This is the worst salary negotiating tactic I’ve ever seen—after 20 years of interviewing

Simply put, it is the worst strategy to use during a salary negotiation. …niceness that crosses the line into phoniness is a major red flag in both interviewing and negotiating. But niceness that crosses the line into phoniness is a major red flag in both interviewing and negotiating. So how do you improve your negotiation strategy? When it comes to negotiating a salary with your current or future boss, it’s both!


Simply put, it is the worst strategy to use during a salary negotiation.
…niceness that crosses the line into phoniness is a major red flag in both interviewing and negotiating.
But niceness that crosses the line into phoniness is a major red flag in both interviewing and negotiating.
So how do you improve your negotiation strategy?
When it comes to negotiating a salary with your current or future boss, it’s both!
This is the worst salary negotiating tactic I’ve ever seen—after 20 years of interviewing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: gary burnison
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, negotiating, youre, salary, agreeable, comes, seenafter, negotiation, value, tactic, work, ive, nice, interviewing, strategy, worst, line


This is the worst salary negotiating tactic I've ever seen—after 20 years of interviewing

The candidate stepped into my office carrying, of all things, a fruit basket. It was the final round of interviews and meeting me was part of it. As the candidate talked about his eagerness to join the firm, I kept waiting for some explanation — some story — that would make sense of the half dozen apples, four pears, and three oranges sitting in on my desk. A family orchard, perhaps? Some point he wanted to make? Nope. It was just his way of being nice — and it felt manipulative. When most people think of “nice,” they think of being pleasant and likable. But when it’s camouflaged to disguise weaknesses and shortcomings, then it’s just ingratiating and placating. It’s a ploy, and it feels insulting. Simply put, it is the worst strategy to use during a salary negotiation. Of course, no one wants to deal with a jerk — someone who comes in “hot” with unreasonable demands, as if arrogance is a strategy. But it’s just as problematic when people believe being nice will land them a better deal.

It doesn’t always pay to play nice

According to new research from Harvard University, being too nice in a negotiation can backfire — and after more than 20 years of interviewing and hiring, I couldn’t agree more. Across four experiments, and with more than 1,500 participants, researchers tested the economic and interpersonal implications of different negotiation strategies.

…niceness that crosses the line into phoniness is a major red flag in both interviewing and negotiating.

They found that negotiators with a tough and firm communication style achieved better outcomes than those who were warm and friendly. “Negotiators should recognize that being nice may make it more difficult to claim a lot of value,” the study’s authors wrote in a Harvard Business Review article. Of course, the goal is to get what you want and walk away with your relationship intact. But niceness that crosses the line into phoniness is a major red flag in both interviewing and negotiating. So how do you improve your negotiation strategy? If you can master the five rules below, then it won’t matter if you’re naughty or nice: 1. Don’t be too agreeable. Someone who only nods and says “yes” without countering on anything comes across as naive or, even worse, desperate. Whenever I meet candidates who are too agreeable, I can’t help but wonder: Are they completely out of options? Does this unwillingness to engage in the give-and-take signal how they’ll interact with customers and vendors? Collective genius comes from constructive conflict — when the deeper questions get asked and explored. And often, an overly agreeable person won’t engage in that process. For all these reasons, a smiley face isn’t going to tip the balance for you. Negotiation is all about leverage and the value you bring to an organization. 2. Work together. With all due respect to “The Godfather,” Michael Corleone was wrong when he declared: “It’s not personal, it’s strictly business.” When it comes to negotiating a salary with your current or future boss, it’s both! I’ve seen it all: Shouting matches, uncontrollable sobbing, storming out. Even if it works and you end up reaching a deal, you’ll still need to work together once you’re officially part of the company. And people — your boss, especially — will never forgot how you acted during the negotiation. The bottom line? Work together and be professional. Do it in a way that acknowledges you’re both on the same side of the table. 3. Have a value mindset. You’ll never have as much leverage as you do when an employer makes you an offer. It means you have best and most essential skills compared to all the other candidates who interviewed for the job — and that the leaders really want you to join the team. So focus on the value you bring to helping the company achieve its goals. Doing so can keep you from coming off as arrogant or greedy, and it will prevent you from underselling yourself.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: gary burnison
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, negotiating, youre, salary, agreeable, comes, seenafter, negotiation, value, tactic, work, ive, nice, interviewing, strategy, worst, line


