US futures point to higher open as US-China trade talks resume

These stocks are the trade talk ‘tells’ with prices to move firstFor investors reading the tea leaves of every trade headline, watch these stocks as they will tell you first if any progress is made. Marketsread more


These stocks are the trade talk ‘tells’ with prices to move firstFor investors reading the tea leaves of every trade headline, watch these stocks as they will tell you first if any progress is made. Marketsread more
US futures point to higher open as US-China trade talks resume Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talk, futures, tea, talks, higher, tell, progress, prices, point, uschina, tells, resume, stocks, watch, open, reading, trade


US futures point to higher open as US-China trade talks resume

These stocks are the trade talk ‘tells’ with prices to move first

For investors reading the tea leaves of every trade headline, watch these stocks as they will tell you first if any progress is made.

Markets

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talk, futures, tea, talks, higher, tell, progress, prices, point, uschina, tells, resume, stocks, watch, open, reading, trade


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Worried about a recession? Here are 4 ways to protect your finances

But Tiffany Aliche, personal finance expert and founder of The Budgetnista says there are several simple steps you can take to protect your finances. “We’ve all heard the whispers: recession, recession, recession,” Aliche tells CNBC Make It. Here are four steps Aliche recommends taking today so that if a recession hits, you won’t be scrambling. “You should be having at least three months,” Aliche says. She was a schoolteacher at a non-profit school when the last recession hit, making about $50,0


But Tiffany Aliche, personal finance expert and founder of The Budgetnista says there are several simple steps you can take to protect your finances. “We’ve all heard the whispers: recession, recession, recession,” Aliche tells CNBC Make It. Here are four steps Aliche recommends taking today so that if a recession hits, you won’t be scrambling. “You should be having at least three months,” Aliche says. She was a schoolteacher at a non-profit school when the last recession hit, making about $50,0
Worried about a recession? Here are 4 ways to protect your finances Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, finances, aliche, need, financial, youre, months, worried, ways, resume, steps, savings, job, recession, protect


Worried about a recession? Here are 4 ways to protect your finances

It seems like every time you turn on the TV or open a newspaper these days, financial experts are talking about the possibility of a recession. But Tiffany Aliche, personal finance expert and founder of The Budgetnista says there are several simple steps you can take to protect your finances. “We’ve all heard the whispers: recession, recession, recession,” Aliche tells CNBC Make It. But it’s important to keep in mind that even if a recession comes, it’s not going to be like the last, “super terrible” recession that Americans experienced starting in 2008, she says. That’s because the 2018 financial crisis was linked to the housing market. Thousands of Americans, including Aliche, lost their homes because the housing bubble burst. “So it wasn’t just a financial downturn. People were literally losing their homes. That’s what made it extra terrible,” Aliche says. It’s also important to keep in mind that fluctuations in the market are normal. Market “ebbs and flows are natural,” Aliche says. But that also means you should always be prepared, she adds. Here are four steps Aliche recommends taking today so that if a recession hits, you won’t be scrambling.

1. Build up your savings

One way to prepare for any financial setback is to have an emergency savings account. “You should be having at least three months,” Aliche says. However, saving up only three months of living expenses is for someone who knows they can get a job quickly, she adds. For example, a nurse. Nurses are in high demand and it’s a job that you can find pretty much everywhere. But if you have a specialized job, such as an aerospace engineer or a psychobiologist, it may be more difficult and take longer to find another position if you’re laid off. In that case, you should aim to put away more than three months’ worth of emergency savings, likely closer to a year or more.

2. Live frugally

Not only should you have robust emergency savings, but you should live below your means. “You should not be living at capacity because you want to be able to pivot,” Aliche says. She was a schoolteacher at a non-profit school when the last recession hit, making about $50,000 a year. But when she lost her job and had to take a pay cut, she didn’t have to dramatically cut back her expenses. Because she was only spending about $30,000 a year, it was easier for her to find a collection of jobs that covered her living expenses. To get your finances in good shape before a downturn hits, Aliche recommends putting together a monthly budget so you can identify where you’re spending money and where it may be possible to trim. That might mean packing your lunch more often or opting for a cheaper cable package — or it may require some bigger changes, such as finding a cheaper apartment. More from Invest in You:

