AT&T will soon automatically block annoying robocalls

AT&T said this week that it will soon block spam calls or alert customers of suspected spammers. The FCC mandated in February that U.S. carriers need to help stop spam calls. T-Mobile already offers customers two free tools, Scam Block and Scam ID, but Scam Block needs to be turned on first. The Google Pixel 3 and Pixel 3a can automatically screen calls for you, while iOS 13, which will roll out this fall, uses Siri to automatically silence calls from unknown numbers. Correction: A previous vers


AT&T said this week that it will soon block spam calls or alert customers of suspected spammers. The FCC mandated in February that U.S. carriers need to help stop spam calls. T-Mobile already offers customers two free tools, Scam Block and Scam ID, but Scam Block needs to be turned on first. The Google Pixel 3 and Pixel 3a can automatically screen calls for you, while iOS 13, which will roll out this fall, uses Siri to automatically silence calls from unknown numbers. Correction: A previous vers
AT&T will soon automatically block annoying robocalls Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, att, customers, calls, soon, annoying, scam, users, automatically, suspected, spam, robocalls, turned, unwanted, block


AT&T will soon automatically block annoying robocalls

AT&T said this week that it will soon block spam calls or alert customers of suspected spammers. The blocking will first activate for new lines and will then be applied to all existing accounts, the carrier said on Tuesday.

The feature will be on by default but can be turned off by users who don’t want it, per rules set by the Federal Communications Commission that require carriers to let customers opt out.

The FCC mandated in February that U.S. carriers need to help stop spam calls. Hiya, a spam-blocking app, estimates that 25.3 billion unwanted robocalls were received by U.S. wireless customers in the first half of this year alone, even to people who are registered on the Do Not Call list.

AT&T’s service is the first that will be on by default, instead of requiring users to opt in or download a separate app.

T-Mobile already offers customers two free tools, Scam Block and Scam ID, but Scam Block needs to be turned on first. Sprint charges a $2.99 fee for Premium Caller ID, and Verizon alerts customers if a call is from a suspected spammer. Google and Apple have worked to add spam blocking into Android and iOS too.

The Google Pixel 3 and Pixel 3a can automatically screen calls for you, while iOS 13, which will roll out this fall, uses Siri to automatically silence calls from unknown numbers.

Correction: A previous version of this story included an incorrect number of unwanted robocalls.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: todd haselton
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Robocalls are not only annoying — there’s an entire dirty industry behind them, FTC reveals

The actions are important because they draw the connection between robocalls, which may seem like mere annoyances, to the fraudulent organizations or illegal mass-calling schemes behind them. A ‘franchise-like’ opportunityIn some cases, robocalls proliferate through programs that resemble multilevel marketing schemes, where business founders push robocall packages on “members” to spur quick growth. This organization originated tens of millions of calls claiming they were from a generic departmen


The actions are important because they draw the connection between robocalls, which may seem like mere annoyances, to the fraudulent organizations or illegal mass-calling schemes behind them. A ‘franchise-like’ opportunityIn some cases, robocalls proliferate through programs that resemble multilevel marketing schemes, where business founders push robocall packages on “members” to spur quick growth. This organization originated tens of millions of calls claiming they were from a generic departmen
Robocalls are not only annoying — there’s an entire dirty industry behind them, FTC reveals Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, robocalls, calls, card, industry, credit, dirty, organization, theres, consumers, defendants, organizations, annoying, ftc, case, program, entire, reveals


Robocalls are not only annoying — there's an entire dirty industry behind them, FTC reveals

Joseph Simons, chairman of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) nominee for U.S. President Donald Trump, speaks during a Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee confirmation hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018. Andrew Harrer | Bloomberg | Getty Images

The Federal Trade Commission announced last week a crackdown on robocallers, giving one of the clearest pictures yet of the people and organizations behind the avalanche of nuisance phone calls to consumers. The actions are important because they draw the connection between robocalls, which may seem like mere annoyances, to the fraudulent organizations or illegal mass-calling schemes behind them. “We have a strong robocalling enforcement program, which is meant to protect wider consumers from abuse and abusive calls,” said Ian Barlow, program coordinator for the FTC’s Do Not Call program. The most recent FTC action drilled down into organizations that tried to push fake products or multilevel marketing schemes, and those that sold real products but marketed them in illegal ways. Here’s what they found out.

