Here’s an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts

Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache. But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience. Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource CenterDon’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the es


Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache. But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience. Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource CenterDon’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the es
Here’s an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unique, heres, resume, perfect, harvard, example, according, writing, try, truth, experts, university, written, career


Here's an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts

Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache.

But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience.

Certainly, they aren’t exactly the same (resumes shouldn’t be written in a narrative style), but both share a few similarities: They tell the truth, differentiate you from others, highlight your most unique qualities and capture readers’ attention.

Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):

IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource Center

Don’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the essential tips below:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unique, heres, resume, perfect, harvard, example, according, writing, try, truth, experts, university, written, career


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This is the most impressive resume I’ve ever seen—based on my 20 years of hiring and interviewing

A few years ago, however, I was surprised to find a resume that actually managed to impress me. It told a storyThis resume told a story about the candidate’s career journey. Instead of “led marketing and sales team,” say “supervised sales team and achieved 15% annual growth vs. 0.5% budget. ” This made it easier for me to fact-check the resume, which in turn made the candidate seem like an honest person. The candidate submitted her resume, then called the hiring manager and asked, “Would you hir


A few years ago, however, I was surprised to find a resume that actually managed to impress me. It told a storyThis resume told a story about the candidate’s career journey. Instead of “led marketing and sales team,” say “supervised sales team and achieved 15% annual growth vs. 0.5% budget. ” This made it easier for me to fact-check the resume, which in turn made the candidate seem like an honest person. The candidate submitted her resume, then called the hiring manager and asked, “Would you hir
This is the most impressive resume I’ve ever seen—based on my 20 years of hiring and interviewing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26  Authors: gary burnison
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ive, team, say, told, resume, impressive, listed, 20, resumes, hiring, candidate, job, seenbased, instead, interviewing


This is the most impressive resume I've ever seen—based on my 20 years of hiring and interviewing

I’ve received thousands of resumes throughout my entire career — and believe me, I’ve seen them all: Too long, too short, too boring, too many typos, too hard to read and every layout imaginable. To be completely honest, I’ve never been a huge fan of resumes. Heck, I even wrote a book about all the things that are more important than the resume. Of course, you need one, but what most experts don’t tell you is that resumes only account for 10% of the hiring decision. That said, it would take a lot to wow a tough critic like myself. A few years ago, however, I was surprised to find a resume that actually managed to impress me. In fact, it was one of the best resumes I had ever seen. It had no gimmicks, no Fortune 500 company listed and wasn’t folded into an origami airplane. Needless to say, I hired the candidate. Here’s what made it stand out from the rest:

1. It was easy to read

This resume had plenty of white space and was two pages long, which is expected if you have more than 10 years of experience. Everything was nicely organized: Line spacing was just right, company names in bold, titles italicized and job details arranged in bullet points. Oh, and not a single typo to be found. I liked that the font was nothing fancy. Too many candidates waste time obsessing over which font to use. I won’t weigh in on Times New Roman versus Calibri, but I will say that it should always be simple and easy to read.

2. It told a story

This resume told a story about the candidate’s career journey. There were no information gaps (i.e., a missing summer). From top to bottom, there was a clear “before and after.” In just a few seconds, I was able to see a “staircase pattern” of the candidate’s career. In other words, the chronological list of work history — in order of date, with the most recent position at the top — showed a clear progression of more senior roles and more advanced responsibilities.

