To counter China, Australia plans $1.5 billion Pacific infrastructure fund

Australia will create a A$2 billion ($1.46 billion) fund to provide loans to Pacific nations to build infrastructure, Prime Minister Scott Morrison is expected to announce on Thursday, as Canberra seeks to counter China’s influence in the region. Australia and China have been vying for influence in sparsely populated Pacific island countries that control vast swathes of resource-rich oceans. To counter, Morrison plans to announce that Australia will renew its focus on the Pacific, primarily thro


Australia will create a A$2 billion ($1.46 billion) fund to provide loans to Pacific nations to build infrastructure, Prime Minister Scott Morrison is expected to announce on Thursday, as Canberra seeks to counter China’s influence in the region. Australia and China have been vying for influence in sparsely populated Pacific island countries that control vast swathes of resource-rich oceans. To counter, Morrison plans to announce that Australia will renew its focus on the Pacific, primarily thro
To counter China, Australia plans $1.5 billion Pacific infrastructure fund Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: brendon thorne, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 15, morrison, develop, fund, relations, infrastructure, billion, pacific, countries, australia, china, counter, plans


To counter China, Australia plans $1.5 billion Pacific infrastructure fund

Australia will create a A$2 billion ($1.46 billion) fund to provide loans to Pacific nations to build infrastructure, Prime Minister Scott Morrison is expected to announce on Thursday, as Canberra seeks to counter China’s influence in the region.

Australia and China have been vying for influence in sparsely populated Pacific island countries that control vast swathes of resource-rich oceans.

China has spent $1.3 billion on confessional loans and gifts since 2011 to become the Pacific’s second-largest donor after Australia, stoking concern in the West that several tiny nations could end up overburdened and in debt to Beijing.

To counter, Morrison plans to announce that Australia will renew its focus on the Pacific, primarily through a new infrastructure fund.

“This $2 billion infrastructure initiative will significantly boost Australia’s support for infrastructure development in Pacific countries and Timor Leste,” according to a speech Morrison is due to deliver in the state of Queensland and seen by Reuters.

“It will invest in essential infrastructure such as telecommunications, energy, transport, water, and it will stretch our aid dollars further.”

Foreign policy analysts say Australia’s new infrastructure fund will test Australia’s already cool relations with China, its largest trading partner.

“This announcement will be a gauge of whether Australia can improve relations with Beijing while doing things that would have previously annoyed China,” said Nick Bisley, professor of international relations at Melbourne’s La Trobe University.

Ties between the two countries have been strained since Australia accused China of meddling in its domestic affairs late last year.

Australia’s Foreign Minister Marise Payne will on Thursday meet her Chinese counterpart in Beijing, the first visit by a senior Canberra in two years after bilateral relations soured.

Australia has already this year pledged to develop several infrastructure projects in the Pacific but it has been forced to raid its aid budget to fund the projects.

In May, Australia said it would spend about A$200 million to develop an undersea internet cables to Papua New Guinea (PNG) and the Solomon Islands amid national security concerns about China’s Huawei Technologies.

Earlier this month, Australia said it would help PNG develop a naval base, beating out China as a possible partner for the port development.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: brendon thorne, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 15, morrison, develop, fund, relations, infrastructure, billion, pacific, countries, australia, china, counter, plans


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Cramer: ‘Thaw’ in US-China relations and weak data sent stocks higher

Data on U.S. manufacturing growth and President Donald Trump’s tweet about speaking with the Chinese president paved the way for stocks to continue climbingin Thursday’s trading session, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said. “I’ve been saying that we need to see the Fed or the president blink in their respective battles against inflation and China. The Manufacturing Index, which tracks national factory activity, was at its lowest level since April. “Remember, weaker data gives Fed Chair Jerome Powell some wig


