EA slides after losing licensing rights to Cristiano Ronaldo’s team Juventus for FIFA 20

Trade war to drag on as Trump says long way to go and China… The U.S. and China restarted their trade talks, but signs are showing a comprehensive deal could be a long way off, if it happens at all. Marketsread more


Trade war to drag on as Trump says long way to go and China… The U.S. and China restarted their trade talks, but signs are showing a comprehensive deal could be a long way off, if it happens at all. Marketsread more
EA slides after losing licensing rights to Cristiano Ronaldo’s team Juventus for FIFA 20 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: jesse pound, sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, trade, way, long, slides, cristiano, losing, rights, talks, war, juventus, team, licensing, ea, restarted, happens, showing, fifa, ronaldos, signs


EA slides after losing licensing rights to Cristiano Ronaldo's team Juventus for FIFA 20

Trade war to drag on as Trump says long way to go and China…

The U.S. and China restarted their trade talks, but signs are showing a comprehensive deal could be a long way off, if it happens at all.

Markets

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: jesse pound, sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, trade, way, long, slides, cristiano, losing, rights, talks, war, juventus, team, licensing, ea, restarted, happens, showing, fifa, ronaldos, signs


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Civil rights groups file lawsuit challenging Trump asylum rule

Three civil rights groups filed a lawsuit on Tuesday challenging the Trump administration’s new asylum rule, which bars asylum claims from most noncitizens who travel through another country on their way to the United States. The suit alleges that the rule violates the Immigration and Nationality Act as well as federal laws governing administrative procedure. “This is the Trump administration’s most extreme run at an asylum ban yet. The rule also violates federal law requiring “that asylum canno


Three civil rights groups filed a lawsuit on Tuesday challenging the Trump administration’s new asylum rule, which bars asylum claims from most noncitizens who travel through another country on their way to the United States. The suit alleges that the rule violates the Immigration and Nationality Act as well as federal laws governing administrative procedure. “This is the Trump administration’s most extreme run at an asylum ban yet. The rule also violates federal law requiring “that asylum canno
Civil rights groups file lawsuit challenging Trump asylum rule Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, filed, lawsuit, federal, civil, country, rights, administrations, groups, trump, challenging, violates, file, rule, asylum, law


Civil rights groups file lawsuit challenging Trump asylum rule

Ana Maria, from El Salvador, carries her one-year-old son Mateo as they walk through a field with other asylum-seeking migrants from Central America after they illegally crossed the Rio Grande river into the U.S. from Mexico, in Penitas, Texas, March 31, 2019.

Three civil rights groups filed a lawsuit on Tuesday challenging the Trump administration’s new asylum rule, which bars asylum claims from most noncitizens who travel through another country on their way to the United States. The rule was published in the federal register on Tuesday and was supposed to take effect immediately.

The American Civil Liberties Union, Southern Poverty Law Center and Center for Constitutional Rights filed the suit in federal court in San Francisco. The suit alleges that the rule violates the Immigration and Nationality Act as well as federal laws governing administrative procedure.

“This is the Trump administration’s most extreme run at an asylum ban yet. It clearly violates domestic and international law, and cannot stand,” ACLU attorney Lee Gelernt said in a statement.

The 34-page complaint was filed on behalf of nonprofit groups that provide assistance to asylum seekers. It seeks a permanent ban on the enforcement of the rule along with a declaration that the rule is “unlawful and invalid.”

The lawsuit claims that the rule “directly violates Congress’s clear requirement” that noncitizens must be “firmly resettled” in a third country, and not just pass through it, for that passage to invalidate their asylum claim.

The rule also violates federal law requiring “that asylum cannot be categorically denied based on an asylum seeker’s route to the United States,” attorneys for the groups wrote.

The Department of Justice declined to comment.The Trump administration’s new rule was announced on Monday amid furor in Washington over the treatment of migrants in detention facilities along the border.

The asylum rule has exceptions for those who applied for asylum protection in a third country and were denied it, and those who qualify as victims of a “severe form of trafficking.”

WATCH: Trump considers ousting Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, filed, lawsuit, federal, civil, country, rights, administrations, groups, trump, challenging, violates, file, rule, asylum, law


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Netflix has now lost two of its most popular shows as old media companies flex their muscle

Something strange is happening in the world of technology and media: Netflix is becoming the incumbent, and the upstart challengers are companies that have been around for nearly a century. But there’s little doubt that part of the motivation of legacy media companies embracing subscription streaming services is to capture some of Netflix’s valuation — or bring CEO Reed Hastings’ behemoth back down to earth. The WarnerMedia streaming service will have the exclusive rights to the hit sitcom Frien


Something strange is happening in the world of technology and media: Netflix is becoming the incumbent, and the upstart challengers are companies that have been around for nearly a century. But there’s little doubt that part of the motivation of legacy media companies embracing subscription streaming services is to capture some of Netflix’s valuation — or bring CEO Reed Hastings’ behemoth back down to earth. The WarnerMedia streaming service will have the exclusive rights to the hit sitcom Frien
Netflix has now lost two of its most popular shows as old media companies flex their muscle Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lost, shows, muscle, media, popular, rights, million, streaming, hbo, friends, warnermedia, netflix, service, old, companies, flex


Netflix has now lost two of its most popular shows as old media companies flex their muscle

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings is pictured on May 3, 2018 in Lille, northern France during the first edition of the TV Series Mania festival.

