We asked the Democrats running for president how they would negotiate with China on trade. Here’s what they said

China has not been forthright in even admitting that intellectual property theft and technology transfer occurs. On the intellectual property theft, we know that much of the IP theft is state-backed. We should address cybersecurity and intellectual property theft issues directly with China and use the WTO to negotiate trade disputes and establish clear enforcement mechanisms. As we press China on trade and intellectual property theft, we need to demonstrate our resolve in ways that actually help


China has not been forthright in even admitting that intellectual property theft and technology transfer occurs. On the intellectual property theft, we know that much of the IP theft is state-backed. We should address cybersecurity and intellectual property theft issues directly with China and use the WTO to negotiate trade disputes and establish clear enforcement mechanisms. As we press China on trade and intellectual property theft, we need to demonstrate our resolve in ways that actually help
We asked the Democrats running for president how they would negotiate with China on trade. Here’s what they said Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, practices, property, running, negotiate, democrats, wto, trade, american, president, asked, theft, rights, heres, intellectual, china, chinas


We asked the Democrats running for president how they would negotiate with China on trade. Here's what they said

China’s President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump attend a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. Nicolas Asfouri | AFP | Getty Images

With trade negotiations between the U.S. and China stalled and an escalating trade war threatening global markets, President Donald Trump has said that the Chinese are “DREAMING” that he will be defeated by a Democrat in 2020. But Democrats have not said much about their own plans for negotiating with the Chinese. To learn more, CNBC asked the 21 top Democrats running for president about their views. We asked them what they believe is working under Trump — and what they would change. We also asked whether human rights issues in China, where the U.S. has said more than a million Muslims are held in concentration camps, should be part of any trade deal. Lastly, we asked about what they would do about China’s efforts to tighten its military grip on the South China Sea, where more than $3 trillion of trade passes annually. Below, unedited, are our questions and the answers we received from the seven Democrats who responded. Those Democrats are Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, former Maryland Rep. John Delaney, Rep. Seth Moulton, D-Mass., Miramar, Florida, Mayor Wayne Messam and spiritual coach Marianne Williamson. Two other Democrats provided partial responses. A spokesperson for Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., provided an excerpt from the senator’s platform that is included as a response to the first question. An aide to Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke wrote in a statement: “Holding China accountable should not come at the expense of American workers. That is why we must not settle for any deal that does not respect intellectual property, level the playing field in the Chinese market, nor end unfair trade practices. We must advance progress based on shared interests and core democratic values.” Joe Biden, the Democratic front runner, did not respond to CNBC’s survey as of publication time but has dismissed China’s economic competitiveness while on the campaign trail, earning some criticism from his fellow contenders. “China is going to eat our lunch? Come on, man,” Biden told a crowd in Iowa earlier this month. He described himself as a “fair trader” and said he has been “arguing for a long time that we should treat other countries the way in which they treat us, which is, particularly as it relates to China: If they want to trade here, they’re going to be under the same rules.” CNBC provided the questions to each campaign on May 6. What do you think is the best approach to addressing China’s practices with regard to intellectual property theft, technology transfer, industrial subsidies and other matters in which the two countries are at odds. Is it through multinational organizations like the World Trade Organization and the United Nations? Will you take any action unilaterally? If so, what action? Sanders: It is in the interests of the United States to work to strengthen institutions like the WTO and the UN rather than trying to go it alone. American concerns about China’s technology practices are shared in Europe and across the Asia-Pacific. We can place far more pressure on China to change its policies if we work together with the broader international community and the other developed economies. International institutions also offer China a template for reforming its own internal intellectual property and industrial practices. Swalwell: I’m a member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, as well as of the Judiciary Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet, so I’ve seen first-hand the economic espionage that China commits and the adverse impact it has on American businesses. China has not been forthright in even admitting that intellectual property theft and technology transfer occurs. Nor is China transparent on its industrial subsidies. Curbing China’s dishonest practices must be a part of any negotiation; as president, I would hold China accountable. On the intellectual property theft, we know that much of the IP theft is state-backed. In order to combat this we must take a multi-pronged approach — both defensive and offensive. We must have a strong enforcement mechanism with which to hold China accountable for their actions and continue to impose penalties when theft occurs. China has made promises to institute reforms of their policies governing IP rights, technology transfers and cyber-theft of trade secrets in the past but we know these are not being imposed. Read more: Eric Swalwell of California joins 2020 presidential race The legal and diplomatic approaches have not been completely effective, it is critical that we implement other actions such as developing early warning systems, particularly when it comes to the stealing of defense technology. This can be done through private-public partnerships. We must also be ready to take counter action when a theft is detected. It is vital that we continue to have a multinational approach to addressing these issues. We can’t go it alone; we must involve allies — and other victims of China’s practices — such as Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand.