Data on U.S. manufacturing growth and President Donald Trump’s tweet about speaking with the Chinese president paved the way for stocks to continue climbingin Thursday’s trading session, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said. “I’ve been saying that we need to see the Fed or the president blink in their respective battles against inflation and China. The Manufacturing Index, which tracks national factory activity, was at its lowest level since April. “Remember, weaker data gives Fed Chair Jerome Powell some wig
Cramer: ‘Thaw’ in US-China relations and weak data sent stocks higher Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-01  Authors: elizabeth gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, data, thaw, fed, way, stocks, hikes, weak, president, cramer, relations, manufacturing, sent, index, uschina, rate, prices, higher


Cramer: 'Thaw' in US-China relations and weak data sent stocks higher

Data on U.S. manufacturing growth and President Donald Trump’s tweet about speaking with the Chinese president paved the way for stocks to continue climbingin Thursday’s trading session, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said.

Between a report that showed “a real slowdown” in manufacturing growth in October — a sign that could lead the Federal Reserve to pause its interest rate hikes — and “a thaw” in U.S.-China relations, much of the stock market managed to mount a recovery from its October lows, Cramer said.

“I’ve been saying that we need to see the Fed or the president blink in their respective battles against inflation and China. Neither one blinked today, but … we got a glimpse of how things could go right and it sent stocks flying,” the “Mad Money” host said.

Cramer found the manufacturing report from The Institute for Supply Management especially interesting. The Manufacturing Index, which tracks national factory activity, was at its lowest level since April. New orders, production and the employment index all fell since last month.

“Now, I’m not saying they need to stop tightening immediately,” he said. “I am absolutely fine with another rate hike next month because I want to ensure that the economy won’t overheat, just like the Fed. After all, the ISM purchases index, which measures prices for raw materials, jumped from 66 to 71. That’s too hot.”

But with wood, metal and oil prices declining, Cramer suspected companies would find a way to offset price increases with lower fuel costs to save U.S. consumers from tariff-related pain.

“I think those lower [commodity] prices will work their way through the system in a positive way, which means the inflation problem will solve itself,” he said. “Remember, weaker data gives Fed Chair Jerome Powell some wiggle room to pause his plans for three more rate hikes next year, rate hikes that I think could really hurt the economy if the data continues to show deceleration.”

Paired with Trump’s tweet, which sent stocks of companies that build their products in China higher, it was the “one-two punch” the stock market needed coming out of October, the “Mad Money” host said.

“If the Fed or the president blink for real, … we could have more upside,” he said. “But after this remarkable run indeed, let’s not get too greedy.”

Stocks ended the trading session mostly higher, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average capping off a more than 900-point gain over the last three days. The S&P 500 rose by 1 percent and the Nasdaq Composite climbed 1.7 percent.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-01  Authors: elizabeth gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, data, thaw, fed, way, stocks, hikes, weak, president, cramer, relations, manufacturing, sent, index, uschina, rate, prices, higher


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Japan needs China’s business and pacified US-China relations

China is now testing how far a more constructive relation with Japan may go in the context of a rapidly changing geopolitical landscape. And beware this red herring: The idea that Beijing suddenly warmed up to closer relations with Japan as a result of China’s weakening economy and a trade dispute with the U.S. is arrant nonsense. China, clearly, does not need Japan for the steady growth of its huge and rapidly expanding domestic market. Japan’s $206.1 billion in bilateral trade with China durin


China is now testing how far a more constructive relation with Japan may go in the context of a rapidly changing geopolitical landscape. And beware this red herring: The idea that Beijing suddenly warmed up to closer relations with Japan as a result of China’s weakening economy and a trade dispute with the U.S. is arrant nonsense. China, clearly, does not need Japan for the steady growth of its huge and rapidly expanding domestic market. Japan’s $206.1 billion in bilateral trade with China durin
Japan needs China’s business and pacified US-China relations Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-29  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch, kim kyung-hoon-pool, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, state, china, pacified, billion, trade, needs, chinas, japan, growth, foreign, uschina, trillion, rapidly, business, relations


Japan needs China's business and pacified US-China relations

The Japanese prime minister’s state visit to China last week was therefore a triumph of persistence — six years of an incredible political tour de force.