3. It listed accomplishments, rather than just responsibilities

I’m not interested in reading what you copied and pasted from the original job description listing. What employers really want to know is whether you’re an above average candidate who’s capable of delivering quantifiable results. It’s always better to highlight your responsibilities by detailing your most impressive accomplishments: Examples: Instead of “expanded operations to international markets,” say “expanded operations to eight new countries in Latin America. ”

Instead of “led marketing and sales team,” say “supervised sales team and achieved 15% annual growth vs. 0.5% budget. ”

4. It told the truth

There weren’t any discrepancies that raised red flags. Everything was believable and numbers weren’t exaggerated. Even better, the candidate included links to their LinkedIn page and professional website, which included a portfolio of their work. This made it easier for me to fact-check the resume, which in turn made the candidate seem like an honest person. My advice? Tell the truth — period. A colleague once told me about someone who listed “convicted felon” on her resume. The candidate submitted her resume, then called the hiring manager and asked, “Would you hire an ex-convict?” After a series of questions and some due diligence, they offered her the job. And based on what I’ve heard, she ended up being an excellent hire. While big accomplishments and recognizable company names will give you an advantage, make no mistake: Employers will do a reference check — and if they found out that you lied about something, it’s game over.

5. It didn’t have any cliché claims

There were no generic and high-level claims such as “creative,” “hard-working,” “results-driven,” “excellent communicator” or, my least favorite, “team player.” Including any of these cliché terms will make your hiring manager roll their eyes in less than a second. Go for action verbs and skip the cheesy adjectives and overused terms. Examples: Instead of “excellent communicator,” say “presented at face-to-face client meetings and spoke at college recruiting events. ”

Instead of “highly creative,” say “designed and implemented new global application monitoring platform.”

6. It came through a recommendation


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26  Authors: gary burnison
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ive, team, say, told, resume, impressive, listed, 20, resumes, hiring, candidate, job, seenbased, instead, interviewing


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Want your resume to sail to the top of the pile? Make sure you do all these things

But armed with that knowledge, you can now tailor your resume so it uses AI to your advantage. Given all these behind-the-scenes algorithms, job hunters need to know how their resume looks to computer “eyes” rather than human ones. “The algorithms are really good at deducing these are the key skills for a job,” Siegel said. Have an up-to-date formatAlgorithms try to turn the information on your resume into usable data, said Siegel, so make sure you use a traditional, text-based format. The magic


But armed with that knowledge, you can now tailor your resume so it uses AI to your advantage. Given all these behind-the-scenes algorithms, job hunters need to know how their resume looks to computer “eyes” rather than human ones. “The algorithms are really good at deducing these are the key skills for a job,” Siegel said. Have an up-to-date formatAlgorithms try to turn the information on your resume into usable data, said Siegel, so make sure you use a traditional, text-based format. The magic
Want your resume to sail to the top of the pile? Make sure you do all these things Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, skills, meier, sure, experience, algorithms, siegel, resumes, match, pile, resume, sail, job, ai, things


Want your resume to sail to the top of the pile? Make sure you do all these things

You use Siri and Alexa, aka artificial intelligence, to find pizza or get the forecast. Now, AI is a deep but unseen part of your job hunt. Companies increasingly use AI to cut down on guesswork. Instead of sorting through thousands of resumes, they can instantly seek out those with the resumes that match what employers are looking for. That’s great for them, but how does that help you? It doesn’t. But armed with that knowledge, you can now tailor your resume so it uses AI to your advantage. You do that by knowing how the algorithms work.

Pixsooz | Getty Images

Just as spellcheck alerts you to a typo, other algorithms pore over your electronically submitted resume for misspellings, grammar and information about your work history. With thousands of previous versions of a job that can be scanned, the algorithm uses the available data on resumes to find the best candidates for a talent recruiter, according to Ian Siegel, CEO of ZipRecruiter, an online job marketplace. “Machine learning can cherry pick and rapidly learn from the employer how to do a lookalike search,” Siegel said. “That turns out to be by far the best method you can use to match.” More from Invest in You:

What hiring managers want to see in your social profile

You didn’t get that job. Was it because of your thank you note?