How to invest and pay off your student loans, according to the Broke Millennial

Here’s what to do if you’re ‘bad with money,’ says author of ‘I Will Teach You to be Rich’

Wealth manager to millennials: These 3 steps will help you get rich

3. Polish your resume

If a recession does occur, you may need to worry about unemployment. When economic growth slows, companies typically generate less revenue and may need to lay off employees. That could mean you need to look for a job with little to no notice, so it pays to have your resume up to date, Aliche says. That may also include putting together a portfolio and updating your social media accounts. Does your LinkedIn photo and profile look professional? If not, fix it now so you don’t have to delay if you need to start job hunting. “You want to make sure that when someone finds you online that they’re already impressed with you,” Aliche says. “I always say this: Social media is your resume before the resume. Are you presenting yourself in a positive light?”

4. Don’t stress


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, finances, aliche, need, financial, youre, months, worried, ways, resume, steps, savings, job, recession, protect


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Ritual founder Katerina Schneider isn’t interested in resumes—here’s how she spots a good hire

Katerina Schneider’s resume is impressive. But if there’s one thing Schneider has learned while building her team as founder and CEO of Ritual, it’s that a resume isn’t the best way to determine a good hire. “I learned early on that I was hiring based on resume,” Schneider tells CNBC Make It. I’d say, ‘Oh, this person has an MBA and Ph.D. and works for this big company — that’s awesome! “I realized that some of the best people we’ve hired embody the same values as the early people in the company


Katerina Schneider’s resume is impressive. But if there’s one thing Schneider has learned while building her team as founder and CEO of Ritual, it’s that a resume isn’t the best way to determine a good hire. “I learned early on that I was hiring based on resume,” Schneider tells CNBC Make It. I’d say, ‘Oh, this person has an MBA and Ph.D. and works for this big company — that’s awesome! “I realized that some of the best people we’ve hired embody the same values as the early people in the company
Ritual founder Katerina Schneider isn’t interested in resumes—here’s how she spots a good hire Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, values, isnt, interested, good, learned, company, schneider, katerina, ritual, resumesheres, resume, founder, team, hire, schneiders, spots, think, thats, investment


Ritual founder Katerina Schneider isn't interested in resumes—here's how she spots a good hire

Katerina Schneider’s resume is impressive. She holds a degree in applied mathematics and economics from Brown University, started her career in investment banking with Lehman Brothers, led global digital innovation at Universal Music Group, and managed an active portfolio of over 70 investments at Troy Carter’s investment fund, including Dropbox, Warby Parker, Spotify, Uber and Lyft.

But if there’s one thing Schneider has learned while building her team as founder and CEO of Ritual, it’s that a resume isn’t the best way to determine a good hire.

In fact, she doesn’t think a resume is necessary at all to get hired at her wellness company. “I learned early on that I was hiring based on resume,” Schneider tells CNBC Make It. “I think that’s a mistake a lot of first-time founders often make. I’d say, ‘Oh, this person has an MBA and Ph.D. and works for this big company — that’s awesome! They’re probably great.’ And I got burned a couple of times doing that.”

These days, educational background and previous experience aren’t what catch Schneider’s eye in a potential hire. Instead, she looks for people who match the company values she established along with her team when they reached 50 employees.

“I realized that some of the best people we’ve hired embody the same values as the early people in the company,” Schneider says. Those core values include principles like embracing the no’s, getting gritty and making an impact.

Ritual was named one of LinkedIn’s top start-ups of the year, due to high interest among job seekers on the search platform, as well as the company’s ability to attract talent from other major companies.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, values, isnt, interested, good, learned, company, schneider, katerina, ritual, resumesheres, resume, founder, team, hire, schneiders, spots, think, thats, investment


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Asia stocks mixed; US-China trade talks set to resume

Asia Pacific stocks were mixed on Friday as investors watched for developments on the U.S.-China trade front. Mainland Chinese stocks were edged up on the day, with the Shenzhen component up 0.89% to 9,548.96 and Shenzhen composite advancing 0.91% to approximately 1,612.26. In Hong Kong, the Hang Seng index slipped 0.3%, as of its final hour of trading. The Topix index also shed 1.17% to end its trading day at 1,604.25. In South Korea, the Kospi declined 1.19% to end its trading day at 2,049.93.