Careful, though. Abe is on probation (just take a look at that handshake at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse). China is now testing how far a more constructive relation with Japan may go in the context of a rapidly changing geopolitical landscape. The Chinese know that Abe flunked a similar test with Russia, which will probably cost him one of the apparently dearest objectives of his political career.

And beware this red herring: The idea that Beijing suddenly warmed up to closer relations with Japan as a result of China’s weakening economy and a trade dispute with the U.S. is arrant nonsense.

In fact, China’s economy is in good shape. The gross domestic product growth was 6.7 percent in the first three quarters of this year. Inflation is stable (2.5 percent in September), public finances are sound (a budget deficit of 3 percent of GDP and public debt of $5.2 trillion, or 47.6 percent of GDP), and there is a trade surplus on goods and services of $70 billion, with a whopping $3 trillion stashed in foreign exchange reserves.

China, clearly, does not need Japan for the steady growth of its huge and rapidly expanding domestic market. And neither is China desperate for Japanese investments. According to the latest United Nations numbers, China was the world’s largest recipient of foreign direct investments in the first half of this year. During that period, China got $70 billion in FDI inflows, a 6 percent increase from the year-earlier, despite a 41 percent global decline for trans-border direct investments.

It is also ridiculous to think that China needed Japan as an ally in its trade dispute with the U.S.

No, Abe’s comment in 2012 about the importance of China for Japan’s economic growth is more valid today than six years ago, and his Herculean efforts to patch up relations with China are testimony to his extraordinary dedication to his country’s welfare.

Japan’s $206.1 billion in bilateral trade with China during the first eight months of this year is by far the largest segment of Tokyo’s foreign trade transactions. The U.S., with a bilateral trade business of $143.8 billion, comes in as a distant second.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-29  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch, kim kyung-hoon-pool, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, state, china, pacified, billion, trade, needs, chinas, japan, growth, foreign, uschina, trillion, rapidly, business, relations


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China, Japan to forge closer ties at ‘historic turning point’

Abe said on Friday that bilateral relations with China are at an “historic turning point” and that he expects new possibilities in industries such as infrastructure, logistics, healthcare and finance. He has held “frank” discussions with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang since arriving in Beijing on Thursday and is expected to meet with Xi later on Friday in the first full-scale Sino-Japanese summit since 2011. Efforts in advancing China-Japan ties should “persevere unremittingly to prevent the appeara


Abe said on Friday that bilateral relations with China are at an “historic turning point” and that he expects new possibilities in industries such as infrastructure, logistics, healthcare and finance. He has held “frank” discussions with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang since arriving in Beijing on Thursday and is expected to meet with Xi later on Friday in the first full-scale Sino-Japanese summit since 2011. Efforts in advancing China-Japan ties should “persevere unremittingly to prevent the appeara
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Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, japan, forge, chinese, abe, closer, china, healthy, ties, chinajapan, turning, held, li, discussions, historic, stable, relations, point


China, Japan to forge closer ties at 'historic turning point'

Abe said on Friday that bilateral relations with China are at an “historic turning point” and that he expects new possibilities in industries such as infrastructure, logistics, healthcare and finance.

He has held “frank” discussions with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang since arriving in Beijing on Thursday and is expected to meet with Xi later on Friday in the first full-scale Sino-Japanese summit since 2011.

Efforts in advancing China-Japan ties should “persevere unremittingly to prevent the appearance of new twists and turns” so that previous efforts did not go to waste, said Li at a joint briefing with Abe on Friday.

“The Chinese side is willing to work with the Japanese side to return to a normal track, and maintain the stable, sustained and healthy development of bilateral relations,” he said, adding that he had held candid discussions with Abe since his arrival on matters of mutual concerns.