While the U.S. does not have to go through the World Trade Organization and can invoke Section 301 if they are to impose tariffs against China (even though it still has to file a simultaneous complaint with the WTO), the WTO can still be a useful partner. In fact, the WTO has an obligation to enforce the rules they have set up, otherwise it is left to the United States to impose punishment. We should hold the WTO to its obligation. It is also important that U.S. companies acknowledge when theft is occurring by China. In the past, companies have not wanted to impinge on their business with China so they’ve turned a blind eye. I would ensure that reporting this theft it is a win-win for American companies through fair trade practices. Lastly, government departments must coordinate with each other and with U.S. companies. The departments of Commerce and the Treasury, the U.S. Trade Representative and the U.S. State Department must all be aligned to tackle the problem of IP property theft in coordination with the private sector. I would continue to make sure the Justice Department brings criminal cases against the companies that violate trade agreements and steal our trade secrets and intellectual property. I would boost our Trade Representative’s investigation of China’s activities by adding more staff and funding. Ryan: When it comes to China stealing intellectual property from the United States, there is no doubt that multinational organizations need to play a part in holding them accountable. These actions are a serious national security and economic risk for the United States. At the same time, I think our government must take further action when it comes to creating safeguards against China’s actions. That is why I have cosponsored legislation the Fair Trade with China Enforcement Act, which would hold China accountable and create necessary regulations when it comes to trade with China, including prohibiting the sale of national security sensitive technology and intellectual property to China. Read more: Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan — who once tried to take down Nancy Pelosi — is running for president Delaney: China has acted like pirates, stealing intellectual property, building illegal islands, and not playing by the rules. I will build a broad coalition of U.S. allies and have a unified front against China (this will involve working with multinational organizations but also doing a lot more), I will unify our business community against these practices by preventing them from depositing intellectual property funded by taxpayers into joint ventures with China, and I will re-enter the TPP to compete with China. We can hold China accountable and have a productive relationship with them. Read more: What being a successful businessman taught Rep. John Delaney about politics Moulton: These options aren’t mutually exclusive. We should address cybersecurity and intellectual property theft issues directly with China and use the WTO to negotiate trade disputes and establish clear enforcement mechanisms. Protecting our international property is a national security issue, and we need to build a cyberwall to protect against Chinese and Russian attacks. We should start by strengthening the Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center created under President Obama and improve the information-sharing between the private sector and government on cyber threats. As we press China on trade and intellectual property theft, we need to demonstrate our resolve in ways that actually help American workers. Donald Trump has shown he knows nothing about trade. An initial analysis of the net effect of the tariffs is that they are costing the United States economy $1.4 billion a month, and the cost of the tariffs is being passed on to U.S. farmers, companies, and consumers. Read more: Seth Moulton is the latest Democrat running for president. Here are his biggest policy priorities, from green jobs to a public option The United States led the 15 years of negotiations that enabled China to join the WTO and we should reap the benefits of that successful diplomatic effort. Our negotiators secured unprecedented changes to China’s economic and trade policies as conditions for membership, including requiring a dramatic opening of China’s telecom, banking, and insurance sectors, along with the lowering of tariffs on key agricultural products to almost zero. The point is: WTO leverage works. China’s membership in the WTO has been a huge boon to the United States, with U.S. exports to China increasing by 500 percent and agricultural exports increasing by 1000 percent since China joined the organization. Going forward, the WTO should absolutely be involved in establishing trust in trade negotiations and in providing the mechanisms for the enforcement of trade agreements. Bennet: Instead of slapping tariffs on our allies and perpetrating a trade war, Michael believes we need to do the hard work of building coalitions to counter Chinese predatory economic practices, like intellectual property theft and economic espionage, that harm American workers, businesses, farmers, and ranchers. In order to compete with and counter an increasingly authoritarian China, Michael believes we must reinvest in our alliances, champion democratic values like the rule of law and human rights, and sharpen our efforts to combat technology threats that undermine U.S. economic and national security.

