Instagrammers love this iconic spot, but there’s something they don’t want you to see

If there is one thing that Instagram has shown us is that the world is filled with fascinating natural wonders. Unlike other hotspots of the photo-sharing world, Trolltunga — which translates to “Troll’s tongue” — is every bit as beautiful as photographs portray. Interestingly, the website for the regional tourism office keeps it real with an expectation-managing photograph of its most famous spot. It’s common to see photos of breathtaking Preikestolen, or Pulpit Rock, that typically look like t


If there is one thing that Instagram has shown us is that the world is filled with fascinating natural wonders.
Unlike other hotspots of the photo-sharing world, Trolltunga — which translates to “Troll’s tongue” — is every bit as beautiful as photographs portray.
Interestingly, the website for the regional tourism office keeps it real with an expectation-managing photograph of its most famous spot.
It’s common to see photos of breathtaking Preikestolen, or Pulpit Rock, that typically look like t
Instagrammers love this iconic spot, but there’s something they don’t want you to see Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: monica buchanan pitrelli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spot, kjeragbolten, world, photos, instagrammers, line, love, iconic, dont, getty, wait, soldal, visitors, theres, trolltunga, rock


Instagrammers love this iconic spot, but there's something they don't want you to see

If there is one thing that Instagram has shown us is that the world is filled with fascinating natural wonders. The downside? There are few geological secrets anymore. What was once a tribe’s, then a town’s, and eventually a country’s pride and joy is now subject to the whims of the international traveling world — all 1.4 billion of us. Take Norway’s now-famous Trolltunga. Jutting 2,300 feet above the north side of Ringedalsvatnet lake, the natural rock formation resulted from receding glaciers that broke off large, angular blocks from area mountains. It’s easy to see why photos at the site are an instant hit.

Two visitors gaze off Norway’s Trolltunga. Oleh_Slobodeniuk | E+ | Getty Images

The serenity. The solitude.

Trolltunga in Hardangerfjord, Norway. Morten Rustad | 500px Prime | Getty Images

The stillness of the remote surroundings. But widen the frame a bit, and that’s not the story.

Tourism explosion at Trolltunga

A decade ago, fewer than 800 people a year traveled to Trolltunga. Next year, that figure’s expected to hit 100,000. Trolltunga was formed roughly 10,000 years before the advent of the internet, but social media has played a major role in its massive influx. A photo there seems to combine everything we’ve come to expect from online travel photos: distant lands, a touch of daredevilism, breath-taking scenery and a soul-searchingly authentic experience.

Trolltunga, from a different angle. Kotenko_A | iStock Editorial | Getty Images

“Instagram has elevated the interest in the site that really no conventional marketing campaign can do,” said Bo Vibe, head of digital marketing at Fjord Tours. “Getting the ‘selfie’ on the top becomes the end-all for many visitors.” “Facebook has probably had just as much influence as Instagram,” said Jostein Soldal, CEO of Trolltunga Active, citing effective local and national marketing campaigns, word of mouth and the sheer beauty of the area as other factors. Unlike other hotspots of the photo-sharing world, Trolltunga — which translates to “Troll’s tongue” — is every bit as beautiful as photographs portray. But that solemn mood conveyed on social media doesn’t match what’s happening just beyond the selfie-frame.

Tourists wait in line to be photographed on Trolltunga. Kotenko_A | iStock Editorial | Getty Images

As tourist numbers have increased, so have the lines. Visitors who arrive in the summer months have been known to wait longer than three hours to get a photograph on the tongue’s tip. The longest waits often result when good weather follows a long period of rain — and when the average number of visitors increases from 800 to 2,000 per day. Travelers who arrive from June to September should mentally prepare for an average wait of 60 to 90 minutes for a photo opp. “If you are prepared that there will be a line and spend the time just enjoying all the impressive poses many of the tourists are doing, the waiting is not a big issue,” said Soldal. Interestingly, the website for the regional tourism office keeps it real with an expectation-managing photograph of its most famous spot.

Trolltunga’s saving grace – it’s hard to get there

Consistently ranked one of the best hikes in Norway, the journey to reach Trolltunga isn’t an easy one. From Skjeggedal, it’s a 10- to 12-hour hike that covers 28 kilometers and an 800-meter ascent. Hikers need to be fit and equipped with food, water, headlights, hiking boots and other gear. Efforts to inform tourists of this have helped reduce rescue operations from an all-time high of 40 in 2016 to just 12 in 2018. Built in the early 1900s, a funicular called Mågelibanen once made the journey to Trolltunga considerably easier, but it closed in 2012. To date, the only way to reach it is by foot, a fact that suits the local population just fine, says Soldal. “We don’t want more visitors,” he said with a laugh. “Plus, if it’s a five-minute walk, the Trolltunga will lose some of its ‘I did it’ factor.” There is a steep, private road that takes travelers 400 meters up the mountain, but it’s still eight hours of hiking from there. Only 30 cars are allowed to park at a time, and the hairpin turns on the drive aren’t for the faint of heart.