They reached consensus, Li said, that safeguarding long-term healthy and stable China-Japan ties was in accordance with the interests of both countries and the region and the world.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-26
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Trade war hostility may be keeping US-China military relations in a state of friction

Military ties between the world’s two largest economies could remain at a deadlock until both parties make progress on thorny political and economic issues, strategists predict. Mattis and Wei also discussed an existing invitation for Wei to visit Washington, the Associated Press reported. However, it’s unclear whether talks can meaningfully improve military links, which have suffered as the trade war spills over into other aspects of the U.S.-China relationship. “Traditionally, military ties la


Military ties between the world’s two largest economies could remain at a deadlock until both parties make progress on thorny political and economic issues, strategists predict. Mattis and Wei also discussed an existing invitation for Wei to visit Washington, the Associated Press reported. However, it’s unclear whether talks can meaningfully improve military links, which have suffered as the trade war spills over into other aspects of the U.S.-China relationship. “Traditionally, military ties la
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-19  Authors: nyshka chandran, thomas watkins afp getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, uschina, state, friction, wei, keeping, military, ties, mattis, economic, issues, progress, security, hostility, relations, war


Trade war hostility may be keeping US-China military relations in a state of friction

Military ties between the world’s two largest economies could remain at a deadlock until both parties make progress on thorny political and economic issues, strategists predict.

In an effort to ease diplomatic hostilities that spiked following U.S. Vice President Mike Pence’s sharp critique of Beijing earlier this month, U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis met Chinese Defense Minister Wei Fenghe on the sidelines of an Asian security summit in Singapore on Thursday.

No new agreements were announced, but Chinese media reported that both sides agreed to deepen trust during the hour-and-a-half discussion. Mattis and Wei also discussed an existing invitation for Wei to visit Washington, the Associated Press reported.

However, it’s unclear whether talks can meaningfully improve military links, which have suffered as the trade war spills over into other aspects of the U.S.-China relationship.

“Substantive issues will need to be addressed before the U.S. and China can continue military dialogue,” said Alexander Neill, senior fellow for Asia-Pacific security at The International Institute for Strategic Studies. “Traditionally, military ties lag behind other areas of the bilateral relationship so I don’t think any progress can be made until the trade war and other economic issues get sorted out.”

The two superpowers have already scaled down several high-level security engagements amid ongoing trade concerns.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-19  Authors: nyshka chandran, thomas watkins afp getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, uschina, state, friction, wei, keeping, military, ties, mattis, economic, issues, progress, security, hostility, relations, war


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China’s Commerce Ministry: We’re holding out hope for better-than-ever US relations

China would still like to have a close economic relationship with the U.S. despite current trade tensions, the Asian nation’s Ministry of Commerce said Thursday. In the last several months, the Trump administration has levied tariffs on an increasing amount of imports from China. China countered with its own tariffs on $60 billion worth of goods from its largest trading partner. That followed tit-for-tat tariffs on $50 billion worth of imports from the other. “At this time, most businesses are s


China would still like to have a close economic relationship with the U.S. despite current trade tensions, the Asian nation’s Ministry of Commerce said Thursday. In the last several months, the Trump administration has levied tariffs on an increasing amount of imports from China. China countered with its own tariffs on $60 billion worth of goods from its largest trading partner. That followed tit-for-tat tariffs on $50 billion worth of imports from the other. “At this time, most businesses are s
China’s Commerce Ministry: We’re holding out hope for better-than-ever US relations Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-18  Authors: evelyn cheng, li huisi, china news service, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, commerce, chinas, face, china, worth, tariffs, gao, imports, betterthanever, economic, holding, relations, goods, hope, billion, trade, ministry


China's Commerce Ministry: We're holding out hope for better-than-ever US relations

China would still like to have a close economic relationship with the U.S. despite current trade tensions, the Asian nation’s Ministry of Commerce said Thursday.

“We believe the overall trend (toward deeper exchange) will not reverse,” spokesperson Gao Feng said during a press briefing, according to a CNBC translation. “(We) hope the U.S. and China can look beyond the current situation and realize an even closer economic and trade cooperation with mutual benefits that resonate between the two business communities.”

