‘It is impossible’ for US-Russia relations to improve while sanctions are in place, Deripaska says

Russian tycoon Oleg Deripaska, a close confidant of Russian President Vladimir Putin, said on Sunday that Moscow and Washington are more interested in “muscle flexing” than improving their relationship. Asked whether he has hopes of thawing tensions between Russia and the West while economic sanctions are in place, Deripaska replied: “The way I see it, from the U.S. side, it is impossible.” “If you look at the reality, Russian people (and) American people, they don’t hate each other,” he told CN


Russian tycoon Oleg Deripaska, a close confidant of Russian President Vladimir Putin, said on Sunday that Moscow and Washington are more interested in “muscle flexing” than improving their relationship. Asked whether he has hopes of thawing tensions between Russia and the West while economic sanctions are in place, Deripaska replied: “The way I see it, from the U.S. side, it is impossible.” “If you look at the reality, Russian people (and) American people, they don’t hate each other,” he told CN
‘It is impossible’ for US-Russia relations to improve while sanctions are in place, Deripaska says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: sam meredith, natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, place, impossible, way, improve, treasury, deripaska, flexing, muscle, sanctions, russian, wider, moscow, relations, west, usrussia


'It is impossible' for US-Russia relations to improve while sanctions are in place, Deripaska says

Russian tycoon Oleg Deripaska, a close confidant of Russian President Vladimir Putin, said on Sunday that Moscow and Washington are more interested in “muscle flexing” than improving their relationship.

Asked whether he has hopes of thawing tensions between Russia and the West while economic sanctions are in place, Deripaska replied: “The way I see it, from the U.S. side, it is impossible.”

“If you look at the reality, Russian people (and) American people, they don’t hate each other,” he told CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore during an exclusive interview in Moscow. “In the heart of the Russian people, I think there is room to go and start a new page but the problem is all of this muscle flexing from both sides.”

Deripaska on Friday filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Treasury Department to lift the sanctions it placed on him last year as part of a wider retaliation for Russian interference in the U.S. election and what the Treasury described as its “malign activity around the globe.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: sam meredith, natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, place, impossible, way, improve, treasury, deripaska, flexing, muscle, sanctions, russian, wider, moscow, relations, west, usrussia


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India-Pakistan situation is ‘very worrying’: Council on Foreign Relations

India-Pakistan situation is ‘very worrying’: Council on Foreign Relations14 Hours AgoSaudi Arabia indicated that it wants to help to de-escalate tensions between India and Pakistan. Alyssa Ayres of the Council on Foreign Relations said it would be “fairly difficult” for a Saudi leader to play a “mediating” role.


India-Pakistan situation is ‘very worrying’: Council on Foreign Relations14 Hours AgoSaudi Arabia indicated that it wants to help to de-escalate tensions between India and Pakistan. Alyssa Ayres of the Council on Foreign Relations said it would be “fairly difficult” for a Saudi leader to play a “mediating” role.
India-Pakistan situation is ‘very worrying’: Council on Foreign Relations Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, indiapakistan, relations, situation, wants, worrying, saudi, tensions, role, council, relations14, foreign


India-Pakistan situation is 'very worrying': Council on Foreign Relations

India-Pakistan situation is ‘very worrying’: Council on Foreign Relations

14 Hours Ago

Saudi Arabia indicated that it wants to help to de-escalate tensions between India and Pakistan. Alyssa Ayres of the Council on Foreign Relations said it would be “fairly difficult” for a Saudi leader to play a “mediating” role.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, indiapakistan, relations, situation, wants, worrying, saudi, tensions, role, council, relations14, foreign


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US, China could reach a ‘midway’ deal: Former South Korean trade min

US, China could reach a ‘midway’ deal: Former South Korean trade min5:30 PM ET Tue, 12 Feb 2019Kim Jong-hoon, a professor at Yonsei University, says a big deal between the U.S. and China cannot be done “safely” before the March deadline. He says he expects a deal but it won’t be in its “final form.” He also weighs in on South Korea-China relations.


