‘I have the same rights as anybody else’ to run in the 2020 election, Mike Bloomberg says

Newly announced Democratic presidential candidate, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg meets Virginia House Delegate-Elect Nancy Guy (not seen) at a coffee shop on November 25, 2019 in Norfolk, Virginia. Addressing criticism that his ego pushed him to enter the 2020 presidential race, former New York Mayor Mike Bloomberg says he has “the same rights as anybody else” to run. Bloomberg, whose net worth according to Forbes is around $55 billion, has seen pushback regarding his status as another


Newly announced Democratic presidential candidate, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg meets Virginia House Delegate-Elect Nancy Guy (not seen) at a coffee shop on November 25, 2019 in Norfolk, Virginia.
Addressing criticism that his ego pushed him to enter the 2020 presidential race, former New York Mayor Mike Bloomberg says he has “the same rights as anybody else” to run.
Bloomberg, whose net worth according to Forbes is around $55 billion, has seen pushback regarding his status as another
‘I have the same rights as anybody else’ to run in the 2020 election, Mike Bloomberg says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: yelena dzhanova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, presidential, job, election, 2020, york, mayor, seen, race, rights, candidates, states, run, anybody, think, mike, bloomberg


'I have the same rights as anybody else' to run in the 2020 election, Mike Bloomberg says

Newly announced Democratic presidential candidate, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg meets Virginia House Delegate-Elect Nancy Guy (not seen) at a coffee shop on November 25, 2019 in Norfolk, Virginia.

Addressing criticism that his ego pushed him to enter the 2020 presidential race, former New York Mayor Mike Bloomberg says he has “the same rights as anybody else” to run.

Bloomberg, whose net worth according to Forbes is around $55 billion, has seen pushback regarding his status as another wealthy white man to enter the race.

“Yeah, I guess it takes an ego to think that you could do the job,” he said in an interview that aired Friday on “CBS This Morning.”

He then revisited some of his accomplishments as mayor. “I have 12 years of experience in City Hall. And I think if you go back today and ask most people about those 12 years, they would say that the — not me, but the team that I put together — made an enormous difference in New York City. And New York City benefited from it and continues to benefit from it today from what we did then.”

He added that he had the best chance among all the candidates to beat President Donald Trump in 2020. “I think that I would do the best job of competing with him and beating him,” he said in the interview, which was conducted Thursday.

But jumping into the race should not be seen as a slap to front-runner Joe Biden, he added.

“He doesn’t have the job of president of the United States and neither do I,” Bloomberg said. “At the moment, the person that has it is Donald Trump. I’m trying to take away the job from Donald Trump.”

Bloomberg dismissed concerns about diversity in the field as black and Latino candidates struggle to compete. Sen. Kamala Harris dropped out this week, citing lack of resources. Currently, all the candidates who have qualified for the Democratic debate on Dec. 19 are white.

“Entry is not a barrier” Bloomberg said. “I thought there was a lot of diversity in the group of Democratic aspirants.”

But he added, “The public is out there picking and choosing and narrowing down this field. The truth of the matter is you had a lot of diversity in the candidates, some of whom were very competent. Why they aren’t there as you narrowed it down, I — you have to talk to other people who are experts. I don’t know.”

Among the billionaire’s biggest critics are Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, who have accused him of trying to buy the election. Since his campaign launch on Nov. 24, Bloomberg has invested more than $57 million in TV advertising.

Bloomberg decided to skip the first four nominating states — Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina — focusing his campaign on Super Tuesday on March 3, when the largest number of states and territories hold primaries or caucuses.

The former mayor teased the idea of a presidential bid for weeks prior to entering the race but said in March that he would not run for president.

A national poll from the Economist and YouGov puts him at 3% support among voters.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: yelena dzhanova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, presidential, job, election, 2020, york, mayor, seen, race, rights, candidates, states, run, anybody, think, mike, bloomberg


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China suspends US military visits to Hong Kong, sanctions US-based NGOs

Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China November 27, 2019. China said on Monday U.S. military ships and aircraft won’t be allowed to visit Hong Kong, and also announced sanctions against several U.S. non-government organisations for encouraging protesters to “engage in extremist, violent and criminal acts.” China last week promised it would issue “firm counter measures” after U.S. President Donald Trump signed into law the “Hong Kong Human Rights and Democr


Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China November 27, 2019.
China said on Monday U.S. military ships and aircraft won’t be allowed to visit Hong Kong, and also announced sanctions against several U.S. non-government organisations for encouraging protesters to “engage in extremist, violent and criminal acts.”
China last week promised it would issue “firm counter measures” after U.S. President Donald Trump signed into law the “Hong Kong Human Rights and Democr
China suspends US military visits to Hong Kong, sanctions US-based NGOs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rights, ships, sanctions, week, kong, hong, ngos, china, usbased, beijing, visit, protesters, times, visits, suspends, military


China suspends US military visits to Hong Kong, sanctions US-based NGOs

Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China November 27, 2019.