Something strange is happening in the world of technology and media: Netflix is becoming the incumbent, and the upstart challengers are companies that have been around for nearly a century.

Disney, AT&T’s WarnerMedia, and Comcast’s NBCUniversal are all launching direct-to-consumer streaming services by the first quarter of 2020. And they’re all coming after Netflix.

Sure, there will be enough consumer dollars to go around for Netflix to keep its massive subscriber base (155 million globally) growing. But there’s little doubt that part of the motivation of legacy media companies embracing subscription streaming services is to capture some of Netflix’s valuation — or bring CEO Reed Hastings’ behemoth back down to earth.

That’s why WarnerMedia announced Tuesday it is pulling Friends off Netflix when it debuts its service in 2020, which will be called HBO Max. The WarnerMedia streaming service will have the exclusive rights to the hit sitcom Friends. AT&T is paying $85 million per year for the U.S. rights for five years, according to a person familiar with the matter. Netflix was paying $80 million for global rights to the show and wasn’t in a position to re-bid, given WarnerMedia’s contractual options around streaming rights for the show, the person said. The Wall Street Journal first reported how much WarnerMedia would pay for Friends.

Netflix has been preparing to lose Friends, just as it realized it may lose The Office to NBC Universal’s streaming service, which will happen in 2021, and has been spending billions on new original content exclusive to the service to keep customers satisfied.

But losing both Friends and The Office is significant to the potential health of the streaming service moving forward. The two series are the two most watched shows on all of Netflix, according to research firm Jumpshot.

WarnerMedia CEO John Stankey’s goal is to get 70 million subscribers to sign up for HBO Max. That’s double the amount of U.S. subscribers for HBO. For years, Wall Street has valued Netflix on its subscriber growth rather than its profits. Legacy media companies have rued this dichotomy, frustrated that investors value old media differently than Netflix, which has grown from a startup to a company with a $175 billion enterprise value.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lost, shows, muscle, media, popular, rights, million, streaming, hbo, friends, warnermedia, netflix, service, old, companies, flex


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Venezuelan security forces have committed ‘gross violations’ of human rights, UN says

The United Nations has issued a scathing critique of the human rights situation in Venezuela, accusing the government of targeting opponents with a “shocking” number of extrajudicial killings. Following a three-day trip to Venezuela last month, UN human rights chief Michelle Bachelet published a 16-page report accusing security forces loyal to President Nicolas Maduro of committing a series of “gross violations” against dissenters. Referring to these figures, the report said that researchers fro


The United Nations has issued a scathing critique of the human rights situation in Venezuela, accusing the government of targeting opponents with a “shocking” number of extrajudicial killings. Following a three-day trip to Venezuela last month, UN human rights chief Michelle Bachelet published a 16-page report accusing security forces loyal to President Nicolas Maduro of committing a series of “gross violations” against dissenters. Referring to these figures, the report said that researchers fro
Venezuelan security forces have committed ‘gross violations’ of human rights, UN says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gross, security, water, united, violations, venezuelan, number, report, human, rights, venezuela, forces, committed


Venezuelan security forces have committed 'gross violations' of human rights, UN says

A member of Venezuela’s Special Action Forces (FAES) takes part in a security operation in the 70’s neighbourhood, municipality of El Valle, in Caracas, on April 1, 2019.

The United Nations has issued a scathing critique of the human rights situation in Venezuela, accusing the government of targeting opponents with a “shocking” number of extrajudicial killings.

Following a three-day trip to Venezuela last month, UN human rights chief Michelle Bachelet published a 16-page report accusing security forces loyal to President Nicolas Maduro of committing a series of “gross violations” against dissenters.

Special Action Forces were said to have killed 5,287 people last year and another 1,569 by mid-May of this year.

Referring to these figures, the report said that researchers from the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) believed there are “reasonable grounds to believe that many of these killings constitute extrajudicial executions committed by the security forces.”

Victims were arrested and shot, with crime scenes manipulated to suggest they had resisted police, the report said Thursday. Bachelet was scheduled to present the findings to the Human Rights Council in Geneva on Friday.

The detailed report, which was based on “558 interviews with victims and witnesses of human rights violations,” described a lawless system of oppression and estimated the actual number of deaths in the country could be much higher.

