Doing this when buying a home can ‘put your future at risk,’ expert says

Bankrate polled 2,582 adults, including 789 millennials ages 23-38, and asked participants how they are funding their down payments and closing costs. Over half, or 53%, of millennials say they’re saving. And 13% of millennial respondents say they’re tapping their retirement accounts, as compared to 8% and 7% of Gen Xers and baby boomers. Putting ‘your future at risk'”Tapping into retirement savings is a risky move that can put your future at risk,” says Deborah Kearns, a mortgage analyst for Ba


Bankrate polled 2,582 adults, including 789 millennials ages 23-38, and asked participants how they are funding their down payments and closing costs. Over half, or 53%, of millennials say they’re saving. And 13% of millennial respondents say they’re tapping their retirement accounts, as compared to 8% and 7% of Gen Xers and baby boomers. Putting ‘your future at risk'”Tapping into retirement savings is a risky move that can put your future at risk,” says Deborah Kearns, a mortgage analyst for Ba
Doing this when buying a home can ‘put your future at risk,’ expert says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-13  Authors: alizah salario, bob sullivan, ivana pino, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buying, future, say, long, savings, think, financial, retirement, risk, respondents, money, expert, youre, millennials, doing


Doing this when buying a home can 'put your future at risk,' expert says

To save for a down payment on a new home, some millennials are getting creative, according to a recent survey of prospective homebuyers from Bankrate.com. But one of their strategies in particular, experts worry, may be shortsighted, and even risky. Bankrate polled 2,582 adults, including 789 millennials ages 23-38, and asked participants how they are funding their down payments and closing costs. (Respondents could pick multiple answers.) Over half, or 53%, of millennials say they’re saving. Some are taking more drastic steps: 14% say they’ve moved in with family or friends to cut down on expenses, and 12% are selling personal items such as jewelry, cars, or electronics. And 13% of millennial respondents say they’re tapping their retirement accounts, as compared to 8% and 7% of Gen Xers and baby boomers.

Graphic preview How people find the money to buy homes Millennials tend to use more sources to fund the down payment and closing costs on their first homes than other generations. Social chart title Note: Respondents could choose more than one answer. kiersten schmidt/grow Bankrate

Here’s why experts suggest you think twice before dipping into your retirement fund.

Putting ‘your future at risk’

“Tapping into retirement savings is a risky move that can put your future at risk,” says Deborah Kearns, a mortgage analyst for Bankrate. “By and large, homeownership has long been touted as the way you build wealth,” she says. “While that’s still true to some extent, you can’t overextend yourself to make that happen.” Mark LaSpisa, a certified financial planner and president of Vermillion Financial Advisors in South Barrington, Illinois, agrees. While there may be some cases in which putting equity from retirement savings into a home may make sense, the “psychological, habit-forming” component of drawing down from your retirement savings is a concern, too: “It’s easy to think, ‘I broke the seal, and now I can go in and raid my IRA for any reason,'” he says.

By and large, homeownership has long been touted as the way you build wealth. While that’s still true to some extent, you can’t overextend yourself to make that happen. Deborah Kearns mortgage analyst, Bankrate.com

Generally, when you pull from a retirement account before you reach age 59½, your withdrawal is considered an “early” or “premature” distribution. That means the money is subject to taxes and a 10% penalty. Traditional and Roth IRAs make an exception for first-time homebuyers, letting you avoid those consequences. But even if you’re not incurring additional costs in the short-term, you may well be setting yourself back over the long term. Let’s say you decide to take $10,000 out of your retirement account to put toward a first-home purchase, and you’re 32, the average age of first-time buyers. If you instead left that money in the account and it saw average returns of 8% over the next 33 years until you retire at 65, those funds would have grown to more than $126,700. But growing your retirement savings thanks to compounding interest is only part of why experts recommend leaving that $10,000 alone. If you chip away now at what you’ve already saved, you might find it harder to stay on track later with your retirement goals, should you experience a job loss or other financial emergency that affects your ability to save. For all of these reasons, Suze Orman’s advice is to leave the money in your retirement accounts alone. “Do not take a loan, do not make withdrawals, do not touch your retirement accounts,” Orman told CNBC Make It last year. “Because if you think you need that money now, I’m here to tell you you’re going to need it even more later on in life when you no longer have a paycheck coming in.”