These people in their 30s are doing a simple thing to get rich On the other side of the job hunt, AI can match a person to a pool of applicants who have experience or skills in common with the job seeker and show the jobs they’ve applied to. “AI is the new version of keyword algorithms,” which have been around since the 1990s, said Robert Meier, a job transition expert and CEO of JobMarketExperts, which deals with a range of employment issues. What they look for: continuity of work history, job title progression and education. “Specific companies may have different metrics they look for, such as software experience or credentials,” Meier said. What has changed is the number of applicants. Digital applications are easy and free, Meier says, and any job opening now has so many more candidates for a company to screen. But most are eliminated almost immediately, and only the top 2% of candidates make it to the interview, according to Meier. Given all these behind-the-scenes algorithms, job hunters need to know how their resume looks to computer “eyes” rather than human ones. Here are five things to consider with resumes you will submit electronically.

1. Be straightforward

“Put things in the simplest, most straightforward language possible,” Siegel said. Clearly list your skills and the years of experience you have with each one. Instead of “professional sound engineer with varied experience in wide variety of software,” check the job description for specifics. Better to say you’re a sound engineer with four years’ experience using Avid Pro Tools. “The algorithms are really good at deducing these are the key skills for a job,” Siegel said.

2. Spelling counts

It’s critical to remember that algorithms on job sites scan for a range of signals. “You might be cavalier about spelling and grammar,” Siegel said. “That’s an easy signal.” For most companies, that means your resume is automatically discarded.

3. Have an up-to-date format

Algorithms try to turn the information on your resume into usable data, said Siegel, so make sure you use a traditional, text-based format. Don’t use Photoshop on your resume: The algorithm can’t derive data from a picture. “Use a modern text editor,” Siegel said. “WordPerfect will make for a challenging document.”

4. The magic of ‘results’

A resume filled with results — not duties and responsibilities — attracts employers like moths to a flame, JobMarketExperts’ Meier said. Phrase your accomplishments as revenue, income or money saved. Perhaps you made some aspect of a company function more efficient or found a way to cut costs. A resume that includes specific numbers, percentages and quantities will get a closer look.

5. Have a mobile-ready resume


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, skills, meier, sure, experience, algorithms, siegel, resumes, match, pile, resume, sail, job, ai, things


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This is the advice Kevin O’Leary gave his own daughter when she was job hunting after college

“When my daughter graduated from college and she hit the job market, I gave her this advice: Put together a resume that’s one page long, no more than three paragraphs, max,” O’Leary tells CNBC Make It. “And in that text, explain one thing — how you’re going to help your employer make more money. ” “It’s not about you, it’s about what you can do to help that business succeed,” he says. “If you haven’t explained to me in the first [page] how you’re going to help my business succeed, I’ll never hir


“When my daughter graduated from college and she hit the job market, I gave her this advice: Put together a resume that’s one page long, no more than three paragraphs, max,” O’Leary tells CNBC Make It. “And in that text, explain one thing — how you’re going to help your employer make more money. ” “It’s not about you, it’s about what you can do to help that business succeed,” he says. “If you haven’t explained to me in the first [page] how you’re going to help my business succeed, I’ll never hir
This is the advice Kevin O’Leary gave his own daughter when she was job hunting after college Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01  Authors: sarah berger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, going, oleary, page, daughter, help, advice, kevin, hunting, resume, job, gave, succeed, business, youre, college


This is the advice Kevin O'Leary gave his own daughter when she was job hunting after college

“When my daughter graduated from college and she hit the job market, I gave her this advice: Put together a resume that’s one page long, no more than three paragraphs, max,” O’Leary tells CNBC Make It. “And in that text, explain one thing — how you’re going to help your employer make more money. ”

As graduation season approaches, many young people are polishing their resumes and diving into the job market. As an entrepreneur with experience scouting top talent, “Shark Tank” star Kevin O’Leary had two key pieces of resume advice for his now 25-year-old daughter Savannah when she first started job-hunting: Keep it succinct, and show the prospective employer what you can do for them.

“It’s not about you, it’s about what you can do to help that business succeed,” he says.

O’Leary says that when he’s looking at resumes, he never reads beyond the first page, and he’s not alone — recruiters spend about 7.4 seconds on average scanning a resume.