China said on Monday U.S. military ships and aircraft won’t be allowed to visit Hong Kong, and also announced sanctions against several U.S. non-government organisations for encouraging protesters to “engage in extremist, violent and criminal acts.”

The measures were announced by China’s Foreign Ministry in response to U.S. legislation passed last week supporting anti-government protesters. It said it had suspended taking requests for U.S. military visits indefinitely, and warned of further action to come.

“We urge the U.S. to correct the mistakes and stop interfering in our internal affairs. China will take further steps if necessary to uphold Hong Kong’s stability and prosperity and China’s sovereignty,” said ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said at a daily news briefing in Beijing.

China last week promised it would issue “firm counter measures” after U.S. President Donald Trump signed into law the “Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act,” which supports anti-government protesters in Hong Kong and threatens China with potential sanctions.

There are fears that the row over Hong Kong could impact efforts by Beijing and Washington to reach preliminary deal that could de-escalate a prolonged trade war between the two countries.

The U.S.-headquartered NGOs targeted by Beijing include the National Endowment for Democracy, the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs, the International Republican Institute, Human Rights Watch, and Freedom House.

“They shoulder some responsibility for the chaos in Hong Kong and they should be sanctioned and pay the price,” said Hua.

In more normal times, several U.S. naval ships visit Hong Kong annually, a rest-and-recreation tradition that dates back to the pre-1997 colonial era which Beijing allowed to continue after the handover from British to Chinese rule.

Visits have at times been refused amid broader tensions and two U.S. ships were denied access in August.

The USS Blue Ridge, the command ship of the Japanese-based Seventh Fleet, stopped in Hong Kong in April – the last ship to visit before mass protests broke out in June.

Foreign NGOs are already heavily restricted in China, and have previously received sharp rebukes for reporting on rights issues in the country including the mass detention of Uighur Muslims in Xinjiang.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rights, ships, sanctions, week, kong, hong, ngos, china, usbased, beijing, visit, protesters, times, visits, suspends, military


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Supreme Court shows little appetite for expanding gun rights in arguments over repealed New York regulation

Gun owners and second amendment advocates gather at the Ohio State House to protest gun control legislation on September 14, 2019 in Columbus, Ohio. A decision in thew New York case is expected by July, in the midst of the 2020 presidential election. The case was challenging a New York City gun regulation that barred the transport of handguns outside of the city, even to a second home or firing range. Roberts also asked whether gun owners could still seek damages if the high court were to find t


Gun owners and second amendment advocates gather at the Ohio State House to protest gun control legislation on September 14, 2019 in Columbus, Ohio.
A decision in thew New York case is expected by July, in the midst of the 2020 presidential election.
The case was challenging a New York City gun regulation that barred the transport of handguns outside of the city, even to a second home or firing range.
Roberts also asked whether gun owners could still seek damages if the high court were to find t
Supreme Court shows little appetite for expanding gun rights in arguments over repealed New York regulation Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, supreme, owners, arguments, courts, state, city, shows, repealed, second, court, little, regulation, gun, rights, case, expanding, york


Supreme Court shows little appetite for expanding gun rights in arguments over repealed New York regulation

Gun owners and second amendment advocates gather at the Ohio State House to protest gun control legislation on September 14, 2019 in Columbus, Ohio.

A decision in thew New York case is expected by July, in the midst of the 2020 presidential election. The nation’s gun laws have become one of the key issues in the Democratic race amidst an uptick in mass-shooting deaths and youth-led activism, though substantive new legislation is seen as all-but-impossible for the foreseeable future under divided government.

The dispute had one of the highest profiles of the court’s term. The court has not addressed gun legislation since deciding two landmark cases in 2008 and 2010, which held that the Second Amendment protected the individual right to keep guns for the purpose of self-defense in the home.