Taking the long view


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-13  Authors: alizah salario, bob sullivan, ivana pino, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buying, future, say, long, savings, think, financial, retirement, risk, respondents, money, expert, youre, millennials, doing


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US–China trade war optimism? Big companies are not buying it

If you follow the markets, there’s been recent reason for optimism about a U.S.-China trade deal. The quarterly survey finds CFOs around the world increasingly are worried about U.S. trade policy as a business risk factor. If a trade deal remains elusive, even that stability may not last long. — CNBC Global CFO Survey Q3 U.S. CFOs taking the survey did reveal significant concerns about the trade war in other responses. Impact of trade tensions new new U.S. tariffs—CNBC Global CFO Survey Q3 The d


If you follow the markets, there’s been recent reason for optimism about a U.S.-China trade deal. The quarterly survey finds CFOs around the world increasingly are worried about U.S. trade policy as a business risk factor. If a trade deal remains elusive, even that stability may not last long. — CNBC Global CFO Survey Q3 U.S. CFOs taking the survey did reveal significant concerns about the trade war in other responses. Impact of trade tensions new new U.S. tariffs—CNBC Global CFO Survey Q3 The d
US–China trade war optimism? Big companies are not buying it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-13  Authors: eric rosenbaum, anthony volastro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buying, china, big, companies, deal, survey, business, optimism, president, risk, trade, policy, cfo, cfos, war, uschina


US–China trade war optimism? Big companies are not buying it

If you follow the markets, there’s been recent reason for optimism about a U.S.-China trade deal. Some investors are buying it — literally — with recent gains in stocks attributed to positive signals from the U.S. and China after a volatile August. But there’s one group of market insiders not buying the talk: corporate executives. In other words, the people who run the companies whose publicly traded shares have been rebounding. Top executives in the U.S. and around the world are not placing bets that the U.S.-China trade war will be resolved anytime soon. In fact, corporations say they expect to feel the pain of trade tensions over the next six months, according to the third-quarter CNBC Global CFO Council survey. The quarterly survey finds CFOs around the world increasingly are worried about U.S. trade policy as a business risk factor. Chief financial officers also downgraded their view of the U.S. economy, from “improving” to “stable.” If a trade deal remains elusive, even that stability may not last long. “With this level of uncertainty between the U.S. and China, I would think ‘stable’ might actually be a win a couple of quarters from now,” said Jack McCullough, president and founder of the CFO Leadership Council, an executive networking group. “I cannot recall when CFOs were as jittery about a change in policy as they are today.” The CNBC Global CFO Council represents some of the largest public and private companies in the world, collectively managing more than $5 trillion in market value across a wide variety of sectors. The Q3 2019 survey was conducted between Aug. 21 and Sept. 3 among 62 global members of the council.

Trade is the biggest risk factor

Thirty-five percent of CFOs cited U.S. trade policy as the “biggest external risk factor,” which was more than double the second biggest risk highlighted: “consumer demand.” Fears about trade were up from 22% in the second quarter. There was an important split between U.S. CFOs and those based around the world. Thirty-five percent of U.S. CFOs cited consumer demand as the top external risk factor, which can be explained by the fact that the resilience of the U.S. economy, in spite of slowdowns in Europe and China, has been based on consumer strength. What is the biggest external risk factor currently facing your business? — CNBC Global CFO Survey Q3 U.S. CFOs taking the survey did reveal significant concerns about the trade war in other responses. About sixty-five percent said trade policy will be a negative for their business over the next six months. In Q2 that had dropped to 40% — possibly due to a prevailing and false sense of security that a deal would be easier to achieve than has proven to be the case — but it is now back up to a level consistent with the Q3 2018 through Q1 2019 surveys. “The surprise may be that only about 65% of CFOs view that trade policy will be a negative for their organizations,” McCullough said. “While at a macro level it’s easy to understand the motivation behind the recent policy changes, I can’t find a single CFO who has told me it would be a positive for his or her business. … It is uniformly negative for their business, at least in the eyes of finance chiefs.”