Asia Pacific stocks were mixed on Friday as investors watched for developments on the U.S.-China trade front. Mainland Chinese stocks were edged up on the day, with the Shenzhen component up 0.89% to 9,548.96 and Shenzhen composite advancing 0.91% to approximately 1,612.26. In Hong Kong, the Hang Seng index slipped 0.3%, as of its final hour of trading. The Topix index also shed 1.17% to end its trading day at 1,604.25. In South Korea, the Kospi declined 1.19% to end its trading day at 2,049.93.
Asia stocks mixed; US-China trade talks set to resume Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, index, stocks, uschina, weve, resume, slipped, set, trade, weak, asia, talks, mixed, trading, shares, shenzhen, day


Asia stocks mixed; US-China trade talks set to resume

Asia Pacific stocks were mixed on Friday as investors watched for developments on the U.S.-China trade front.

Mainland Chinese stocks were edged up on the day, with the Shenzhen component up 0.89% to 9,548.96 and Shenzhen composite advancing 0.91% to approximately 1,612.26. The Shanghai composite added 0.11% to around 2,932.17.

China’s industrial profits for August dropped 2% from a year earlier, according to the country’s National Bureau of Statistics. That followed a 2.6% gain in July and a 3.1% in June.

“The pressure is there, it’s not just in terms of … exports,” Sian Fenner, lead Asia economist at Oxford Economics, told CNBC’s “Street Signs” on Friday. “The investment growth has remained very weak and we’ve even seen that consumption has actually slowed with what we’ve been seeing in retail sales.”

“It does look we’re gonna have another weak quarter and we will need more stimulus,” she added.

In Hong Kong, the Hang Seng index slipped 0.3%, as of its final hour of trading.

Japan’s Nikkei 225 slipped 0.77% to close at 21,878.90 as shares of index heavyweight and conglomerate Softbank Group fell 1.96%. The Topix index also shed 1.17% to end its trading day at 1,604.25. Shares of Apple supplier Japan Display plummeted 10.45% after the company said Thursday Chinese investment firm Harvest Group would withdraw from a bailout.

In South Korea, the Kospi declined 1.19% to end its trading day at 2,049.93. Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 closed 0.58% higher at 6,716.10.

Overall, the MSCI Asia ex-Japan index traded 0.24% lower.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, index, stocks, uschina, weve, resume, slipped, set, trade, weak, asia, talks, mixed, trading, shares, shenzhen, day


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China trade talks are set to resume on Oct. 10

Trade talks between the U.S. and China are set to resume Oct. 10-11 in Washington, three people close to the talks told CNBC on Thursday. Chinese Vice Premier Liu He will be representing the delegation from Beijing, one of the people told CNBC. But Liu was stripped of that title on a subsequent trip, after Communist Party hardliners balked at some of the concessions to which he had agreed. The White House, the Treasury Department and Office of the U.S. Trade Representative did not respond to CNB


Trade talks between the U.S. and China are set to resume Oct. 10-11 in Washington, three people close to the talks told CNBC on Thursday. Chinese Vice Premier Liu He will be representing the delegation from Beijing, one of the people told CNBC. But Liu was stripped of that title on a subsequent trip, after Communist Party hardliners balked at some of the concessions to which he had agreed. The White House, the Treasury Department and Office of the U.S. Trade Representative did not respond to CNB
China trade talks are set to resume on Oct. 10 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: kevin breuninger kayla tausche, kevin breuninger, kayla tausche
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talks, told, washington, trade, office, china, set, liu, resume, oct, president, title, beijing


China trade talks are set to resume on Oct. 10

Trade talks between the U.S. and China are set to resume Oct. 10-11 in Washington, three people close to the talks told CNBC on Thursday.

Chinese Vice Premier Liu He will be representing the delegation from Beijing, one of the people told CNBC.

Liu visited Washington this spring sporting the title “special envoy,” empowering him to negotiate on behalf of President Xi Jinping and pledge in the Oval Office with President Donald Trump to buy American soybeans.

But Liu was stripped of that title on a subsequent trip, after Communist Party hardliners balked at some of the concessions to which he had agreed.

The White House, the Treasury Department and Office of the U.S. Trade Representative did not respond to CNBC’s requests for comment about the date for the resumption of talks.