Messam: The strained trade relations between the U.S. and China is a complex issue that should be confronted with a measured and sober disposition. The combined approach of multinational organizations and unilateral action should be leveraged to protect intellectual property, technology assets, and trade secrets. Before engaging trade wars that could have detrimental impacts to American businesses and our economy, we must seek to solve our trade differences diplomatically. Where multinational organization negotiations don’t work, I would seek specific and direct trade remedies not limited to: • tariffs • blockade on imports of stolen intellectual property Read more: Little-known Florida mayor becomes the latest Democrat vying to take on Trump in 2020 Williamson: The United States Intellectual Property is some of the most valued in the world. According to the USTR, by stealing our intellectual property, China costs American businesses between $225 billion and $600 billion annually. We must use all tools at our disposal to ensure China respects intellectual property law. This will include working with and leveraging the power of the international community to make certain that China engages in fair trade. The U.S. government must also enlist the help and cooperation from American businesses to help solve this problem. Increased internal controls, more robust screening and standardized best practices will make it more difficult for Chinese agents to operate. Many opportunities are a matter of simple theft. More diligence will help curb crimes of opportunity. Lastly, a firm no nonsense stance against China on every front will be necessary to send a clear message that these practices won’t be tolerated. Should a trade deal with China address human rights issues? If not, will your administration address human rights in China and, if so, how? Sanders: Yes. Labor protections are very weak in China, and the rights of workers are an essential component of human rights. The Trump administration has proven itself indifferent to labor rights, and apparently would prefer that American workers are reduced to the position of Chinese workers, rather than that labor everywhere enjoy basic protections and strong standard of living. The Trump administration has also done nothing to pressure China over its abhorrent treatment of the Uighur and Tibetan peoples. Future trade negotiations should, for example, target American corporations that contribute surveillance technologies that enable China’s authoritarian practices. Swalwell: Yes, a trade deal must have a component to address human rights activity. We must be a model for the world and call out countries such as China that violate human rights. Ryan: Yes. As the United States negotiates any future trade deal with China, we must address the human rights violations. The actions we have seen from the Chinese government when it comes to the inhumane treatment of the ethnic minorities is inexcusable. And no future trade agreement can ignore these violations. Delaney: Human rights are a priority to the Delaney Administration.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, practices, property, running, negotiate, democrats, wto, trade, american, president, asked, theft, rights, heres, intellectual, china, chinas


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Event for Brazil’s Bolsonaro defies corporate backing of LGBT rights

Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro speaks during a discussion on US-Brazil relations at the US Chamber of Commerce in Washington, DC on March 18, 2019. Marriott International, among many big corporations, has gone on record in support of the LGBT community. But now Marriott is among the corporations facing backlash over an event that will honor Brazil’s new and controversial president Jair Bolsonaro, who has a history of homophobic comments. The event attracted major corporate sponsors, including


Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro speaks during a discussion on US-Brazil relations at the US Chamber of Commerce in Washington, DC on March 18, 2019. Marriott International, among many big corporations, has gone on record in support of the LGBT community. But now Marriott is among the corporations facing backlash over an event that will honor Brazil’s new and controversial president Jair Bolsonaro, who has a history of homophobic comments. The event attracted major corporate sponsors, including
Event for Brazil’s Bolsonaro defies corporate backing of LGBT rights Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: ryan ruggiero donovan russo, ryan ruggiero, donovan russo, kate rooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, corporations, bolsonaro, times, defies, president, york, backing, brazils, rights, corporate, vocal, event, comments, lgbt, pulled


Event for Brazil's Bolsonaro defies corporate backing of LGBT rights

Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro speaks during a discussion on US-Brazil relations at the US Chamber of Commerce in Washington, DC on March 18, 2019.

Marriott International, among many big corporations, has gone on record in support of the LGBT community. Its CEO, Arne Sorenson, has been one of the most vocal defenders of LGBT rights in recent years as corporations have been pulled more squarely into divisive social and legal battles related to LGBT discrimination.

But now Marriott is among the corporations facing backlash over an event that will honor Brazil’s new and controversial president Jair Bolsonaro, who has a history of homophobic comments. He also has made incendiary comments about gender, indigenous groups and torture.

The Marriott Marquis in New York City will be hosting the Brazilian-American Chamber of Commerce 2019 Person of the Year Award Gala Dinner, honoring Bolsonaro. The event attracted major corporate sponsors, including Delta Air Lines, UnitedHealth Group, Morgan Stanley and Bank of America.

Additional sponsors include HSBC, Citigroup, JPMorgan, UBS and Bank of New York Mellon, Santander, BNP Paribas and Forbes’ local licensee Forbes Brasil, whose publisher said it has been a media sponsor of the event for five years and will continue to sponsor it to strengthen ties between Brazil and the U.S.

Bain & Co. pulled out of event sponsorship on Tuesday, as did the Financial Times. Delta told CNBC on Tuesday afternoon that it had pulled out of event sponsorship.