While at a macro level it’s easy to understand the motivation behind the recent policy changes, I can’t find a single CFO who has told me it would be a positive for his or her business. Jack McCullough president and founder, CFO Leadership Council

McCullough noted that his networking group offers an online forum for more than 1,100 chief financial officers to discuss issues of importance to their business. He said there never has been a question that he can recall about government policy that has dominated discussion as much as the trade policy has recently. That discussion has included whether manufacturing is moving and strategies for dealing with tariffs. “It is top of mind, and they are not confident they will emerge from this unscathed,” he said. Nearly half of North American CFOs surveyed by CNBC said they are facing higher input costs, and more than one-quarter said they have increased prices to offset those costs. They were more likely than European or Asian counterparts to say they have experienced higher costs and passed on those costs to customers. And more likely to say they have moved operations to minimize the impact of tariffs, though that was less than 20% of CFO respondents. While U.S. CFOs indicated in the survey that they were not confident about increasing their capital spend, less than 10% said they had delayed or canceled projects because of trade policy. Impact of trade tensions new new U.S. tariffs—CNBC Global CFO Survey Q3 The daily headlines can be tougher to measure. On Thursday alone, news broke that the U.S. and China were considering an interim trade deal, but a few minutes later a senior White House official told CNBC no such deal was in the works. President Donald Trump did agree to delay increasing tariffs on $250 billion worth of Chinese goods from Oct. 1 to Oct. 15 as a “gesture of goodwill,” and that move was matched by China, which said it would restart purchase of some U.S. agricultural products. Then later in the day, President Trump told reporters he would be open to an interim trade deal with China but would prefer a lasting deal. “It’s something we would consider, I guess,” Trump said. The U.S. and China have agreed to meet again at the negotiating table in October, a plan that was reported after an early September phone call between Chinese Vice Premier Liu He, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. CFOs view of the trade war is not yet influencing their thinking about President Trump’s reelection chances. The survey found the majority of CFOs of the belief that Trump will be reelected in 2020 and the U.S. economy will not slip into a recession next year.

Trade weighing on business investment


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-13  Authors: eric rosenbaum, anthony volastro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buying, china, big, companies, deal, survey, business, optimism, president, risk, trade, policy, cfo, cfos, war, uschina


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Jamie Dimon says JP Morgan is preparing for the risk of zero rates in the US

Jamie Dimon said that while he doubts the wave of negative interest rates in countries around the world will reach the U.S., he’s preparing J.P. Morgan Chase for the possibility anyway. “Obviously, you’ve got to worry about the long term effect of those interest rates,” Dimon said. Dimon, chairman and CEO of J.P. Morgan, admitted that the drop in U.S. interest rates surprised him. Last year, he said that rates should rise and that the 10-year Treasury yield could reach 4%. The bank can trim cost


Jamie Dimon said that while he doubts the wave of negative interest rates in countries around the world will reach the U.S., he’s preparing J.P. Morgan Chase for the possibility anyway. “Obviously, you’ve got to worry about the long term effect of those interest rates,” Dimon said. Dimon, chairman and CEO of J.P. Morgan, admitted that the drop in U.S. interest rates surprised him. Last year, he said that rates should rise and that the 10-year Treasury yield could reach 4%. The bank can trim cost
Jamie Dimon says JP Morgan is preparing for the risk of zero rates in the US Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: hugh son
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, morgan, risk, businesses, reach, zero, rates, preparing, jamie, negative, dimon, interest, countries, yield


Jamie Dimon says JP Morgan is preparing for the risk of zero rates in the US

Jamie Dimon said that while he doubts the wave of negative interest rates in countries around the world will reach the U.S., he’s preparing J.P. Morgan Chase for the possibility anyway.

“I don’t think we’ll have zero rates in the U.S., but we’re thinking about how to be prepared for it, just in the normal course of risk management,” Dimon said Tuesday at a conference in New York.

“Obviously, you’ve got to worry about the long term effect of those interest rates,” Dimon said. “But it’s hard. There are businesses it doesn’t affect at all. And there are businesses where it just sucks into your margin and there’s very little you can do about it.”