US, China could reach a ‘midway’ deal: Former South Korean trade min5:30 PM ET Tue, 12 Feb 2019Kim Jong-hoon, a professor at Yonsei University, says a big deal between the U.S. and China cannot be done “safely” before the March deadline. He says he expects a deal but it won’t be in its “final form.” He also weighs in on South Korea-China relations.
US, China could reach a ‘midway’ deal: Former South Korean trade min Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, min, midway, relations, wont, reach, korean, china, south, deal, yonsei, university, trade, weighs, safely


US, China could reach a 'midway' deal: Former South Korean trade min

US, China could reach a ‘midway’ deal: Former South Korean trade min

5:30 PM ET Tue, 12 Feb 2019

Kim Jong-hoon, a professor at Yonsei University, says a big deal between the U.S. and China cannot be done “safely” before the March deadline. He says he expects a deal but it won’t be in its “final form.” He also weighs in on South Korea-China relations.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, min, midway, relations, wont, reach, korean, china, south, deal, yonsei, university, trade, weighs, safely


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Italian and French relations are falling apart fast. Here’s why

France has now recalled its ambassador to Italy following months of escalating tension, but why has it got so heated between the two — normally cordial — European neighbors? The latest verbal skirmish between the European countries came after Italian Deputy Prime Minister Luigi Di Maio crossed the border to meet with the French anti-government protesters known as the “gilet jaunes” (yellow vests) just outside Paris. Di Maio took to Twitter to say the “winds of change had crossed the Alps” before


France has now recalled its ambassador to Italy following months of escalating tension, but why has it got so heated between the two — normally cordial — European neighbors? The latest verbal skirmish between the European countries came after Italian Deputy Prime Minister Luigi Di Maio crossed the border to meet with the French anti-government protesters known as the “gilet jaunes” (yellow vests) just outside Paris. Di Maio took to Twitter to say the “winds of change had crossed the Alps” before
Italian and French relations are falling apart fast. Here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-08  Authors: david reid, brian snyder, andrea ronchini, nurphoto, getty images, simona granati – corbis, corbis news
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, winds, relations, falling, crossed, apart, heres, french, protesters, european, workingclass, italy, maio, italian, yellow, fast


Italian and French relations are falling apart fast. Here's why

France has now recalled its ambassador to Italy following months of escalating tension, but why has it got so heated between the two — normally cordial — European neighbors?

The latest verbal skirmish between the European countries came after Italian Deputy Prime Minister Luigi Di Maio crossed the border to meet with the French anti-government protesters known as the “gilet jaunes” (yellow vests) just outside Paris.

Di Maio took to Twitter to say the “winds of change had crossed the Alps” before inviting the protesters to a follow-up meeting in Rome.

The 32-year-old is the leader of the Italian populist Five Star Movement (M5S) and sees the French protests, with its rural and working-class roots, as a natural ally to his own party’s cause in Italy.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-08  Authors: david reid, brian snyder, andrea ronchini, nurphoto, getty images, simona granati – corbis, corbis news
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, winds, relations, falling, crossed, apart, heres, french, protesters, european, workingclass, italy, maio, italian, yellow, fast


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Pope calls for Yemen relief as he heads to UAE

“The people are exhausted by the long conflict and many children are hungry, but humanitarian aid isn’t accessible,” Francis said in his noontime Sunday blessing. The Catholic Church believes there are some 1 million Catholics in the UAE. Vaidyanathan, who converted from Hinduism to Catholicism while living in Dubai, said the Emirates’ religious tolerance is commendable given the trends of the region. He dodged a question about whether Francis would raise Yemen’s yearslong war in his private tal


“The people are exhausted by the long conflict and many children are hungry, but humanitarian aid isn’t accessible,” Francis said in his noontime Sunday blessing. The Catholic Church believes there are some 1 million Catholics in the UAE. Vaidyanathan, who converted from Hinduism to Catholicism while living in Dubai, said the Emirates’ religious tolerance is commendable given the trends of the region. He dodged a question about whether Francis would raise Yemen’s yearslong war in his private tal
Pope calls for Yemen relief as he heads to UAE Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-03  Authors: alessandra benedetti – corbis, corbis news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, calls, catholic, humanitarian, public, yemens, emirates, relief, francis, uae, meeting, heads, yemen, relations, pope, religious


Pope calls for Yemen relief as he heads to UAE

Pope Francis made an urgent appeal for an end to the humanitarian crisis in Yemen on Sunday as he embarked on the first-ever papal trip to the Arabian Peninsula, where he is seeking to turn a page in Christian-Muslim relations while also ministering to a unique, thriving island of Catholicism.

Francis called for the urgent observation of a limited cease-fire reached in December and for food and medicine to get to Yemen’s people, who are suffering the world’s worst humanitarian crisis.