Bolsonaro is reportedly receiving the reward for his prioritizing of Christian values and family. He’s been president of Brazil since January and has been a vocal opponent of same-sex marriage, homosexuality and abortion. According to the New York Times, which cataloged some of his controversial comments, Bolsonaro said he would “rather have a son who is an addict than a son who is gay” and that he was “proud to be homophobic.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: ryan ruggiero donovan russo, ryan ruggiero, donovan russo, kate rooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, corporations, bolsonaro, times, defies, president, york, backing, brazils, rights, corporate, vocal, event, comments, lgbt, pulled


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Wall Street banks boycott Brunei-owned hotels after kingdom makes homosexuality punishable by death

A growing list of multinational banks are banning employees from staying at hotels owned by the sultan of Brunei, where homosexuality and adultery is punishable by death. Deutsche Bank announced its boycott of Brunei-owned properties in early April as a sign of support for LGBTQ rights. Earlier this month, Brunei introduced laws that make gay sex punishable by death by stoning. Homosexuality has always been illegal in the small, oil-rich nation, but the new, stricter Islamic laws introduce the d


A growing list of multinational banks are banning employees from staying at hotels owned by the sultan of Brunei, where homosexuality and adultery is punishable by death. Deutsche Bank announced its boycott of Brunei-owned properties in early April as a sign of support for LGBTQ rights. Earlier this month, Brunei introduced laws that make gay sex punishable by death by stoning. Homosexuality has always been illegal in the small, oil-rich nation, but the new, stricter Islamic laws introduce the d
Wall Street banks boycott Brunei-owned hotels after kingdom makes homosexuality punishable by death Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: kate rooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, homosexuality, bruneiowned, laws, kingdom, street, called, punishable, hotels, death, sultan, brunei, sex, staying, bank, rights, dorchester, makes, wall, boycott


Wall Street banks boycott Brunei-owned hotels after kingdom makes homosexuality punishable by death

Brunei’s Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah (C) attends an event in Bandar Seri Begawan on April 3, 2019. Brunei’s sultan called for Islamic teachings in the country to be strengthened as strict new sharia punishments, including death by stoning for gay sex and adultery, were due to come into force on April 3.

A growing list of multinational banks are banning employees from staying at hotels owned by the sultan of Brunei, where homosexuality and adultery is punishable by death.

J.P. Morgan, Goldman Sachs and others — called to task by celebrities such as Elton John, George Clooney and Ellen DeGeneres — have barred staff from staying at properties owned by the Dorchester Collection hotel group, run by the Brunei state-owned investment agency. The ban includes luxury names such as Los Angeles’ Beverly Hills Hotel and Hotel Bel-Air, and London’s Dorchester and 45 Park Lane.

The news was first reported by the Financial Times. A spokesperson for J.P. Morgan confirmed the report to CNBC but declined to comment further.

Deutsche Bank announced its boycott of Brunei-owned properties in early April as a sign of support for LGBTQ rights. Goldman Sachs and Bank of America have confirmed to CNBC that they are no longer using the Dorchester Group. CitiGroup, Jefferies, Morgan Stanley and Nomura have also banned employees from staying at nine luxury hotels owned by the small Southeast Asian nation, according to Financial News Network.

“The new laws introduced by Brunei breach the most basic human rights, and we believe it is our duty as a firm to take action against them,” Stuart Lewis, chief risk officer and member of the management board at Deutsche Bank, said in a statement. “We are proud to support LGBTIQ rights around the world, and as part of this we regularly review our business partnerships to ensure that they are aligned with this principle.”

Earlier this month, Brunei introduced laws that make gay sex punishable by death by stoning. Adultery, rape, sodomy, extramarital sexual relations for Muslims, robbery, and insult or defamation of the Prophet Muhammad are also banned — and prosecuted the same way. Homosexuality has always been illegal in the small, oil-rich nation, but the new, stricter Islamic laws introduce the death penalty as punishment.

In response to the boycotts, the Dorchester Collection said in a statement that they “understand people’s anger and frustration but this is a political and religious issue that we don’t believe should be played out in our hotels and amongst our 3,630 employees.”

Singer Elton John and George Clooney have called for corporate boycotts. In a column published in Deadline last month, Clooney said, while you can’t shame “murderous regimes,” you can “shame the banks, the financiers and the institutions that do business with them and choose to look the other way.”

The United Nations has also condemned the laws. U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet called them cruel and inhumane punishments that breach international human rights law. According to Amnesty International, gay sex is a crime in 72 countries and punishable by death in eight, including Saudi Arabia.

Still, in a recent interview Brunei’s billionaire leader, Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah, who has an estimated $20 billion fortune, called for “stronger” Islamic teachings in the country, according to French news agency AFP. The sultan has been in power since 1967.

— CNBC’s Ryan Ruggiero and Donovan Russo, and Holly Ellyatt contributed reporting.