Trolltunga isn’t alone

Trolltunga isn’t Norway’s only site to achieve Insta-fame. It’s common to see photos of breathtaking Preikestolen, or Pulpit Rock, that typically look like this:

Norway’s Preikestolen, or Pulpit Rock. Oleh_Slobodeniuk | E+ | Getty Images

But with 300,000 visitors a year — roughly three times as many visitors as Trolltunga — it’s better to assume it will look more like this in person.

Hiikers at Preikestolen. Xichao Yu | 500px | Getty Images

The journey to Pulpit Rock is a less-arduous, eight-kilometer hike that can be completed in three to four hours, making it a popular stop on the tourist bus and cruise ship circuit. Instagram is also rife with photos of Kjeragbolten, another picture-perfect geological wonder in Norway.

Woman atop Kjeragbolten. kotangens | iStock | Getty Images

But behind-the-scenes photos show that the line at Kjeragbolten is decidedly less zen.

Hikers wait in line to take a photo at Kjeragbolten. Courtesy of Ali Ronca at amsterdamandbeyond.com

How to avoid the crowds

For a less-congested experience, one option is to book an off-season tour. Winter tours reward visitors with open trails, little to no waits and beautiful snow-covered views, though the hike is more difficult and conditions can be too slick to step out onto the troll’s tongue. Off-season hikes — from October to May — can be dangerous for novices and should not be attempted without a guide. Early morning starts in high season are also possible, though it adds the extra challenge of hiking in darkness.

It’s an area where all logic says is not a place to settle down. And we have managed it for 8,000 years. Jostein Soldal CEO, Trolltunga Active


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: monica buchanan pitrelli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spot, kjeragbolten, world, photos, instagrammers, line, love, iconic, dont, getty, wait, soldal, visitors, theres, trolltunga, rock


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Four things to do at Australia’s Uluru monolith — besides climb it

They’ve also been vocal about the fact they’d prefer people didn’t climb Uluru, as this was seldom allowed in the past. Eighty percent of tourists to Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park respected the request, although the other 20% chose to haul themselves up the rock’s 348-meter (1,141 feet) surface regardless. The climbing ban was marked by a ceremony by the Anangu, the original owners of the land that is now part of Uluru-Kata-Tjuta National Park. Tourism NT/Mitchell CoxWalking all or part of Ulur


They’ve also been vocal about the fact they’d prefer people didn’t climb Uluru, as this was seldom allowed in the past.
Eighty percent of tourists to Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park respected the request, although the other 20% chose to haul themselves up the rock’s 348-meter (1,141 feet) surface regardless.
The climbing ban was marked by a ceremony by the Anangu, the original owners of the land that is now part of Uluru-Kata-Tjuta National Park.
Tourism NT/Mitchell CoxWalking all or part of Ulur
Four things to do at Australia’s Uluru monolith — besides climb it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: sue white, monica buchanan pitrelli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tjuta, getty, national, legs, art, rock, australias, walk, visitors, park, things, climb, uluru, monolith


Four things to do at Australia's Uluru monolith — besides climb it

Climbing is banned, but there’s plenty to do during a visit to Uluru.

Since Australia’s rusty-red monolith, Uluru, was handed back to its original owners in 1977, the Anangu people have welcomed visitors to walk its 9.4 kilometer (5.8 mile) circumference and soak up its spiritual presence. They’ve also been vocal about the fact they’d prefer people didn’t climb Uluru, as this was seldom allowed in the past. Eighty percent of tourists to Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park respected the request, although the other 20% chose to haul themselves up the rock’s 348-meter (1,141 feet) surface regardless. At least 35 climbers died while doing so.

The climbing ban was marked by a ceremony by the Anangu, the original owners of the land that is now part of Uluru-Kata-Tjuta National Park. SAEED KHAN | AFP | Getty Images

Now, there’s no longer a choice. On October 26 of this year, the park’s Board of Management officially banned climbing on Uluru. In the weeks that followed, the chains installed in 1963 to help people climb the steep rock were removed and symbolically handed over to Anangu elders. Regardless of what you call it — Uluru is also known as Ayers Rock — there are dozens of ways to experience all that is sacred about Uluru and the rest of Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park. Here are just a few options.

Take in Uluru on two legs

Many visitors begin with a free, ranger-guided walk along the two-kilometer (1.2 mile) wheelchair-accessible Mala Walk. However, many Anangu suggest taking a slow exploration of the Tjukurpa Tunnel before setting out. Here, to the sounds of ceremonial songs, visitors can learn about the Anangu’s laws, traditions and art. The guided Mala Walk departs at 8 a.m. or 10 a.m. daily, depending on the season. Photos aren’t allowed for cultural reasons.