Trump administration officials have said they expected the stalled talks with Beijing to resume next month.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: kevin breuninger kayla tausche, kevin breuninger, kayla tausche
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talks, told, washington, trade, office, china, set, liu, resume, oct, president, title, beijing


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Use ‘outside skills’ from your side hustle to help you at work, experts say — here’s how

A side hustle can help you acquire new skills that can bolster your resume, helping you make the case for a raise or putting you in the running for a new job. That experience can benefit you at your day job, says Sabatier: “It’s a powerful combination: Make extra money doing something you enjoy and building new skills.” Here’s how experts say your side hustle can help you at work. You’d be in a good position to ask for a raise, Sabatier points out, or to pivot within your company if you demonstr


A side hustle can help you acquire new skills that can bolster your resume, helping you make the case for a raise or putting you in the running for a new job. That experience can benefit you at your day job, says Sabatier: “It’s a powerful combination: Make extra money doing something you enjoy and building new skills.” Here’s how experts say your side hustle can help you at work. You’d be in a good position to ask for a raise, Sabatier points out, or to pivot within your company if you demonstr
Use ‘outside skills’ from your side hustle to help you at work, experts say — here’s how Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: myelle lansat, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, raise, outside, hustle, sabatier, job, pivot, heres, say, youre, work, help, experts, skills, resume, website


Use 'outside skills' from your side hustle to help you at work, experts say — here's how

A side hustle can help you acquire new skills that can bolster your resume, helping you make the case for a raise or putting you in the running for a new job. It’s likely that you had to do some ground work before launching your side hustle, says Grant Sabatier, creator of Millennial Money, an online personal finance community, and that you had to work hard to become successful. Maybe you had to learn to build a website, or get better at copy writing, or figure out a digital and social media marketing strategy. That experience can benefit you at your day job, says Sabatier: “It’s a powerful combination: Make extra money doing something you enjoy and building new skills.” Here’s how experts say your side hustle can help you at work.

How to get a raise or promotion

“Not everything is quantifiable, but if you can bring those outside skills inside the office and demonstrate how you’re adding value, you’d be a good candidate for a bonus, raise, or making a pivot within your company,” says Sabatier. For example, if you learned how to build a website for your side gig and your employer is looking to launch a new website, you can raise your hand and offer expertise “using the skills you developed outside your full-time job,” he adds. Now let’s say you enjoy working on web development more than your current role. You’d be in a good position to ask for a raise, Sabatier points out, or to pivot within your company if you demonstrate success outside your role.

It’s a powerful combination: Make extra money doing something you enjoy and building new skills. Grant Sabatier creator of Millennial Money

How to find a new career

If you’re interested in finding a new job or even pivoting careers, it will take more than a run-of-the-mill resume to stand out to a potential employer, says Claire Bissot, managing director at CBIZ HR Services. Let’s say you’re applying for your dream job, but you only have four of the seven skills listed on the job description. Taking on a side hustle might be a way to develop those missing skills, and in turn strengthen your resume, making yourself a more attractive candidate. Bissot says that prospective employers are looking for examples of resilience, motivation, self awareness, personal development, and other soft skills as well. Because side hustlers, by nature, have an entrepreneurial mindset and have proven their ability to execute their ideas, they tend to possess these kinds of traits. Bissot recommends highlighting projects that have challenged you to grow as an individual, regardless of your material success. In fact, talking about any failures you’ve experienced with your side hustle, and how you’ve recovered and learned from them, can reveal your potential as an employee. “Your strengths are your strengths, and yes, they grow over time, but I want to know your weaknesses and if there is an opportunity there to make [them] into a strength,” she says. “More often than not, we learn from our failures more significantly than we do from our successes.” More from Grow: How 3 indie filmmakers achieved their dreams without going broke

Take 3 steps to successfully pivot your career

Cardi B explains how to practice self-care even if you’re ‘broke’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: myelle lansat, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, raise, outside, hustle, sabatier, job, pivot, heres, say, youre, work, help, experts, skills, resume, website


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Microsoft hires Apple’s former Siri chief