While court conservatives including Justices Neil Gorsuch and Samuel Alito seemed eager to use the case to address the reach of the Second Amendment, it appeared likely after an hour of arguments that Chief Justice John Roberts would side with the court’s liberals to dismiss the matter altogether as moot in light of the repeal of the regulation.

The case was challenging a New York City gun regulation that barred the transport of handguns outside of the city, even to a second home or firing range. After the court agreed to hear the case, though, the city did away with the regulation and the state passed a law that prevented the city from reviving it.

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court seemed unlikely to deliver a major win for gun-rights activists during arguments on Monday in the first significant Second Amendment case the justices have heard in nearly a decade.

Supporters of gun control and firearm safety measures hold a protest rally outside the US Supreme Court as the Court hears oral arguments in State Rifle and Pistol v. City of New York, NY, in Washington, DC, December 2, 2019.

Paul Clement, who argued on behalf of three gun owners in New York and a state affiliate of the National Rifle Association, argued that the case was still active because his clients could potentially seek monetary damages in the future.

Clement also argued that even under New York’s new regulations, his clients could still be penalized if they did not travel directly to a firing range outside the city, such as if they stopped for coffee.

But Richard Dearing, an attorney for New York, said that the city guaranteed that gun owners would not be prosecuted for such stops. And he said that any challenge to the new regulations would have to be argued in a future battle.

“There may be a controversy here. But it’s a new controversy that will have to be litigated in a new case,” Dearing said.

Clement, who argued for 20 minutes, had little time to address the merits of New York’s gun regulation. Instead, he spent nearly all of his arguments fielding questions from the court’s liberal wing about why the justices should rule on the case at all.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who asked the first question of the day, sounded off on a theme that would be heard throughout.

“The state says: Thou shalt not enforce the regulations. So, what’s left of this case?” Ginsburg asked.

Ginsburg’s health has been in the spotlight because of two recent cancer scares and a hospitalization last month after she experienced chills and a fever. But the 86-year-old justice appeared healthy on Monday.

The court’s other liberals also wrestled with Clement over whether it was proper for the court to decide the case.

“You’re asking us to opine on a law that’s not on the books anymore,” said Justice Sonia Sotomayor, an Obama-appointee.

Justice Stephen Breyer, who was appointed by President Bill Clinton, said he did not think it was bad “when people who have an argument settle their argument.”

Roberts asked few questions throughout. But at one point, the chief justice asked Dearing if it was possible that individuals who violated the old regulation could be targeted in any way by the city, even though it is no longer in force. Roberts also asked whether gun owners could still seek damages if the high court were to find the case moot.

Dearing responded that the gun owners would face no consequences for any past violations of the regulation, and he left open the possibility for damages, though he suggested there could be a time limit.

Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who is known to have an expansive view of the Second Amendment, did not ask any questions.

One wrinkle during arguments came from a difference in opinion between Clement and Jeffrey Wall, the Justice Department’s principal deputy solicitor general, who was arguing in favor of the gun owners.

Gorsuch asked Wall whether he agreed with Clement that the potential for gun owners to be prosecuted for stopping for coffee while traveling to a gun range kept the case alive.

“Why isn’t that good enough?” Gorsuch asked.

Wall said it was a “close call” and a “hard question” but stopped short of endorsing the argument. Instead, Wall emphasized that the gun owners could still seek monetary damages.

All in all, the justices spent just a few minutes probing the key constitutional question that gun-control activists feared would be on the table and that gun-rights groups hoped the court would address.

Since the court’s landmark 2008 opinion in D.C. v. Heller, the lower courts have generally weighed the public interest in gun laws as part of their consideration of whether they are legal. Using that methodology, appeals courts have upheld a broad range of gun restrictions, and those laws have remained on the books as the Supreme Court refused to review them.

Conservatives, including Kavanaugh while a federal appeals court judge, have argued that such considerations are unconstitutional, and that judges should instead look to whether the law was historically seen as permissible.

Ahead of arguments, gun-control activists worried that the court’s 5-4 conservative majority would issue a ruling that adopted that approach.

The case is New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v. City of New York, No. 18-280.