In the last several months, the Trump administration has levied tariffs on an increasing amount of imports from China. The rate of U.S. duties on the latest $200 billion of Chinese goods is also set to increase to 25 percent from 10 percent at the end of the year. China countered with its own tariffs on $60 billion worth of goods from its largest trading partner. That followed tit-for-tat tariffs on $50 billion worth of imports from the other.

But the world’s second-largest economy is still relatively more reliant on exports than the U.S. is on imports.

While the effect on most Chinese companies is limited, those whose products have a weaker competitive edge will face a definite impact, Gao said.

“At this time, most businesses are still full of confidence in the face of these challenges,” he added. “Individual governments will also implement appropriate measures to help businesses and workers cope any difficulties that may appear.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-18  Authors: evelyn cheng, li huisi, china news service, getty images
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US ‘strategic interests’ are likely to shape response to Saudi Arabia, expert says

A look at the future of US-Saudi Arabia relations 13 Hours Ago | 03:25Despite reports suggesting the Saudi Arabian government was involved in the disappearance of U.S.-based journalist Jamal Khashoggi, Washington is likely to prioritize maintaining its relations with Riyadh, according to a think tank expert. Khashoggi, a Washington Post columnist and critic of powerful Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, vanished two weeks ago after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul to retrieve docume


A look at the future of US-Saudi Arabia relations 13 Hours Ago | 03:25Despite reports suggesting the Saudi Arabian government was involved in the disappearance of U.S.-based journalist Jamal Khashoggi, Washington is likely to prioritize maintaining its relations with Riyadh, according to a think tank expert. Khashoggi, a Washington Post columnist and critic of powerful Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, vanished two weeks ago after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul to retrieve docume
US ‘strategic interests’ are likely to shape response to Saudi Arabia, expert says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-16  Authors: harini v, ozan kose, afp, getty images
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US 'strategic interests' are likely to shape response to Saudi Arabia, expert says

A look at the future of US-Saudi Arabia relations 13 Hours Ago | 03:25

Despite reports suggesting the Saudi Arabian government was involved in the disappearance of U.S.-based journalist Jamal Khashoggi, Washington is likely to prioritize maintaining its relations with Riyadh, according to a think tank expert.

Khashoggi, a Washington Post columnist and critic of powerful Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, vanished two weeks ago after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul to retrieve documents. Saudi Arabia has so far denied any wrongdoing.

NBC News reported on Monday that Riyadh is considering a plan to say Khashoggi was killed inside the consulate, potentially pointing to rogue operatives in an interrogation gone wrong.

Nevertheless, U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration is likely to continue strengthening its relationship with ally Saudi Arabia despite concerns about Riyadh’s potential involvement in the journalist’s disappearance, according to Emily Hawthorne, Middle East and North Africa analyst at geopolitical think tank Stratfor.

“I don’t think this administration is looking as hard into issues of human rights” compared to strategic alliances with partners that promise “mutual benefit,” Hawthorne said, noting that the United States has many ongoing strategic concerns in the Middle East.

Some of America’s concerns include Iran, oil markets and arms sales, she added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-16  Authors: harini v, ozan kose, afp, getty images
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US-Saudi relations are imperiled by journalist Jamal Khashoggi’s disappearance

“We want to have a relationship with Saudi Arabia. It’s also Trump, who has long-standing business ties to Saudi Arabia. Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., voiced doubt there would be support in Congress for another arms sale to Saudi Arabia — though lawmakers haven’t blocked sales before. He also called for at least a temporary halt in U.S. military support for the Saudi bombing campaign in Yemen. Murphy tweeted that if Saudi Arabia is found complicit in Khashoggi’s death, it should be viewed as a “fu


“We want to have a relationship with Saudi Arabia. It’s also Trump, who has long-standing business ties to Saudi Arabia. Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., voiced doubt there would be support in Congress for another arms sale to Saudi Arabia — though lawmakers haven’t blocked sales before. He also called for at least a temporary halt in U.S. military support for the Saudi bombing campaign in Yemen. Murphy tweeted that if Saudi Arabia is found complicit in Khashoggi’s death, it should be viewed as a “fu
US-Saudi relations are imperiled by journalist Jamal Khashoggi’s disappearance Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-12  Authors: jabin botsford, the washington post, getty images, jacquelyn martin
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, support, ussaudi, prescott, peace, disappearance, relations, administration, relationship, arabia, khashoggis, theyre, imperiled, saudi, journalist, congress, jamal, trump