“One big red flag for me when I’m looking at a resume and it makes me take it right into the ‘out’ pile is more than half of it talking about your success in high school or the name of your dog or what your score was on your baseball team,” O’Leary says. “I couldn’t give a s—.”

Career experts agree that going into exhaustive detail about your career history can be counterproductive, and instead recommend focusing on your more current and relevant experience.

“If you haven’t explained to me in the first [page] how you’re going to help my business succeed, I’ll never hire you,” says O’Leary. “I want to know how you’re going to help me make money in my business, remember that.”

O’Leary — who cut his kids off financially after college so they could learn to succeed on their own — adds that his strategy worked for Savannah, who is now living and working in New York City. “She was very succinct about that and she got employed right away.”

Don’t miss: Kevin O’Leary on college admissions scandal: ‘I’ll tell you who you really screwed: Your kid’

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Disclosure: CNBC owns the exclusive off-network cable rights to “Shark Tank.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01  Authors: sarah berger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, going, oleary, page, daughter, help, advice, kevin, hunting, resume, job, gave, succeed, business, youre, college


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Brexit talks resume as May’s leadership comes under renewed pressure

Brexit talks between the U.K. government and the main opposition Labour party have resumed after lawmakers returned to work following the Easter break. A spokesperson for U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May told reporters Tuesday that the talks will “require compromise on both sides.” A customs union is an agreement that allows partaking countries to set common external tariffs, allowing goods to travel freely between those countries. The draft proposal between the U.K. and EU does not include a cus


Brexit talks between the U.K. government and the main opposition Labour party have resumed after lawmakers returned to work following the Easter break. A spokesperson for U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May told reporters Tuesday that the talks will “require compromise on both sides.” A customs union is an agreement that allows partaking countries to set common external tariffs, allowing goods to travel freely between those countries. The draft proposal between the U.K. and EU does not include a cus
Brexit talks resume as May’s leadership comes under renewed pressure Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: david reid, thierry monasse, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mays, leadership, comes, renewed, eu, pressure, resume, talks, countries, customs, union, trade, labour, uk, brexit, prime


Brexit talks resume as May's leadership comes under renewed pressure

Brexit talks between the U.K. government and the main opposition Labour party have resumed after lawmakers returned to work following the Easter break.

A spokesperson for U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May told reporters Tuesday that the talks will “require compromise on both sides.”

Asked if the government could agree retaining a customs union wit the EU to secure a deal with Labour, the spokesman said: “You know the prime minister’s position with regard to the importance of being able to do trade deals.”

A customs union is an agreement that allows partaking countries to set common external tariffs, allowing goods to travel freely between those countries. The draft proposal between the U.K. and EU does not include a customs union as supporters of Brexit say it prevents the right to strike fresh trade deals.

Earlier this month, May agreed another new Brexit date with EU leaders. It delays the U.K.’s departure until October 31, 2019.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: david reid, thierry monasse, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mays, leadership, comes, renewed, eu, pressure, resume, talks, countries, customs, union, trade, labour, uk, brexit, prime


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Want to be irresistible to hiring managers? Avoid these 6 resume mistakes at all costs

Never underestimate the power of basic skills such as MS Office, Excel and communication skills. Hiring managers receive piles and piles of jargon-filled resumes that it’s difficult for them to assume what skills you do or don’t have. Play it safe and include even the most basic soft skills, especially the ones that are listed under the “minimum requirements” section of the job listing. Peter Yang is a career expert and the CEO of Resume Writing Services, the parent company of ResumeGo. Before t


Never underestimate the power of basic skills such as MS Office, Excel and communication skills. Hiring managers receive piles and piles of jargon-filled resumes that it’s difficult for them to assume what skills you do or don’t have. Play it safe and include even the most basic soft skills, especially the ones that are listed under the “minimum requirements” section of the job listing. Peter Yang is a career expert and the CEO of Resume Writing Services, the parent company of ResumeGo. Before t
Want to be irresistible to hiring managers? Avoid these 6 resume mistakes at all costs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: peter yang, juliano
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, irresistible, hiring, underestimate, resume, work, managers, yang, youtubedont, basic, mistakes, avoid, skills, piles, timemanagement, writing, worked, costs