Dimon, chairman and CEO of J.P. Morgan, admitted that the drop in U.S. interest rates surprised him. Last year, he said that rates should rise and that the 10-year Treasury yield could reach 4%.

The 10-year yield was at 1.69% on Tuesday, down from 2.68% to start the year. It fell as low as 1.44% last month as investors rushed into Treasuries on fears of a global economic slowdown and as the Federal Reserve cut rates. Benchmark bonds in major countries like Germany are trading with negative yields.

The bank can trim costs and charge clients more account fees to make up for squeezed margins as rates fall, Dimon said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: hugh son
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, morgan, risk, businesses, reach, zero, rates, preparing, jamie, negative, dimon, interest, countries, yield


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Watch out for this key level in Facebook, Piper Jaffray technical analyst says

The increased regulatory pressure from federal and state bodies hasn’t deterred Craig Johnson, chief market technician at Piper Jaffray. So, we would continue to be a buyer here of Facebook shares,” said Johnson. Gina Sanchez, CEO of Chantico Global, says regulatory risk could knock Facebook down from its high valuations. Facebook trades at nearly 22 times forward earnings. If anything, I think that risk continues to grow,” said Sanchez.


The increased regulatory pressure from federal and state bodies hasn’t deterred Craig Johnson, chief market technician at Piper Jaffray. So, we would continue to be a buyer here of Facebook shares,” said Johnson. Gina Sanchez, CEO of Chantico Global, says regulatory risk could knock Facebook down from its high valuations. Facebook trades at nearly 22 times forward earnings. If anything, I think that risk continues to grow,” said Sanchez.
Watch out for this key level in Facebook, Piper Jaffray technical analyst says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, risk, level, facebook, analyst, think, shares, piper, technical, moving, trading, trades, times, watch, sanchez, key, jaffray, state


Watch out for this key level in Facebook, Piper Jaffray technical analyst says

Facebook is under a fresh wave of scrutiny.

New York State Attorney Letitia James launched a joint investigation into potential antitrust violations on Friday, joining Florida, Iowa, and Colorado among others in putting the heat on Facebook. The latest probe comes on top of an investigation by the Federal Trade Commission.

The increased regulatory pressure from federal and state bodies hasn’t deterred Craig Johnson, chief market technician at Piper Jaffray.

“We’re still friendly toward the shares,” Johnson said on CNBC’s “Trading Nation” on Friday. “When you look at this chart, we’re still making a series of higher highs and higher lows coming off the December lows, and we’re moving right up toward that 50-day moving average at $191.”

Facebook touched the 50-day moving average on Thursday, but dipped lower Friday. It has not traded above that trend line since early August.

“Any sort of move above that $191 level sets the stock up to move back toward the $204 or $205 range which I do think is a logical place to go. So, we would continue to be a buyer here of Facebook shares,” said Johnson.

Gina Sanchez, CEO of Chantico Global, says regulatory risk could knock Facebook down from its high valuations.

“Facebook, even despite all of this news, is still trading at a premium in terms of forward PE relative to the industry, and so I don’t know that it’s necessarily pricing in the risk that some of these probes present to Facebook,” Sanchez said on the same segment.

Facebook trades at nearly 22 times forward earnings. The XLC communication services ETF by comparison trades with an 18.5 times multiple.

“These probes don’t go away. If anything, I think that risk continues to grow,” said Sanchez. “At the end of the day, we continue to grapple with whether or not companies like this should even be run for profit or are they simply just a commodity and a utility that really isn’t going to make growth kinds of returns.”

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, risk, level, facebook, analyst, think, shares, piper, technical, moving, trading, trades, times, watch, sanchez, key, jaffray, state


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High medical costs have driven these people to put their health at risk

The cost of care has become so onerous that some people have ditched going to the doctor altogether. To save on health care, a third of people aged 25 to 45 avoided seeing a medical professional, hoping instead that their condition will eventually resolve, according to data from the Nationwide Retirement Institute. “Health care is one of the top reasons why people go into bankruptcy,” said Kristi Rodriguez, leader of the Nationwide Retirement Institute. Indeed, a March 2019 study in the American


The cost of care has become so onerous that some people have ditched going to the doctor altogether. To save on health care, a third of people aged 25 to 45 avoided seeing a medical professional, hoping instead that their condition will eventually resolve, according to data from the Nationwide Retirement Institute. “Health care is one of the top reasons why people go into bankruptcy,” said Kristi Rodriguez, leader of the Nationwide Retirement Institute. Indeed, a March 2019 study in the American
High medical costs have driven these people to put their health at risk Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: darla mercado john w schoen, darla mercado, john w schoen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nationwide, twothirds, costs, medical, driven, risk, bankruptcy, study, health, retirement, taking, high, care, according


High medical costs have driven these people to put their health at risk

The cost of care has become so onerous that some people have ditched going to the doctor altogether.