US-Saudi relations are imperiled by journalist Jamal Khashoggi's disappearance

The two men — both in their 30s, both trusted aides of older, familial leaders — struck a bond. As their countries’ chief negotiators on Israeli-Palestinian peace, Kushner and the Saudi prince were both looking to make a name for themselves on the world stage and consulted with each other frequently over the following months.

Kushner championed Crown Prince Mohammed to the president and senior foreign policy officials, some of whom expressed wariness at the embrace of MBS, as he is known in diplomatic circles.

The two men’s relationship also played a key role in Riyadh becoming the unlikely first stop on Trump’s maiden international trip in May 2017. Trump, despite endorsing a travel ban on Muslims during his campaign, became the first U.S. president to make his official first trip to an Islamic nation.

Relations between the two countries are complex because they are entwined on energy, military, economic and intelligence issues. The Trump administration has aggressively courted the Saudis for support of its Middle East agenda to counter Iranian influence, fight extremism and forge peace between Israel and the Palestinians.

“We want to have a relationship with Saudi Arabia. They’re a strategic partner. They’re a mortal enemy of the Iranians. They’re helping us on terrorism,” said Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., a Trump supporter and top member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

“Having said all that, if this did happen — and it’s increasingly likely that something bad happened to this man at the hands of the Saudi government — that shows contempt for us. That’s disrespectful to us. It puts people like me in a box who’ve been one of the leading champions of the relationship.”

It’s not just Graham who’s in a box. It’s also Trump, who has long-standing business ties to Saudi Arabia.

Jeff Prescott, who was senior director for the Middle East at the National Security Council during the Obama administration, said that a reassessment of the U.S. relationship with Saudi Arabia is overdue and that Trump should raise U.S. complaints with Saudi leaders.

“What the Trump administration has given Saudi Arabia is a green light to pursue any policy,” said Prescott, now executive director of National Security Action, a group of former officials opposed to the Trump administration. “The key question is whether Republicans will have the courage to force the administration to have a reckoning of the relationship.”

He said Kushner’s project to forge peace between Israel and the Palestinians also could be in jeopardy.

“There is no question that a rift with Saudi Arabia — or even relations strained by pressure from Congress — would make an already bleak prospect even less likely,” Prescott said.

In Congress, there is a push for sanctions under a human rights law, and lawmakers are questioning American support for the Saudi-led bombing campaign against Iranian-backed rebels in Yemen. The U.S. has raised concerns previously about heavy civilian casualties caused by the Saudi-led coalition fighting in Yemen.

Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., voiced doubt there would be support in Congress for another arms sale to Saudi Arabia — though lawmakers haven’t blocked sales before. He also called for at least a temporary halt in U.S. military support for the Saudi bombing campaign in Yemen. Murphy tweeted that if Saudi Arabia is found complicit in Khashoggi’s death, it should be viewed as a “fundamental break in our relationship with Saudi Arabia.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-12  Authors: jabin botsford, the washington post, getty images, jacquelyn martin
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, support, ussaudi, prescott, peace, disappearance, relations, administration, relationship, arabia, khashoggis, theyre, imperiled, saudi, journalist, congress, jamal, trump


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Asia markets: US-China relations, Fed, currencies in focus

Asia markets saw broad declines on the final trading day of the week, following a tumble overnight on Wall Street. The Nikkei 225 was down by 0.8 percent to close at 23,783.72, while the Topix index slipped by 0.47 percent to 1,792.65. Meanwhile, Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index slid by 0.19 percent to close at 26,572.57, with computer maker Lenovo’s stock dropping by 15.1 percent. Down Under, the ASX 200 bucked the overall trend to edge up 0.15 percent to close at 6,185.5, with the energy sector als