Want to be irresistible to hiring managers? Avoid these 6 resume mistakes at all costs

Never underestimate the power of basic skills such as MS Office, Excel and communication skills. (Things to leave out: Leadership, time-management, project scheduling, etc.) Hiring managers receive piles and piles of jargon-filled resumes that it’s difficult for them to assume what skills you do or don’t have. Play it safe and include even the most basic soft skills, especially the ones that are listed under the “minimum requirements” section of the job listing.

Peter Yang is a career expert and the CEO of Resume Writing Services, the parent company of ResumeGo. Before that, he worked as a manager and recruiter for more than 20 years. His work has also appeared in Inc. and Glassdoor.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: peter yang, juliano
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, irresistible, hiring, underestimate, resume, work, managers, yang, youtubedont, basic, mistakes, avoid, skills, piles, timemanagement, writing, worked, costs


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Stressed about your resume? Here are 4 things to know before hiring a professional writing service

Many services offer unbelievably low rates — but only because they need to in order to sustain a profitable business model. More often than not, a low rate means you’re getting an inexperienced writer who is willing to be compensated for much less. Services typically charge anywhere from $100 to $400, depending on how advanced your resume needs to be. To avoid getting an inexperienced writer, do your research on the service. It also helps to call them to ask for samples and confirm that your ass


Many services offer unbelievably low rates — but only because they need to in order to sustain a profitable business model. More often than not, a low rate means you’re getting an inexperienced writer who is willing to be compensated for much less. Services typically charge anywhere from $100 to $400, depending on how advanced your resume needs to be. To avoid getting an inexperienced writer, do your research on the service. It also helps to call them to ask for samples and confirm that your ass
Stressed about your resume? Here are 4 things to know before hiring a professional writing service Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: peter yang, crystal sing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, avoid, stressed, getting, hiring, low, writers, know, inexperienced, resume, youre, writer, services, writing, service, things, professional


Stressed about your resume? Here are 4 things to know before hiring a professional writing service

Many services offer unbelievably low rates — but only because they need to in order to sustain a profitable business model. This is usually a red flag. More often than not, a low rate means you’re getting an inexperienced writer who is willing to be compensated for much less. (Believe it or not, some services even hire a fresh-faced grad straight out of college.)

Services typically charge anywhere from $100 to $400, depending on how advanced your resume needs to be. Another trap to avoid is the “$25 resume and a 24-hour turnaround time.” Remember, the writer’s job is to create a compelling document that’s more than just a history of your career, and if they’re not spending more than a few days on your resume, expect to get something very crappy.

To avoid getting an inexperienced writer, do your research on the service. It also helps to call them to ask for samples and confirm that your assigned writer has had some sort of formal training on resume writing, especially in your industry.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: peter yang, crystal sing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, avoid, stressed, getting, hiring, low, writers, know, inexperienced, resume, youre, writer, services, writing, service, things, professional


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US, China resume trade talks in Beijing after ‘productive working dinner’

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Friday he had a “productive working dinner” the previous night in Beijing, kicking off a day of talks aimed at resolving the bitter trade dispute between the world’s two largest economies. Mnuchin did not elaborate and it was not immediately clear with whom he had dined on Thursday night. White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said the United States may drop some tariffs if a trade deal is reached while keeping others in place to ensure Beijing’s


U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Friday he had a “productive working dinner” the previous night in Beijing, kicking off a day of talks aimed at resolving the bitter trade dispute between the world’s two largest economies. Mnuchin did not elaborate and it was not immediately clear with whom he had dined on Thursday night. White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said the United States may drop some tariffs if a trade deal is reached while keeping others in place to ensure Beijing’s
US, China resume trade talks in Beijing after ‘productive working dinner’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: lucy nicholson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, productive, talks, resume, tariffs, beijing, dinner, washington, chinese, transfer, united, china, technology, trade, working


US, China resume trade talks in Beijing after 'productive working dinner'

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Friday he had a “productive working dinner” the previous night in Beijing, kicking off a day of talks aimed at resolving the bitter trade dispute between the world’s two largest economies.