To save on health care, a third of people aged 25 to 45 avoided seeing a medical professional, hoping instead that their condition will eventually resolve, according to data from the Nationwide Retirement Institute.

The institute performed an online poll of 1,000 adults in that age cohort in July.

Close to 3 in 10 of the participants said they considered not seeking care to avoid their high deductibles, while more than 20% said they stretched their prescription drugs by taking less than the recommended dosage.

“Health care is one of the top reasons why people go into bankruptcy,” said Kristi Rodriguez, leader of the Nationwide Retirement Institute.

Indeed, a March 2019 study in the American Public Journal of Health found that about two-thirds of all bankruptcies were related to medical problems.

Annually, 530,000 families file for bankruptcy due to health-care issues and bills, according to the research.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: darla mercado john w schoen, darla mercado, john w schoen
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Gold falls 1% on Powell’s remarks, improved risk appetite

Gold fell 1% on Friday as upbeat remarks from Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell and improved risk appetite offset a weaker-than-expected U.S. nonfarm payrolls report, putting bullion on track for a second straight weekly loss. “The sell-off in gold was mainly due to the slightly optimistic tone Powell delivered throughout the session. Spot gold was down 0.7% to $1,508 per ounce, after falling more than 1% earlier in the session. “The overall longer-term outlook for gold, however, remains stron


Gold fell 1% on Friday as upbeat remarks from Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell and improved risk appetite offset a weaker-than-expected U.S. nonfarm payrolls report, putting bullion on track for a second straight weekly loss. “The sell-off in gold was mainly due to the slightly optimistic tone Powell delivered throughout the session. Spot gold was down 0.7% to $1,508 per ounce, after falling more than 1% earlier in the session. “The overall longer-term outlook for gold, however, remains stron
Gold falls 1% on Powell’s remarks, improved risk appetite Cached Page below :
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Gold falls 1% on Powell's remarks, improved risk appetite

Gold fell 1% on Friday as upbeat remarks from Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell and improved risk appetite offset a weaker-than-expected U.S. nonfarm payrolls report, putting bullion on track for a second straight weekly loss.

The U.S. Labor Department’s monthly employment report showed job growth slowed more than expected in August, with retail hiring declining for a seventh month.

Powell called the jobs report consistent with a quite strong labor market, in remarks made at a panel discussion in Zurich, adding that despite trade uncertainties he did not foresee or expect a U.S. recession.

“The sell-off in gold was mainly due to the slightly optimistic tone Powell delivered throughout the session. He was pointing out that the U.S. economy was still performing well. Markets were expecting it (speech) to be slightly dovish,” said Edward Moya, senior market analyst with OANDA.

Spot gold was down 0.7% to $1,508 per ounce, after falling more than 1% earlier in the session. U.S. gold futures settled down $10 at $1,515.50.

“The overall longer-term outlook for gold, however, remains strong and it’s going to be slightly choppy going into the rate decision in mid-September,” Moya said.

“The main reason we are going to see gold remaining supportive is the stimulus from the Fed and China’s central bank is going to keep coming. Investors are not expecting a 50 basis point cut in the September Fed meeting, but they are expecting the talks to be there.”

Uncertainties around U.S.-China trade ties, fears of a deceleration in global economic growth and negative Treasury yields around the world were further supporting bullion, analysts said.

However, a planned resumption of trade talks between Washington and Beijing, and robust U.S. economic data on Thursday did re-ignite some appetite for riskier assets, pushing gold down more than 2% in the previous session.