A ‘franchise-like’ opportunity

In some cases, robocalls proliferate through programs that resemble multilevel marketing schemes, where business founders push robocall packages on “members” to spur quick growth. In one case, an organization known alternately as “8 Figure Dream Lifestyle, ” “Millionaire Mind” and “Online Entrepreneur Academy” enticed consumers to buy memberships to gain access to a “franchise-like opportunity” to sell the organization’s “proven business model” or “blueprint for success” downstream. Members paid between $2,395 and $22,495 to join, and the business claimed they could earn $5,000 to $10,000 in the first two weeks, followed by similarly large sums. In one case, a founder of the organization bragged of making $6.5 million off the “blueprint,” though it’s unclear how much founders were able to profit. Attorneys for the defendants declined to comment. In addition to the robocall training and operational help the companies allegedly provided members, they also provided the email, texting and social media marketing packages. In another robocalling case, a company called Redwood Scientific sold dissolving oral film strips that were billed to treat everything from smoking to obesity to sexual performance. The calls attempted to auto-enroll victims into subscription plans for the strips. That case was settled, with one defendant agreeing to no longer make deceptive health claims, among other provisions. The defendants neither admitted nor denied the allegations in the complaint as part of the agreement. The FTC also looked at an organization called Life Management Services, which allegedly netted $15.6 million from consumers who thought they were reorganizing their credit card debt through an interest rate reduction service. This organization originated tens of millions of calls claiming they were from a generic department like “bank card services” or a “credit assistance program.” In others, the group said they represented a “licensed enrollment center” for companies such as Visa or Mastercard. Consumers who stayed on the line were told they needed to make up-front payments of between $500 and $5,000 to pay off credit card bills, or even larger sums to enroll in a debt relief program. “In reality, the defendants sometimes made a rudimentary attempt to contact the consumer’s credit card company, but consumers report that defendants were almost never able to obtain the promised rates or savings,” the FTC said. The defendants could not be reached for comment. In 2018, the FTC and the State of Florida won a summary judgment in the case ordering the group’s leader to pay $23 million. Another complaint, against a corporation called First Choice Horizon, outlines how the robocaller “under the guise of confirming consumers’ identities” for an offer of “bogus credit card interest rate reduction services,” further “tricked them into providing their personal financial information, including their social security and credit card numbers,” according to the FTC. The defendants’ attorneys did not return calls requesting comment.

Thousands of calls to a single number


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: kate fazzini
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Robocalls are rampant despite the Do Not Call list — FCC urges phone providers to help stop them

Hiya, a startup aiming to reduce telemarketing calls, estimates that Americans got 26.3 billion robocalls last year, a 46 percent increase from 2017. The FTC said consumers who still get scam calls can file a complaint. Pai, whose agency works with the FTC to prevent robocalls, said telemarketing calls are the No. The largest fines in the FCC’s 85-year history have been imposed on robocallers who have been bombarding American consumers with these scam calls.” “We empowered some of the carriers t


Hiya, a startup aiming to reduce telemarketing calls, estimates that Americans got 26.3 billion robocalls last year, a 46 percent increase from 2017. The FTC said consumers who still get scam calls can file a complaint. Pai, whose agency works with the FTC to prevent robocalls, said telemarketing calls are the No. The largest fines in the FCC’s 85-year history have been imposed on robocallers who have been bombarding American consumers with these scam calls.” “We empowered some of the carriers t
Robocalls are rampant despite the Do Not Call list — FCC urges phone providers to help stop them Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-26  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, telemarketing, stop, rampant, calls, scam, help, fcc, rules, pai, despite, told, spoofed, providers, trade, robocalls, urges, list, phone


Robocalls are rampant despite the Do Not Call list — FCC urges phone providers to help stop them

The Federal Communications Commission, as part of a crackdown on the billions of unsolicited robocalls every year, is warning phone providers to implement technology to stop the scammers or face new government rules, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said Tuesday

“Recently I told the industry, ‘Look, we need to adopt call authentication, essentially a digital fingerprint, for every single phone call this year. We need to have it now or otherwise it’s going to be regulatory intervention,'” Pai told CNBC’s Jon Fortt, in a “Squawk Box” interview from the Mobile World Congress trade show in Barcelona, Spain.

Hiya, a startup aiming to reduce telemarketing calls, estimates that Americans got 26.3 billion robocalls last year, a 46 percent increase from 2017. The average U.S. consumer received 10 spam calls per month last year, Hiya’s Robocall Radar report shows.