Mnuchin and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer were in the Chinese capital for the first face-to-face meetings between the two sides in weeks after missing an initial end-of-March goal for a summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping to sign a pact.

“We had a very productive working dinner last night, and we are looking forward to meeting today,” Mnuchin said as he left his hotel to meet with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He, who is due to visit Washington next week to continue the talks.

Mnuchin did not elaborate and it was not immediately clear with whom he had dined on Thursday night.

Trump imposed tariffs on $250 billion of Chinese imports last year in a move to force China to change the way it does business with the rest of the world and to pry open more of China’s economy to U.S. companies.

On Thursday, Chinese Premier Li Keqiang said Beijing will sharply expand market access for foreign banks and securities and insurance companies, adding to speculation that China may soon announce new rules to allow foreign financial firms to increase their presence at home.

White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said the United States may drop some tariffs if a trade deal is reached while keeping others in place to ensure Beijing’s compliance.

“We’re not going to give up our leverage,” he told reporters in Washington on Thursday.

Mnuchin and Lighthizer greeted a waiting Liu at the Diaoyutai State Guest House just before 9 a.m. (0100) on Friday for what China’s Commerce Ministry has said would be a full day of talks.

Among Trump’s demands are for Beijing to end practices that Washington alleges result in the systematic theft of U.S. intellectual property and the forced transfer of American technology to Chinese companies.

U.S. companies say they are often pressured into handing over technological know-how to Chinese joint venture partners, local officials or regulators as a condition for doing business in China.

The U.S. government says that technology is often subsequently transferred to and used by Chinese competitors.

The issue has proved a tough one for negotiators as U.S. officials say China has previously refused to acknowledge the problem exists to the extent alleged by the United States, making discussing a resolution difficult.

China says it has no technology transfer requirements enshrined in its laws and any such transfers are a result of legitimate transactions.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: lucy nicholson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, productive, talks, resume, tariffs, beijing, dinner, washington, chinese, transfer, united, china, technology, trade, working


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Major Asian markets close higher as US-China trade talks resume this week

The Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 91.87 points to 25,717.46 and the S&P 500 added 0.4 percent to 2,815.44 — on track for its best first-quarter performance since 1998. The U.S. dollar index, which tracks the greenback against a basket of its peers, was at 97.129 after rising from lows below 97.0 yesterday. The Australian dollar was at $0.7098 after weakening from the $0.71 handle in the previous session. Oil prices gained in the afternoon of Asian trading hours, as the international benchm


The Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 91.87 points to 25,717.46 and the S&P 500 added 0.4 percent to 2,815.44 — on track for its best first-quarter performance since 1998. The U.S. dollar index, which tracks the greenback against a basket of its peers, was at 97.129 after rising from lows below 97.0 yesterday. The Australian dollar was at $0.7098 after weakening from the $0.71 handle in the previous session. Oil prices gained in the afternoon of Asian trading hours, as the international benchm
Major Asian markets close higher as US-China trade talks resume this week Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, markets, treasury, dollar, talks, resume, rose, week, asian, uschina, higher, report, points, close, rising, gained, futures, economic, trade, major


Major Asian markets close higher as US-China trade talks resume this week

Overnight on Wall Street, stocks rose. The Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 91.87 points to 25,717.46 and the S&P 500 added 0.4 percent to 2,815.44 — on track for its best first-quarter performance since 1998. The Nasdaq Composite rose 0.3 percent to 7,669.17.

The moves stateside came following a Reuters report that Chinese officials made unprecedented offers regarding forced technology transfers as well as other major sticking points, as U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin arrived in Beijing for further negotiations.