WATCH: Deutsche Bank working hard to fight financial crime, CFO says


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: kate rooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, homosexuality, bruneiowned, laws, kingdom, street, called, punishable, hotels, death, sultan, brunei, sex, staying, bank, rights, dorchester, makes, wall, boycott


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Top 10 cities LGBT travelers are booking for Gay Pride this year, according to Orbitz

And 2019 is a big year — it’s the 50th anniversary of the 1969 Stonewall riots in Manhattan, New York, when members of the LGBT community stood up against police raids to fight for their rights. The clash spurred the gay rights movement and the first gay pride celebration took place there a year later. Orbitz, a travel booking site and the first online travel company to launch a microsite dedicated to LGBT travel, according to Travel Pulse, recently pulled data and did an online survey to determ


And 2019 is a big year — it’s the 50th anniversary of the 1969 Stonewall riots in Manhattan, New York, when members of the LGBT community stood up against police raids to fight for their rights. The clash spurred the gay rights movement and the first gay pride celebration took place there a year later. Orbitz, a travel booking site and the first online travel company to launch a microsite dedicated to LGBT travel, according to Travel Pulse, recently pulled data and did an online survey to determ
Top 10 cities LGBT travelers are booking for Gay Pride this year, according to Orbitz Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: jimmy im, new york daily news archive
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gay, rights, online, pride, cities, travelers, according, booking, orbitz, events, york, data, travel, lgbt


Top 10 cities LGBT travelers are booking for Gay Pride this year, according to Orbitz

There are more than 150 cities across America that celebrate Gay Pride, with events like concerts (like New York City’s famous Dance on the Pier with past singers like Cher), marches (like the annual Trans March in Atlanta), parades (like Capital Pride in Washington D.C.) and all-night parties (like Overboard LBC on the Queen Mary cruise ship in Long Beach, California).

And 2019 is a big year — it’s the 50th anniversary of the 1969 Stonewall riots in Manhattan, New York, when members of the LGBT community stood up against police raids to fight for their rights. The clash spurred the gay rights movement and the first gay pride celebration took place there a year later.

Orbitz, a travel booking site and the first online travel company to launch a microsite dedicated to LGBT travel, according to Travel Pulse, recently pulled data and did an online survey to determine where LGBT travelers were booking this year for Gay Pride.

Here are the top 10 cities LGBT travelers are looking to book this year based on data compiled by Orbitz, along with the dates for each city’s respective Gay Pride events. Festivities can last from a single day to a whole month, depending on the city.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: jimmy im, new york daily news archive
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gay, rights, online, pride, cities, travelers, according, booking, orbitz, events, york, data, travel, lgbt


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Texas Tech med school agrees to no longer consider race in admissions

The Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, under pressure from the Department of Education, will no longer consider race as a factor in its medical school admissions process, according to an agreement signed by the health center’s president in February. The Office for Civil Rights is also investigating admissions practices at Harvard and Yale. The move appears to be the first time the Trump administration has secured a commitment from a school to no longer consider race in admissions. The


The Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, under pressure from the Department of Education, will no longer consider race as a factor in its medical school admissions process, according to an agreement signed by the health center’s president in February. The Office for Civil Rights is also investigating admissions practices at Harvard and Yale. The move appears to be the first time the Trump administration has secured a commitment from a school to no longer consider race in admissions. The
Texas Tech med school agrees to no longer consider race in admissions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: tucker higgins, leah millis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, consider, admissions, tech, agrees, race, department, civil, texas, agreement, longer, school, education, med, rights, university


Texas Tech med school agrees to no longer consider race in admissions

The Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, under pressure from the Department of Education, will no longer consider race as a factor in its medical school admissions process, according to an agreement signed by the health center’s president in February.

The agreement, which was reviewed by CNBC, comes nearly 14 years after the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights launched an investigation into whether the center’s admissions policies violated the Civil Rights Act’s prohibition on racial discrimination. The Office for Civil Rights is also investigating admissions practices at Harvard and Yale.

The move appears to be the first time the Trump administration has secured a commitment from a school to no longer consider race in admissions. The agreement requires that the school revise all of its admissions and recruitment materials by September. The pact’s existence was first reported by The Wall Street Journal.

The Trump administration has been hostile to affirmative action policies, which were encouraged under President Barack Obama. In July, the Departments of Justice and Education announced that they had scrapped Obama-era policy guidelines that called on schools to factor in the race of their applicants in order to achieve diversity.

“The Supreme Court has issued clear guidance on the appropriate consideration of race in college admissions,” Liz Hill, press secretary for the Education Department, said in a statement.

The Supreme Court has long upheld affirmative action under certain conditions and did so again recently in a 2016 case involving the University of Texas.