Microsoft has hired Bill Stasior, the person who until recently was in charge of the Siri virtual assistant at Apple. Since then Microsoft has made AI acquisitions that have brought in additional talent, including Bonsai, Lobe and Semantic Machines. Prior to his time at Apple, Stasior was one of the top executives at Amazon. Javier Soltero, the person who was leading the Microsoft’s Siri competitor, Cortana, left last year. WATCH: Microsoft announces $1 billion investment in Elon Musk-backed AI


Microsoft has hired Bill Stasior, the person who until recently was in charge of the Siri virtual assistant at Apple. Since then Microsoft has made AI acquisitions that have brought in additional talent, including Bonsai, Lobe and Semantic Machines. Prior to his time at Apple, Stasior was one of the top executives at Amazon. Javier Soltero, the person who was leading the Microsoft’s Siri competitor, Cortana, left last year. WATCH: Microsoft announces $1 billion investment in Elon Musk-backed AI
Microsoft hires Apple’s former Siri chief Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, siri, resume, hires, technology, apple, ai, chief, company, microsoft, apples, earlier, microsofts, stasior


Microsoft hires Apple's former Siri chief

Microsoft has hired Bill Stasior, the person who until recently was in charge of the Siri virtual assistant at Apple.

The move underlines Microsoft’s focus under CEO Satya Nadella on emerging technologies like artificial intelligence.

In 2016 Microsoft established the Artificial Intelligence and Research engineering group in a reorganization. Months later the company added AI to its list of top priorities in its annual report. Last year Microsoft went further in another reorganization that placed some AI teams in the group working on Microsoft’s Azure public cloud.

Since then Microsoft has made AI acquisitions that have brought in additional talent, including Bonsai, Lobe and Semantic Machines.

Stasior announced his job change by updating his resume on his personal website on Monday. The resume says he’ll be corporate vice president of technology in the office of the chief technology officer, Kevin Scott. The Information reported on the move earlier on Monday.

A Microsoft spokesperson confirmed Stasior’s hire. “Starting in August, he will work to help align technology strategies across the company,” the spokesperson wrote in an email to CNBC.

Stasior was vice president for AI and Siri when he left in May, according to the resume. He had been at Apple since 2012. He said that he expanded the team from 70 engineers to more than 1,100 people and that he “played the leading role in bringing modern machine learning to Siri and Apple.” Apple said in 2018 that Siri was being actively used on more than 500 million devices, and earlier this year the company said that Siri would sound more natural in the forthcoming iOS 13 release. Apple previously made gains in this area through AI work.

Prior to his time at Apple, Stasior was one of the top executives at Amazon. He previously worked at AltaVista and Oracle. Stasior didn’t respond to a request for comment.

Javier Soltero, the person who was leading the Microsoft’s Siri competitor, Cortana, left last year. Earlier this year Cortana was decoupled from the search box in Microsoft’s Windows 10 operating system.

WATCH: Microsoft announces $1 billion investment in Elon Musk-backed AI company


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, siri, resume, hires, technology, apple, ai, chief, company, microsoft, apples, earlier, microsofts, stasior


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Here’s an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts

Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache. But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience. Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource CenterDon’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the es


Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache. But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience. Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource CenterDon’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the es
Here’s an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unique, heres, resume, perfect, harvard, example, according, writing, try, truth, experts, university, written, career


Here's an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts

Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache.

But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience.

Certainly, they aren’t exactly the same (resumes shouldn’t be written in a narrative style), but both share a few similarities: They tell the truth, differentiate you from others, highlight your most unique qualities and capture readers’ attention.

Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):

IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource Center

Don’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the essential tips below:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unique, heres, resume, perfect, harvard, example, according, writing, try, truth, experts, university, written, career


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This is the most impressive resume I’ve ever seen—based on my 20 years of hiring and interviewing

A few years ago, however, I was surprised to find a resume that actually managed to impress me. It told a storyThis resume told a story about the candidate’s career journey. Instead of “led marketing and sales team,” say “supervised sales team and achieved 15% annual growth vs. 0.5% budget. ” This made it easier for me to fact-check the resume, which in turn made the candidate seem like an honest person. The candidate submitted her resume, then called the hiring manager and asked, “Would you hir