The trade standoff between the two economic powerhouses has been closely watched by investors, amid rising concerns of an economic slowdown as the bond market flashed signals that a recession could come soon.

“I think ultimately we will be rewarded with a deal of sorts which both sides will proclaim … as a fantastic victory,” Rob Carnell, chief economist and head of Asia-Pacific research at ING Bank, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Friday.

“The thing to bear in mind is this is a process,” Carnell said. “Whatever we get out of this, it’s nice to say ‘right, okay we’ll draw a line under this bit, now we have to look forward to all the other things that we haven’t sorted out’.”

The 10-year Treasury rate hit its lowest level since December of 2017 on Thursday. This comes after the same bond fell below its three-month counterpart last week — a phenomenon described as a inverted yield curve, seen as an early indicator of a recession.

The U.S. dollar index, which tracks the greenback against a basket of its peers, was at 97.129 after rising from lows below 97.0 yesterday.

The Australian dollar was at $0.7098 after weakening from the $0.71 handle in the previous session.

Oil prices gained in the afternoon of Asian trading hours, as the international benchmark Brent crude futures added 0.27 percent to $68.00 per barrel. U.S. crude futures also rose 0.42 percent to $59.56 per barrel.

— CNBC’s Fred Imbert contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, markets, treasury, dollar, talks, resume, rose, week, asian, uschina, higher, report, points, close, rising, gained, futures, economic, trade, major


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The most outrageous resume lies employers have seen—and the 4 secret tactics they use to catch a liar

In fact, a 2017 survey from Careerbuilder found that 75 percent of hiring managers have spotted a lie on a resume at some point in their careers. What’s even more shocking is how outrageous some of those lies were. “Applicant falsely claimed to have a PMI credential when applying for a job at Project Management Institute (PMI), the organization that grants that credential.” “Applicant claimed to be an anti-terrorist spy for the CIA at the same time period he was in elementary school.” Here a few


In fact, a 2017 survey from Careerbuilder found that 75 percent of hiring managers have spotted a lie on a resume at some point in their careers. What’s even more shocking is how outrageous some of those lies were. “Applicant falsely claimed to have a PMI credential when applying for a job at Project Management Institute (PMI), the organization that grants that credential.” “Applicant claimed to be an anti-terrorist spy for the CIA at the same time period he was in elementary school.” Here a few
The most outrageous resume lies employers have seen—and the 4 secret tactics they use to catch a liar Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19  Authors: peter yang, dars
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, employers, claimed, whats, catch, seenand, pmi, outrageous, liar, wasapplicant, understandable, resume, secret, managers, worked, willing, hiring, lies, tactics, job


The most outrageous resume lies employers have seen—and the 4 secret tactics they use to catch a liar

In 2012, Scott Thompson resigned from his role as CEO of Yahoo — all because he was caught having lied about the details of his college degrees.

Sounds crazy, but this sort of stuff happens quite often. In fact, a 2017 survey from Careerbuilder found that 75 percent of hiring managers have spotted a lie on a resume at some point in their careers.

What’s even more shocking is how outrageous some of those lies were. According to the report, here are the notable ones cited by hiring managers:

“Applicant said he worked at Microsoft, but then had no idea who Bill Gates was.”

“Applicant falsely claimed to have a PMI credential when applying for a job at Project Management Institute (PMI), the organization that grants that credential.”

“Applicant claimed to be an anti-terrorist spy for the CIA at the same time period he was in elementary school.”

“Applicant said he studied under Nietzsche.”

Given what’s at stake, it’s certainly understandable why so many job seekers are willing to take the risk of lying on their resumes, but don’t be so naive to think employers are oblivious when reviewing applications. Here a few tactics hiring managers use to catch liars:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19  Authors: peter yang, dars
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, employers, claimed, whats, catch, seenand, pmi, outrageous, liar, wasapplicant, understandable, resume, secret, managers, worked, willing, hiring, lies, tactics, job


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