He made the appeal at the Vatican before boarding a plane to the United Arab Emirates, which has been Saudi Arabia’s main ally in its war in Yemen — a way to avoid embarrassing his hosts with a public call while in the region.

“The people are exhausted by the long conflict and many children are hungry, but humanitarian aid isn’t accessible,” Francis said in his noontime Sunday blessing. “The cries of these children and their parents rise up” to God.

Francis is travelling to Abu Dhabi to participate in a conference on interreligious dialogue sponsored the Emirates-based Muslim Council of Elders, an initiative that seeks to counter religious fanaticism by promoting a moderate brand of Islam. It’s the brainchild of Sheikh Ahmed el-Tayeb, the grand imam of Egypt’s Al-Azhar, the revered 1,000-year-old seat of Sunni Islam that trains clerics and scholars from around the world.

In a video message to the Emirates on the eve of his trip, Francis paid homage to his “friend and dear brother” el-Tayeb and praised his courage in calling the meeting to assert that “God unites and doesn’t divide.”

“I am pleased with this meeting offered by the Lord to write, on your dear land, a new page in the history of relations among religions and confirm that we are brothers despite our differences,” Francis said.

In a statement Saturday, Al-Azhar described the upcoming meeting as “historic” and praised the “deeply fraternal relationship” between its imam and the pope, which it said even includes birthday greetings.

Francis and el-Tayeb are to address the “Human Fraternity Meeting” Monday that has drawn not only Christian and Muslim representatives but hundreds of Jewish, Hindu, Buddhist and other Christian faith leaders. It’s all part of the Emirates’ “Year of Tolerance” and its effort to show its openness to other faiths in a region otherwise known for severe restrictions on religions outside of Islam.

“It’s something new for the Muslim world, that within the discussion of dialogue, they’re talking about interreligious dialogue across the board,” beyond basic Christian-Muslim relations, said Marco Impagliazzo, president of the Sant’Egidio Community, a Rome-based Catholic organization active in interfaith relations who will be attending the conference.

Francis’ other main initiative in Abu Dhabi is a giant Mass on Tuesday in the city’s main sports arena that is expected to draw some 135,000 people in what some have called the largest show of public Christian worship on the Arabian Peninsula. There, Francis will see firsthand a Catholic community that is big, diverse and dynamic, at a time when the wider Mideast has seen an exodus of Christians fleeing persecution at the hands of the Islamic State group and others.

Of the over 9 million people now living in the UAE, around 1 million are Emirati while the rest are foreigners drawn to the oil-rich federation to work in everything from white-collar finance to construction.

The Catholic Church believes there are some 1 million Catholics in the UAE. Most are Filipino and Indian, many of whom have left behind families for work and can face precarious labor conditions, which human rights groups regularly denounce.

“The church has a unique role because it becomes home,” said Brandon Vaidyanathan, chair of the sociology department at Catholic University in Washington, who grew up in Dubai. “It becomes a place of belonging” in a country where foreigners can live, work and practice their faith but will never gain citizenship.

Vaidyanathan, who converted from Hinduism to Catholicism while living in Dubai, said the Emirates’ religious tolerance is commendable given the trends of the region. He noted the “unprecedented” nature of the government’s invitation to Francis, its donation of lands for churches and even a recent decision to rename a mosque “Mother Mary of Jesus.”

Yet he pointed to the difference between freedom to worship and true religious freedom. Crosses, for example, can only be displayed inside churches, proselytizing for faiths other than Islam is banned and Muslims are forbidden from converting.

Francis will likely focus on issues of religious freedom and fraternity in his public remarks. Unlike all his other foreign trips, he will not deliver a political speech.

Vatican spokesman Alessandro Gisotti said the reason was to give greater emphasis to his speech to the interfaith conference. He dodged a question about whether Francis would raise Yemen’s yearslong war in his private talks with the Emirates’ ruler. The UAE is deeply involved in the Saudi-led war in the Arab world’s poorest country, where tens of thousands have been killed and millions face food and medical shortages.

“I don’t know if the Holy Father will confront it publicly or privately, but certainly on many occasions, even recently, he has underlined the need to search for peace in particular to guarantee the humanitarian rights of the population, especially children,” Gisotti said.

Aid groups working in Yemen hope Francis won’t just rely on his public appeals, but will use his visit to bring his message to the Emirati leadership in person.