The National Do Not Call Registry is still operational, and the Federal Trade Commission suggests that Americans looking to reduce the number of unwanted calls sign up. The FTC said consumers who still get scam calls can file a complaint.

Pai, whose agency works with the FTC to prevent robocalls, said telemarketing calls are the No. 1 complaint at the FCC and the top consumer protection priority. “We really beefed up our enforcement efforts. The largest fines in the FCC’s 85-year history have been imposed on robocallers who have been bombarding American consumers with these scam calls.”

The FCC said the enforcement of its Truth in Caller ID Act, which prohibits the transmission of misleading or inaccurate caller ID information with the intent to defraud, resulted in over $200 million in fines issued in 2018 alone. On Feb. 14, the agency proposed new rules banning illegal spoofed text messages and international calls.

“Because of the internet we can get all of these calls from abroad [and] they seem to be coming from a local source,” Pai said. “We empowered some of the carriers to block calls that obviously spoofed; so the same area code, the next three digits are same. We want to empower them to take action.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-26  Authors: matthew j belvedere
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Robocalls are rampant despite the Do Not Call list — FCC urges phone providers to help stop them

Hiya, a startup aiming to reduce telemarketing calls, estimates that Americans got 26.3 billion robocalls last year, a 46 percent increase from 2017. The FTC said consumers who still get scam calls can file a complaint. Pai, whose agency works with the FTC to prevent robocalls, said telemarketing calls are the No. The largest fines in the FCC’s 85-year history have been imposed on robocallers who have been bombarding American consumers with these scam calls.” “We empowered some of the carriers t


Hiya, a startup aiming to reduce telemarketing calls, estimates that Americans got 26.3 billion robocalls last year, a 46 percent increase from 2017. The FTC said consumers who still get scam calls can file a complaint. Pai, whose agency works with the FTC to prevent robocalls, said telemarketing calls are the No. The largest fines in the FCC’s 85-year history have been imposed on robocallers who have been bombarding American consumers with these scam calls.” “We empowered some of the carriers t
Robocalls are rampant despite the Do Not Call list — FCC urges phone providers to help stop them Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-26  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, scam, urges, list, rules, despite, trade, help, telemarketing, fcc, phone, told, spoofed, pai, rampant, providers, robocalls, calls, stop


Robocalls are rampant despite the Do Not Call list — FCC urges phone providers to help stop them

The Federal Communications Commission, as part of a crackdown on the billions of unsolicited robocalls every year, is warning phone providers to implement technology to stop the scammers or face new government rules, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said Tuesday

“Recently I told the industry, ‘Look, we need to adopt call authentication, essentially a digital fingerprint, for every single phone call this year. We need to have it now or otherwise it’s going to be regulatory intervention,'” Pai told CNBC’s Jon Fortt, in a “Squawk Box” interview from the Mobile World Congress trade show in Barcelona, Spain.

Hiya, a startup aiming to reduce telemarketing calls, estimates that Americans got 26.3 billion robocalls last year, a 46 percent increase from 2017. The average U.S. consumer received 10 spam calls per month last year, Hiya’s Robocall Radar report shows.

The National Do Not Call Registry is still operational, and the Federal Trade Commission suggests that Americans looking to reduce the number of unwanted calls sign up. The FTC said consumers who still get scam calls can file a complaint.

Pai, whose agency works with the FTC to prevent robocalls, said telemarketing calls are the No. 1 complaint at the FCC and the top consumer protection priority. “We really beefed up our enforcement efforts. The largest fines in the FCC’s 85-year history have been imposed on robocallers who have been bombarding American consumers with these scam calls.”

The FCC said the enforcement of its Truth in Caller ID Act, which prohibits the transmission of misleading or inaccurate caller ID information with the intent to defraud, resulted in over $200 million in fines issued in 2018 alone. On Feb. 14, the agency proposed new rules banning illegal spoofed text messages and international calls.

