December’s ISM non-manufacturing index signals better-than-expected expansion

The Institute for Supply Management’s non-manufacturing index climbed to 55 last month from 53.9 in November. The services reading is a stark contrast from ISM’s manufacturing index, which fell last month to its lowest level since June 2009. Employment in the sector decreased slightly last month from November, while prices were unchanged. China and the U.S. agreed in December to sign a so-called phase one trade deal this month. News of the partial resolution lifted sentiment in capital markets a


The Institute for Supply Management’s non-manufacturing index climbed to 55 last month from 53.9 in November.
The services reading is a stark contrast from ISM’s manufacturing index, which fell last month to its lowest level since June 2009.
Employment in the sector decreased slightly last month from November, while prices were unchanged.
China and the U.S. agreed in December to sign a so-called phase one trade deal this month.
News of the partial resolution lifted sentiment in capital markets a
December’s ISM non-manufacturing index signals better-than-expected expansion Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, index, nonmanufacturing, ism, signals, trade, services, resolution, supply, slightly, decembers, expansion, month, partial, respondents, sector, reading, betterthanexpected


December's ISM non-manufacturing index signals better-than-expected expansion

Servers fill glasses with water at guest’s tables before an event in Washington, D.C.

Activity in the U.S. services sector rose slightly in December as businesses felt relieved by a partial trade agreement between the U.S. and China, data released Tuesday showed.

The Institute for Supply Management’s non-manufacturing index climbed to 55 last month from 53.9 in November. Economists polled by Dow Jones expected the reading to come in at 54.3.

The services reading is a stark contrast from ISM’s manufacturing index, which fell last month to its lowest level since June 2009.

“The respondents are positive about the potential resolution on tariffs,” Anthony Nieves, chair of The Institute for Supply Management, said in a statement. “However, respondents continue to have difficulty with labor resources.”

Employment in the sector decreased slightly last month from November, while prices were unchanged. Business activity, meanwhile, climbed by 5.6 points to 57.2.

China and the U.S. agreed in December to sign a so-called phase one trade deal this month. President Donald Trump later said the agreement would be signed on Jan. 15.

News of the partial resolution lifted sentiment in capital markets and sent U.S. stocks to all-time highs heading into 2020.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, index, nonmanufacturing, ism, signals, trade, services, resolution, supply, slightly, decembers, expansion, month, partial, respondents, sector, reading, betterthanexpected


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

How to save money on 3 popular New Year’s resolutions

Many of the most popular resolutions focus on financial and physical well-being. One of the top resolutions in the survey was achieving financial goals — 51% of respondents with planned resolutions for 2020 said they wanted to save more money, pay off debts, or buy a new house in the coming year. Sticking to New Year’s resolutions doesn’t have to be expensive, and some pledges can even help you save money to put toward those 2020 financial goals. Here are a few tips to make some of the most popu


Many of the most popular resolutions focus on financial and physical well-being.
One of the top resolutions in the survey was achieving financial goals — 51% of respondents with planned resolutions for 2020 said they wanted to save more money, pay off debts, or buy a new house in the coming year.
Sticking to New Year’s resolutions doesn’t have to be expensive, and some pledges can even help you save money to put toward those 2020 financial goals.
Here are a few tips to make some of the most popu
How to save money on 3 popular New Year’s resolutions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: ben jay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, popular, money, membership, financial, respondents, resolutions, planned, goals, save, 2020, survey


How to save money on 3 popular New Year's resolutions

About 38% of Americans have a New Year’s resolution planned for 2020, according to a recent Urban Plates/Ipsos survey. If the trend from 2019 holds, just under half of those people will follow through on it. Many of the most popular resolutions focus on financial and physical well-being. People want to be smart with their money and lead healthier lives. One of the top resolutions in the survey was achieving financial goals — 51% of respondents with planned resolutions for 2020 said they wanted to save more money, pay off debts, or buy a new house in the coming year. Sticking to New Year’s resolutions doesn’t have to be expensive, and some pledges can even help you save money to put toward those 2020 financial goals. Here are a few tips to make some of the most popular resolutions work for your budget.

Eat healthier

Eating healthier tied with financial goals as a top resolution, with 51% of people in the Urban Plates survey saying they planned to do so — mainly by avoiding fast food and eating fewer processed foods. One easy way to save while sticking with this goal is by prepping more of your own meals instead of dining out. That gives you greater control over ingredients, which can make eating healthy easier. It can also be remarkably cost-effective. “If done smartly, I think cooking at home can save you at least 60% on food costs,” Beth Moncel of Budget Bytes recently told Grow. “It may take a little practice and learning a couple new skills, but I can easily make a meal for less than $5. Eating out can easily cost $15 per meal or more.”