In most cases, “women and men were subjected to one or more forms of torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, including electric shocks, suffocation with plastic bags, water boarding, beatings, sexual violence, water and food deprivation, stress positions and exposure to extreme temperatures.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gross, security, water, united, violations, venezuelan, number, report, human, rights, venezuela, forces, committed


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TikTok is under investigation in the UK over children’s data privacy rights

The Logo of social media app TikTok (also known as Douyin) is displayed on a smartphone on December 14, 2018 in Berlin, Germany. Popular Chinese video sharing app TikTok is under investigation in the U.K. for how it collects and uses children’s personal information. Elizabeth Denham, head of the U.K.’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), said in a parliamentary hearing Tuesday the agency is investigating whether TikTok violated the EU’s data privacy law called GDPR (General Data Protection


The Logo of social media app TikTok (also known as Douyin) is displayed on a smartphone on December 14, 2018 in Berlin, Germany. Popular Chinese video sharing app TikTok is under investigation in the U.K. for how it collects and uses children’s personal information. Elizabeth Denham, head of the U.K.’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), said in a parliamentary hearing Tuesday the agency is investigating whether TikTok violated the EU’s data privacy law called GDPR (General Data Protection
TikTok is under investigation in the UK over children’s data privacy rights Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-03  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, children, privacy, data, investigation, rights, childrens, uk, looking, watch, personal, denham, tiktok, app


TikTok is under investigation in the UK over children's data privacy rights

The Logo of social media app TikTok (also known as Douyin) is displayed on a smartphone on December 14, 2018 in Berlin, Germany.

Popular Chinese video sharing app TikTok is under investigation in the U.K. for how it collects and uses children’s personal information.

Elizabeth Denham, head of the U.K.’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), said in a parliamentary hearing Tuesday the agency is investigating whether TikTok violated the EU’s data privacy law called GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation), which requires companies to provide specific protections related to children’s personal data.

“We are looking at the transparency tools for children,” Denham said. “We’re looking at the messaging system, which is completely open, we’re looking at the kind of videos that are collected and shared by children online. So we do have an active investigation into TikTok right now, so you can watch that space.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-03  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, children, privacy, data, investigation, rights, childrens, uk, looking, watch, personal, denham, tiktok, app


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Trump administration says it will print census without citizenship question

The Trump administration on Tuesday said it will print the 2020 census without a question about citizenship, bringing to an apparent close a contentious legal battle over that aspect of the decennial survey. The announcement comes after the Supreme Court effectively blocked the addition of the question on Thursday. Chief Justice John Roberts, who authored the opinion of the court, wrote that the administration’s explanation for adding the question — that it would bolster efforts to enforce the V


The Trump administration on Tuesday said it will print the 2020 census without a question about citizenship, bringing to an apparent close a contentious legal battle over that aspect of the decennial survey. The announcement comes after the Supreme Court effectively blocked the addition of the question on Thursday. Chief Justice John Roberts, who authored the opinion of the court, wrote that the administration’s explanation for adding the question — that it would bolster efforts to enforce the V
Trump administration says it will print census without citizenship question Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-02  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, decision, census, lawyers, supreme, deadline, court, printing, trump, citizenship, question, print, rights, administration


Trump administration says it will print census without citizenship question

The Trump administration on Tuesday said it will print the 2020 census without a question about citizenship, bringing to an apparent close a contentious legal battle over that aspect of the decennial survey.

The announcement comes after the Supreme Court effectively blocked the addition of the question on Thursday. Chief Justice John Roberts, who authored the opinion of the court, wrote that the administration’s explanation for adding the question — that it would bolster efforts to enforce the Voting Rights Act — appeared “contrived.”

But after that decision was announced, it was not clear whether government lawyers would seek to present another rationale for the question. Any attempt to do so faced a tight deadline. The Census Bureau said it had to begin printing by July 1 or additional resources would be required.

“The Supreme Court’s ruling left little opportunity for the administration to cure the defects with its decision to add a citizenship question and, most importantly, they were simply out of time given the impending deadline for printing forms,” Kristen Clarke, the executive director of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, which successfully challenged the question in federal court in California, said in a statement.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-02  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, decision, census, lawyers, supreme, deadline, court, printing, trump, citizenship, question, print, rights, administration


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Why NBC is paying $500 million to stream ‘The Office,’ a show it already owns

The streaming service is set to shell out $100 million per year for the show, even though it’s technically a property of NBC’s parent company. So, if “The Office” is an NBC show, why is NBC shelling out $500 million to put it on its forthcoming streaming service? In this case, the NBC streaming service is buying the rights to “The Office” from Universal Television. A person familiar with the negotiations said Netflix made an offer to keep “The Office” on its streaming service, but the offer was


The streaming service is set to shell out $100 million per year for the show, even though it’s technically a property of NBC’s parent company. So, if “The Office” is an NBC show, why is NBC shelling out $500 million to put it on its forthcoming streaming service? In this case, the NBC streaming service is buying the rights to “The Office” from Universal Television. A person familiar with the negotiations said Netflix made an offer to keep “The Office” on its streaming service, but the offer was
Why NBC is paying $500 million to stream ‘The Office,’ a show it already owns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, million, company, television, paying, nbc, service, netflix, stream, office, transfer, 500, streaming, rights, owns


Why NBC is paying $500 million to stream 'The Office,' a show it already owns

NBC is reclaiming “The Office.”

The Comcast company on Tuesday revealed that it has signed an exclusive deal to house the show on its upcoming streaming service for five years, starting in 2021. But just because NBC owns the show, doesn’t mean it won’t have to pay for it.