“Because of the internet we can get all of these calls from abroad [and] they seem to be coming from a local source,” Pai said. “We empowered some of the carriers to block calls that obviously spoofed; so the same area code, the next three digits are same. We want to empower them to take action.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-26  Authors: matthew j belvedere
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Robocallers tried to cash in on the federal government shutdown

Robocallers were trying to cash in on the recent partial federal government shutdown. “I have an important update regarding your IRS tax debt. The recent government shutdown is affecting your standing with the IRS and although some IRS operations are down, billing and collections remain active. “I was actually calling because in lieu of the government shutdown, backed federal taxes are now being dismissed at just an unstoppable rate. If the government shuts down again, Quilici expects the same t


Robocallers were trying to cash in on the recent partial federal government shutdown. “I have an important update regarding your IRS tax debt. The recent government shutdown is affecting your standing with the IRS and although some IRS operations are down, billing and collections remain active. “I was actually calling because in lieu of the government shutdown, backed federal taxes are now being dismissed at just an unstoppable rate. If the government shuts down again, Quilici expects the same t
Robocallers tried to cash in on the federal government shutdown Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: jennifer schlesinger, andrea day, chip somodevilla, getty images, joe raedle, sarinyapinngam, istock
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, robocallers, irs, scammers, shutdown, cash, calls, robocalls, tried, taxes, quilici, tax, shut, federal


Robocallers tried to cash in on the federal government shutdown

The phone rings and you run to pick it up, only to hear an automated recording. You are not alone.

There are approximately 5 billion robocalls made every month, according to robocall blocking app, YouMail. That number has been consistent, but the context of those calls changes. The most recent scam? Robocallers were trying to cash in on the recent partial federal government shutdown.

“The robocallers are marketers. You can think of them as marketers in the wrong business,” said Alex Quilici, CEO of YouMail. “They are always testing different ways to get people to respond to their calls.”

Days after the shutdown, two robocalls began about taxes.

“I have an important update regarding your IRS tax debt. The recent government shutdown is affecting your standing with the IRS and although some IRS operations are down, billing and collections remain active. So give me a call back at this number,” said one recording given to CNBC by YouMail.

The second call was also about taxes.

“I was actually calling because in lieu of the government shutdown, backed federal taxes are now being dismissed at just an unstoppable rate. We can take advantage of the situation and help you clear out not just your federal back taxes but also some state tax issues you might be facing. When you get this message please give me a call back,” said another recording given to CNBC by YouMail.

YouMail estimates more than 1 million people got the call with many people receiving it more than once. Quilici says with these type of calls, 3 to 5 percent of receivers call back.

“Some fraction of those people are going to get scammed and it’s going to be for real money,” Quilici said.

During the shutdown, if consumers tried to add their number to the Do Not Call Registry, a list of people who do not want to be called by telemarketers maintained by the Federal Trade Commission, they found the website shutdown. The websites to file complaints with the FTC or the Federal Communication Commission, which also has oversight of robocalls, were also shut. The websites quickly came back once the government reopened.

This message appeared when trying to file a robocall complaint on the FCC’s website.

If the government were shutdown longer, Quilici expects there could have been greater effects.

“The real impact for all of this is the long-term enforcement. So had the government shut down for a long time, the FCC isn’t chasing the bad guys,” he said.

“These two examples make clear robocallers read the news and leverage events to dupe people and get their money. They are very similar to the IRS scam calls that scare people into thinking they owe back taxes, when they do not. Because of the government shutdown, the FTC was not funded and could not receive complaints from consumers. But, we are open and very much want people to report [such calls] to the FTC at donotcall.gov. These complaints are critical to our law enforcement work,” said Lois Greisman, associate director of the FTC’s division of marketing practices.

The FCC directed CNBC to its website.

The FCC is working to, as Chairman Ajit Pai said, “stop the scourge of illegal robocalls.” He has made combating unlawful robocalls and malicious caller ID spoofing his “top consumer protection priority,” the website reads. “Chairman Pai has launched several important public policy initiatives to help combat unlawful robocalls and malicious caller ID spoofing. The Commission under his leadership has also taken unprecedented enforcement actions to punish those who flout consumer protection laws.”

Robocallers also take advantage of other news.

“The last election we saw the student loan scammers talk about how President [Donald] Trump was going to force people to pay back their money right away,” Quilici said. “We’ve seen with Obamacare when there’s the deadline December 15 the scam calls pick up rapidly.”

The scammers can also take advantage of the government being open. “I actually expect to see more about the government being back open and we can now help you than we saw about the government being shut down,” Quilici said.

If the government shuts down again, Quilici expects the same tax calls to start up.