Read more: The Supreme Court is about to hear its biggest gun-control case in a decade


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, supreme, owners, arguments, courts, state, city, shows, repealed, second, court, little, regulation, gun, rights, case, expanding, york


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US law backing Hong Kong protests could end up hurting everyone — the US, China and Hong Kong

Anthony Wallace | AFP | Getty ImagesU.S. President Donald Trump signed into law two bills supporting Hong Kong protesters on Wednesday. The laws were introduced to preserve Hong Kong’s rights and autonomy, but one of them actually contains provisions that could end up hurting the economies of the U.S., China and Hong Kong. Losing special statusAs a special administrative region of China, Hong Kong is governed under the “one country, two systems” principle. On trade, Hong Kong has been a major de


Anthony Wallace | AFP | Getty ImagesU.S. President Donald Trump signed into law two bills supporting Hong Kong protesters on Wednesday.
The laws were introduced to preserve Hong Kong’s rights and autonomy, but one of them actually contains provisions that could end up hurting the economies of the U.S., China and Hong Kong.
Losing special statusAs a special administrative region of China, Hong Kong is governed under the “one country, two systems” principle.
On trade, Hong Kong has been a major de
US law backing Hong Kong protests could end up hurting everyone — the US, China and Hong Kong Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-29  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mainland, hong, china, status, kong, backing, rights, hurting, law, special, financial, chinese, kongs, protests, end


US law backing Hong Kong protests could end up hurting everyone — the US, China and Hong Kong

Secondary school students attend a rally at Edinburgh Place in Hong Kong on August 22, 2019. Anthony Wallace | AFP | Getty Images

U.S. President Donald Trump signed into law two bills supporting Hong Kong protesters on Wednesday. The laws were introduced to preserve Hong Kong’s rights and autonomy, but one of them actually contains provisions that could end up hurting the economies of the U.S., China and Hong Kong. Trump signed two bills on Wednesday pertaining to Hong Kong: One involves an annual review of the city’s autonomy from China; the another bars the sale of munitions to Hong Kong police, such as tear gas and rubber bullets. It is the first — the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act of 2019 — that could lead to the removal of the so-called special status that Hong Kong currently enjoys, and that could hurt the Chinese territory’s economic prospects and businesses that operate there. Hong Kong, a former British colony that returned to Chinese rule in 1997, has seen widespread demonstrations since June, some of which have led to violent clashes between protesters and the police. The protests were initially sparked by a proposed law that would have allowed extradition to mainland China, but the unrest later morphed into broader anti-government demonstrations that include demands such as greater democracy and universal suffrage. The two U.S. laws come amid widespread criticism of heavy-handed treatment of protesters by the Hong Kong police and government, which Beijing supports.

Protecting Hong Kong

The Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act of 2019 include the following provisions: Requiring the U.S. State Department to annually review whether Hong Kong is “sufficiently autonomous” from China to justify its “unique treatment” under U.S. law

Requiring the American president to impose sanctions on individuals found violating human rights in Hong Kong by freezing their assets and denying them entry into the U.S.

U.S. visas to Hong Kong applicants may not be denied because they’ve been arrested or detained for taking part in pro-democracy protests The bill was touted by Congress as a way to deter Beijing’s influence and interference in Hong Kong’s internal affairs. But many analysts have said it’s largely “symbolic” in nature.

“I think it’s (a) significant but symbolic step,” Ben Bland, director of the Southeast Asia Project at Australian think tank Lowy Institute, said last week before Congress passed the two bills. “It’s really important for the Hong Kong democracy movement. Many people on the streets have been calling for the U.S. to signal its support and to signal its dissatisfaction with what the Chinese government has been doing in Hong Kong over the last few years: Squeezing the city’s freedom and autonomy,” he told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Asia.”

Losing special status

As a special administrative region of China, Hong Kong is governed under the “one country, two systems” principle. Under that structure, Hong Kong is given self-governing power, a largely separate legal and economic framework from China, and various freedoms including limited election rights. Such a system underpins Hong Kong’s status as a global financial and business center, especially as a middleman between China and the world. The city’s autonomy from China is also a reason why the U.S. treats it differently from other Chinese cities. For example, elevated U.S. tariffs imposed on China in the trade war don’t apply to Hong Kong.

Hong Kong’s importance to the Chinese economy is disproportionate to its size. Tianlei Huang Peterson Institute for International Economics

Losing that special treatment would damage the city’s economy, and its repercussions could potentially feed through the global financial system. To be sure, the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act of 2019 by itself doesn’t mandate the removal of the territory’s special status if the U.S. finds that Hong Kong is not sufficiently autonomous from China. The revocation has to come from Trump through an executive order, or Congress via the United States-Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992, which spells out Washington’s special treatment of the city. Nevertheless, analysts said Washington is not likely to go so far as to revoke the city’s special status, given the economic stake the U.S. has in Hong Kong.