Video by Jason Armesto

Work out, be more active, and lose weight

Half of survey respondents said they wanted to work out and/or be more active in 2020. For many, those goals go hand-in-hand with losing weight, which 42% cited as an aim. Joining a gym could help with all three, and as of 2018, the average membership cost $58 a month, according to Statistic Brain. But there are a few good ways to save before you even walk in for your first workout, including negotiating your membership deal and taking advantage of discounts offered through your employer or health insurer. Fitness trainer Nicole Hulley told Grow earlier this year that she recommends people pay on a monthly basis for the first few months, before you sign a longer-term contract. That gives you an opportunity to evaluate the gym and make sure it’s a fit for your budget and fitness needs. “If you’re not planning on taking all those group fitness classes or swimming in the pool, those things are really what drives up the membership price,” Hulley says. “You could easily go to a small, local gym for $45 a month, as opposed to all the fluff other gyms offer, which you end up paying for whether you use it or not.”

Be more environmentally friendly

Just under a quarter of survey respondents (22%) expressed a desire to be more environmentally friendly, via moves like recycling more and reducing waste or plastic use.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: ben jay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, popular, money, membership, financial, respondents, resolutions, planned, goals, save, 2020, survey


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Nearly 7% of Disney+ users with Netflix plan to cancel Netflix, survey shows

A small but significant group of Netflix and Disney+ users have told Bank of America they expect to cancel their Netflix subscriptions, rekindling concerns that new combatants in Wall Street’s “Streaming Wars” could hamstring current players. The bank’s survey of over 1,000 Americans showed that 6.5% of respondents using both services said they plan to terminate their Netflix accounts. Sixty-five percent of respondents said Disney+ was not a good substitute for Netflix, while 33% said it was. “O


A small but significant group of Netflix and Disney+ users have told Bank of America they expect to cancel their Netflix subscriptions, rekindling concerns that new combatants in Wall Street’s “Streaming Wars” could hamstring current players.
The bank’s survey of over 1,000 Americans showed that 6.5% of respondents using both services said they plan to terminate their Netflix accounts.
Sixty-five percent of respondents said Disney+ was not a good substitute for Netflix, while 33% said it was.
“O
Nearly 7% of Disney+ users with Netflix plan to cancel Netflix, survey shows Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-18  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, respondents, plan, shows, post, disney, survey, stock, schindler, cancel, content, users, sign, streaming, nearly, netflix


Nearly 7% of Disney+ users with Netflix plan to cancel Netflix, survey shows

A small but significant group of Netflix and Disney+ users have told Bank of America they expect to cancel their Netflix subscriptions, rekindling concerns that new combatants in Wall Street’s “Streaming Wars” could hamstring current players.

The bank’s survey of over 1,000 Americans showed that 6.5% of respondents using both services said they plan to terminate their Netflix accounts.

Analysts Nat Schindler and Justin Post cautioned, however, that they have doubts as to whether the survey’s respondents will follow through on their plans.

“We are skeptical that much of this churn is incremental or will be realized, with Bloomberg reporting Netflix had seen no increase in cancellations on 11/22, 10 days after the Disney+ launch,” they wrote.

But “this level of churn, if realized, could be higher than expectations,” they wrote. In other words, if people actually cancel Netflix subscriptions as fast as the BofA survey suggests, brokerages across Wall Street would have to readjust their revenue forecasts.

To be sure, Bank of America remains positive on Netflix as a whole and recommends investors buy the stock. If the stock performs as well as analysts Post and Schindler predict over the next 12 months, stakeholders will be up 35%, a healthy return for any stock trader and ahead of the S&P 500’s 2019 gain of 27%.

In fact, Bank of America found that, compared to its prior survey, overall cancellation intentions for Netflix fell slightly to 4% from 5%. Sixty-five percent of respondents said Disney+ was not a good substitute for Netflix, while 33% said it was.

“Our survey and company reports suggest healthy U.S. adoption of Disney+, but we are encouraged that most early Disney+ users do not see it as a substitute for Netflix,” Post and Schindler wrote. “While it is possible that there is some incremental churn from Disney+, it looks to be modest and we do not see any broad trend changes in our survey data compared to October.”