CAFOD, the overseas aid group of the Catholic Church in England and Wales, recently joined a coalition of British humanitarian organizations in appealing for Yemen’s limited cease-fire to hold so that humanitarian aid can reach the most vulnerable.

“We have confidence in the greatness of the pope to be our advocate and the advocate for the Yemeni people,” said Giovanna Reda, CAFOD’s head of humanitarian programs for the Middle East.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-03  Authors: alessandra benedetti – corbis, corbis news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, calls, catholic, humanitarian, public, yemens, emirates, relief, francis, uae, meeting, heads, yemen, relations, pope, religious


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Here’s how US-Venezuela tensions got to the brink of crisis

The fraught relationship between the United States and Venezuela has come to a head. Amid a collapsing economy sparked by government corruption, social unrest and a global commodity bust, oil-rich nation faces even more uncertainty in the wake of President Donald Trump’s decision to back a Venezuelan opposition leader instead of President Nicolas Maduro. “I am the only president of Venezuela,” Maduro said in response to a White House statement recognizing 35-year-old Juan Guaido as the interim l


The fraught relationship between the United States and Venezuela has come to a head. Amid a collapsing economy sparked by government corruption, social unrest and a global commodity bust, oil-rich nation faces even more uncertainty in the wake of President Donald Trump’s decision to back a Venezuelan opposition leader instead of President Nicolas Maduro. “I am the only president of Venezuela,” Maduro said in response to a White House statement recognizing 35-year-old Juan Guaido as the interim l
Here’s how US-Venezuela tensions got to the brink of crisis Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-24  Authors: amanda macias, fred imbert, luis robayo, afp, getty images, juan barreto, maxim shemetov, marina lystseva, tass via getty images, us navy photo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, relations, usvenezuela, maduro, tensions, states, nicolas, heres, venezuela, venezuelan, state, regime, crisis, brink, united, president


Here's how US-Venezuela tensions got to the brink of crisis

The fraught relationship between the United States and Venezuela has come to a head.

Amid a collapsing economy sparked by government corruption, social unrest and a global commodity bust, oil-rich nation faces even more uncertainty in the wake of President Donald Trump’s decision to back a Venezuelan opposition leader instead of President Nicolas Maduro.

“I am the only president of Venezuela,” Maduro said in response to a White House statement recognizing 35-year-old Juan Guaido as the interim leader of Venezuela. “We do not want to return to the 20th century of gringo interventions and coups d’état,” Maduro added.

Maduro then gave all U.S. diplomatic personnel 72 hours to leave Venezuela.

The State Department said it would ignore the order because it “does not consider former president Nicolas Maduro to have the legal authority to break diplomatic relations with the United States or to declare our diplomats persona non grata.”

Read more: Venezuelan defense minister and Russia back Maduro

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Thursday that “the United States is ready to provide more than $20 million in humanitarian assistance to the people of Venezuela” in order to address the “severe food and medicine shortages.”

“The regime of former president Nicolas Maduro is illegitimate. His regime is morally bankrupt, it’s economically incompetent, and it is profoundly corrupt. It is undemocratic to the core,” Pompeo said adding that the U.S. did not arrive at this decision overnight.

These fast-moving developments have brought U.S.-Venezuelan relations to a boiling point after a nearly two-decade saga.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-24  Authors: amanda macias, fred imbert, luis robayo, afp, getty images, juan barreto, maxim shemetov, marina lystseva, tass via getty images, us navy photo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, relations, usvenezuela, maduro, tensions, states, nicolas, heres, venezuela, venezuelan, state, regime, crisis, brink, united, president


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Break in US-Venezuela relations raises fresh concerns for oil market and OPEC

A sudden escalation in long-burning tensions between the United States and Venezuela could have far-reaching ramifications in the oil market, where the Bolivarian Republic remains a significant player despite its plunging output. Shortly after President Donald Trump recognized Guaido, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro severed relations with the United States and gave U.S. diplomatic personnel 72 hours to leave the country. The latest development raises the prospect that the United States will


A sudden escalation in long-burning tensions between the United States and Venezuela could have far-reaching ramifications in the oil market, where the Bolivarian Republic remains a significant player despite its plunging output. Shortly after President Donald Trump recognized Guaido, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro severed relations with the United States and gave U.S. diplomatic personnel 72 hours to leave the country. The latest development raises the prospect that the United States will
Break in US-Venezuela relations raises fresh concerns for oil market and OPEC Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-23  Authors: tom dichristopher, wil riera, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, raises, venezuela, states, relations, united, president, venezuelan, break, opec, energy, republic, oil, usvenezuela, sanctions, concerns, fresh, trump, market


Break in US-Venezuela relations raises fresh concerns for oil market and OPEC

A sudden escalation in long-burning tensions between the United States and Venezuela could have far-reaching ramifications in the oil market, where the Bolivarian Republic remains a significant player despite its plunging output.