US interests in Hong Kong

One reason why Washington wouldn’t cancel Hong Kong’s special status is the tight trade and financial relationship between the two, observers said. On its website, the State Department said that more than 1,300 American firms operate in Hong Kong, of which 300 base their Asian regional operations there. Nearly all major U.S. financial firms have a presence there.

On trade, Hong Kong has been a major destination for U.S. legal and accounting services, according to the State Department. Last year, the U.S.’s largest goods trade surplus worldwide — at $31.1 billion — was with Hong Kong, the State Department said. Many of those relationships were built on Hong Kong’s trusted position as a relatively safe place to access China — the world’s second-largest economy with much untapped business opportunities. The American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong has said that anything that changes the status of the city would have “a chilling effect” on U.S. trade and investment in the city, reported Reuters.

Hong Kong’s importance to China

Hong Kong’s economic growth contribution to China has diminished through the years, but the city has remained an important financial center for mainland businesses. Given its openness to foreign investors, Hong Kong has for years been the place where mainland Chinese companies raise funds through listing on the Hong Kong stock market and issuing bonds.

Hong Kong’s role as the China’s financial arm for the rest of the world has helped mainland China in keeping its financial sector insulated … French investment bank Natixis

In recent years, Hong Kong has become the gateway for foreign investors to buy Chinese financial assets through the stock and bond connect programs. The city is also one of the few places where the Chinese yuan is traded outside the mainland, facilitating the internationalization of the currency. “Hong Kong’s role as the China’s financial arm for the rest of the world has helped mainland China in keeping its financial sector insulated without suffering the negative consequences of such isolation, i.e. limited access to finance or difficult access to assets in the rest of the world,” French investment bank Natixis wrote in an August report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-29  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mainland, hong, china, status, kong, backing, rights, hurting, law, special, financial, chinese, kongs, protests, end


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China plans stronger protections for intellectual property rights

China said on Sunday it would seek to improve protections for intellectual property rights, including raising the upper limits for compensation for rights infringements. An opinion document released by the State Council and Communist Party’s Central Office on Sunday evening called for a strengthening of protections through both the civil and criminal justice systems and an effective enforcement of penalties. The upper limits on legal compensation should be raised substantially, it said. The docu


China said on Sunday it would seek to improve protections for intellectual property rights, including raising the upper limits for compensation for rights infringements.
An opinion document released by the State Council and Communist Party’s Central Office on Sunday evening called for a strengthening of protections through both the civil and criminal justice systems and an effective enforcement of penalties.
The upper limits on legal compensation should be raised substantially, it said.
The docu
China plans stronger protections for intellectual property rights Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-24
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, enforcement, stronger, rights, compensation, intellectual, protections, property, upper, limits, china, document, plans


China plans stronger protections for intellectual property rights

China said on Sunday it would seek to improve protections for intellectual property rights, including raising the upper limits for compensation for rights infringements.

An opinion document released by the State Council and Communist Party’s Central Office on Sunday evening called for a strengthening of protections through both the civil and criminal justice systems and an effective enforcement of penalties.

The upper limits on legal compensation should be raised substantially, it said.

The document said that by 2022, China should be making progress in issues that have affected intellectual property rights enforcement, such as low compensation, high costs, and the difficulty of proof. By 2025, there should be a better system of protection in place.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-24
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, enforcement, stronger, rights, compensation, intellectual, protections, property, upper, limits, china, document, plans


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Hong Kong rights bill unlikely to derail US-China trade talks, strategy firm principal says

A U.S. bill aiming to protect human rights in Hong Kong is unlikely to disrupt trade talks between Washington and Beijing, said Amy Celico, principal at Albright Stonebridge Group. “I don’t think it’s enough of an issue to derail the trade talks,” she told CNBC’s Sri Jegarajah at the Morgan Stanley APAC Summit. The “Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act” cleared both chambers of Congress this week as Hong Kong remains engulfed in mass protests. The bill would require the U.S. State Department


A U.S. bill aiming to protect human rights in Hong Kong is unlikely to disrupt trade talks between Washington and Beijing, said Amy Celico, principal at Albright Stonebridge Group.
“I don’t think it’s enough of an issue to derail the trade talks,” she told CNBC’s Sri Jegarajah at the Morgan Stanley APAC Summit.
The “Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act” cleared both chambers of Congress this week as Hong Kong remains engulfed in mass protests.
The bill would require the U.S. State Department
Hong Kong rights bill unlikely to derail US-China trade talks, strategy firm principal says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-22  Authors: ana nicolaci da costa
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, week, strategy, uschina, kong, firm, talks, rights, trade, unlikely, hong, agriculture, human, principal, bill


Hong Kong rights bill unlikely to derail US-China trade talks, strategy firm principal says

Flags of the US and China are placed ahead of a meeting between US Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue and China’s Agriculture Minister Han Changfu at the Ministry of Agriculture in Beijing on June 30, 2017.