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66% of US workers would move abroad for a better-paying job—here’s where they’d go

Higher pay would be the biggest motivator for Americans to work abroad, according to the survey. Slightly fewer U.S. workers would emigrate if it meant improving their work-life balance in a different country (64%) or to search for a more meaningful career (58%). Companies with global offices may want to offer workers more opportunities to transfer abroad, Chavez suggests, which could improve employee recruitment and retention. As the Randstad survey suggests, the appetite for working abroad is


Higher pay would be the biggest motivator for Americans to work abroad, according to the survey.
Slightly fewer U.S. workers would emigrate if it meant improving their work-life balance in a different country (64%) or to search for a more meaningful career (58%).
Companies with global offices may want to offer workers more opportunities to transfer abroad, Chavez suggests, which could improve employee recruitment and retention.
As the Randstad survey suggests, the appetite for working abroad is
66% of US workers would move abroad for a better-paying job—here’s where they’d go Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-09  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jobheres, theyd, countries, survey, randstad, salary, balance, betterpaying, work, chavez, worklife, workers, abroad


66% of US workers would move abroad for a better-paying job—here's where they'd go

The opportunity to move abroad for work doesn’t present itself every day, but for the majority of Americans, they’d take it if it meant earning more money.

The latest Randstad Workmonitor Mobility Index found 66% of U.S. workers would move abroad for a substantially higher salary, a share that slightly edges out the 59% of workers around the world outside the U.S. who’d do the same. (The survey doesn’t define what constitutes a “substantially higher salary” in its questioning.)

Higher pay would be the biggest motivator for Americans to work abroad, according to the survey. Slightly fewer U.S. workers would emigrate if it meant improving their work-life balance in a different country (64%) or to search for a more meaningful career (58%). And just about half would leave the country if moving abroad was the only way to hold onto their current job.

Jodi Chavez is group president for professional staffing at Randstad U.S. She tells CNBC Make It that these findings could indicate the need for U.S. companies to get more competitive with pay and benefits.

“Part of what this says is, while the talent shortage is very much alive in the U.S., workers have not seen the increase in salary they would like to see, and they are willing to move abroad to work globally and also improve their overall wellbeing,” she says.

Workers who move abroad for stronger earning power might be onto something. HSBC’s latest expat survey showed the average 18 to 34-year-old’s salary rose 35% after relocating overseas, from $40,358 to $54,484. In some markets, earning potential rose by as much as 51%.

American workers most want to work in the U.K., Canada and Australia, the survey finds. A lack of language barrier is one reason why, and Chavez says U.S. workers may be more likely to have family members in these countries to provide the beginnings of a social safety net in a new environment.

The potential for better work-life balance is also a major draw.

“Some other countries have strict work-life balance policies that tend to favor employees,” Chavez says. Most full-time workers in the U.K. are entitled to 28 days of paid holiday leave, for example, and the Canadian government provides employment policies and benefits for parental leave and caregiving leave.

“What U.S. employers can do is to learn from some of these other countries and figure out the best way to still be highly productive and successful, but also incorporate some of those desired work-life balanced schedules that are attractive to today’s U.S. workforce,” Chavez says.

However, employers may take comfort in knowing the U.S. is the No. 1 choice for people around the world to move to for work, if given the opportunity. Randstad’s survey found 28% of international employees want to work in the U.S. most, above Germany (25%) and Australia (22%).

While global workers might not find as many policies that enable better work-life balance, they’re often drawn to the potential for higher pay and opportunities for innovation, Chavez says. She points to the number of growing companies, especially within tech, that may be attractive to non-U.S. workers who can help bridge the skills gap and contribute to new products and ideas.

Companies with global offices may want to offer workers more opportunities to transfer abroad, Chavez suggests, which could improve employee recruitment and retention.

This kind of flexibility could also increase job satisfaction. A recent MetLife survey found more expat workers were happy with their jobs compared with those who stay local.