On Wednesday, the Trump administration announced it would back Venezuelan National Assembly leader Juan Guaido, who declared himself the country’s interim president earlier in the day. Shortly after President Donald Trump recognized Guaido, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro severed relations with the United States and gave U.S. diplomatic personnel 72 hours to leave the country.

The latest development raises the prospect that the United States will expand sanctions to U.S.-Venezuelan energy trade, a move that would be potentially devastating to Venezuela. The nation has seen its oil production crater in recent years, depriving the socialist republic of its lifeblood energy revenue and exacerbating a devastating economic crisis.

But the consequences could also ripple throughout the broader oil market and complicate OPEC’s relationship with the United States.

RBC Capital Markets is already forecasting an additional drop of 300,000 to 500,00 barrels a day from Venezuela in 2019. If the Trump administration pulls the trigger on energy sanctions, those declines could balloon to several hundred thousand more barrels, says Helima Croft, global head of commodity strategy at RBC.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-23  Authors: tom dichristopher, wil riera, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, raises, venezuela, states, relations, united, president, venezuelan, break, opec, energy, republic, oil, usvenezuela, sanctions, concerns, fresh, trump, market


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‘Nobody likes American sanctions,’ Russia’s VTB Bank chief says

Majority state-owned VTB bank was placed on a U.S. Ukraine-related sanctions list in 2014. Andrey Kostin was added to a 2018 list of sanctioned individuals as he was deemed to be a government official. He told CNBC last May that the decision to put him on the list was “unfair.” “I don’t think European companies like (the secondary) sanctions that they’re facing either on (doing business with) Iran or Russia. He added that global economic growth could be at risk as a result of fractious global re


Majority state-owned VTB bank was placed on a U.S. Ukraine-related sanctions list in 2014. Andrey Kostin was added to a 2018 list of sanctioned individuals as he was deemed to be a government official. He told CNBC last May that the decision to put him on the list was “unfair.” “I don’t think European companies like (the secondary) sanctions that they’re facing either on (doing business with) Iran or Russia. He added that global economic growth could be at risk as a result of fractious global re
‘Nobody likes American sanctions,’ Russia’s VTB Bank chief says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-22  Authors: holly ellyatt, andrey rudakov, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, economic, trade, global, american, development, likes, russias, vtb, bank, project, list, sanctions, relations, russia, chief, business


'Nobody likes American sanctions,' Russia's VTB Bank chief says

Majority state-owned VTB bank was placed on a U.S. Ukraine-related sanctions list in 2014. Andrey Kostin was added to a 2018 list of sanctioned individuals as he was deemed to be a government official. He told CNBC last May that the decision to put him on the list was “unfair.”

European companies doing business with Russia, specifically on the construction of the ‘Nord Stream 2′ gas pipeline project, have also been threatened with secondary sanctions by the U.S.

Kostin said that threat was a negative development but said there were better chances to a rapprochement with Europe if relations surrounding Ukraine improved.

“I don’t think European companies like (the secondary) sanctions that they’re facing either on (doing business with) Iran or Russia. And it creates certain restrictions for the development of relations between Russia and Europe as well, particularly on the Nord Stream 2 (gas pipeline project), but the project is still going ahead, as far as I understand. But of course, its future is not quite clear though.”

Commenting on the wider global outlook as world leaders and business heads meet in Switzerland at the annual economic forum, Kostin said he had little expectation of the U.S.’ trade war with China and its fraught relations with Russia being resolved any time soon.

“From the meetings I’ve had in Davos over the last couple of days, I’ve heard the opinion from American counterparts that we shouldn’t expect for the next two years any change of heart on the part of the U.S. administration regarding Russia or China. So I’m afraid we have a couple of years ahead where we’ll not be in a position to change this trend very much,” he said.