Climbing isn’t necessary to appreciate the beauty of Uluru. Tourism NT/Mitchell Cox

Walking all or part of Uluru’s circumference is a memorable experience, not the least for the crevices, caves and rock art found there. Try the geologically-impressive Lungkata Walk for opportunities to touch the rock, while the North-East Face Walk passes a multitude of sacred sites. The Uluru Birds app is a trusty companion that helps bird-watchers identify some of the park’s 178 avian species. Later in the day, weary legs can rest during the free bush tucker journeys (a talk about native bush foods) held daily at Ayers Rock Resort.

Trade two legs for two wheels

Uluru offers plenty of options to swap two legs for two wheels. The most serene is cycling; hire a bike from the mobile truck at the Cultural Centre and pedal to spots like the Mutitjulu Waterhole, one of the few permanent water sources in the area.

Traverse the sandy park paths with Uluru Segway Tours. bennymarty | iStock Editorial | Getty Images

If your legs don’t offer enough power, jump on a Segway, motorized trike or Harley Davidson for a sunrise or sunset spin around the rock.

Take to the sky

Most people come to the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site, for its cultural and natural uniqueness, but for visitors desperate for adventure, Uluru delivers. It’s possible to see both Uluru and the domed formations of nearby Kata Tjuta by plane, or for an added thrill, by helicopter. Those needing an extra adrenaline rush can rock the sky with Skydive Uluru. The company offers dives from 10,000 or 12,000 feet — the latter with a longer free-fall period — for spectacular views of “The Red Centre” of Australia.

Uluru, from above. ullstein bild | ullstein bild | Getty Images

Getting out at night

A lot of time and energy goes into seeing Uluru at sunrise or sunset. But here, darkness doesn’t always signal sleep. Photo buffs can learn the art of astrophotography from award-winning photographers. And, a four-night workshop gives after-hours access to the park.

After dark, learn the art of astrophotography at Uluru Kata Tjuta National Park. swissmediavision | iStock Unreleased | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: sue white, monica buchanan pitrelli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tjuta, getty, national, legs, art, rock, australias, walk, visitors, park, things, climb, uluru, monolith


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Discovery Channel founder gives VIP tour of his $279 million ranch

Discovery Channel founder gives VIP tour of his $279 million ranchThe 8,000 acre Colorado mega-ranch of Discovery Channel founder John Hendricks has ancient red rock formations, lush canyons, and a river that runs through it.


Discovery Channel founder gives VIP tour of his $279 million ranchThe 8,000 acre Colorado mega-ranch of Discovery Channel founder John Hendricks has ancient red rock formations, lush canyons, and a river that runs through it.
Discovery Channel founder gives VIP tour of his $279 million ranch Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, channel, vip, founder, river, gives, million, ranchthe, 279, discovery, red, ranch, tour, runs, rock


Discovery Channel founder gives VIP tour of his $279 million ranch

Discovery Channel founder gives VIP tour of his $279 million ranch

The 8,000 acre Colorado mega-ranch of Discovery Channel founder John Hendricks has ancient red rock formations, lush canyons, and a river that runs through it.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, channel, vip, founder, river, gives, million, ranchthe, 279, discovery, red, ranch, tour, runs, rock


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Convicted pedophile Gary Glitter will not receive music royalties from ‘Joker,’ report says

The rights holders to music by convicted pedophile Gary Glitter have reportedly said that the disgraced former glam rock star will not receive any royalties after one of his songs was featured in the box-office hit “Joker.” The contentious inclusion of “Rock and Roll Part 2” in the R-rated comic book film had sparked an intense backlash from moviegoers, with many concerned about the prospect of Glitter receiving lucrative music royalties. Speaking to the LA Times in an interview published Friday


The rights holders to music by convicted pedophile Gary Glitter have reportedly said that the disgraced former glam rock star will not receive any royalties after one of his songs was featured in the box-office hit “Joker.” The contentious inclusion of “Rock and Roll Part 2” in the R-rated comic book film had sparked an intense backlash from moviegoers, with many concerned about the prospect of Glitter receiving lucrative music royalties. Speaking to the LA Times in an interview published Friday
Convicted pedophile Gary Glitter will not receive music royalties from ‘Joker,’ report says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, times, rock, report, jailed, gary, songs, publishing, receive, pedophile, joker, convicted, group, music, royalties, glitter, umpg


Convicted pedophile Gary Glitter will not receive music royalties from 'Joker,' report says

The rights holders to music by convicted pedophile Gary Glitter have reportedly said that the disgraced former glam rock star will not receive any royalties after one of his songs was featured in the box-office hit “Joker.”

The contentious inclusion of “Rock and Roll Part 2” in the R-rated comic book film had sparked an intense backlash from moviegoers, with many concerned about the prospect of Glitter receiving lucrative music royalties.