As the Randstad survey suggests, the appetite for working abroad is there. Advances in technology that enable global connectivity and raise visibility of life abroad plays a huge part, and Chavez says workers are jumping at the possibilities.

“It’s a fascinating place to be,” she says. “Millennials and gen Z are interested in expanding beyond what’s in front of them — their city, their country — and the ability to think beyond borders in a career and life perspective is an exciting opportunity.”

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Don’t miss: These are the best countries to move to if you want to work abroad


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-09  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jobheres, theyd, countries, survey, randstad, salary, balance, betterpaying, work, chavez, worklife, workers, abroad


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These industries have the highest share of open jobs—here’s how much they pay

In certain industries, the number of open jobs is especially pronounced. A recent analysis from Indeed uses Bureau of Labor Statistics data to find the industries having the hardest time filling open roles. Fields feeling the biggest crunch are education and health care, the results show. A shortage of health care workers could continue to worsen as the share of the aging baby boomer population grows, while health care workers also retire out of their professions. These are the industries having


In certain industries, the number of open jobs is especially pronounced.
A recent analysis from Indeed uses Bureau of Labor Statistics data to find the industries having the hardest time filling open roles.
Fields feeling the biggest crunch are education and health care, the results show.
A shortage of health care workers could continue to worsen as the share of the aging baby boomer population grows, while health care workers also retire out of their professions.
These are the industries having
These industries have the highest share of open jobs—here’s how much they pay Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, open, median, workers, highest, jobs, teachers, share, salary, health, care, industries, jobsheres, pay


These industries have the highest share of open jobs—here's how much they pay

According to Labor Department figures, 5.8 million people looked for work in October and had their pick among 7.02 million job vacancies.

In certain industries, the number of open jobs is especially pronounced.

A recent analysis from Indeed uses Bureau of Labor Statistics data to find the industries having the hardest time filling open roles. In the report, the jobs site calculates how many hires were made for every 100 job openings in a given sector, averaged over April, May and June of this year.

Fields feeling the biggest crunch are education and health care, the results show. Within these areas, just over half, or 53, of every 100 positions were filled in a month’s time.

Though very different lines of work, both educators and health-care professionals often face long hours and demanding work conditions.

BLS data finds school teachers earn a median annual salary around $58,000 to $60,000, compared with the national median wage of $38,646 per year. However, median stats can paint a broad picture: The bottom 10% of teachers, on the other hand, earn less than $40,000 annually. Issues of low pay, long hours, overcrowded classrooms and stretched resources fueled the latest teachers’ strike in Chicago, which is just one example of the financial challenges teachers across the United States face.

Health-care workers may be in tight demand given the highly specialized training the field requires. Sometimes, this translates to generous paychecks: Physicians, pharmacists and dentists are some of the highest-paid jobs in the U.S. High pay could mean professionals within this space are happy with their compensation and aren’t looking to change jobs, leaving open roles to sit vacant.

In other cases, however, as with home health or personal care aides, round-the-clock schedules are met with median annual wages around $24,000 despite a surge in demand. Home health care has grown by 150% to nearly 2.3 million workers in the past 10 years, according to The New York Times. A shortage of health care workers could continue to worsen as the share of the aging baby boomer population grows, while health care workers also retire out of their professions.

Other industries with high shares of vacancies include financial services, manufacturing, transportation and warehousing.

These types of jobs tend to require less specialization and may command a lower salary. However, Indeed economist Nick Bunker tells CNBC Make It that the research shows employers may have an easier time filling open roles if they raised wages. Even if salary is capped within a certain role, the report suggests companies may want to offer other benefits — professional development courses, investment in training, perks that encourage better work-life balance — to fill the employment gap.

For some workers, this news could provide guidance if a career change is on the table.

“If you’re up for changing careers, there are signs showing us that health care is a strong field — it’s a good opportunity now and in the future,” Bunker says in the report.