A few years ago, however, I was surprised to find a resume that actually managed to impress me. It told a storyThis resume told a story about the candidate’s career journey. Instead of “led marketing and sales team,” say “supervised sales team and achieved 15% annual growth vs. 0.5% budget. ” This made it easier for me to fact-check the resume, which in turn made the candidate seem like an honest person. The candidate submitted her resume, then called the hiring manager and asked, “Would you hir
This is the most impressive resume I’ve ever seen—based on my 20 years of hiring and interviewing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26  Authors: gary burnison
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ive, team, say, told, resume, impressive, listed, 20, resumes, hiring, candidate, job, seenbased, instead, interviewing


This is the most impressive resume I've ever seen—based on my 20 years of hiring and interviewing

I’ve received thousands of resumes throughout my entire career — and believe me, I’ve seen them all: Too long, too short, too boring, too many typos, too hard to read and every layout imaginable. To be completely honest, I’ve never been a huge fan of resumes. Heck, I even wrote a book about all the things that are more important than the resume. Of course, you need one, but what most experts don’t tell you is that resumes only account for 10% of the hiring decision. That said, it would take a lot to wow a tough critic like myself. A few years ago, however, I was surprised to find a resume that actually managed to impress me. In fact, it was one of the best resumes I had ever seen. It had no gimmicks, no Fortune 500 company listed and wasn’t folded into an origami airplane. Needless to say, I hired the candidate. Here’s what made it stand out from the rest:

1. It was easy to read

This resume had plenty of white space and was two pages long, which is expected if you have more than 10 years of experience. Everything was nicely organized: Line spacing was just right, company names in bold, titles italicized and job details arranged in bullet points. Oh, and not a single typo to be found. I liked that the font was nothing fancy. Too many candidates waste time obsessing over which font to use. I won’t weigh in on Times New Roman versus Calibri, but I will say that it should always be simple and easy to read.

2. It told a story

This resume told a story about the candidate’s career journey. There were no information gaps (i.e., a missing summer). From top to bottom, there was a clear “before and after.” In just a few seconds, I was able to see a “staircase pattern” of the candidate’s career. In other words, the chronological list of work history — in order of date, with the most recent position at the top — showed a clear progression of more senior roles and more advanced responsibilities.

3. It listed accomplishments, rather than just responsibilities

I’m not interested in reading what you copied and pasted from the original job description listing. What employers really want to know is whether you’re an above average candidate who’s capable of delivering quantifiable results. It’s always better to highlight your responsibilities by detailing your most impressive accomplishments: Examples: Instead of “expanded operations to international markets,” say “expanded operations to eight new countries in Latin America. ”

Instead of “led marketing and sales team,” say “supervised sales team and achieved 15% annual growth vs. 0.5% budget. ”

4. It told the truth

There weren’t any discrepancies that raised red flags. Everything was believable and numbers weren’t exaggerated. Even better, the candidate included links to their LinkedIn page and professional website, which included a portfolio of their work. This made it easier for me to fact-check the resume, which in turn made the candidate seem like an honest person. My advice? Tell the truth — period. A colleague once told me about someone who listed “convicted felon” on her resume. The candidate submitted her resume, then called the hiring manager and asked, “Would you hire an ex-convict?” After a series of questions and some due diligence, they offered her the job. And based on what I’ve heard, she ended up being an excellent hire. While big accomplishments and recognizable company names will give you an advantage, make no mistake: Employers will do a reference check — and if they found out that you lied about something, it’s game over.

5. It didn’t have any cliché claims

There were no generic and high-level claims such as “creative,” “hard-working,” “results-driven,” “excellent communicator” or, my least favorite, “team player.” Including any of these cliché terms will make your hiring manager roll their eyes in less than a second. Go for action verbs and skip the cheesy adjectives and overused terms. Examples: Instead of “excellent communicator,” say “presented at face-to-face client meetings and spoke at college recruiting events. ”

Instead of “highly creative,” say “designed and implemented new global application monitoring platform.”