Glitter, whose real name is Paul Gadd, was jailed for a total of 16 years in 2015 for attempted rape, four counts of indecent assault and one count of having sex with a girl under 13. All six offenses were committed in the 1970s and 1980s. He was first jailed in 1999 when he admitted to possessing images of child abuse.

Speaking to the LA Times in an interview published Friday, the label Snapper Music, which owns Glitter’s songs, said that the 75-year old “does not get paid — we’ve had no contact with him.”

In the same report, Universal Music Publishing Group (UMPG) also said it was not paying music royalties to Glitter.

“Gary Glitter’s publishing interest in the copyright of his songs is owned by UMPG and other parties, therefore UMPG does not pay him any royalties or other considerations,” the LA Times reported, citing a representative from the publishing group.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, times, rock, report, jailed, gary, songs, publishing, receive, pedophile, joker, convicted, group, music, royalties, glitter, umpg


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Watch this $3.2M pink rock go into ‘surgery’ to make it worth millions more


Watch this $3.2M pink rock go into ‘surgery’ to make it worth millions more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worth, pink, watch, rock, millions, 32m, surgery


Watch this $3.2M pink rock go into 'surgery' to make it worth millions more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worth, pink, watch, rock, millions, 32m, surgery


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This $3.2 million diamond is having ‘surgery’ to be more pink—if it survives, it could double in value

Side-view of the 5-carat pink diamond the Wests will re-polish in ‘diamond surgery.’ Workstation where a master diamond cutter will re-polish the 5-carat pink diamond worth millions. A tiny spark flashes during the cutting process of this 5-carat pink diamond valued at $3.2 Million. West diamonds inspects the 5-carat pink diamond after its ‘diamond surgery’ is complete. Front-view of the newly re-cut 5-carat pink diamond now graded as a fancy intense pink diamond valued around $7 Million.


Side-view of the 5-carat pink diamond the Wests will re-polish in ‘diamond surgery.’ Workstation where a master diamond cutter will re-polish the 5-carat pink diamond worth millions. A tiny spark flashes during the cutting process of this 5-carat pink diamond valued at $3.2 Million. West diamonds inspects the 5-carat pink diamond after its ‘diamond surgery’ is complete. Front-view of the newly re-cut 5-carat pink diamond now graded as a fancy intense pink diamond valued around $7 Million.
This $3.2 million diamond is having ‘surgery’ to be more pink—if it survives, it could double in value Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: erica wright ray parisi, erica wright, ray parisi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, diamonds, pinkif, diamond, scott, 5carat, survives, million, double, pink, rock, having, wheel, stone, west, surgery, color, value


This $3.2 million diamond is having 'surgery' to be more pink—if it survives, it could double in value

I’d never heard of a diamond going into “surgery,” so when I was invited to watch a massive 5-carat pink diamond worth $3.2 million go under the knife (aka, diamond cutting wheel), I was more than a little curious. “One wrong move and the stone could just shatter, then millions of dollars right down the drain,” Scott West tells me as he looks at a bright pink diamond in the palm of his hand.

Scott West of L.J. West Diamonds holds a rare, 5-carat pink diamond in his hand. CNBC

The thought of shattering such a perfect gem makes me cringe, but Scott West knows what he’s doing. He and his dad, Larry West, are the father-son duo who run L.J. West Diamonds, a wholesale diamond house in New York City that’s been around for 41 years. The Wests are known as “diamantaires” in the industry, experts whose primary business is sourcing and cutting rare colored diamonds.

Larry and Scott West of L.J. West Diamonds inspecting their latest acquisition through a jeweler’s loupe. CNBC

First a little back story on their pink rock… “We purchased it at auction for $3.2 million, but we see the potential to add millions to its value,” says Scott.

Front-view of the massive, 5-carat fancy pink diamond Scott and Larry West will attempt to re-cut to increase its value. CNBC

When Scott and his dad shelled out all that cash, they were drawn to the rock because they knew they could unlock more value in the stone by cutting it. In fact, they specialize in cutting and shaving colored diamonds in ways that improve cut, clarity, and color. In essence, a new shape can help a stone better reflect light, which can enhance or magnify a diamond’s natural hue. In this case, they believe they can reshape this exotic pink rock to make it even more pink. They do it because a more intense pink color will make it even more valuable. Scott says it’s pretty simple, “The more color the stone has, the more valuable it is.” How much more valuable? Scott tells me, “If we are successful, we can double the stone’s value overnight.” So with this rock we’re talking going from $3.2 million to some where north of $6 million.

The 5-carat pink diamond must be visually inspected by a microscope to check for any imperfections. CNBC

Operation pink

The Wests say they confirmed through computer modeling that some tweaks to the stone’s shape would make it better reflect light and pump up its pink hue — and that price-tag. During the operation, they plan to remove a few micro millimeters from key points around the rock and shave the angle of a few facets. The diamond’s 5-carat weight is big part of the reason it’s worth so much money, so they want to get this done by removing as little weight from the stone as possible.