These are the industries having the hardest time filling open jobs, plus what they pay, according to BLS data.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, open, median, workers, highest, jobs, teachers, share, salary, health, care, industries, jobsheres, pay


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This millennial paid off $102,000 in student loans in 6 years after starting with a $40,000 salary

Mandy Velez graduated from the University of Pittsburgh in 2013 with more than $75,000 in student loans. Velez, 28, had taken out a total of five loans ranging from $7,500 to more than $32,000 with interest rates between 6% and 11.75%. She calculated that if she only made the minimum monthly payment of $300, it would take her until 2046 to pay off her student loans and cost an extra $96,000 in interest. Subtract New York City rent, along with living expenses, and she would not have much spare mo


Mandy Velez graduated from the University of Pittsburgh in 2013 with more than $75,000 in student loans.
Velez, 28, had taken out a total of five loans ranging from $7,500 to more than $32,000 with interest rates between 6% and 11.75%.
She calculated that if she only made the minimum monthly payment of $300, it would take her until 2046 to pay off her student loans and cost an extra $96,000 in interest.
Subtract New York City rent, along with living expenses, and she would not have much spare mo
This millennial paid off $102,000 in student loans in 6 years after starting with a $40,000 salary Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-05  Authors: robert exley jr, patrick b healey, founder, president of caliber financial partners, joseph bartholomew
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 102000, 40000, vacation, worlds, student, velez, ventures, loans, starting, used, paid, york, video, pay, millennial, salary


This millennial paid off $102,000 in student loans in 6 years after starting with a $40,000 salary

Mandy Velez graduated from the University of Pittsburgh in 2013 with more than $75,000 in student loans.

Velez, 28, had taken out a total of five loans ranging from $7,500 to more than $32,000 with interest rates between 6% and 11.75%.

She calculated that if she only made the minimum monthly payment of $300, it would take her until 2046 to pay off her student loans and cost an extra $96,000 in interest.

Velez’s first journalism job out of college paid $40,000. Subtract New York City rent, along with living expenses, and she would not have much spare money to throw at her debt.

Watch the video above to learn more about the method Velez used to pay off her student loans.

More from Personal Finance:

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Your credit card debt could be making you sick

Disclosure: NBCUniversal and Comcast Ventures are investors in Acorns.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-05  Authors: robert exley jr, patrick b healey, founder, president of caliber financial partners, joseph bartholomew
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 102000, 40000, vacation, worlds, student, velez, ventures, loans, starting, used, paid, york, video, pay, millennial, salary


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NFL player Carl Nassib makes millions but sticks to a $3,500 budget for rent, food and bills

NFL linebacker Carl Nassib signed a four-year, $3.6 million contract with the Cleveland Browns when he was drafted in 2016. His new salary “didn’t really change my headspace much,” he tells CNBC Make It. I was more focused on my career as a football player than worrying about how much money I had in the bank.” Three years after signing with the Browns, Nassib is making a base salary of $2.03 million with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers — and he still plays it safe with his money. The 26-year-old team c


NFL linebacker Carl Nassib signed a four-year, $3.6 million contract with the Cleveland Browns when he was drafted in 2016.
His new salary “didn’t really change my headspace much,” he tells CNBC Make It.
I was more focused on my career as a football player than worrying about how much money I had in the bank.”
Three years after signing with the Browns, Nassib is making a base salary of $2.03 million with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers — and he still plays it safe with his money.
The 26-year-old team c
NFL player Carl Nassib makes millions but sticks to a $3,500 budget for rent, food and bills Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-03  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nassib, makes, player, carl, money, sticks, thats, millions, worrying, rent, salary, tells, million, budget, food, nfl, browns


NFL player Carl Nassib makes millions but sticks to a $3,500 budget for rent, food and bills

NFL linebacker Carl Nassib signed a four-year, $3.6 million contract with the Cleveland Browns when he was drafted in 2016. The deal also came with a six-figure bonus: $889,752.

His new salary “didn’t really change my headspace much,” he tells CNBC Make It. “I was just like, I have this money, I better be smart with it. I was more focused on my career as a football player than worrying about how much money I had in the bank.”

Three years after signing with the Browns, Nassib is making a base salary of $2.03 million with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers — and he still plays it safe with his money. The 26-year-old team captain sticks to a monthly budget of $3,500 for rent, food and bills. He spends another $400 to $500 on miscellaneous expenses.