Still, Disney’s incursion into the streaming world represents one of the most strenuous tests yet for Netflix.

Analyst and investors alike have for weeks monitored streaming trends for any sign that Disney+’s trove of tried-and-true content like “Star Wars” and Marvel is either compelling enough to justify Americans’ use of both platforms or a substitution away from Netflix.

So even a marginal increase in the number of people saying they plan to cancel Netflix and stick with Disney could be a bad sign for the former.

To potentially make things tougher for Netflix, the competition shows little sign of easing as Amazon, Hulu and others compete for subscribers with original content and price warfare. While some have drilled down on big content spending and higher subscription fees, others have sought to offer more modest alternatives.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-18  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, respondents, plan, shows, post, disney, survey, stock, schindler, cancel, content, users, sign, streaming, nearly, netflix


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Travelers hesitant to fly the Boeing 737 Max, survey finds

Grounded Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are seen parked in an aerial photo at Boeing Field in Seattle, Washington, July 1, 2019. Travelers are concerned about the safety of the Boeing 737 Max and many will be hesitant to fly on it — even after regulators deem it safe, a survey released on Thursday found. A fifth of respondents said they would fly the Max immediately after it is reintroduced into airline fleets, the Bank of America Merrill Lynch survey found. More than 300 Boeing 737 Max planes were in


Grounded Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are seen parked in an aerial photo at Boeing Field in Seattle, Washington, July 1, 2019.
Travelers are concerned about the safety of the Boeing 737 Max and many will be hesitant to fly on it — even after regulators deem it safe, a survey released on Thursday found.
A fifth of respondents said they would fly the Max immediately after it is reintroduced into airline fleets, the Bank of America Merrill Lynch survey found.
More than 300 Boeing 737 Max planes were in
Travelers hesitant to fly the Boeing 737 Max, survey finds Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-12  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, finds, aircraft, boeing, fleets, 737, hesitant, travelers, regulators, max, survey, plane, respondents, fly, planes


Travelers hesitant to fly the Boeing 737 Max, survey finds

Grounded Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are seen parked in an aerial photo at Boeing Field in Seattle, Washington, July 1, 2019.

Travelers are concerned about the safety of the Boeing 737 Max and many will be hesitant to fly on it — even after regulators deem it safe, a survey released on Thursday found.

That could pose a challenge for airlines eager to put the public at ease when the planes reenter service after two fatal crashes. Regulators don’t expect to clear the planes until next year but have offered no firm timeline.

A fifth of respondents said they would fly the Max immediately after it is reintroduced into airline fleets, the Bank of America Merrill Lynch survey found. Nearly two-thirds of those surveyed said they would wait at least six months before flying or never fly it, while most respondents said they would switch to another aircraft if they had the opportunity.

More than 300 Boeing 737 Max planes were in fleets worldwide at the time of the grounding in mid-March, but carriers have more than 4,000 on order.

Executives at U.S. carriers, including American and United, said they plan to fly the plane early on, a way to drum up confidence in the aircraft before it is fully reintegrated into fleets. U.S. carriers have taken the planes out of their schedules until early March as the grounding wears on.

Carriers have also said they will waive fees or work with travelers who are hesitant to fly on the plane and would rather to travel on another type of plane, but airlines routinely swap out aircraft so travelers don’t always get the plane they prefer.

Still, about half of respondents said they were unaware the planes are grounded.

“This could be a positive if passengers ultimately don’t care about the aircraft,” the bank said in its poll of 2,135 people. “However, it also could be a negative if fliers have an unexpected negative reaction upon boarding a 737 MAX flight.”

The two crashes — one in Indonesia in October 2018 and another in Ethiopia in March — claimed 346 lives.

Boeing has developed a software fix for the jetliners, its bestselling aircraft, but regulators haven’t yet signed off on that or on proposed changes to pilot training.

The FAA’s administrator, Steve Dickson, a former Delta pilot and executive, on Wednesday said he plans to fly the updated 737 Max and undergo the new training himself before he signs off on the jets.