One wrong move and the stone could just shatter, then millions of dollars right down the drain. Scott West L.J. West Diamonds partner and V.P.

And since diamonds are one of the hardest materials in the world, instead of a scalpel, the tool in this surgery is a steel polishing wheel coated with diamond dust that spins anywhere from 350 to 600 RPMs. When you touch a diamond to the spinning wheel, in a split second it can shave micro millimeters from a facet. In the diamond business this delicate surgery is called “re-polishing.” The risk is, if you apply too much pressure to the diamond or hold it at the wrong angle on the wheel, it could destroy the stone.

Side-view of the 5-carat pink diamond the Wests will re-polish in ‘diamond surgery.’ CNBC

“We had a 20-carat yellow diamond that ‘busted on the wheel’ we call it… it went from $600,000 to $100,000 – just like that, it’s the unlucky lotto,” says Scott.

Inside the diamond OR

This delicate procedure is rarely seen outside the industry and this is the first time L.J. West Diamonds is allowing cameras inside the “operating room.” “When you re-polish these stones, it can be very nerve-wracking…but you have to go for it,” Scott says. We take an elevator three floors up from the L.J. West offices to an area called the gem-polishing room. It’s a high-security area that requires us to be swiped in with a digital key and enter through two sets of security doors, where finally someone unlocks it and lets us through.

Workstation where a master diamond cutter will re-polish the 5-carat pink diamond worth millions. CNBC

We enter a small, magenta-painted room with five diamond cutting stations. The air is thick, filled with microscopic particles of diamond dust and it smells kind of smoky. The guys sitting at these stations are called master diamond cutters. In order to reach this master level of diamond cutting, some of these craftsmen must practice for over 10 years with white diamonds before they acquire skills and patience needed to handle even rarer colored diamonds. Scott takes the pink diamond he’s carrying over to a man dressed in a navy blue button-down shirt that reminds me of something a wood shop worker would wear. His hands are covered in dust. Scott tells me he’s one of the best diamond “surgeons” in America, but there are ground rules: I can’t use his name in my reporting and our cameras can never be pointed at his face. (People who work in the diamond industry generally like to be discrete about their access to multi-million dollar diamonds so they don’t become targets.)

The 5-carat pink diamond is set into a clamp the master diamond cutter will run along the polishing wheel. CNBC

The mysterious diamond master asks if we’re ready, and I nudge my camera guy to make sure he’s rolling. This guy’s about to increase the value of this diamond by millions of dollars — or destroy it.

This polishing wheel made of steel and coated with diamond dust is used to shave down micro millimeters of the pink diamond stone. CNBC

I hold my breath as he brings the stone closer to the spinning wheel and Scott’s holding his breath too.

A tiny spark flashes during the cutting process of this 5-carat pink diamond valued at $3.2 Million. CNBC

When the rock hits the wheel and the first spin chews into the stone, the sound is jarring. It’s a lot like the terrible buzz you hear when having a cavity drilled by the dentist, only this is 10 times louder. Scott’s got $3.2 million on the line, so his eyes are glued to the wheel. After about 30 minutes of spinning, checking facets and weighing the diamond on a scale, the diamond master says he’s done for the day. Scott tells me it’s too dangerous to do too much cutting in a single sitting, instead they pause because they don’t want to over cut the stone and must let the “excited” stone relax: The speed of the wheel and grinding the stone against it causes the diamond to heat up and intensify the color. This color increase is often temporary, so Larry and Scott need to give this pink diamond time to cool down and rest while they re-evaluate the techniques they’ll use to finish up the job.

The master diamond cutter holds the stone as he inspects the color post cutting. CNBC

In fact, the re-polishing process for this rock unfolds over more than 10 sessions and two weeks. In total, this diamond spends about six hours in the “operating room.”

Larry West of L.J. West diamonds inspects the 5-carat pink diamond after its ‘diamond surgery’ is complete. CNBC

Seeing pink

I visit the Wests on the final day of surgery and when I see the stone, I honestly can’t tell any difference. The Wests explain it takes an expert eye to see it. Larry West whips out his jeweler’s loupe, a small magnifying glass experts use in the business, to closely examine the newly shaped stone and announces, “Well, Scott I think you did the trick.”

Side-by-side comparison of the 5-carat pink diamond that underwent ‘diamond surgery,’ the average person may not be able to discern the difference in color. CNBC

But before the Wests can pop the champagne, they need to ship the rock to the Gemological Institute of America (GIA), the institute that officially classifies gems by color and clarity on the industry’s standardized diamond grading scale. Experts at the GIA will assess the rock to determine if the operation has really made the rock any more pink.