The streaming service is set to shell out $100 million per year for the show, even though it’s technically a property of NBC’s parent company. Universal Television, a separate division of NBCUniversal, produced the show with Deedle-Dee Productions and Reveille Productions.

“The Office” has been a staple on Netflix, and was far and away the most streamed show on the service in 2018, according to data from Nielsen. Viewers streamed more than 52 million minutes of the show that year — 20 million more than the second most watched show, “Friends.”

The 2005 show, a remake of a U.K. comedy series of the same name, aired on NBC for eight seasons and depicts the everyday lives of employees at the Scranton, Pennsylvania branch of a fictional Dunder Mifflin Paper Company.

The documentary-style show, which featured Steve Carell, Rainn Wilson, John Krasinski, Jenna Fischer and B. J. Novak as main characters, was met with mixed reviews during its first season, but gained acclaim with critics and audiences in the seasons that followed.

So, if “The Office” is an NBC show, why is NBC shelling out $500 million to put it on its forthcoming streaming service?

The answer: Transfer pricing, according to Wedbush analyst Michael Pachter.

When a large company like Comcast is made up of smaller, independently run divisions, each division must pay a transfer price for any products or services of another division, he explained.

In this case, the NBC streaming service is buying the rights to “The Office” from Universal Television.

“You have to have internal transfer pricing to prove where you earned each piece of the pie,” Pachter said.

These types of deals are highly regulated to prevent companies from paying less than market value for a product or service. So NBC had to establish pricing based on similar transactions between unrelated parties. For example, Netflix bought the rights to “Friends” from WarnerMedia for $100 million for one year.

Universal Television had to hold an auction for “The Office” at “arm’s length.” Meaning, the company could not have any relationship with a potential bidder. This ensures that all parties have equal access to information related to the deal and assures no collusion between the buyer and seller.

A person familiar with the negotiations said Netflix made an offer to keep “The Office” on its streaming service, but the offer was rejected. Netflix was willing to pay up to $90 million a year for the rights, but NBC topped the bid.

NBC isn’t just paying the transfer cost, it will also shell out a percentage in royalty fees to profit participants of the series, Pachter said. Writers, actors, producers and creators will get a share of the $500 million, as is the case with any show that enters syndication on cable television.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, million, company, television, paying, nbc, service, netflix, stream, office, transfer, 500, streaming, rights, owns


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Abortion, equal pay, family leave: Here are all the women’s rights policies proposed by 2020 candidates so far

“Already, Democratic candidates entering the presidential race have acknowledged the importance of women — women of color — black women — in their pathways to victory,” former Congresswoman Donna Edwards writes in an op-ed for The Washington Post. CNBC Make It took a closer look at how Sen. Kamala Harris, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Sen. Cory Booker, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand and a few other Democrats are leading the way with proposed plans on women’s issues. Elizabeth Warren In response to Alabama’s b


“Already, Democratic candidates entering the presidential race have acknowledged the importance of women — women of color — black women — in their pathways to victory,” former Congresswoman Donna Edwards writes in an op-ed for The Washington Post. CNBC Make It took a closer look at how Sen. Kamala Harris, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Sen. Cory Booker, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand and a few other Democrats are leading the way with proposed plans on women’s issues. Elizabeth Warren In response to Alabama’s b
Abortion, equal pay, family leave: Here are all the women’s rights policies proposed by 2020 candidates so far Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sen, women, leave, plan, rights, pay, far, equal, abortion, family, harris, booker, presidential, proposed, warren, candidates, womens, policies


Abortion, equal pay, family leave: Here are all the women's rights policies proposed by 2020 candidates so far

Senator Elizabeth Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, center, speaks during a health care bill news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017.

As the 2020 presidential campaign continues to heat up — with 23 democratic candidates in the race so far — conversations around women’s rights and policies have taken center stage in many political discussions. From the fight for equal pay and paid parental leave to the push for abortion rights and better maternal healthcare, many presidential hopefuls are aware that they’ll need to address these key issues in order to win over women, who, have historically voted at higher rates than men. “Already, Democratic candidates entering the presidential race have acknowledged the importance of women — women of color — black women — in their pathways to victory,” former Congresswoman Donna Edwards writes in an op-ed for The Washington Post. Though many dismiss identity politics, she writes, “for many women/women of color/black women, identity is politics,” and it will be critical for presidential candidates to recognize that. CNBC Make It took a closer look at how Sen. Kamala Harris, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Sen. Cory Booker, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand and a few other Democrats are leading the way with proposed plans on women’s issues.

Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) and Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) talk with each other as they listen to Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the third day of his Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill September 6, 2018 in Washington, DC. Drew Angerer | Getty Images

Abortion and reproductive rights

On May 15, Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey signed a bill that bans doctors from performing an abortion at any stage during a pregnancy. Alabama is one of more than 10 states — including Georgia, Louisiana and Arkansas — that have passed, or are working to pass, anti-abortion laws. Though these policies have led many presidential hopefuls to speak out against abortion bans on their campaign trail, very few have released actual plans for protecting abortion once in office. Elizabeth Warren In response to Alabama’s bill, Sen. Warren shared her plan for protecting abortion rights in a post published on Medium on May 17. Warren called the bill “the most extreme abortion ban in over 40 years” and writes that as president, she would pass new federal laws to uphold the Roe v. Wade ruling and ensure all women have access to birth control and abortion. She writes that she would do this by making reproductive health coverage part of overall health coverage and she would “[repeal] the Hyde Amendment, which blocks abortion coverage for women under federally funded health care programs like Medicaid, the VA, and the Indian Health Service.” Corey Booker On May 22, Sen. Booker released a plan to create a White House Office for Reproductive Freedom. He says that in addition to increasing the budget for Title X family planning — which has dropped from roughly $297.4 million in 2012 to $286.4 million now — he would reverse Trump’s “gag rule,” which bans doctors from telling women how they can safely and legally access an abortion. Booker says that as president he would also guarantee access to employer-covered contraceptive care and restore evidence-based guidelines for the Teen Pregnancy Prevention program so that young people are educated about their healthcare options. Kamala Harris On May 28, Sen. Harris released a plan on her campaign website that, she says, for the first time would require “states and localities with a history of violating Roe v. Wade to obtain approval from her Department of Justice before any abortion law or practice can take effect.” Additionally, she says she would protect funding for Planned Parenthood and she would nominate judges who support the Roe v. Wade decision. Gillibrand, Beto O’Rourke, Sen. Bernie Sanders and Andrew Yang all say they would appoint judges who support abortion rights. John Hickenlooper On May 29, former Colorado governor John Hickenlooper wrote in a Medium post that as president he would expand the long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) plan that he oversaw in Colorado, which makes healthcare and contraception more accessible and affordable for women. As president, he said he would be “committed to ensuring that every woman has access to the full range of contraceptive options, so she can choose the method that best fits her needs and preferences, and that providers are educated and trained to provide the full range of options in a way that respects decision-making and autonomy.” Additional measures In addition to Warren, many other presidential candidates including Harris, Booker, Gillibrand, Indiana mayor Pete Buttigieg and former Texas congressman Beto O’Rourke said they would repeal the Hyde Amendment. And like Booker, Sanders, Warren, Gillibrand, O’Rourke and Hickenlooper stated that they would also increase the budget for Title X family planning. Meanwhile, Gillibrand and O’Rourke say they would reverse the Trump Administration’s gag rule. “This is about the fundamental question of whether we value women and see them as human beings equal to anyone else,” Gillibrand wrote in a Medium post, “and any Democrat who expects to win the presidency must answer definitively.”

Entrepreneur and 2020 presidential candidate Andrew Yang speaks during a campaign stop at the train depot on February 1, 2019 in Jefferson, Iowa. Joshua Lott | AFP | Getty Images

Equal pay

Women, on average, earn $.80 cents for every dollar paid to men. When broken down by race, Asian-American women earn $0.85 compared to white men, white women earn $0.77 compared to white men and African-American, Native American and Latina women earn $0.61, $0.58 and $0.53, respectively, compared to white men. When it comes to closing the pay gap, Harris leads the way with a detailed plan for how she would enforce equality in the workplace. Kamala Harris On May 20, Harris released an ambitious plan that outlines how she would hold companies responsible for paying and promoting women fairly. Calling her plan “the most aggressive pay proposal in history,” the California senator said that as president she would give companies with 100 or more employees three years to obtain an Equal Pay Certification from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), and companies with 500 or more employees two years to obtain certification. In order to receive this certification, Harris writes that companies would have to prove that they’ve eliminated all pay disparities for men and women who are doing equal work. If a pay gap does exist, then the company would have to prove that it exists based on merit, performance or seniority, and not gender. Any company that fails to meet these requirements would be fined 1% of their profits for every 1% wage gap they allow to persist in their organization. Bernie Sanders Sanders’ campaign website says that he would “adopt equal pay for equal work through the Paycheck Fairness Act,” a proposed law that addresses gaps in the Equal Pay Act of 1963 in order to ensure men and women are paid fairly. Andrew Yang Yang says on his website he would work with states to implement salary disclosure laws and implement pilot studies to test whether policy changes result in more equitable hiring and pay. Pete Buttigieg Buttigieg also says he would sign the Paycheck Fairness Act and he would mandate that companies publicly submit an annual report detailing how much men make in comparison to women at their organization. He says he will also strengthen anti-discrimination laws in order to prevent gender and sexual-identity discrimination, as well as discrimination against pregnant workers. Additional measures Warren and Booker haven’t released specific plans for addressing pay gap issues, but they are co-sponsors of the Paycheck Fairness Act, along with presidential hopefuls Sen. Michael F. Bennet, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, Rep. Seth Moulton, Rep. Tim Ryan and Rep. Eric Swalwell. Refinery29 notes that Warren also leads by example when it comes to equal pay — the average women-to-men earnings ratio among staffers in her office is 1: 0.08.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) speaks at a campaign stop on May 15, 2019 in Nashua, New Hampshire. Spencer Platt | Getty Images

