the U.S.

No, Abe’s comment in 2012 about the importance of China for Japan’s economic growth is more valid today than six years ago, and his Herculean efforts to patch up relations with China are testimony to his extraordinary dedication to his country’s welfare.

Japan’s $206.1 billion in bilateral trade with China during the first eight months of this year is by far the largest segment of Tokyo’s foreign trade transactions. The U.S., with a bilateral trade business of $143.8 billion, comes in as a distant second.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-29  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch, kim kyung-hoon-pool, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, state, china, pacified, billion, trade, needs, chinas, japan, growth, foreign, uschina, trillion, rapidly, business, relations


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China, Japan to forge closer ties at ‘historic turning point’

Abe said on Friday that bilateral relations with China are at an “historic turning point” and that he expects new possibilities in industries such as infrastructure, logistics, healthcare and finance. He has held “frank” discussions with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang since arriving in Beijing on Thursday and is expected to meet with Xi later on Friday in the first full-scale Sino-Japanese summit since 2011. Efforts in advancing China-Japan ties should “persevere unremittingly to prevent the appeara


Abe said on Friday that bilateral relations with China are at an “historic turning point” and that he expects new possibilities in industries such as infrastructure, logistics, healthcare and finance. He has held “frank” discussions with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang since arriving in Beijing on Thursday and is expected to meet with Xi later on Friday in the first full-scale Sino-Japanese summit since 2011. Efforts in advancing China-Japan ties should “persevere unremittingly to prevent the appeara
China, Japan to forge closer ties at ‘historic turning point’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-26
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, japan, forge, chinese, abe, closer, china, healthy, ties, chinajapan, turning, held, li, discussions, historic, stable, relations, point


China, Japan to forge closer ties at 'historic turning point'

Abe said on Friday that bilateral relations with China are at an “historic turning point” and that he expects new possibilities in industries such as infrastructure, logistics, healthcare and finance.

He has held “frank” discussions with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang since arriving in Beijing on Thursday and is expected to meet with Xi later on Friday in the first full-scale Sino-Japanese summit since 2011.

Efforts in advancing China-Japan ties should “persevere unremittingly to prevent the appearance of new twists and turns” so that previous efforts did not go to waste, said Li at a joint briefing with Abe on Friday.

“The Chinese side is willing to work with the Japanese side to return to a normal track, and maintain the stable, sustained and healthy development of bilateral relations,” he said, adding that he had held candid discussions with Abe since his arrival on matters of mutual concerns.

They reached consensus, Li said, that safeguarding long-term healthy and stable China-Japan ties was in accordance with the interests of both countries and the region and the world.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-26
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, japan, forge, chinese, abe, closer, china, healthy, ties, chinajapan, turning, held, li, discussions, historic, stable, relations, point


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