A representative for the medical school did not immediately provide comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: tucker higgins, leah millis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, consider, admissions, tech, agrees, race, department, civil, texas, agreement, longer, school, education, med, rights, university


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Google removes anti-gay app that promoted conversion therapy after backlash

Google removed an app that promoted so-called “conversion therapy” from its Play Store, following pressure from an LGBT rights lobby. The app was made by Texas-based Christian group Living Hope Ministries, which claims it helps gay people with “leaving” their sexuality. “After consulting with outside advocacy groups, reviewing our policies, and making sure we had a thorough understanding of the app and its relation to conversion therapy, we’ve decided to remove it from the Play Store, consistent


Google removed an app that promoted so-called “conversion therapy” from its Play Store, following pressure from an LGBT rights lobby. The app was made by Texas-based Christian group Living Hope Ministries, which claims it helps gay people with “leaving” their sexuality. “After consulting with outside advocacy groups, reviewing our policies, and making sure we had a thorough understanding of the app and its relation to conversion therapy, we’ve decided to remove it from the Play Store, consistent
Google removes anti-gay app that promoted conversion therapy after backlash Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: ryan browne, alexander pohl, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, store, play, group, promoted, app, google, lgbt, removes, therapy, antigay, backlash, rights, conversion


Google removes anti-gay app that promoted conversion therapy after backlash

Google removed an app that promoted so-called “conversion therapy” from its Play Store, following pressure from an LGBT rights lobby.

The app was made by Texas-based Christian group Living Hope Ministries, which claims it helps gay people with “leaving” their sexuality.

“After consulting with outside advocacy groups, reviewing our policies, and making sure we had a thorough understanding of the app and its relation to conversion therapy, we’ve decided to remove it from the Play Store, consistent with other app stores,” a Google spokesperson told CNBC in an emailed statement Friday.

The move came after civil rights group Human Rights Campaign dropped the tech giant from its annual Corporate Equality Index, which evaluates how well companies do at supporting LGBT employees.

In the report, a footnote states that the organization was aware an app distributed on Google’s Play Store had promoted conversion therapy.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: ryan browne, alexander pohl, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, store, play, group, promoted, app, google, lgbt, removes, therapy, antigay, backlash, rights, conversion


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

US mulls measures against human rights violators in China’s Xinjiang

The United States is considering measures against those responsible for human rights violations against Muslims in China’s Xinjiang region, a U.S. State Department spokesman said on Thursday, calling it a “great shame for humanity.” “We are committed to promoting accountability for those who are committing these violations and considering targeted sanctions as well, targeted measures, as well,” spokesman Robert Palladino told reporters at a regular briefing. In announcing the U.S. State Departme


The United States is considering measures against those responsible for human rights violations against Muslims in China’s Xinjiang region, a U.S. State Department spokesman said on Thursday, calling it a “great shame for humanity.” “We are committed to promoting accountability for those who are committing these violations and considering targeted sanctions as well, targeted measures, as well,” spokesman Robert Palladino told reporters at a regular briefing. In announcing the U.S. State Departme
US mulls measures against human rights violators in China’s Xinjiang Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: yasin ozturk, anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, xinjiang, spokesman, chinas, china, violators, targeted, human, considering, rights, mulls, measures, sanctions, state


US mulls measures against human rights violators in China's Xinjiang

The United States is considering measures against those responsible for human rights violations against Muslims in China’s Xinjiang region, a U.S. State Department spokesman said on Thursday, calling it a “great shame for humanity.”

“We are committed to promoting accountability for those who are committing these violations and considering targeted sanctions as well, targeted measures, as well,” spokesman Robert Palladino told reporters at a regular briefing.

Palladino later said he misspoke when he said sanctions. He did not elaborate on what he meant by targeted measures.

“We will continue to call on China to end these policies and to free these people who have been arbitrarily detained,” he said.

Palladino said he echoed Turkey’s description of the Xinjiang situation, in calling it a “great shame for humanity.”

Palladino spoke after China hit back on Thursday in unusually strong terms at U.S. State Department criticisms of its Xinjiang policies.

In announcing the U.S. State Department’s annual “Country Reports on Human Rights Practices” on Wednesday, its top human rights official said the abuses in Xinjiang were of a kind not seen since the 1930s and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said China was “in a league of its own when it comes to human rights violations.”

U.S. officials have said the Trump administration was considering sanctions targeting companies and officials linked to China’s crackdown, including Xinjiang Party Secretary Chen Quanguo, who, as a member of the powerful politburo, is in the upper echelons of China’s leadership.

China has roundly rejected concern about its policies in Xinjiang, where rights groups say the government is operating internment camps holding a million or more Muslims. China says they are vocational training centers aimed at de-radicalization.