Maternal mortality

The U.S. is one of 13 countries where the maternal mortality rate has worsened in the last 25 years. Data shows that black women are three to four times more likely to die from pregnancy or child-birth related causes than white women. Elizabeth Warren In an op-ed for Essence, Warren writes that she would incentivize health systems that keep mothers healthy, push for more inclusive best practices that have historically benefited mothers of color, diversify hospital staffs and hold hospitals accountable for preventable failures. Kamala Harris Similarly, Harris told Elle.com that she would reintroduce the Maternal Care Access and Reducing Emergencies (Maternal CARE) Act, which includes a $25 million grant for training programs and medical schools to fight racial bias in maternal health. The bill will also include an allocation of $125 million to identify high-risk pregnancies and to provide mothers with the culturally competent health care and resources they need. Harris first introduced this bill in 2018, but it did not receive a vote prior to the 115th Congress ending in December. Additional measures Though Booker has not released a detailed presidential plan for addressing the maternal mortality rate, in May, he and Massachusetts Rep. Ayanna Pressley introduced the Maximizing Outcomes for Moms through Medicaid Improvement and Enhancement of Services (MOMMIES) Act. The act would extend the time in which Medicaid will cover postpartum women from two months after giving birth to one year.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand Zach Gibson | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Paid family leave


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sen, women, leave, plan, rights, pay, far, equal, abortion, family, harris, booker, presidential, proposed, warren, candidates, womens, policies


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Hong Kong leader vows to go ahead with contentious China extradition law despite mass protest

Hong Kong’s top official doubled down on a contentious plan to allow extraditions to China on Monday, one day after hundreds of thousands of protesters took to the streets in one of the biggest demonstrations to shake the former British colony in years. Carrie Lam, the territory’s chief executive, ignored calls for her resignation and reiterated the need for the legislation. The rally highlights increasing public anger against the government’s proposal to seek legal changes to allow people in Ho


Hong Kong’s top official doubled down on a contentious plan to allow extraditions to China on Monday, one day after hundreds of thousands of protesters took to the streets in one of the biggest demonstrations to shake the former British colony in years. Carrie Lam, the territory’s chief executive, ignored calls for her resignation and reiterated the need for the legislation. The rally highlights increasing public anger against the government’s proposal to seek legal changes to allow people in Ho
Hong Kong leader vows to go ahead with contentious China extradition law despite mass protest Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-10  Authors: kelly olsen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, proposal, kong, protest, kongs, lam, contentious, leader, rights, security, extradition, participated, increased, vows, hong, despite, freedoms, mass, law


Hong Kong leader vows to go ahead with contentious China extradition law despite mass protest

Hong Kong’s top official doubled down on a contentious plan to allow extraditions to China on Monday, one day after hundreds of thousands of protesters took to the streets in one of the biggest demonstrations to shake the former British colony in years.

Carrie Lam, the territory’s chief executive, ignored calls for her resignation and reiterated the need for the legislation.

The rally highlights increasing public anger against the government’s proposal to seek legal changes to allow people in Hong Kong to be extradited to places with which it has no such agreement — including China.

Flanked by the secretaries for justice and security on Monday, Lam stressed safeguards built into the legislation to prevent human rights abuses and said she will continue in her job. She also lauded those who participated in the march and said it shows that Hong Kong’s “rights and freedoms are as robust as ever.”

Police estimated about 240,000 people marched Sunday at the peak of the protest which saw crowds overflow a city thoroughfare. Organizers, meanwhile, claimed that slightly more than one million people participated. The event rivaled a 2003 demonstration when a reported 500,000 people protested proposed security legislation.

Marchers shouted slogans and held up signs demanding the government withdraw the proposal and for Lam to quit.

It came as concerns have increased that Hong Kong’s rights and freedoms are eroding under what is perceived as increased efforts by the central government in Beijing to increase its influence.

Hong Kong, which on July 1 marks 22 years since Britain handed the territory back to China, was guaranteed a high degree of autonomy as a Special Administrative Region under a “one country, two systems” framework that was to remain unchanged for at least 50 years.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-10  Authors: kelly olsen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, proposal, kong, protest, kongs, lam, contentious, leader, rights, security, extradition, participated, increased, vows, hong, despite, freedoms, mass, law


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We asked the Democrats running for president how they would negotiate with China on trade. Here’s what they said

China has not been forthright in even admitting that intellectual property theft and technology transfer occurs. On the intellectual property theft, we know that much of the IP theft is state-backed. We should address cybersecurity and intellectual property theft issues directly with China and use the WTO to negotiate trade disputes and establish clear enforcement mechanisms. As we press China on trade and intellectual property theft, we need to demonstrate our resolve in ways that actually help


China has not been forthright in even admitting that intellectual property theft and technology transfer occurs. On the intellectual property theft, we know that much of the IP theft is state-backed. We should address cybersecurity and intellectual property theft issues directly with China and use the WTO to negotiate trade disputes and establish clear enforcement mechanisms. As we press China on trade and intellectual property theft, we need to demonstrate our resolve in ways that actually help
We asked the Democrats running for president how they would negotiate with China on trade. Here’s what they said Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, practices, property, running, negotiate, democrats, wto, trade, american, president, asked, theft, rights, heres, intellectual, china, chinas