The GIA lab report shows the upgrade in color for this 5-carat fancy intense pink diamond. CNBC

Two-weeks later, the GIA ships the rock back with the verdict, and Scott is thrilled, “We got the upgrade — from fancy pink to fancy intense pink.” That means the surgery was a success and the diamond’s color is now a more “intense” pink than it was before. Amping up the pink moves the rock into an even smaller group of rare pink diamonds — and that boosts its value by a lot. “Because it did so well, the stone is now worth over $7 million… it was a total home run,” explains Scott. Experts say this pink diamond has definitely increased in value by the millions, but it remains to be seen if L.J. West will find a buyer to pay $7 million for the diamond. The increase in value is a big boost, but the Wests decline to share how it compares to what they have made off past stones.

Front-view of the newly re-cut 5-carat pink diamond now graded as a fancy intense pink diamond valued around $7 Million. CNBC

The Wests have since set the seven-figure diamond into a platinum ring flanked by two white diamonds. They plan to take it on a tour to several V.I.P. events this fall where they believe they’ll find a client who will “fall in love with it” and write them a big check to take it home.

The 5-carat fancy intense pink diamond set in a plaitnum ring with white side stones. CNBC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: erica wright ray parisi, erica wright, ray parisi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, diamonds, pinkif, diamond, scott, 5carat, survives, million, double, pink, rock, having, wheel, stone, west, surgery, color, value


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Ray Dalio’s Beatles-inspired routine for success

Billionaire hedge fund manager Ray Dalio is widely considered a rock star of the investing world. Ray Dalio, founder of investment firm Bridgewater Associates. It works because it brings you into your subconscious mind and it gives one an equanimity. “It works because it brings you into your subconscious mind and it gives one an equanimity. Don’t miss: Billionaire Ray Dalio says this is how to be ‘truly successful’ Like this story?


Billionaire hedge fund manager Ray Dalio is widely considered a rock star of the investing world. Ray Dalio, founder of investment firm Bridgewater Associates. It works because it brings you into your subconscious mind and it gives one an equanimity. “It works because it brings you into your subconscious mind and it gives one an equanimity. Don’t miss: Billionaire Ray Dalio says this is how to be ‘truly successful’ Like this story?
Ray Dalio’s Beatles-inspired routine for success Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, routine, bridgewater, meditation, mind, practice, beatlesinspired, works, dalios, subconscious, success, dalio, hedge, rock, ray


Ray Dalio's Beatles-inspired routine for success

Billionaire hedge fund manager Ray Dalio is widely considered a rock star of the investing world. But the source of his success has a lot to do with superstars of another sort: The Beatles. Dalio was in his early twenties when he was inspired by the famous foursome to take up a new skill: Meditation. Today, half a century on, it remains a constant of his daily routine, and one to which he attributes his greatest career wins.

Ray Dalio, founder of investment firm Bridgewater Associates. J. Countess | Getty Images

“It was life changing,” Dalio, now 70, told CNBC’s Christine Tan in a recent episode of “Managing Asia.” The English rock band popularized a silent form of meditation — known as Transcendental Meditation — in 1968, following a two-month trip to India. The practice, developed by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, involves the use of a mantra, such as “OM,” to reach a state of subconsciousness. Dalio, over the course of his five-decade career, has practiced the technique twice a day, once in the morning and once in the evening, for 20 minutes each.

It works because it brings you into your subconscious mind and it gives one an equanimity. Ray Dalio founder of Bridgewater Associates

That has helped him cope with the ups and downs of running the world’s largest hedge fund, Bridgewater Associates, the company he founded in 1975, he said. That includes the near-collapse of the business in 1982 when Dalio mistakenly bet on the next financial downturn — a moment he has described as “painfully humbling.” “It works because it brings you into your subconscious mind and it gives one an equanimity. In other words, a centered-ness, a calm centered-ness in the middle of a storm,” Dalio explained. The practice also provides an opportunity for creative thinking away from life’s daily distractions, which Dalio said has been vital for his personal development. “It’s like if you take a hot shower and the ideas come to you,” he said. “That ability to reflect well and to be above those things that you’re operating so you can navigate them well is a real great thing to have.” Don’t miss: Billionaire Ray Dalio says this is how to be ‘truly successful’ Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, routine, bridgewater, meditation, mind, practice, beatlesinspired, works, dalios, subconscious, success, dalio, hedge, rock, ray


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Possible BOE rate cuts depend on Brexit, say PIIE

Possible BOE rate cuts depend on Brexit, say PIIE16 Hours AgoNicolas Véron of the Peterson Institute for International Economics says the Bank of England is between “a rock and a hard place.” He also says the BOE doesn’t have a “standard no-deal scenario” for Brexit that it can build policy on.