“One move lower like what we saw on Thursday is not going to change the overall trend and what central banks are doing with interest rates, which over time is going to push gold higher,” said Bob Haberkorn, senior market strategist at RJO Futures.

Bullion has risen about 17.6% so far this year.

Silver was down 3% at $18.06 an ounce, following Thursday’s 4.8% slump.

“We attribute the fall in prices to profit-taking following the steep price rises beforehand,” Commerzbank analyst Daniel Briesemann said in a note.

“We do not believe that this latest correction constitutes a trend reversal but see it rather as (gold and silver) prices taking a breather within an otherwise intact upward trend.”

Platinum fell 1%, to $949.67, while palladium fell 1.2% to $1,541.15.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06
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Judge keeps Anthony Levandowski’s bail at $2 million as ex-Uber engineer’s criminal trial nears

Anthony Levandowski, the ex-Uber engineer charged with stealing trade secrets from his time at Google, was in court on Wednesday to set the final conditions of his bail, which the judge held at $2 million. Last week, the U.S. Department of Justice filed a criminal indictment against Levandowski for 33 charges of theft and attempted theft of trade secrets, alleging he took confidential information from Google to Uber. On Wednesday, the U.S. attorney argued in favor of raising Levandowski’s bail t


Anthony Levandowski, the ex-Uber engineer charged with stealing trade secrets from his time at Google, was in court on Wednesday to set the final conditions of his bail, which the judge held at $2 million. Last week, the U.S. Department of Justice filed a criminal indictment against Levandowski for 33 charges of theft and attempted theft of trade secrets, alleging he took confidential information from Google to Uber. On Wednesday, the U.S. attorney argued in favor of raising Levandowski’s bail t
Judge keeps Anthony Levandowski’s bail at $2 million as ex-Uber engineer’s criminal trial nears Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-04  Authors: paayal zaveri
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, exuber, keeps, nears, bail, trade, week, million, theft, secrets, judge, worth, criminal, levandowski, levandowskis, engineers, anthony, trial, risk


Judge keeps Anthony Levandowski's bail at $2 million as ex-Uber engineer's criminal trial nears

Anthony Levandowski, the ex-Uber engineer charged with stealing trade secrets from his time at Google, was in court on Wednesday to set the final conditions of his bail, which the judge held at $2 million.

Last week, the U.S. Department of Justice filed a criminal indictment against Levandowski for 33 charges of theft and attempted theft of trade secrets, alleging he took confidential information from Google to Uber. On Wednesday, the U.S. attorney argued in favor of raising Levandowski’s bail to $10 million from $2 million to ensure he wouldn’t flee, but the judge overseeing the pre-trial proceedings declined to increase it.

Ismail Ramsey, Levandowski’s attorney, told CNBC in a statement after the hearing, held in San Jose, California, that his client isn’t a flight risk. The $2 million bond included $300,000 in cash that Levandowski posted and $1.7 million worth of his family’s property.

“For the government to label Anthony a flight risk — after it had stopped Anthony from turning himself in to the Marshals, just so they could stage a press conference a week later — is more grandstanding and overreach, just like this misguided prosecution,” Ramsey wrote. He said in the hearing that Levandowski’s net worth is $72 million.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-04  Authors: paayal zaveri
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, exuber, keeps, nears, bail, trade, week, million, theft, secrets, judge, worth, criminal, levandowski, levandowskis, engineers, anthony, trial, risk


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Alphabet and iRhythm are teaming up on tech to detect irregular heart rhythms

Wearable heart monitor company iRhythm is teaming up with Alphabet’s health company Verily on unspecified new technology that will monitor people at risk for atrial fibrillation, a common form of irregular heart rhythm that is associated with strokes and other serious health problems. Verily and iRhythm aren’t the only technology companies working on helping people at risk of atrial fibrillation, which impacts more than 5 million Americans today. The company’s CEO, Kevin King, noted that the tec


Wearable heart monitor company iRhythm is teaming up with Alphabet’s health company Verily on unspecified new technology that will monitor people at risk for atrial fibrillation, a common form of irregular heart rhythm that is associated with strokes and other serious health problems. Verily and iRhythm aren’t the only technology companies working on helping people at risk of atrial fibrillation, which impacts more than 5 million Americans today. The company’s CEO, Kevin King, noted that the tec
Alphabet and iRhythm are teaming up on tech to detect irregular heart rhythms Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-04  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, detect, risk, technology, fibrillation, atrial, company, teaming, irregular, heart, irhythm, working, alphabet, companies, wearable, tech, verily, rhythms