We asked the Democrats running for president how they would negotiate with China on trade. Here's what they said

China’s President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump attend a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. Nicolas Asfouri | AFP | Getty Images

With trade negotiations between the U.S. and China stalled and an escalating trade war threatening global markets, President Donald Trump has said that the Chinese are “DREAMING” that he will be defeated by a Democrat in 2020. But Democrats have not said much about their own plans for negotiating with the Chinese. To learn more, CNBC asked the 21 top Democrats running for president about their views. We asked them what they believe is working under Trump — and what they would change. We also asked whether human rights issues in China, where the U.S. has said more than a million Muslims are held in concentration camps, should be part of any trade deal. Lastly, we asked about what they would do about China’s efforts to tighten its military grip on the South China Sea, where more than $3 trillion of trade passes annually. Below, unedited, are our questions and the answers we received from the seven Democrats who responded. Those Democrats are Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, former Maryland Rep. John Delaney, Rep. Seth Moulton, D-Mass., Miramar, Florida, Mayor Wayne Messam and spiritual coach Marianne Williamson. Two other Democrats provided partial responses. A spokesperson for Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., provided an excerpt from the senator’s platform that is included as a response to the first question. An aide to Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke wrote in a statement: “Holding China accountable should not come at the expense of American workers. That is why we must not settle for any deal that does not respect intellectual property, level the playing field in the Chinese market, nor end unfair trade practices. We must advance progress based on shared interests and core democratic values.” Joe Biden, the Democratic front runner, did not respond to CNBC’s survey as of publication time but has dismissed China’s economic competitiveness while on the campaign trail, earning some criticism from his fellow contenders. “China is going to eat our lunch? Come on, man,” Biden told a crowd in Iowa earlier this month. He described himself as a “fair trader” and said he has been “arguing for a long time that we should treat other countries the way in which they treat us, which is, particularly as it relates to China: If they want to trade here, they’re going to be under the same rules.” CNBC provided the questions to each campaign on May 6. What do you think is the best approach to addressing China’s practices with regard to intellectual property theft, technology transfer, industrial subsidies and other matters in which the two countries are at odds. Is it through multinational organizations like the World Trade Organization and the United Nations? Will you take any action unilaterally? If so, what action? Sanders: It is in the interests of the United States to work to strengthen institutions like the WTO and the UN rather than trying to go it alone. American concerns about China’s technology practices are shared in Europe and across the Asia-Pacific. We can place far more pressure on China to change its policies if we work together with the broader international community and the other developed economies. International institutions also offer China a template for reforming its own internal intellectual property and industrial practices. Swalwell: I’m a member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, as well as of the Judiciary Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet, so I’ve seen first-hand the economic espionage that China commits and the adverse impact it has on American businesses. China has not been forthright in even admitting that intellectual property theft and technology transfer occurs. Nor is China transparent on its industrial subsidies. Curbing China’s dishonest practices must be a part of any negotiation; as president, I would hold China accountable. On the intellectual property theft, we know that much of the IP theft is state-backed. In order to combat this we must take a multi-pronged approach — both defensive and offensive. We must have a strong enforcement mechanism with which to hold China accountable for their actions and continue to impose penalties when theft occurs. China has made promises to institute reforms of their policies governing IP rights, technology transfers and cyber-theft of trade secrets in the past but we know these are not being imposed. Read more: Eric Swalwell of California joins 2020 presidential race The legal and diplomatic approaches have not been completely effective, it is critical that we implement other actions such as developing early warning systems, particularly when it comes to the stealing of defense technology. This can be done through private-public partnerships. We must also be ready to take counter action when a theft is detected. It is vital that we continue to have a multinational approach to addressing these issues. We can’t go it alone; we must involve allies — and other victims of China’s practices — such as Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand.