It has warned of retaliation if Washington were to target Chen and the U.S. administration has yet to act despite complaints about its lack of action from U.S. lawmakers.

Any sanctions decision against so senior an official as Chen would be a rare move on human rights grounds against China by the Trump administration, which is engaged in closely-watched talks with Beijing to try to resolve a trade war.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang said earlier on Thursday that the U.S. human rights report was as usual filled with “ideological prejudice” and groundless accusations. He said China had lodged a complaint with Washington about it.

Lu said China fully safeguards human rights and that the United States should take a hard look at its own domestic human rights record.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: yasin ozturk, anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, xinjiang, spokesman, chinas, china, violators, targeted, human, considering, rights, mulls, measures, sanctions, state


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

We’ll go after big tech if necessary because DC is doing nothing: Arizona attorney general

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich told CNBC on Friday he is prepared to go after big tech companies. “When you have these tech companies dominate the market share, they essentially are akin to the monopolies of old,” Brnovich said on “Closing Bell.” “We as state AGs we are taking a look at maybe whether we should do something and if so what should be done.” Sometimes it’s misleading and maybe ends up maybe compromising some of our privacy rights.” “Washington D.C. has been — at least in the


Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich told CNBC on Friday he is prepared to go after big tech companies. “When you have these tech companies dominate the market share, they essentially are akin to the monopolies of old,” Brnovich said on “Closing Bell.” “We as state AGs we are taking a look at maybe whether we should do something and if so what should be done.” Sometimes it’s misleading and maybe ends up maybe compromising some of our privacy rights.” “Washington D.C. has been — at least in the
We’ll go after big tech if necessary because DC is doing nothing: Arizona attorney general Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, arizona, dc, look, statement, big, maybe, brnovich, state, rights, necessary, tech, doing, general, privacy, washington, attorney


We'll go after big tech if necessary because DC is doing nothing: Arizona attorney general

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich told CNBC on Friday he is prepared to go after big tech companies.

And he’s not alone.

“When you have these tech companies dominate the market share, they essentially are akin to the monopolies of old,” Brnovich said on “Closing Bell.”

“We as state AGs we are taking a look at maybe whether we should do something and if so what should be done.”

Brnovich is one of several state attorneys general who spoke recently to the Washington Post about their willingness to take action against Facebook, Google and other tech giants, which they say have grown too powerful.

Brnovich said they are “worried about this massive amount of data that is being collected, manipulated. Sometimes it’s misleading and maybe ends up maybe compromising some of our privacy rights.”

The states are stepping up because the federal government isn’t, said Brnovich. “Washington D.C. has been — at least in the last decade — where good ideas go to die.”

What’s being seen is the “inaction or inability of the bureaucrats in Washington D.C. to do anything about protecting individual Americans, their privacy rights, how they are being manipulated when it comes to news feeds and news coverage,” he said.

Facebook and Google did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

However, in a statement to the Washington Post, Facebook’s vice president of state and local public policy, said the company has had “productive conversations” with state AGs. “Many officials have approached us in a constructive manner, focused on solutions that ensure all companies are protecting people’s information, and we look forward to working with them,” he said.

Google also gave the paper a statement that said, “Privacy and security are built into all of our products, and we will continue to engage constructively with state attorneys general on policy issues.”

Brnovich wouldn’t comment on individual companies.

“I will assure you that no matter how big the company is that if they are violating the rights of Arizonians, we are going to take a look at them and we are going to come after them hard in the courtroom if that is appropriate.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, arizona, dc, look, statement, big, maybe, brnovich, state, rights, necessary, tech, doing, general, privacy, washington, attorney


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

We’ll go after big tech if necessary because DC is doing nothing: Arizona attorney general

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich told CNBC on Friday he is prepared to go after big tech companies. “When you have these tech companies dominate the market share, they essentially are akin to the monopolies of old,” Brnovich said on “Closing Bell.” “We as state AGs we are taking a look at maybe whether we should do something and if so what should be done.” Sometimes it’s misleading and maybe ends up maybe compromising some of our privacy rights.” “Washington D.C. has been — at least in the


Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich told CNBC on Friday he is prepared to go after big tech companies. “When you have these tech companies dominate the market share, they essentially are akin to the monopolies of old,” Brnovich said on “Closing Bell.” “We as state AGs we are taking a look at maybe whether we should do something and if so what should be done.” Sometimes it’s misleading and maybe ends up maybe compromising some of our privacy rights.” “Washington D.C. has been — at least in the
We’ll go after big tech if necessary because DC is doing nothing: Arizona attorney general Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, arizona, dc, look, statement, big, maybe, brnovich, state, rights, necessary, tech, doing, general, privacy, washington, attorney


We'll go after big tech if necessary because DC is doing nothing: Arizona attorney general

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich told CNBC on Friday he is prepared to go after big tech companies.