— CNBC’s Michael Bloom contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-12  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, finds, aircraft, boeing, fleets, 737, hesitant, travelers, regulators, max, survey, plane, respondents, fly, planes


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

What consumers most want in 2020: a debt-free life

A new survey has found that 84% of individuals said they would rather save $5,000 than lose 5 pounds. What’s more, 84% of consumers also said they would prefer to reduce their debts than lower their computer or phone screen time. That’s according to the 2020 New Year Financial Resolutions Study conducted by Boston-based Fidelity Investments, which included an online survey of 3,012 adults ages 18 and up. The two top resolutions for next year, the survey found, are saving more and reducing debt,


A new survey has found that 84% of individuals said they would rather save $5,000 than lose 5 pounds.
What’s more, 84% of consumers also said they would prefer to reduce their debts than lower their computer or phone screen time.
That’s according to the 2020 New Year Financial Resolutions Study conducted by Boston-based Fidelity Investments, which included an online survey of 3,012 adults ages 18 and up.
The two top resolutions for next year, the survey found, are saving more and reducing debt,
What consumers most want in 2020: a debt-free life Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-09  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, survey, consumers, life, financial, saving, respondents, debtfree, 2020, resolutions, individuals, followed, goals, debt, way


What consumers most want in 2020: a debt-free life

Slphotography | Getty Images

Consumers plan to fight a different battle of the bulge next year. A new survey has found that 84% of individuals said they would rather save $5,000 than lose 5 pounds. What’s more, 84% of consumers also said they would prefer to reduce their debts than lower their computer or phone screen time. That’s according to the 2020 New Year Financial Resolutions Study conducted by Boston-based Fidelity Investments, which included an online survey of 3,012 adults ages 18 and up.

The results come as consumer debt hit a record $4 trillion in 2019. The two top resolutions for next year, the survey found, are saving more and reducing debt, followed by spending less. When asked what could get in their way when it comes to achieving their financial goals, 51% of respondents said unexpected expenses.

That was followed by other concerns such as personal debt, not saving enough, rising health-care costs and the economy. When it came to 2019, many individuals were optimistic about their financial year. About 33% of respondents said they did not make any big financial mistakes. Meanwhile, 28% said they took on new debts or added to their existing balances.

The best way to make sure you make progress towards your 2020 goals is to be specific about what you want to achieve, said Maura Cassidy, vice president of retirement and small business at Fidelity. “Make it really clear and be realistic about being able maintain goals,” Cassidy said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-09  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, survey, consumers, life, financial, saving, respondents, debtfree, 2020, resolutions, individuals, followed, goals, debt, way


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

The Fed will stay in hibernation until at least summer: CNBC survey

Jerome Powell, chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve, speaks during the NABE annual meeting in Denver, Colorado, U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019. Daniel Brenner | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesFederal Reserve policymakers will go into hibernation for as much as six months, holding interest rates unchanged until at least the summer, according to respondents of the December CNBC Fed Survey. But those averages hide a more robust debate about the outlook for growth, the trade wars and Fed policy in the next


Jerome Powell, chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve, speaks during the NABE annual meeting in Denver, Colorado, U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019.
Daniel Brenner | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesFederal Reserve policymakers will go into hibernation for as much as six months, holding interest rates unchanged until at least the summer, according to respondents of the December CNBC Fed Survey.
But those averages hide a more robust debate about the outlook for growth, the trade wars and Fed policy in the next
The Fed will stay in hibernation until at least summer: CNBC survey Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-09  Authors: steve liesman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, survey, fed, trade, hibernation, respondents, market, stay, summer, wrote, cut, growth, outlook, tariffs


The Fed will stay in hibernation until at least summer: CNBC survey

Jerome Powell, chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve, speaks during the NABE annual meeting in Denver, Colorado, U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019. Daniel Brenner | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Federal Reserve policymakers will go into hibernation for as much as six months, holding interest rates unchanged until at least the summer, according to respondents of the December CNBC Fed Survey. But those averages hide a more robust debate about the outlook for growth, the trade wars and Fed policy in the next year. “The risks to the outlook for economic growth and inflation are still tilted to the downside, and the door to future rate cuts remains open,” Kathy Bostjancic, chief U.S. financial market economist at Oxford Economics, wrote in response to the survey. The Fed begins a two-day policy meeting on Tuesday. But Mike Englund, chief economist at Action Economics, said, “The U.S. economy is ending 2019 with faster GDP, productivity, and hours-worked growth, and lower inflation, than was expected at the start of the year. The same is likely to be true in 2020. Market narratives have underestimated the runway length for this expansion.”