Kostin suggested it was becoming harder for Russia to forge alliances, saying “the problem is that I think it’s more and more difficult for Russia to find a counterpart with whom we should agree on certain things.”

He added that global economic growth could be at risk as a result of fractious global relations.

“Davos was always about globalization and freedom of trade and the development of cooperation and what we’re seeing now is a lot of conflicts between different countries in the area of trade, the economy and conflicts inside countries like growing division in the U.S. … so it all raises concerns about future economic growth.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-22  Authors: holly ellyatt, andrey rudakov, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, economic, trade, global, american, development, likes, russias, vtb, bank, project, list, sanctions, relations, russia, chief, business


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Cuban minister warns the White House on allowing courts to fight over the country’s property

A Cuban government minister warned the U.S. State Department that plans to allow legal action over property in the country would create a big mess for both Cuba and the United States. The White House has moved toward allowing thousands of Cuban Americans to sue companies and individuals who have taken ownership of real estate in Cuba that was previously seized from them by the government. It is estimated around $9 billion worth of property could be fought over in the courts. He said recent strid


A Cuban government minister warned the U.S. State Department that plans to allow legal action over property in the country would create a big mess for both Cuba and the United States. The White House has moved toward allowing thousands of Cuban Americans to sue companies and individuals who have taken ownership of real estate in Cuba that was previously seized from them by the government. It is estimated around $9 billion worth of property could be fought over in the courts. He said recent strid
Cuban minister warns the White House on allowing courts to fight over the country’s property Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-22  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, minister, countrys, world, sue, state, relations, warns, cuba, white, allowing, cuban, courts, foreign, fight, property, sector, house


Cuban minister warns the White House on allowing courts to fight over the country's property

A Cuban government minister warned the U.S. State Department that plans to allow legal action over property in the country would create a big mess for both Cuba and the United States.

The White House has moved toward allowing thousands of Cuban Americans to sue companies and individuals who have taken ownership of real estate in Cuba that was previously seized from them by the government.

Speaking at the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Cuba’s Minister of Foreign Trade and Foreign Investment, Rodrigo Malmierca Diaz, said such an act could create legal problems all around the world.

“That would be a big mess not only for Cuba but for the U.S. and all the countries in the world who have business in Cuba,” he said.

Title III of the Helms-Burton Act of 1996 has provided for people to sue over confiscated properties in Cuba but successive U.S. presidents have suspended its legality. It is estimated around $9 billion worth of property could be fought over in the courts.

Malmierca Diaz is the first Cuban official to be sent to Davos in the last decade as the Caribbean island steps up its socio-economic opening. He said recent strides to liberalize Cuba had been made easier under former U.S. President Barack Obama.

“The blockade was always there but President Obama took measures to normalize relations. For example, Obama extended licences for a number of companies to do businesses in Cuba,” he said, before adding that relations with the White House had cooled under President Donald Trump’s stewardship.

He said Cuba’s three-pronged economic plan was to separate the state from public businesses, expand the private sector, and attract more foreign investment. “We want an efficient economy to help pay the bills of the social sector,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-22  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, minister, countrys, world, sue, state, relations, warns, cuba, white, allowing, cuban, courts, foreign, fight, property, sector, house


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Gridlock over US border wall is ‘fundamentally silly’: Expert

Gridlock over US border wall is ‘fundamentally silly’: Expert19 Hours AgoEdward Alden of the Council on Fore­­­ign Relations says the U.S. public is “frustrated” by the inability of American leaders to seriously tackle problems in the country’s border with Mexico.


Gridlock over US border wall is ‘fundamentally silly’: Expert19 Hours AgoEdward Alden of the Council on Fore­­­ign Relations says the U.S. public is “frustrated” by the inability of American leaders to seriously tackle problems in the country’s border with Mexico.
Gridlock over US border wall is ‘fundamentally silly’: Expert Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, seriously, silly, leaders, public, fundamentally, expert, gridlock, wall, problems, border, tackle, relations, mexico


Gridlock over US border wall is 'fundamentally silly': Expert

Gridlock over US border wall is ‘fundamentally silly’: Expert

19 Hours Ago

Edward Alden of the Council on Fore­­­ign Relations says the U.S. public is “frustrated” by the inability of American leaders to seriously tackle problems in the country’s border with Mexico.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, seriously, silly, leaders, public, fundamentally, expert, gridlock, wall, problems, border, tackle, relations, mexico


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