And he’s not alone.

“When you have these tech companies dominate the market share, they essentially are akin to the monopolies of old,” Brnovich said on “Closing Bell.”

“We as state AGs we are taking a look at maybe whether we should do something and if so what should be done.”

Brnovich is one of several state attorneys general who spoke recently to the Washington Post about their willingness to take action against Facebook, Google and other tech giants, which they say have grown too powerful.

Brnovich said they are “worried about this massive amount of data that is being collected, manipulated. Sometimes it’s misleading and maybe ends up maybe compromising some of our privacy rights.”

The states are stepping up because the federal government isn’t, said Brnovich. “Washington D.C. has been — at least in the last decade — where good ideas go to die.”

What’s being seen is the “inaction or inability of the bureaucrats in Washington D.C. to do anything about protecting individual Americans, their privacy rights, how they are being manipulated when it comes to news feeds and news coverage,” he said.

Facebook and Google did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

However, in a statement to the Washington Post, Facebook’s vice president of state and local public policy, said the company has had “productive conversations” with state AGs. “Many officials have approached us in a constructive manner, focused on solutions that ensure all companies are protecting people’s information, and we look forward to working with them,” he said.

Google also gave the paper a statement that said, “Privacy and security are built into all of our products, and we will continue to engage constructively with state attorneys general on policy issues.”

Brnovich wouldn’t comment on individual companies.

“I will assure you that no matter how big the company is that if they are violating the rights of Arizonians, we are going to take a look at them and we are going to come after them hard in the courtroom if that is appropriate.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, arizona, dc, look, statement, big, maybe, brnovich, state, rights, necessary, tech, doing, general, privacy, washington, attorney


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Amazon has been a business bulldozer, except in video

Unlike Netflix or HBO, Amazon can market its content within an Amazon search for merchandise. That could change in the coming years as league rights to the NFL, the NBA and Major League Baseball come up for grabs. “Amazon looks at content creation through a very different lens than a traditional media company,” said Rich Greenfield, a media analyst at BTIG. “A traditional media company is, ‘Well, how much advertising can I generate from this?’ So far, Amazon and Apple haven’t really gone toe to


Unlike Netflix or HBO, Amazon can market its content within an Amazon search for merchandise. That could change in the coming years as league rights to the NFL, the NBA and Major League Baseball come up for grabs. “Amazon looks at content creation through a very different lens than a traditional media company,” said Rich Greenfield, a media analyst at BTIG. “A traditional media company is, ‘Well, how much advertising can I generate from this?’ So far, Amazon and Apple haven’t really gone toe to
Amazon has been a business bulldozer, except in video Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: alex sherman, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, league, video, amazon, business, toe, prime, content, company, search, media, traditional, rights, bulldozer


Amazon has been a business bulldozer, except in video

Amazon’s ability to connect content to commerce won over the Tolkien estate back in 2017, when the company bought the rights to a “Lord of the Rings” series. Unlike Netflix or HBO, Amazon can market its content within an Amazon search for merchandise. Already today, a search for “The Hobbit” doesn’t just show you the book to buy, but it also gives you a chance to subscribe to watch the movie on Prime Video.

Amazon’s next big splash could be sports, especially live sports programming. The company has already acquired some streaming rights to Thursday night football and Premier League games, but it has yet to land a huge exclusive sports rights deal.

That could change in the coming years as league rights to the NFL, the NBA and Major League Baseball come up for grabs. Professional sports leagues may initially be hesitant to sell their rights exclusively to a nontraditional player like Amazon, but the potential to make a bigger profit may make the option more appealing.

“Amazon looks at content creation through a very different lens than a traditional media company,” said Rich Greenfield, a media analyst at BTIG. “A traditional media company is, ‘Well, how much advertising can I generate from this?’ Amazon, the first thing when they talked about the NFL, the number one metric they were looking at is ‘new to Prime,’ meaning new people that have come into the Prime ecosystem because those are people that spend a lot more over the year than people that are not part of the Prime ecosystem.”

The bigger battle, beyond just content, could be ownership of the home. Seamlessly connecting the Amazon Echo to TVs and mobile devices could revolutionize how people find shows and movies. So far, Amazon and Apple haven’t really gone toe to toe. But as Apple gets into original content too, that competition is coming.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: alex sherman, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, league, video, amazon, business, toe, prime, content, company, search, media, traditional, rights, bulldozer


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post