“This year I’ve been more on top of my budget than ever,” he says. That’s partly because he hasn’t switched teams and had to move to a different city, which is common in the NFL: “My expenses are at an all time low because you don’t realize how much moving costs. Everything adds up.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-03  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nassib, makes, player, carl, money, sticks, thats, millions, worrying, rent, salary, tells, million, budget, food, nfl, browns


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Former NFL and Twitter executive shares his No.1 piece of advice for negotiating your first raise

“My advice is to understand what the standard is for the job,” he tells CNBC Make It at SoFi’s recent “Get That Raise” event. Throughout his professional journey, he says he’s learned one key thing about asking for a raise that he thinks all young people should follow. As a long-standing executive in business and finance, SoFi CEO Anthony Noto knows what it’s like to negotiate your salary at work. Noto explains that knowing the standard for how much you should earn based on your performance is a


“My advice is to understand what the standard is for the job,” he tells CNBC Make It at SoFi’s recent “Get That Raise” event.
Throughout his professional journey, he says he’s learned one key thing about asking for a raise that he thinks all young people should follow.
As a long-standing executive in business and finance, SoFi CEO Anthony Noto knows what it’s like to negotiate your salary at work.
Noto explains that knowing the standard for how much you should earn based on your performance is a
Former NFL and Twitter executive shares his No.1 piece of advice for negotiating your first raise Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thing, negotiating, raise, york, no1, process, noto, piece, standard, shares, nfl, salary, tells, advice, position, executive, twitter


Former NFL and Twitter executive shares his No.1 piece of advice for negotiating your first raise

“My advice is to understand what the standard is for the job,” he tells CNBC Make It at SoFi’s recent “Get That Raise” event. “What is the average compensation for that position? What’s the above average compensation for that position, and establish with your employer where you are.”

Throughout his professional journey, he says he’s learned one key thing about asking for a raise that he thinks all young people should follow.

Prior to joining the personal-finance company in 2018, Noto worked as the chief operating officer at Twitter, the co-head of telecommunications, media and technology investment banking at Goldman Sachs and the executive vice president and chief financial officer for the National Football League.

As a long-standing executive in business and finance, SoFi CEO Anthony Noto knows what it’s like to negotiate your salary at work.

Anthony Noto onstage at TechCrunch Disrupt NY 2013 at The Manhattan Center on May 1, 2013 in New York City.

Noto explains that knowing the standard for how much you should earn based on your performance is a key component to negotiating the raise you deserve. “Having this framework and understanding that this is a principle-based conversation and not a demand is critical to the [negotiation] process,” he says, while emphasizing that the discussion should always be a “two-way street” between you and your employer.

In addition to setting a standard for appropriate pay, Noto says you should also set a reasonable time frame for when you will go in and ask for your raise.

“Being on the job for three months is probably not the right time because you haven’t built a track record,” he says. “But as you get your annual reviews and accomplish something really meaningful, you’ll then be ready to receive a promotion and a corresponding piece of compensation.”

New York Times bestselling author and award-winning journalist Elaine Welteroth agrees with Noto. She tells CNBC Make It that after researching their market value, candidates should always go into the negotiation process with a standard idea of the salary they’d like to make.

“Know your floor and know your ceiling,” says the former Teen Vogue editor-in-chief. “Go in at your ceiling and do not drop below your floor, because it will only lead to dissatisfaction.”

Welteroth adds that if the first salary offered is below your satisfactory level, then you should not be afraid to ask for more time to consider the offer.

“There are so many tactics that employers often use to intimidate you and make you feel as though you need to give an answer in the moment, but you actually do not,” she says. “I think the most powerful thing can sometimes be to just take your time.”

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Don’t miss: 12-time gold medalist Allyson Felix on the negotiating advice she wishes she knew at the start of her career


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thing, negotiating, raise, york, no1, process, noto, piece, standard, shares, nfl, salary, tells, advice, position, executive, twitter


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Boeing CEO grilled over salary, accountability in second day of congressional questioning

Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg was grilled over his salary on Wednesday, the second day of congressional hearings after two fatal crashes involving 737 Max jets. Cohen asked if anyone at the company had taken a pay cut amid the grounding of the 737 Max. “You’re saying you’re not giving up any compensation at all,” Cohen asked Muilenburg. He earned total compensation of just under $23.4 million for 2018, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing. Correction: This story has been updat


Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg was grilled over his salary on Wednesday, the second day of congressional hearings after two fatal crashes involving 737 Max jets.
Cohen asked if anyone at the company had taken a pay cut amid the grounding of the 737 Max.
“You’re saying you’re not giving up any compensation at all,” Cohen asked Muilenburg.
He earned total compensation of just under $23.4 million for 2018, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing.
Correction: This story has been updat
Boeing CEO grilled over salary, accountability in second day of congressional questioning Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-30  Authors: elly cosgrove
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, questioning, cohen, boeing, compensation, congressional, saying, second, million, salary, asked, total, accountability, 737, muilenburg, youre, day, ceo, grilled


Boeing CEO grilled over salary, accountability in second day of congressional questioning

Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg was grilled over his salary on Wednesday, the second day of congressional hearings after two fatal crashes involving 737 Max jets.

Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Tenn., questioned in a heated exchange whether Muilenburg was taking responsibility for the fallout from the crashes, which killed 346 people in total. Cohen asked if anyone at the company had taken a pay cut amid the grounding of the 737 Max.

“You’re saying you’re not giving up any compensation at all,” Cohen asked Muilenburg. “You’re continuing to work and make $30 million a year after this horrific two accidents that caused all these people’s relatives to go, to disappear, to die.”

Muilenburg’s annual compensation, though well into the multi-millions, is not quite at $30 million. He earned total compensation of just under $23.4 million for 2018, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing.

When asked directly if Muilenburg would take a cut in pay, he said the company’s board makes those decisions.

“You’re not accountable then,” Cohen said. “You’re saying the board’s accountable.”

Boeing replaced the head of its commercial airplane unit Kevin McAllister earlier this month. He is the senior-most executive to leave in the wake of the catastrophes.

Muilenburg said during the congressional questioning that he has not offered to resign after 737 Max crashes.

Wednesday’s hearing was before the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. Muilenburg appeared before the Senate Commerce Committee.

Correction: This story has been updated to remove an incorrect figure for Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg’s 2018 salary.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-30  Authors: elly cosgrove
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, questioning, cohen, boeing, compensation, congressional, saying, second, million, salary, asked, total, accountability, 737, muilenburg, youre, day, ceo, grilled


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Jean Chatzky: Making this mistake at your first job can put you ‘behind the eight ball for years and years’

Negotiating leads to a $5,000 increase in starting salaries, on average, according to a 2011 study published in the Journal of Organizational Behavior. “If you don’t negotiate for the first [salary], you’re going to be putting yourself behind the eight ball for years and years to come,” Chatzky says. Don’t forget to do online research about the salary of the person you’re negotiating with. Take it or leave it Young people were the least likely to negotiate when they accepted their most recent jo


Negotiating leads to a $5,000 increase in starting salaries, on average, according to a 2011 study published in the Journal of Organizational Behavior.
“If you don’t negotiate for the first [salary], you’re going to be putting yourself behind the eight ball for years and years to come,” Chatzky says.
Don’t forget to do online research about the salary of the person you’re negotiating with.
Take it or leave it Young people were the least likely to negotiate when they accepted their most recent jo
Jean Chatzky: Making this mistake at your first job can put you ‘behind the eight ball for years and years’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-25  Authors: anna-louise jackson, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, according, chatzky, salaries, mistake, making, negotiating, salary, job, negotiate, pay, jean, school, ball, youre


Jean Chatzky: Making this mistake at your first job can put you 'behind the eight ball for years and years'

Negotiating your salary can be intimidating, especially for your first-ever job offer — and in fact, only 16% of workers between the ages of 18 and 24 negotiate for higher pay, according to data from ZipRecruiter. The rest are making an expensive mistake. “It’s really important to go in to your very first job with your negotiating hat on because what we know is that, over time, all of your next salaries key off that last salary,” says Jean Chatzky, CEO of HerMoney.com and bestselling author of books including “Women with Money.” Negotiating leads to a $5,000 increase in starting salaries, on average, according to a 2011 study published in the Journal of Organizational Behavior. Over the course of a 40-year career, losing out on $5,000 by not negotiating that first salary could end up costing you about $634,000, assuming annual pay increases of 5%, according to data from Harvard Law School. “If you don’t negotiate for the first [salary], you’re going to be putting yourself behind the eight ball for years and years to come,” Chatzky says.