Alphabet and iRhythm are teaming up on tech to detect irregular heart rhythms

Wearable heart monitor company iRhythm is teaming up with Alphabet’s health company Verily on unspecified new technology that will monitor people at risk for atrial fibrillation, a common form of irregular heart rhythm that is associated with strokes and other serious health problems.

Verily and iRhythm aren’t the only technology companies working on helping people at risk of atrial fibrillation, which impacts more than 5 million Americans today. Apple got a first-of-its-kind clearance from federal regulators for its electrocardiogram system. It provides both active and passive monitoring of potential cardiac irregularities.

The company’s CEO, Kevin King, noted that the technology is intended “to help diagnose, manage, and eventually treat patients.” But he declined to discuss the specifics about exactly what’s planned. “There are certainly under consideration wearable devices, and there might be apps,” he said by phone.

Verily’s William Marks, who runs the clinical neurology group at the company, also noted that the service will be developed with doctors in mind so they won’t feel overwhelmed by data. “We want to take the noise away from the signal and only present the signal,” he said.

Unlike the Apple Watch, which is intended for a broad population of users, iRhythm and Verily intend to target their technology to people who might not know they have atrial fibrillation but are at risk of the condition because of factors like age and their medical history. The companies didn’t say how they’d find those people, but did hint at the possibility of working with insurance companies. Through its research studies iRhythm has an existing relationship with Aetna, for instance.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-04  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, detect, risk, technology, fibrillation, atrial, company, teaming, irregular, heart, irhythm, working, alphabet, companies, wearable, tech, verily, rhythms


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It’s a ‘great time’ to buy risk assets, Bank of America Merrill Lynch strategist says

Now is the time to buy risk assets, a Bank of America Merrill Lynch strategist told CNBC on Tuesday. “When investors are this bearish, historically, it’s been a great time to buy risky assets like stocks and commodities,” BofAML global investment strategist Jared Woodard said on “Closing Bell. ” But Woodard’s call for investors to buy riskier assets emanates from BofAML’s Bull & Bear Indicator reaching its lowest levels since January. The sentiment indicator dropped from 2.4 to 1.3 last week, fl


Now is the time to buy risk assets, a Bank of America Merrill Lynch strategist told CNBC on Tuesday. “When investors are this bearish, historically, it’s been a great time to buy risky assets like stocks and commodities,” BofAML global investment strategist Jared Woodard said on “Closing Bell. ” But Woodard’s call for investors to buy riskier assets emanates from BofAML’s Bull & Bear Indicator reaching its lowest levels since January. The sentiment indicator dropped from 2.4 to 1.3 last week, fl
It’s a ‘great time’ to buy risk assets, Bank of America Merrill Lynch strategist says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-03  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, great, risk, bank, assets, indicator, policy, america, significant, lynch, buy, woodard, bearish, strategist, merrill, sentiment, investors


It's a 'great time' to buy risk assets, Bank of America Merrill Lynch strategist says

Now is the time to buy risk assets, a Bank of America Merrill Lynch strategist told CNBC on Tuesday.

“When investors are this bearish, historically, it’s been a great time to buy risky assets like stocks and commodities,” BofAML global investment strategist Jared Woodard said on “Closing Bell. ”

Woodard stressed he was looking at a one-to-three-month investment timeline, citing larger macro risks in the economy for next year.

But with investors already in bearish positions and favorable policy coming from the Federal Reserve, which cut interest rates in July for the first time in a decade and is expected to issue another quarter-point cut at its September policy meeting, Woodard said he sees significant short-term upside.

“Historically, you’ve had significant upside in the short term, on average around 6% returns on global equities on a three-month horizon, when sentiment is this bearish,” Woodard said.

All three major indexes fell Tuesday on the first day of September trading. Both China and the U.S. put in place new tariffs on imports Sunday, marking the latest escalation in the ongoing trade war. Investor sentiment also was weakened by the news that U.S. manufacturing contracted for the first time in three years.