Possible BOE rate cuts depend on Brexit, say PIIE16 Hours AgoNicolas Véron of the Peterson Institute for International Economics says the Bank of England is between “a rock and a hard place.” He also says the BOE doesn’t have a “standard no-deal scenario” for Brexit that it can build policy on.
Possible BOE rate cuts depend on Brexit, say PIIE Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-02
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rate, cuts, say, possible, vron, boe, standard, policy, scenario, depend, piie, rock, brexit


Possible BOE rate cuts depend on Brexit, say PIIE

Possible BOE rate cuts depend on Brexit, say PIIE

16 Hours Ago

Nicolas Véron of the Peterson Institute for International Economics says the Bank of England is between “a rock and a hard place.” He also says the BOE doesn’t have a “standard no-deal scenario” for Brexit that it can build policy on.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-02
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rate, cuts, say, possible, vron, boe, standard, policy, scenario, depend, piie, rock, brexit


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US activist investors’ aggressive strategies are starting to force change in Europe

Wall Street’s top activist investors are taking on an increasing prominence in Europe, with over $82 billion of capital now invested by shareholders publicly trying to force change in companies. Activist investors are individuals or groups that purchase substantial amounts of shares of a public company in an attempt to obtain seats on the board and impact significant change in how it operates. A recent example of activist success in Europe came on Monday in the form of a proposed merger between


Wall Street’s top activist investors are taking on an increasing prominence in Europe, with over $82 billion of capital now invested by shareholders publicly trying to force change in companies. Activist investors are individuals or groups that purchase substantial amounts of shares of a public company in an attempt to obtain seats on the board and impact significant change in how it operates. A recent example of activist success in Europe came on Monday in the form of a proposed merger between
US activist investors’ aggressive strategies are starting to force change in Europe Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-30  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rock, cat, europe, wall, investors, aggressive, capital, billion, eat, strategies, starting, quite, takeawaycom, force, activist, shareholders, change


US activist investors' aggressive strategies are starting to force change in Europe

Wall Street’s top activist investors are taking on an increasing prominence in Europe, with over $82 billion of capital now invested by shareholders publicly trying to force change in companies.

Activist investors are individuals or groups that purchase substantial amounts of shares of a public company in an attempt to obtain seats on the board and impact significant change in how it operates.

While the likes of hedge fund executives Bill Ackman, Carl Icahn and Paul Singer have long been household names on Wall Street, European corporations are now feeling the pressure from the expansion of stateside activist players.

A recent example of activist success in Europe came on Monday in the form of a proposed merger between Just Eat and Takeaway.com to form a £9 billion ($10 billion) food delivery giant.

Connecticut-based activist fund Cat Rock Capital owns a 2.5% stake in Just Eat and 4% of Takeaway.com, and has publicly banged the drum for Just Eat to pursue a merger with a rival for quite some time.

Alex Captain, founder and managing partner of Cat Rock Capital, said in a statement on Monday that the Just Eat board’s “clear and decisive action” would allow “long-term shareholders to participate meaningfully in future value creation.”

AJ Bell Investment Director Russ Mould said in a note on Monday that “it remains to be seen if Cat Rock can take all the credit for the strategic development, yet it seems to have had a major influence,” adding that this was “quite remarkable” considering its relatively small stake.

“It goes to show that activists are increasingly powerful and that putting pressure on a business in the public domain can often achieve results fairly quickly,” Mould added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-30  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rock, cat, europe, wall, investors, aggressive, capital, billion, eat, strategies, starting, quite, takeawaycom, force, activist, shareholders, change


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Powell will try not to draw ire of Trump or rock markets after Fed meeting Wednesday

The Fed is not expected to announce any change in interest rate policy, when it issues its statement at 2 p.m. If it were hawkish, the Fed would be leaning toward raising interest rates, and if it were dovish, it would be leaning toward easing policy and cutting interest rates. He also said the Fed should cut rates by a percentage point and use quantitative easing, a financial crisis policy tool. If they don’t mean they’re going to cut rates because of it, why harp on it? The Fed may also make a


The Fed is not expected to announce any change in interest rate policy, when it issues its statement at 2 p.m. If it were hawkish, the Fed would be leaning toward raising interest rates, and if it were dovish, it would be leaning toward easing policy and cutting interest rates. He also said the Fed should cut rates by a percentage point and use quantitative easing, a financial crisis policy tool. If they don’t mean they’re going to cut rates because of it, why harp on it? The Fed may also make a
Powell will try not to draw ire of Trump or rock markets after Fed meeting Wednesday Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, interest, rock, going, dovish, draw, trump, powell, ire, fed, rate, markets, try, meeting, rates, cut, inflation


Powell will try not to draw ire of Trump or rock markets after Fed meeting Wednesday

Jerome Powell, chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve, speaks during a news conference following a Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meeting in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, March 20, 2019.

Fed Chairman Jerome Powell has a tough job ahead of him, as he will have to avoid ruffling both markets and the White House during his briefing Wednesday.