Asia markets saw broad declines on the final trading day of the week, following a tumble overnight on Wall Street. The Nikkei 225 was down by 0.8 percent to close at 23,783.72, while the Topix index slipped by 0.47 percent to 1,792.65. Meanwhile, Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index slid by 0.19 percent to close at 26,572.57, with computer maker Lenovo’s stock dropping by 15.1 percent. Down Under, the ASX 200 bucked the overall trend to edge up 0.15 percent to close at 6,185.5, with the energy sector als
Asia markets: US-China relations, Fed, currencies in focus Cached Page below :
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Asia markets: US-China relations, Fed, currencies in focus

Asia markets saw broad declines on the final trading day of the week, following a tumble overnight on Wall Street.

The Nikkei 225 was down by 0.8 percent to close at 23,783.72, while the Topix index slipped by 0.47 percent to 1,792.65.

In South Korea, the Kospi slid 0.31 percent to close at 2,267.52, as shares of heavyweight Samsung Electronics ended largely flat despite earlier saying that its third-quarter operating profit was likely to have risen to a record high.

Meanwhile, Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index slid by 0.19 percent to close at 26,572.57, with computer maker Lenovo’s stock dropping by 15.1 percent.

Down Under, the ASX 200 bucked the overall trend to edge up 0.15 percent to close at 6,185.5, with the energy sector also higher by 0.15 percent. Oil and gas explorer Beach Energy, which had earlier announced the sale of a 40 percent stake in its Victorian Otway gas assets and trimmed its earnings guidance for fiscal year 2019, saw its stock fall by 3.65 percent.

China’s markets were closed for the Golden Week holiday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-05  Authors: eustance huang
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The new NAFTA deal doesn’t mean US-China trade relations are about to improve

A last-gasp deal to salvage the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) does nothing to improve the prospect of a meaningful breakthrough in the U.S.-China trade war, one market expert told CNBC on Monday. Just hours before a midnight deadline, U.S. and Canadian officials reached a deal to revamp NAFTA, which also includes Mexico, after more than a year of grueling negotiations. Until recently, Canada appeared to be on the brink of being excluded from a final agreement but negotiations over


A last-gasp deal to salvage the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) does nothing to improve the prospect of a meaningful breakthrough in the U.S.-China trade war, one market expert told CNBC on Monday. Just hours before a midnight deadline, U.S. and Canadian officials reached a deal to revamp NAFTA, which also includes Mexico, after more than a year of grueling negotiations. Until recently, Canada appeared to be on the brink of being excluded from a final agreement but negotiations over
The new NAFTA deal doesn’t mean US-China trade relations are about to improve Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-01  Authors: sam meredith, rebecca cook
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nafta, breakthrough, market, deal, relations, agreement, weekend, expert, mean, war, improve, trade, doesnt, uschina, told


The new NAFTA deal doesn't mean US-China trade relations are about to improve

A last-gasp deal to salvage the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) does nothing to improve the prospect of a meaningful breakthrough in the U.S.-China trade war, one market expert told CNBC on Monday.

Just hours before a midnight deadline, U.S. and Canadian officials reached a deal to revamp NAFTA, which also includes Mexico, after more than a year of grueling negotiations.

Until recently, Canada appeared to be on the brink of being excluded from a final agreement but negotiations over the weekend eventually culminated in all three countries signing up to the new United States-Mexico-Canada (USMCA) accord.

However, one market expert cautioned the new NAFTA deal shouldn’t be seen as a sign that there could soon be a breakthrough in troubled trade relations between the U.S. and China.

“I do believe that unfortunately the China story is a lot more complicated (than NAFTA talks),” Luis Costa, head of CEEMEA FX and rates strategy at Citibank, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe” on Monday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-01  Authors: sam meredith, rebecca cook
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nafta, breakthrough, market, deal, relations, agreement, weekend, expert, mean, war, improve, trade, doesnt, uschina, told


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