GDP forecast

Forecasts for growth in gross domestic product in 2020 range from a low of negative 0.5% to a high of 3%, or a percentage point higher than the current level. Less than half of the 43 respondents, who include fund managers, strategists and economists, forecast a cut next year and just 5% expect a hike. Of those who see a cut coming, the majority don’t predict it will happen until June. “The Fed will be on hold for longer than the market is projecting,” wrote John Donaldson, director of fixed income at Haverford Trust. “Even a one-third chance of a cut next June is way overstated.” Respondents say a key to the outlook is what happens with the U.S.-China trade war. A strong 61% majority believe the two countries will sign a limited trade agreement by next year and 57% say the U.S. will not enact additional tariffs on China this year or next. A similar percentage expect tariffs to be rolled back by both sides in the next year. The next deadline for additional U.S. tariffs is Sunday.

Recession chances fall


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-09  Authors: steve liesman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, survey, fed, trade, hibernation, respondents, market, stay, summer, wrote, cut, growth, outlook, tariffs


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Majority of Americans would try banking with big tech, Bain report says

Most Americans are open to ditching traditional banks for big tech, according to a new report. Among people ages 18 to 34 it was even higher — roughly 75% said they would be open to banking with a tech giant. That’s part of what’s driving the tech adoption,” Bain consultant and partner Gerard du Toit told CNBC in a phone interview. In Asia, tech companies Tencent and Alibaba are leading in payments thanks to their mobile apps. Part of retail banks’ strategy will involve partnering to get more d


Most Americans are open to ditching traditional banks for big tech, according to a new report.
Among people ages 18 to 34 it was even higher — roughly 75% said they would be open to banking with a tech giant.
That’s part of what’s driving the tech adoption,” Bain consultant and partner Gerard du Toit told CNBC in a phone interview.
In Asia, tech companies Tencent and Alibaba are leading in payments thanks to their mobile apps.
Part of retail banks’ strategy will involve partnering to get more d
Majority of Americans would try banking with big tech, Bain report says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-18  Authors: kate rooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, bain, respondents, bank, americans, payments, companies, big, tech, higher, technology, banking, open, majority, try


Majority of Americans would try banking with big tech, Bain report says

Most Americans are open to ditching traditional banks for big tech, according to a new report.

Sixty two percent of U.S. respondents in Bain’s annual retail banking report published Monday said they would buy a financial product from an established technology company. Among people ages 18 to 34 it was even higher — roughly 75% said they would be open to banking with a tech giant.

“It has become increasingly clear that consumers would much rather just do their banking digitally than talk to a human being. That’s part of what’s driving the tech adoption,” Bain consultant and partner Gerard du Toit told CNBC in a phone interview. “We’ve seen around the globe increased willingness to bank with a technology company, especially with younger generations.”

Tech players were not equally appealing to every age group. Among U.S. respondents age 65 or older, only 32% said they would bank with established technology companies. The firm surveyed 131,000 people across 22 countries and found that young people across all regions were significantly more open to alternative banking options.

The study highlights Silicon Valley’s potential reach as it wades into consumer finance. Google is partnering with Citigroup to launch a checking account as early as next year, a source familiar with the plans told CNBC last week. Apple launched its an iPhone-integrated credit card with Goldman Sachs this summer. Last week, Facebook launched a new payments service that will operate across its family of apps. In Asia, tech companies Tencent and Alibaba are leading in payments thanks to their mobile apps.

Willingness to bank with big tech was even higher in Asia and Latin America. More than 89% of respondents in China would bank with a technology company, according to the report. People were enthusiastic in major European countries. In France, by contrast, 29% of respondents would be open to using technology companies.

Respondents also gave the tech disruptors higher “net promoter scores” — a metric used to measure customer experience — than they gave to traditional banks. The leaders in customer experience in both bank and tech companies are “those who have a digital-first mode,” said du Toit, who leads the banking and payments sector of Bain’s Financial Services practice in North America.

Part of retail banks’ strategy will involve partnering to get more distribution as tech companies continue moving into Wall Street’s territory, according to Du Toit.