Fed watchers say the chairman will have to walk a fine line, so as not tilt too hawkish, which could unnerve markets and draw the ire of President Donald Trump. Trump launched a new Twitter attack on the Fed as it met on Tuesday, calling for a 1 percentage point rate hike and a return to quantitative easing.

The Fed chair will also want to avoid sounding too dovish, due to the strength of the economy and the fact financial conditions have improved considerably in the last several months. The Fed is not expected to announce any change in interest rate policy, when it issues its statement at 2 p.m. ET, though it may mention that the economy has improved and inflation has weakened.

“If [Powell] does his job, it’s going to be a nonevent,” said Joseph LaVorgna, Natixis chief economist for the Americas.

“The reason they won’t be too dovish is because the equity market is at a record high. However, the strength in the dollar combined with weak inflation is not going to make them hawkish either,” he said.

Fed policy is currently somewhere in the middle, since the Fed has paused its rate hiking and is watching the economic data before it makes any further moves. If it were hawkish, the Fed would be leaning toward raising interest rates, and if it were dovish, it would be leaning toward easing policy and cutting interest rates.

“The Fed needs to stay firmly on the sidelines without spooking financial markets. They can’t come to a consensus soon enough on what they are going to do if inflation doesn’t pick up in the months to come. They are walking a tight rope between wanting a warmer economy and being justifiably concerned about how low rates are stoking bubbles,” notes Grant Thornton chief economist Diane Swonk.

She expects that Powell’s comments will be well prepared and to the point. “Shorter is better. [He] needs to stay out of the target range of the administration. He will not answer questions [about the] Fed nominee,” Swonk added. Currently, Stephen Moore is a Trump nominee for the Fed, after Herman Cain withdrew.

Trump ramped up his criticism of the Fed Tuesday when he fired off a tweet that said how great China’s stimulus program has been, compared to the U.S. He also said the Fed should cut rates by a percentage point and use quantitative easing, a financial crisis policy tool.

“To call for a 1% cut and resumption of QE, those moves by the Fed would be consistent with a massive financial crisis rather than the current economic state,” said Jon Hill, U.S. rate strategist at BMO. “It just seems like political posturing ahead of the decision where it’s a foregone conclusion that the Fed’s not cutting or raising rates tomorrow.”

Hill said the Fed officials will be careful not to sound too dovish because of both the record-high stock market and the desire to stress their independence and not seem like they can be influenced by Trump’s demand for easier policy.

Yet, behind closed doors, the Fed is likely to be discussing a very dovish move, or the idea of using interest rate cuts as a type of insurance against an economic downturn. But it is not likely to mention the idea in its statement and Powell will not endorse it if questioned about it.

“There has been chatter from Fed members [Chicago Fed President] Charlie Evans and [Vice Chairman] Rich Clarida and some writers that the Fed should consider ‘insurance’ rate cuts ala 1995 and 1998 as lower inflation gives them cover,” notes Peter Boockvar, chief investment officer at Bleakley Advisory Group.

Fed watchers say the Fed is not going to signal any change in policy yet, but may want to have the option of moving interest rates in either direction.

“I think they want to sound even-keeled. The problem they run into is if they keep harping on low inflation it’s going to sound really dovish. This is where it comes back to bite them if that’s not really what they mean. If they don’t mean they’re going to cut rates because of it, why harp on it? He’s going to have to balance what he says,” said Boockvar.

A big topic of interest Wednesday will be how the Fed addresses low inflation, with PCE inflation reported at about 1.5% in March. PCE is the inflation measure watched by the Fed, though CPI inflation has been running higher.

The Fed plans to review how it considers inflation, currently targeted at 2%, so any comments on inflation could be potentially market moving.

The Fed may also make a technical cut to the interest rate on excess reserves, reducing it by about 5 basis points to bring down the fed funds rate.

Citigroup currency strategists said the Fed could make the ‘technical adjustment,’ given that the effective fed funds rate has been moving towards the upper end of the Fed’s target range.

“The upward drift may well be temporary and related to tax payments and the Fed could easily wait to cut later (including outside of FOMC meetings). We have little visibility on the likelihood of a cut to IOER, but in recent history, the Powell Fed has decided to make a change when there was no strong reason to wait, so our weak base case is that the IOER cut takes place at this meeting. Even though this is meant to be a technical adjustment, the Fed will be aware that such a cut in the present environment would have some symbolic significance,” the strategists wrote.

The Fed may also release some more information on its balance sheet and the type of securities it intends to hold, when it ends its wind down program.

Boockvar said Trump should be careful what he wishes for when it comes to Fed policy.

“What Trump is tweeting about…if excessively low rates, even below zero rates, and a lot of QE was this magical elixir, then the Japanese and European economies would be booming right now instead of barely growing,” said Boockvar.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, interest, rock, going, dovish, draw, trump, powell, ire, fed, rate, markets, try, meeting, rates, cut, inflation


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