The scammers behind the calls can be from anywhere, even the U.S., but Quilici says they most commonly come from India. To make the calls sound more professional, he says they sometimes hire voiceover talent from the U.S. online.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: jennifer schlesinger, andrea day, chip somodevilla, getty images, joe raedle, sarinyapinngam, istock
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, robocallers, irs, scammers, shutdown, cash, calls, robocalls, tried, taxes, quilici, tax, shut, federal


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Robocalls jumped 60 percent in the U.S. last year and scammers are finding more ways to make money

You are getting bombarded with robocalls. “Scam calls have been increasing very steadily, and it’s driving people to not answer their phone,” said YouMail CEO Alex Quilici. “It’s driving people to not answer their phone and it’s kind of created this death spiral of phone calls as the robocallers ramp up their efforts, and the legitimate roboccalls try harder to get through.” Scams make up an estimated 40 percent of all robocalls, Quilici said, while the other 60 percent are “legitimate” robocall


You are getting bombarded with robocalls. “Scam calls have been increasing very steadily, and it’s driving people to not answer their phone,” said YouMail CEO Alex Quilici. “It’s driving people to not answer their phone and it’s kind of created this death spiral of phone calls as the robocallers ramp up their efforts, and the legitimate roboccalls try harder to get through.” Scams make up an estimated 40 percent of all robocalls, Quilici said, while the other 60 percent are “legitimate” robocall
Robocalls jumped 60 percent in the U.S. last year and scammers are finding more ways to make money Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-02  Authors: kate fazzini, zero creatives, getty images, source, magdalena petrova cnbc
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, phone, driving, ways, technology, legitimate, jumped, money, calls, 60, answer, robocalls, finding, quilici, scammers, youmail


Robocalls jumped 60 percent in the U.S. last year and scammers are finding more ways to make money

It’s not your imagination. You are getting bombarded with robocalls.

Robocalling, a practice where marketers send automated voice messages to thousands of phones at once, surged 60 percent in the U.S. last year to 48 billion calls, according to preliminary year-end data from YouMail, a robocall management company that tracks the volume of calls.

“Scam calls have been increasing very steadily, and it’s driving people to not answer their phone,” said YouMail CEO Alex Quilici. “It’s driving people to not answer their phone and it’s kind of created this death spiral of phone calls as the robocallers ramp up their efforts, and the legitimate roboccalls try harder to get through.”

Both mobile carriers and smart phone makers are racing to keep up with the influx, but have been unsuccessful so far because the technology to deploy the calls is cheap, easy and lucrative for scammers. Scams make up an estimated 40 percent of all robocalls, Quilici said, while the other 60 percent are “legitimate” robocalls, like those that come from pharmacies, libraries, schools and political candidates.

“New, inexpensive technology and products have enabled scammers, including those located outside the U.S., to set up mass calling operations that can place high volumes of spoofed calls with minimal investment,” said Andrew Morgan, a spokesman for AT&T. “We will have to continue to find new tools as illegal scammers adjust their techniques to overcome the latest innovations.”


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Oprah hits back at ‘racist robocalls’ in Georgia gubernatorial race

The robocall, reportedly from white supremacist group The Road to Power, impersonates Winfrey using racist language in a mock endorsement for Abrams, who is African-American. Both Abrams and her Republican opponent, Secretary of State Brian Kemp, condemned the robocall. Abrams’ campaign went on the attack against Kemp. Over the weekend, Kemp’s office reported a potential cybersecurity breach on Georgia’s “My Voter Page,” and said it had “opened an investigation into the Democratic Party of Georg


The robocall, reportedly from white supremacist group The Road to Power, impersonates Winfrey using racist language in a mock endorsement for Abrams, who is African-American. Both Abrams and her Republican opponent, Secretary of State Brian Kemp, condemned the robocall. Abrams’ campaign went on the attack against Kemp. Over the weekend, Kemp’s office reported a potential cybersecurity breach on Georgia’s “My Voter Page,” and said it had “opened an investigation into the Democratic Party of Georg
Oprah hits back at ‘racist robocalls’ in Georgia gubernatorial race Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-06  Authors: kevin breuninger, jessica mcgowan, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kemp, abrams, party, democratic, voter, using, racist, campaign, georgia, hits, winfrey, race, gubernatorial, state, robocalls, oprah, states


Oprah hits back at 'racist robocalls' in Georgia gubernatorial race

The robocall, reportedly from white supremacist group The Road to Power, impersonates Winfrey using racist language in a mock endorsement for Abrams, who is African-American. A lawyer and former minority leader of the state’s House of Representatives, Abrams is also the first black female gubernatorial nominee for a major political party in U.S. history.