“They wouldn’t want to be left on the sidelines 10 to 15 years from now with no dance partner, and all the big tech names tied up,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-18  Authors: kate rooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, bain, respondents, bank, americans, payments, companies, big, tech, higher, technology, banking, open, majority, try


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Almost two out of three UK adults wouldn’t immediately help their partner out of debt, survey says

Just 37% of U.K. adults say they would immediately step in to help their partner out of debt troubles, according to a survey conducted by asset manager Fidelity International. In neither sex did a majority of respondents think that the reason for falling into debt would affect a decision to bail out a partner. Just two-fifths (38%) of women said they would want to know why their partner fell into debt before stepping in. The poll of 2,000 U.K. adults was conducted by the asset manager in May 201


Just 37% of U.K. adults say they would immediately step in to help their partner out of debt troubles, according to a survey conducted by asset manager Fidelity International.
In neither sex did a majority of respondents think that the reason for falling into debt would affect a decision to bail out a partner.
Just two-fifths (38%) of women said they would want to know why their partner fell into debt before stepping in.
The poll of 2,000 U.K. adults was conducted by the asset manager in May 201
Almost two out of three UK adults wouldn’t immediately help their partner out of debt, survey says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-30  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, survey, help, women, immediately, wouldnt, debt, adults, proportion, manager, respondents, partner, problem, know, men


Almost two out of three UK adults wouldn't immediately help their partner out of debt, survey says

Just 37% of U.K. adults say they would immediately step in to help their partner out of debt troubles, according to a survey conducted by asset manager Fidelity International.

The numbers fall even further if the situation happened repeatedly, with just 21% of women and 16% of men saying that they would help their partner out but only once.

In neither sex did a majority of respondents think that the reason for falling into debt would affect a decision to bail out a partner.

Just two-fifths (38%) of women said they would want to know why their partner fell into debt before stepping in. An even smaller proportion of men (30%) said they would need to know the details.

The poll of 2,000 U.K. adults was conducted by the asset manager in May 2019 and all respondents had over £1,000 ($1,290) worth of investable assets.

An almost identical proportion of men (86%) and women (85%) questioned said they would rather know about their partner’s debt so they could tackle the problem together.

Britons have an average £31,284 ($40,297) of personal debt, of which £1,373 is credit card debt, according to research from U.K. organization The Money Charity.

Maike Currie, Director at Fidelity International, said that while debt could be “thorny issue” for any relationship, communication is key and tackling these issues early on can prevent them from becoming an “insurmountable problem” later down the line.

She suggested starting off by distinguishing between different types of debt and paying off the most pressing first, such as high-interest borrowings like credit cards.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-30  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, survey, help, women, immediately, wouldnt, debt, adults, proportion, manager, respondents, partner, problem, know, men


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

93% of millennials are aware of their credit score, according to Discover’s Credit Health survey

Millennials have a reputation for not being the most savvy with their finances, but Discover’s annual Credit Health survey found they’re the generation most aware of their credit score. About nine in 10 (93%) millennials (ages 18 to 34, according to this survey) know their credit score, which is a huge jump from 55% in 2017. It’s a good idea to check your credit score on a regular basis for several reasons. You can raise your credit score by implementing simple actions into your daily life, such


Millennials have a reputation for not being the most savvy with their finances, but Discover’s annual Credit Health survey found they’re the generation most aware of their credit score.
About nine in 10 (93%) millennials (ages 18 to 34, according to this survey) know their credit score, which is a huge jump from 55% in 2017.
It’s a good idea to check your credit score on a regular basis for several reasons.
You can raise your credit score by implementing simple actions into your daily life, such
93% of millennials are aware of their credit score, according to Discover’s Credit Health survey Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, life, checking, score, millennials, health, credit, aware, respondents, survey, according, discovers, likely


93% of millennials are aware of their credit score, according to Discover's Credit Health survey

Millennials have a reputation for not being the most savvy with their finances, but Discover’s annual Credit Health survey found they’re the generation most aware of their credit score. About nine in 10 (93%) millennials (ages 18 to 34, according to this survey) know their credit score, which is a huge jump from 55% in 2017.

This increased awareness can be attributed to the numerous tools available that make checking your credit score so accessible, Stefanie O’Connell, personal finance expert, tells CNBC Select.

Additionally, she says that many millennials are coming of age and need to check their credit for major milestones, such as renting an apartment or taking out a lease.

In comparison, 79% of Gen X (ages 35 to 54) and 73% of boomers (55 and older) are aware of their credit score. Millennials are also the most likely to believe their credit standing has an impact on their day-to-day life (78%), compared to just 52% of Gen X and 35% of boomers.

When it comes to actually checking their credit score, 82% of respondents said they checked it at least once in the last year, up from 72% in 2017.