A U.S. bill aiming to protect human rights in Hong Kong is unlikely to disrupt trade talks between Washington and Beijing, said Amy Celico, principal at Albright Stonebridge Group.

While Celico said it was a “significant issue” for China she did not expect the passing of that bill to steer U.S.-China talks off course.

“I don’t think it’s enough of an issue to derail the trade talks,” she told CNBC’s Sri Jegarajah at the Morgan Stanley APAC Summit.

The “Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act” cleared both chambers of Congress this week as Hong Kong remains engulfed in mass protests. The measure needs to be signed by President Donald Trump before it becomes law.

The bill would require the U.S. State Department to annually certify that Hong Kong has enough autonomy to warrant its continued special status. Under that distinction, Hong Kong receives unique treatment that spares the Asian financial center from tariffs that have been slapped on China in the ongoing trade war with the U.S.

The legislation would also look to impose sanctions on those responsible for human rights violations in Hong Kong.

Asked about the bill at a press conference this week, China’s foreign ministry spokesperson Geng Shuang said “China strongly condemns and firmly opposes it.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-22  Authors: ana nicolaci da costa
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, week, strategy, uschina, kong, firm, talks, rights, trade, unlikely, hong, agriculture, human, principal, bill


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Trump signing pro-Hong Kong rights bill into law will worsen US-China relationship, former US ambassador to China says

Protesters build a wall to block a road at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, in Hong Kong on November 14, 2019. U.S.-China relations will worsen if President Donald Trump signs a pro-Hong Kong rights bill into law, a former American ambassador to China said on Thursday. Baucus’ comments came after the House passed a pro-Hong Kong rights bill on Wednesday, putting Trump in a bind as he tries not to roil high-stakes trade talks with China. (There’s a) wonderful top line vision to it: standards


Protesters build a wall to block a road at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, in Hong Kong on November 14, 2019.
U.S.-China relations will worsen if President Donald Trump signs a pro-Hong Kong rights bill into law, a former American ambassador to China said on Thursday.
Baucus’ comments came after the House passed a pro-Hong Kong rights bill on Wednesday, putting Trump in a bind as he tries not to roil high-stakes trade talks with China.
(There’s a) wonderful top line vision to it: standards
Trump signing pro-Hong Kong rights bill into law will worsen US-China relationship, former US ambassador to China says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-21  Authors: huileng tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, bill, signing, human, kong, baucus, rights, relationship, china, prohong, relations, worsen, uschina, trump, house, law, hong


Trump signing pro-Hong Kong rights bill into law will worsen US-China relationship, former US ambassador to China says

Protesters build a wall to block a road at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, in Hong Kong on November 14, 2019.

U.S.-China relations will worsen if President Donald Trump signs a pro-Hong Kong rights bill into law, a former American ambassador to China said on Thursday.

“I don’t think this bill is going to help protesters achieve their goals. Second, it has an impact on U.S.-China relations. I think this is going to worsen relations,” said Max Baucus, who was appointed ambassador by President Barack Obama.

It will also cause more uncertainty regarding potential trade agreement, added Baucus, who is also a former Democratic senator from Montana.

Baucus’ comments came after the House passed a pro-Hong Kong rights bill on Wednesday, putting Trump in a bind as he tries not to roil high-stakes trade talks with China.

The chamber approved a measure that aims to protect human rights in Hong Kong by a 417-1 margin amid efforts to crack down on months of anti-government protests. The House passed a second bill to bar the export of certain munitions to Hong Kong police by the same margin.

The Senate unanimously approved both pieces of legislation, so they head to Trump’s desk after House passage. And Trump will likely sign the bill, Baucus told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.”

“It sounds good for American politicians. It sounds good for President Trump. (There’s a) wonderful top line vision to it: standards for human rights,” said Baucus.