While the U.S. does not have to go through the World Trade Organization and can invoke Section 301 if they are to impose tariffs against China (even though it still has to file a simultaneous complaint with the WTO), the WTO can still be a useful partner. In fact, the WTO has an obligation to enforce the rules they have set up, otherwise it is left to the United States to impose punishment. We should hold the WTO to its obligation. It is also important that U.S. companies acknowledge when theft is occurring by China. In the past, companies have not wanted to impinge on their business with China so they’ve turned a blind eye. I would ensure that reporting this theft it is a win-win for American companies through fair trade practices. Lastly, government departments must coordinate with each other and with U.S. companies. The departments of Commerce and the Treasury, the U.S. Trade Representative and the U.S. State Department must all be aligned to tackle the problem of IP property theft in coordination with the private sector. I would continue to make sure the Justice Department brings criminal cases against the companies that violate trade agreements and steal our trade secrets and intellectual property. I would boost our Trade Representative’s investigation of China’s activities by adding more staff and funding. Ryan: When it comes to China stealing intellectual property from the United States, there is no doubt that multinational organizations need to play a part in holding them accountable. These actions are a serious national security and economic risk for the United States. At the same time, I think our government must take further action when it comes to creating safeguards against China’s actions. That is why I have cosponsored legislation the Fair Trade with China Enforcement Act, which would hold China accountable and create necessary regulations when it comes to trade with China, including prohibiting the sale of national security sensitive technology and intellectual property to China. Read more: Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan — who once tried to take down Nancy Pelosi — is running for president Delaney: China has acted like pirates, stealing intellectual property, building illegal islands, and not playing by the rules. I will build a broad coalition of U.S. allies and have a unified front against China (this will involve working with multinational organizations but also doing a lot more), I will unify our business community against these practices by preventing them from depositing intellectual property funded by taxpayers into joint ventures with China, and I will re-enter the TPP to compete with China. We can hold China accountable and have a productive relationship with them. Read more: What being a successful businessman taught Rep. John Delaney about politics Moulton: These options aren’t mutually exclusive. We should address cybersecurity and intellectual property theft issues directly with China and use the WTO to negotiate trade disputes and establish clear enforcement mechanisms. Protecting our international property is a national security issue, and we need to build a cyberwall to protect against Chinese and Russian attacks. We should start by strengthening the Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center created under President Obama and improve the information-sharing between the private sector and government on cyber threats. As we press China on trade and intellectual property theft, we need to demonstrate our resolve in ways that actually help American workers. Donald Trump has shown he knows nothing about trade. An initial analysis of the net effect of the tariffs is that they are costing the United States economy $1.4 billion a month, and the cost of the tariffs is being passed on to U.S. farmers, companies, and consumers. Read more: Seth Moulton is the latest Democrat running for president. Here are his biggest policy priorities, from green jobs to a public option The United States led the 15 years of negotiations that enabled China to join the WTO and we should reap the benefits of that successful diplomatic effort. Our negotiators secured unprecedented changes to China’s economic and trade policies as conditions for membership, including requiring a dramatic opening of China’s telecom, banking, and insurance sectors, along with the lowering of tariffs on key agricultural products to almost zero. The point is: WTO leverage works. China’s membership in the WTO has been a huge boon to the United States, with U.S. exports to China increasing by 500 percent and agricultural exports increasing by 1000 percent since China joined the organization. Going forward, the WTO should absolutely be involved in establishing trust in trade negotiations and in providing the mechanisms for the enforcement of trade agreements. Bennet: Instead of slapping tariffs on our allies and perpetrating a trade war, Michael believes we need to do the hard work of building coalitions to counter Chinese predatory economic practices, like intellectual property theft and economic espionage, that harm American workers, businesses, farmers, and ranchers. In order to compete with and counter an increasingly authoritarian China, Michael believes we must reinvest in our alliances, champion democratic values like the rule of law and human rights, and sharpen our efforts to combat technology threats that undermine U.S. economic and national security.

Messam: The strained trade relations between the U.S. and China is a complex issue that should be confronted with a measured and sober disposition. The combined approach of multinational organizations and unilateral action should be leveraged to protect intellectual property, technology assets, and trade secrets. Before engaging trade wars that could have detrimental impacts to American businesses and our economy, we must seek to solve our trade differences diplomatically. Where multinational organization negotiations don’t work, I would seek specific and direct trade remedies not limited to: • tariffs • blockade on imports of stolen intellectual property Read more: Little-known Florida mayor becomes the latest Democrat vying to take on Trump in 2020 Williamson: The United States Intellectual Property is some of the most valued in the world. According to the USTR, by stealing our intellectual property, China costs American businesses between $225 billion and $600 billion annually. We must use all tools at our disposal to ensure China respects intellectual property law. This will include working with and leveraging the power of the international community to make certain that China engages in fair trade. The U.S. government must also enlist the help and cooperation from American businesses to help solve this problem. Increased internal controls, more robust screening and standardized best practices will make it more difficult for Chinese agents to operate. Many opportunities are a matter of simple theft. More diligence will help curb crimes of opportunity. Lastly, a firm no nonsense stance against China on every front will be necessary to send a clear message that these practices won’t be tolerated. Should a trade deal with China address human rights issues? If not, will your administration address human rights in China and, if so, how? Sanders: Yes. Labor protections are very weak in China, and the rights of workers are an essential component of human rights. The Trump administration has proven itself indifferent to labor rights, and apparently would prefer that American workers are reduced to the position of Chinese workers, rather than that labor everywhere enjoy basic protections and strong standard of living. The Trump administration has also done nothing to pressure China over its abhorrent treatment of the Uighur and Tibetan peoples. Future trade negotiations should, for example, target American corporations that contribute surveillance technologies that enable China’s authoritarian practices. Swalwell: Yes, a trade deal must have a component to address human rights activity. We must be a model for the world and call out countries such as China that violate human rights. Ryan: Yes. As the United States negotiates any future trade deal with China, we must address the human rights violations. The actions we have seen from the Chinese government when it comes to the inhumane treatment of the ethnic minorities is inexcusable. And no future trade agreement can ignore these violations. Delaney: Human rights are a priority to the Delaney Administration.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, practices, property, running, negotiate, democrats, wto, trade, american, president, asked, theft, rights, heres, intellectual, china, chinas


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