It’s a good idea to check your credit score on a regular basis for several reasons. For starters, checking your score can make you aware of any possible fraud on your account. If you see a drastic dip in your score, it may indicate that someone opened an account in your name or stole your card number.

Monitoring your score can also help you track progress when building credit. More than half (56%) of respondents said they are actively trying to improve their credit. You can raise your credit score by implementing simple actions into your daily life, such as limiting spending and making on-time payments. Plus the higher your credit score, the more likely you’ll qualify for the best credit cards and financing options.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, life, checking, score, millennials, health, credit, aware, respondents, survey, according, discovers, likely


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Fed to cut rates again, but other economic concerns are emerging ahead of election: CNBC survey

Nearly 80% of the 43 respondents believe the Fed will cut rates at its meeting this week, the third cut this year. But 63% believe the Fed will pause in its rate cuts for the remainder of the year. On average, the respondents, who include fund managers, economists and strategists, think the next cut will come in February. Although twice burned, respondents to the CNBC Fed Survey once again had confidence in a positive outcome to trade talks. Meanwhile, 76% say tariffs have resulted in higher pri


Nearly 80% of the 43 respondents believe the Fed will cut rates at its meeting this week, the third cut this year.
But 63% believe the Fed will pause in its rate cuts for the remainder of the year.
On average, the respondents, who include fund managers, economists and strategists, think the next cut will come in February.
Although twice burned, respondents to the CNBC Fed Survey once again had confidence in a positive outcome to trade talks.
Meanwhile, 76% say tariffs have resulted in higher pri
Fed to cut rates again, but other economic concerns are emerging ahead of election: CNBC survey Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: steve liesman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, fed, rates, election, economic, cut, concerns, emerging, ahead, rate, recession, tariffs, respondents, survey, believe


Fed to cut rates again, but other economic concerns are emerging ahead of election: CNBC survey

2020 presidential candidates Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont, from left, former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden, Senator Elizabeth Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, and Pete Buttigieg, mayor of South Bend, arrive on stage for the Democratic presidential candidate debate in Westerville, Ohio, U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2019. The candidates meet for the fourth debate after an extraordinary series of events that has dramatically altered the race since the last forum in September. Photographer: Allison Farrand/Bloomberg via Getty Images Allison Ferrand | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Even while the stock market breaks out to new records, the CNBC Fed Survey finds elevated concerns over recession, growing divisions about the outlook for monetary policy and worries about the economic policies of both President Donald Trump and Democratic contenders for the presidency. Nearly 80% of the 43 respondents believe the Fed will cut rates at its meeting this week, the third cut this year. But 63% believe the Fed will pause in its rate cuts for the remainder of the year. On average, the respondents, who include fund managers, economists and strategists, think the next cut will come in February. Still, 40% believe the Fed is done cutting at least through 2020. “After the next cut, the fed funds rate would re-enter the zone where there is no evidence that further cuts help the economy,” wrote John Donaldson, director of fixed income at Haverford Trust Co. “If ultra-low rates and negative rates are such a panacea, why aren’t Japan and Germany growing at 6% rather than teetering on recessions?”

Economic forecasts

For the U.S., respondents now see a 34% chance of recession in the next year, the highest since 2011, amid elevated concerns over protectionist trade policies and global economic weakness. While recession is not the base case, respondents forecast economic growth at just 1.75% this year, down from 2.9% in 2018, and then rebounding to 2% in the next two years. Respondents expect the unemployment rate to tick up above 4% by 2021. As a result of the lukewarm economic outlook, expectations for the stock market are modest. The S&P 500 is seen rising to only 3,228 by the end of 2021 for a gain of just over 6% in the next two years from the current level. “The most critical issue facing the economy is the trade war and interest rate cuts will do little to change the course of growth as long as the threats of tariffs persist,” wrote Joel L. Naroff, president, Naroff Economic Advisors. Although twice burned, respondents to the CNBC Fed Survey once again had confidence in a positive outcome to trade talks. Eighty-three percent believe Washington and Beijing will sign a limited trade agreement this year, a level of conviction rivaling prior predictions for U.S.-China deals that proved wrong. Meanwhile, 76% say tariffs have resulted in higher prices for consumers and 60% believe tariffs have played a “significant role” in the global slowdown. About 60% have reduced their growth forecasts for this year and next due to tariffs.

Grading Trump, Democratic contenders


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: steve liesman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, fed, rates, election, economic, cut, concerns, emerging, ahead, rate, recession, tariffs, respondents, survey, believe


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post