“It’s very hard in the current political climate in Washington D.C. which has near hysterical reactions against China to not sign the bill of human rights,” he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-21  Authors: huileng tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, bill, signing, human, kong, baucus, rights, relationship, china, prohong, relations, worsen, uschina, trump, house, law, hong


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Stacey Abrams on the books that have impacted her career the most

As a political leader who has accomplished a lot in her career, Abrams says there is one collection of books that has had the most impact on her professional journey. Shortly after losing the Georgia governor’s race to Republican Brian Kemp, Abrams started her voting rights group Fair Fight. At the Lesbians Who Tech & Allies summit earlier this year, Abrams spoke about the role she believes voter suppression played in her election outcome last year. “We need to talk about voter suppression the w


As a political leader who has accomplished a lot in her career, Abrams says there is one collection of books that has had the most impact on her professional journey.
Shortly after losing the Georgia governor’s race to Republican Brian Kemp, Abrams started her voting rights group Fair Fight.
At the Lesbians Who Tech & Allies summit earlier this year, Abrams spoke about the role she believes voter suppression played in her election outcome last year.
“We need to talk about voter suppression the w
Stacey Abrams on the books that have impacted her career the most Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-21  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, impacted, georgia, rights, voting, johnson, suppression, career, leader, abrams, used, books, voter, stacey, power


Stacey Abrams on the books that have impacted her career the most

In addition to being a Yale-trained lawyer, entrepreneur and politician, former Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams is an award-winning author who has written eight romantic suspense novels under the pen name Selena Montgomery.

Those novels, in total, have sold more than 100,000 copies. Her latest book, “Lead from the Outside: How to Build Your Future and Make Real Change,” is part memoir, part self-help book and scored a spot on the New York Times bestseller list.

As a political leader who has accomplished a lot in her career, Abrams says there is one collection of books that has had the most impact on her professional journey.

“I actually have spent the most time reading Robert Caro’s compendium on Lyndon B. Johnson,” she tells CNBC Make It at The Riveter Summit. “I think President Johnson was an extraordinary leader and a deeply flawed man who made terrible mistakes and did extraordinary things.”

Abrams says Caro’s collection “The Years of Lyndon Johnson,” (which includes four books: “The Path to Power,” “Means of Ascent,” “Master of the Senate” and “The Passage of Power”) taught her that “the best way to be a leader — whether it’s in politics, or in business, or in life — is to recognize that very few people are one dimensional.”

“We are often comprised of tremendous capacity and terrible fears and failures,” says Abrams. “I’ve used his journey to really help remind me of how to be a better person, but also, what are the stakes and how far can we reach?”

Abrams says Caro’s books have also taught her about “the power of redemption.” Johnson was “an avowed racist who helped put in place the architecture that created the opportunity for me to sit where I sit and to stand where I stand,” says Abrams.

The 36th president has a controversial legacy: He was known to use racially offensive language, and his presidency was marked by failures around the Vietnam War, and racial strife. Yet Johnson also signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (making it unlawful to discriminate based on race, among other things) and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 (which prohibited racial discrimination in the voting process). He also ushered in multiple war on poverty programs that still exist today.

Abrams, who gained national attention in 2018 when she ran as Georgia’s democratic candidate for governor, understands the impact of Johnson’s work and has since used her own platform to continue the fight for equal access to voting.

Shortly after losing the Georgia governor’s race to Republican Brian Kemp, Abrams started her voting rights group Fair Fight. According to the organization’s website, its mission is to “promote fair elections in Georgia and around the country, encourage voter participation in elections, and educate voters about elections and their voting rights.”

At the Lesbians Who Tech & Allies summit earlier this year, Abrams spoke about the role she believes voter suppression played in her election outcome last year. “Voter suppression, it works by convincing people in practice that they don’t count,” Abrams said as she talked about the need to bring more awareness to the issue. “We need to talk about voter suppression the way we talk about the Kardashians … with such insistence that people have to respond.”