But Woodard’s call for investors to buy riskier assets emanates from BofAML’s Bull & Bear Indicator reaching its lowest levels since January. The sentiment indicator dropped from 2.4 to 1.3 last week, flashing a contrarian buy signal.

The indicator is based on a 10-point scale and takes into account 18 different inputs, such as fund flows, price action and asset allocation from large and small investors, Woodard said.

The bank said in a research note Friday that the drop was caused by outflows in emerging market debt and equities, in addition to a quick uptick in Treasury markets.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-03  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, great, risk, bank, assets, indicator, policy, america, significant, lynch, buy, woodard, bearish, strategist, merrill, sentiment, investors


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A ‘fear bubble’ is creating a huge buying opportunity, long-time market bull Jim Paulsen says

But long-time bull Jim Paulsen is positioning for a breakout by year’s end because he believes dread is oversaturating the market. “People are not loading into stocks even though we’re really close to market highs. Paulsen, who correctly predicted the stock market would sharply rebound from last December’s historic pullback, expects evidence of a stronger economy will calm fears. “I think the odds favor all of the policy stimulus we’ve introduced: fiscal stimulus, policy stimulus, monetary growt


But long-time bull Jim Paulsen is positioning for a breakout by year’s end because he believes dread is oversaturating the market. “People are not loading into stocks even though we’re really close to market highs. Paulsen, who correctly predicted the stock market would sharply rebound from last December’s historic pullback, expects evidence of a stronger economy will calm fears. “I think the odds favor all of the policy stimulus we’ve introduced: fiscal stimulus, policy stimulus, monetary growt
A ‘fear bubble’ is creating a huge buying opportunity, long-time market bull Jim Paulsen says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-01  Authors: stephanie landsman, steve chiavarone
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, longtime, think, stimulus, fear, bull, stocks, huge, risk, creating, weve, paulsen, close, thats, yields, market, opportunity, buying, jim


A 'fear bubble' is creating a huge buying opportunity, long-time market bull Jim Paulsen says

A bad August for the markets may usher in an even worst September based on seasonal trends.

But long-time bull Jim Paulsen is positioning for a breakout by year’s end because he believes dread is oversaturating the market.

“We almost have a fear bubble. That’s our primary thing that sits out there for me,” the Leuthold Group’s chief investment strategist told CNBC’s “Trading Nation ” on Friday. “People are not loading into stocks even though we’re really close to market highs. They’re loading into bonds even though they have close to record low yields… The behavior just screams fear.”

August marked the market’s second losing month of the year. The Dow and S&P 500 were off almost 2% while the tech-heavy Nasdaq fell by about 3%. In July, stocks were hitting all-time highs.

Paulsen, who correctly predicted the stock market would sharply rebound from last December’s historic pullback, expects evidence of a stronger economy will calm fears.

“I think the odds favor all of the policy stimulus we’ve introduced: fiscal stimulus, policy stimulus, monetary growth, lower yields,” he added. “It’s been about six to nine months lag time, and I think it’s going to start to improve economic reports.”

According to Paulsen, that’ll be what ultimately paves the way to new record highs.

“If you pierce a fear bubble, do you have a big rally? And, I kind of think that’s one of the contributing factors to the upside,” said Paulsen. “If we find out it turns out better than feared, many, many portfolios are under allocated to risk assets and will have to re-adjust themselves trying to get more risk which could drive risk assets a lot higher.”

Yet, he acknowledges the market is in a late-stage economic growth cycle. However, he isn’t going into recession countdown mode like many of his Wall Street peers.

“We’ve grown slowly close to the 2% stall speed we used to worry about the entire recovery. We’re at full employment with 4% unemployment,” Paulsen said. “We’re in the longest recovery ever now in U.S. history. So there are certainly characteristics of being near the end. But character wise, I just don’t see the overextended nature mainly because we’ve been so conservative.”

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-01  Authors: stephanie landsman, steve chiavarone
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, longtime, think, stimulus, fear, bull, stocks, huge, risk, creating, weve, paulsen, close, thats, yields, market, opportunity, buying, jim


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