Both Abrams and her Republican opponent, Secretary of State Brian Kemp, condemned the robocall.

“This automated call is absolutely disgusting,” Kemp said in a statement Friday. “I stand against any person or organization that peddles this type of unbridled hate and unapologetic bigotry. These vile efforts to degrade and disparage others are contrary to the highest ideals of our state and country. We unequivocally condemn this group and their horrible actions.”

Abrams’ campaign went on the attack against Kemp. “It’s disturbing that after months of racist, sexist and inaccurate attacks against Stacey Abrams, Brian Kemp has only now suddenly decided to find a conscience as polls are tightening and Georgia voters are making it clear that they reject the kind of hate he and his allies have been spewing around the state,” the Abrams campaign statement said.

Winfrey strongly endorsed Abrams and stumped for her at a campaign event Thursday in Marietta. At the event, Winfrey, who briefly drew national attention as a possible challenger in 2020 to President Donald Trump, said she was a registered Independent and that she was “not trying to test any waters” for a political run.

“I’ve earned the right to do what I want to do when I want to do it. I’ve earned the right to think for myself — and to vote for myself,” Winfrey said to rousing applause in her speech.

Soon after, the talk show host and media mogul posted Instagram videos of her canvassing door-to-door for Abrams.

Abrams has long criticized Kemp, who is also in charge of overseeing the state’s elections, of using selective voter suppression tactics to stifle Democratic turnout. Kemp has denied using such tactics, saying “the liberal left” makes the same allegations against Republicans “every two years.”

Over the weekend, Kemp’s office reported a potential cybersecurity breach on Georgia’s “My Voter Page,” and said it had “opened an investigation into the Democratic Party of Georgia.”

Abrams called the announcement “desperate.” The state’s Democratic Party said the allegations are “100 percent false.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-06  Authors: kevin breuninger, jessica mcgowan, getty images
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Why student loan companies are lobbying to keep robocalls

Ever since an accident when he was 30, he’s been paralyzed from the waist down, and the relentless calls from Navient about his student loans triggered his nerves. His $60,000 in federal student loans have been canceled due to his severe disability, but Navient, one of the country’s largest student loan servicers, is still collecting on his $40,000 in private loans. Navient called Hunter nearly 2,000 times, according to his lawyer Billy Peerce Howard, from The Consumer Protection Firm in Tampa,


Ever since an accident when he was 30, he’s been paralyzed from the waist down, and the relentless calls from Navient about his student loans triggered his nerves. His $60,000 in federal student loans have been canceled due to his severe disability, but Navient, one of the country’s largest student loan servicers, is still collecting on his $40,000 in private loans. Navient called Hunter nearly 2,000 times, according to his lawyer Billy Peerce Howard, from The Consumer Protection Firm in Tampa,
Why student loan companies are lobbying to keep robocalls Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-03  Authors: annie nova, bill hinton, getty images, source, -william peerce howard, lawyer at the consumer protection firm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, phone, loan, peerce, robocalls, loans, hes, lavoie, hunters, howard, student, navient, hunter, companies, lobbying


Why student loan companies are lobbying to keep robocalls

When the phone rang, James Hunter’s legs burned in pain.

Ever since an accident when he was 30, he’s been paralyzed from the waist down, and the relentless calls from Navient about his student loans triggered his nerves.

“Any time my phone would ring, I would get an anxiety attack,” Hunter, 44, said.

His $60,000 in federal student loans have been canceled due to his severe disability, but Navient, one of the country’s largest student loan servicers, is still collecting on his $40,000 in private loans. He sent the company notes from his doctor, and explained to them that he’s in a wheelchair and unable to put his film degree to use, but to no avail. The calls continued.

“They had my back against the wall with no remedy,” Hunter said. “I felt hopeless.”

Now he’s suing the company for damages from the harassment.

Navient called Hunter nearly 2,000 times, according to his lawyer Billy Peerce Howard, from The Consumer Protection Firm in Tampa, Florida. Peerce Howard is currently working on around a dozen other cases, in addition to Hunter’s, against Navient over its robocall practices.