6. It came through a recommendation


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26  Authors: gary burnison
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ive, team, say, told, resume, impressive, listed, 20, resumes, hiring, candidate, job, seenbased, instead, interviewing


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Want your resume to sail to the top of the pile? Make sure you do all these things

But armed with that knowledge, you can now tailor your resume so it uses AI to your advantage. Given all these behind-the-scenes algorithms, job hunters need to know how their resume looks to computer “eyes” rather than human ones. “The algorithms are really good at deducing these are the key skills for a job,” Siegel said. Have an up-to-date formatAlgorithms try to turn the information on your resume into usable data, said Siegel, so make sure you use a traditional, text-based format. The magic


But armed with that knowledge, you can now tailor your resume so it uses AI to your advantage. Given all these behind-the-scenes algorithms, job hunters need to know how their resume looks to computer “eyes” rather than human ones. “The algorithms are really good at deducing these are the key skills for a job,” Siegel said. Have an up-to-date formatAlgorithms try to turn the information on your resume into usable data, said Siegel, so make sure you use a traditional, text-based format. The magic
Want your resume to sail to the top of the pile? Make sure you do all these things Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, skills, meier, sure, experience, algorithms, siegel, resumes, match, pile, resume, sail, job, ai, things


Want your resume to sail to the top of the pile? Make sure you do all these things

You use Siri and Alexa, aka artificial intelligence, to find pizza or get the forecast. Now, AI is a deep but unseen part of your job hunt. Companies increasingly use AI to cut down on guesswork. Instead of sorting through thousands of resumes, they can instantly seek out those with the resumes that match what employers are looking for. That’s great for them, but how does that help you? It doesn’t. But armed with that knowledge, you can now tailor your resume so it uses AI to your advantage. You do that by knowing how the algorithms work.

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Just as spellcheck alerts you to a typo, other algorithms pore over your electronically submitted resume for misspellings, grammar and information about your work history. With thousands of previous versions of a job that can be scanned, the algorithm uses the available data on resumes to find the best candidates for a talent recruiter, according to Ian Siegel, CEO of ZipRecruiter, an online job marketplace. “Machine learning can cherry pick and rapidly learn from the employer how to do a lookalike search,” Siegel said. “That turns out to be by far the best method you can use to match.” More from Invest in You:

What hiring managers want to see in your social profile

You didn’t get that job. Was it because of your thank you note?

These people in their 30s are doing a simple thing to get rich On the other side of the job hunt, AI can match a person to a pool of applicants who have experience or skills in common with the job seeker and show the jobs they’ve applied to. “AI is the new version of keyword algorithms,” which have been around since the 1990s, said Robert Meier, a job transition expert and CEO of JobMarketExperts, which deals with a range of employment issues. What they look for: continuity of work history, job title progression and education. “Specific companies may have different metrics they look for, such as software experience or credentials,” Meier said. What has changed is the number of applicants. Digital applications are easy and free, Meier says, and any job opening now has so many more candidates for a company to screen. But most are eliminated almost immediately, and only the top 2% of candidates make it to the interview, according to Meier. Given all these behind-the-scenes algorithms, job hunters need to know how their resume looks to computer “eyes” rather than human ones. Here are five things to consider with resumes you will submit electronically.

1. Be straightforward

“Put things in the simplest, most straightforward language possible,” Siegel said. Clearly list your skills and the years of experience you have with each one. Instead of “professional sound engineer with varied experience in wide variety of software,” check the job description for specifics. Better to say you’re a sound engineer with four years’ experience using Avid Pro Tools. “The algorithms are really good at deducing these are the key skills for a job,” Siegel said.

2. Spelling counts

It’s critical to remember that algorithms on job sites scan for a range of signals. “You might be cavalier about spelling and grammar,” Siegel said. “That’s an easy signal.” For most companies, that means your resume is automatically discarded.

3. Have an up-to-date format

Algorithms try to turn the information on your resume into usable data, said Siegel, so make sure you use a traditional, text-based format. Don’t use Photoshop on your resume: The algorithm can’t derive data from a picture. “Use a modern text editor,” Siegel said. “WordPerfect will make for a challenging document.”

4. The magic of ‘results’

A resume filled with results — not duties and responsibilities — attracts employers like moths to a flame, JobMarketExperts’ Meier said. Phrase your accomplishments as revenue, income or money saved. Perhaps you made some aspect of a company function more efficient or found a way to cut costs. A resume that includes specific numbers, percentages and quantities will get a closer look.

5. Have a mobile-ready resume


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, skills, meier, sure, experience, algorithms, siegel, resumes, match, pile, resume, sail, job, ai, things


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