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Don’t miss: Stacey Abrams has used an Excel spreadsheet to track life her goals since she was 18—why it’s been crucial to her success


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-21  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, impacted, georgia, rights, voting, johnson, suppression, career, leader, abrams, used, books, voter, stacey, power


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Asia stocks set to trade lower amid concerns ‘phase one’ US-China trade deal may not be signed in 2019

Asia stocks were set to trade lower on Thursday following a report that an anticipated “phase one” trade deal between the U.S. and China may not be inked by the end of 2019. That report came after The Wall Street Journal reported, citing former Trump administration officials, that the ongoing trade talks could hit an impasse. The developments come as Dec. 15 looms, with more tariffs on Chinese goods to the U.S. set to kick in. The matter was further complicated by U.S. Congress passing a Hong Ko


Asia stocks were set to trade lower on Thursday following a report that an anticipated “phase one” trade deal between the U.S. and China may not be inked by the end of 2019.
That report came after The Wall Street Journal reported, citing former Trump administration officials, that the ongoing trade talks could hit an impasse.
The developments come as Dec. 15 looms, with more tariffs on Chinese goods to the U.S. set to kick in.
The matter was further complicated by U.S. Congress passing a Hong Ko
Asia stocks set to trade lower amid concerns ‘phase one’ US-China trade deal may not be signed in 2019 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-21  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nikkei, ongoing, phase, rights, uschina, asia, trade, report, kong, concerns, set, stocks, deal, signed, reported, lower


Asia stocks set to trade lower amid concerns 'phase one' US-China trade deal may not be signed in 2019

Asia stocks were set to trade lower on Thursday following a report that an anticipated “phase one” trade deal between the U.S. and China may not be inked by the end of 2019.

Futures pointed to a lower open for Japanese shares. The Nikkei futures contract in Chicago was at 23,050 while its counterpart in Osaka was at 23,110. The Nikkei 225 last closed at 23,148.57.

Meanwhile, Australian stocks declined in early trade, with the S&P/ASX 200 shed around 0.4%.

Market reaction to overnight developments on U.S.-China trade will be watched.

Reuters reported, citing trade experts and people close to U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration, the completion of a partial trade deal could be pushed into 2020 as China seeks more extensive tariff rollbacks. That report came after The Wall Street Journal reported, citing former Trump administration officials, that the ongoing trade talks could hit an impasse.

The developments come as Dec. 15 looms, with more tariffs on Chinese goods to the U.S. set to kick in.

The matter was further complicated by U.S. Congress passing a Hong Kong rights bill, amid ongoing turmoil in the city that has been plagued by civil unrest for months. Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said Beijing “condemns and firmly opposes” the first bill, known as the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-21  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nikkei, ongoing, phase, rights, uschina, asia, trade, report, kong, concerns, set, stocks, deal, signed, reported, lower


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US Senate unanimously passes Hong Kong rights bill, sending legislation to House

A protester runs during an attempt to leave The Hong Kong Polytechnic University on November 18, 2019 in Hong Kong, China. The U.S. Senate, in a unanimous vote, passed legislation on Tuesday aimed at protecting human rights in Hong Kong amid China’s crackdown on a pro-democracy protest movement that has gripped the vital financial center for months. Following the voice vote by senators, the “Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act” now goes to the House of Representatives, which earlier approve


A protester runs during an attempt to leave The Hong Kong Polytechnic University on November 18, 2019 in Hong Kong, China.
The U.S. Senate, in a unanimous vote, passed legislation on Tuesday aimed at protecting human rights in Hong Kong amid China’s crackdown on a pro-democracy protest movement that has gripped the vital financial center for months.
Following the voice vote by senators, the “Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act” now goes to the House of Representatives, which earlier approve
US Senate unanimously passes Hong Kong rights bill, sending legislation to House Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vote, legislation, work, whats, unanimously, rights, senate, sending, house, chinese, passes, freedoms, hong, bill, kong, human


US Senate unanimously passes Hong Kong rights bill, sending legislation to House

A protester runs during an attempt to leave The Hong Kong Polytechnic University on November 18, 2019 in Hong Kong, China.

The U.S. Senate, in a unanimous vote, passed legislation on Tuesday aimed at protecting human rights in Hong Kong amid China’s crackdown on a pro-democracy protest movement that has gripped the vital financial center for months.

Following the voice vote by senators, the “Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act” now goes to the House of Representatives, which earlier approved its own version of the measure. The two chambers will have to work out their differences before any legislation can be sent to President Donald Trump for his consideration.

“The people of Hong Kong see what’s coming — they see the steady effort to erode the autonomy and their freedoms,” said Republican Senator Marco Rubio, accusing Beijing of “violence and repression.”

Demonstrators are angry at what they see as Chinese meddling in the freedoms promised to Hong Kong when Britain returned its longtime colony to Chinese rule in 1997.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vote, legislation, work, whats, unanimously, rights, senate, sending, house, chinese, passes, freedoms, hong, bill, kong, human


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