Nikki A. Lavoie, director of corporate communications at Navient, said many borrowers require one-on-one support to fully understand their options.

“Direct communication is critical to address, resolve, and avoid delinquent and defaulted loans,” Lavoie said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-03  Authors: annie nova, bill hinton, getty images, source, -william peerce howard, lawyer at the consumer protection firm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, phone, loan, peerce, robocalls, loans, hes, lavoie, hunters, howard, student, navient, hunter, companies, lobbying


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How to avoid two of the most dangerous and widespread summer scams

You may be heading off for vacation this summer, but scams don’t take a break. In fact, scam calls are up 60 percent so far this year and are expected to hit record-setting levels this summer. Robocalls tend to spike this time of year, according to according to the YouMail Robocall Index. While not all robocalls are scams (some companies do place legitimate automated calls), YouMail estimates that over 27 percent of the 16.3 billion robocalls received in the first five months of 2018 were scams.


You may be heading off for vacation this summer, but scams don’t take a break. In fact, scam calls are up 60 percent so far this year and are expected to hit record-setting levels this summer. Robocalls tend to spike this time of year, according to according to the YouMail Robocall Index. While not all robocalls are scams (some companies do place legitimate automated calls), YouMail estimates that over 27 percent of the 16.3 billion robocalls received in the first five months of 2018 were scams.
How to avoid two of the most dangerous and widespread summer scams Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-28  Authors: megan leonhardt, laszlo szirtesi, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, security, scam, number, summer, scams, smith, avoid, according, dangerous, robocalls, youmail, widespread, calls


How to avoid two of the most dangerous and widespread summer scams

You may be heading off for vacation this summer, but scams don’t take a break. In fact, scam calls are up 60 percent so far this year and are expected to hit record-setting levels this summer.

Robocalls tend to spike this time of year, according to according to the YouMail Robocall Index. While not all robocalls are scams (some companies do place legitimate automated calls), YouMail estimates that over 27 percent of the 16.3 billion robocalls received in the first five months of 2018 were scams. And the Better Business Bureau’s Scam Tracker shows the number of scams reported to the organization this May and June is almost double the number flagged in 2017.

“There seems to be a pattern of robocalls spiking in the summer following tax season,” Daniel Smith, head of security research at security company Radware, tells CNBC Make It. Criminals are hoping that a few of the people they call daily are actually in debt with the IRS, which could give them leverage to draw in victims, Smith says.

Summer typically brings an influx of travel scams and student loan cons in particular. Here’s how to avoid them.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-28  Authors: megan leonhardt, laszlo szirtesi, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, security, scam, number, summer, scams, smith, avoid, according, dangerous, robocalls, youmail, widespread, calls


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How to block the annoying robocalls that you keep getting

If you’re like me, chances are you’re constantly getting bombarded by robocalls. You know the type: You pick up the phone only to hear some pre-recorded message — sometimes not even in English — about how you owe someone money or you’ve won a free vacation to Barbados. These sorts of robocalls are smarter than ever, too. Spammers are capable of spoofing the area code where you live so that it appears to be a local call or even one from a legitimate business you’ve used. I’m going to walk you t


If you’re like me, chances are you’re constantly getting bombarded by robocalls. You know the type: You pick up the phone only to hear some pre-recorded message — sometimes not even in English — about how you owe someone money or you’ve won a free vacation to Barbados. These sorts of robocalls are smarter than ever, too. Spammers are capable of spoofing the area code where you live so that it appears to be a local call or even one from a legitimate business you’ve used. I’m going to walk you t
How to block the annoying robocalls that you keep getting Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-04  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, type, youre, annoying, block, won, store, start, used, getting, walk, robocalls, vacation, youve


How to block the annoying robocalls that you keep getting

If you’re like me, chances are you’re constantly getting bombarded by robocalls. You know the type: You pick up the phone only to hear some pre-recorded message — sometimes not even in English — about how you owe someone money or you’ve won a free vacation to Barbados.

These sorts of robocalls are smarter than ever, too. Spammers are capable of spoofing the area code where you live so that it appears to be a local call or even one from a legitimate business you’ve used. And of course you answer: Maybe it’s a neighbor, the drug store or a doctor calling.

Usually it isn’t.

I’m going to walk you through how some of those calls happen in the first place, and how to start blocking them.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-04  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, type, youre, annoying, block, won, store, start, used, getting, walk, robocalls, vacation, youve


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