Video by Courtney Stith Here are two of Chatzky’s tips for navigating these salary discussions.

1. Research typical salaries

Before salary discussions, it’s important to do your homework. Chatzky recommends consulting websites like PayScale or Salary.com to figure out what someone with your skills and experience level is likely to earn or asking current employees if they can ballpark how much someone with your qualifications might make. Don’t forget to do online research about the salary of the person you’re negotiating with. Figuring out how much he or she may make can help you if you need to throw out the first number in a salary negotiation, Chatzky says. “Knowing your opponent — and in this case, they are your opponent — is a valuable way to spend your time before you walk in the door.”

Take it or leave it Young people were the least likely to negotiate when they accepted their most recent job offer. Young people were the least likely to negotiate when they accepted their most recent job offer kiersten schmidt/grow ZipRecruiter

Another added benefit of knowing how much your immediate manager makes is that it could prompt you to work harder, according to a 2018 study conducted by professors at Harvard Business School and UCLA’s Anderson School of Management. The researchers said workers who learned that salary information may have found it to be aspirational because it was just a promotion or two away.

2. Ask for what you’re worth

A salary negotiation is about more than just finding out what other people with a similar job title earn. Chances are you’ll find a range of salaries. Experts recommend aiming for the high end of that range — justifying that number with the value you’ll bring to the company. Even if you aim a bit higher than the company is willing to pay, that gives you more room to negotiate a salary that’s closer to what you want.

It’s really important to go in to your very first job with your negotiating hat on because what we know is that over time, all of your next salaries key off that last salary. Jean Chatzky CEO of HerMoney.com


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-25  Authors: anna-louise jackson, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, according, chatzky, salaries, mistake, making, negotiating, salary, job, negotiate, pay, jean, school, ball, youre


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How Social Security benefits are calculated on a $75,000 salary

How Social Security benefits are calculated on a $75,000 salary8 Hours AgoSocial Security is an essential part of retiring in the U.S. Nearly nine of ten people aged 65 and older receive benefits, which are based on your income, the year you were born and the age you decided to start taking money out. How it’s calculated, however, is anything but simple. Here’s how the math is broken down and how much you can expect to earn in Social Security benefits on a $75,000 salary.


How Social Security benefits are calculated on a $75,000 salary8 Hours AgoSocial Security is an essential part of retiring in the U.S. Nearly nine of ten people aged 65 and older receive benefits, which are based on your income, the year you were born and the age you decided to start taking money out.
How it’s calculated, however, is anything but simple.
Here’s how the math is broken down and how much you can expect to earn in Social Security benefits on a $75,000 salary.
How Social Security benefits are calculated on a $75,000 salary Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-25
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, benefits, calculated, salary8, taking, salary, social, security, 75000, start, simple


How Social Security benefits are calculated on a $75,000 salary

How Social Security benefits are calculated on a $75,000 salary

8 Hours Ago

Social Security is an essential part of retiring in the U.S. Nearly nine of ten people aged 65 and older receive benefits, which are based on your income, the year you were born and the age you decided to start taking money out. How it’s calculated, however, is anything but simple. Here’s how the math is broken down and how much you can expect to earn in Social Security benefits on a $75,000 salary.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-25
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, benefits, calculated, salary8, taking, salary, social, security, 75000, start, simple


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Chicago teachers’ strike continues to cancel class for over 360,000 students—here’s how much teachers are paid in the US

Over 25,000 teachers in Chicago went on strike on October 17, forcing the cancellation of classes for over 361,000 students in the country’s third-largest school district. As the strike continues into a new week, the union’s demands highlight the financial challenges teachers across the United States face. The median annual salary for primary school teachers in the United States is $56,790, while the salary increases to $60,320 for high school teachers, according to 2018 data from the Bureau of


Over 25,000 teachers in Chicago went on strike on October 17, forcing the cancellation of classes for over 361,000 students in the country’s third-largest school district.
As the strike continues into a new week, the union’s demands highlight the financial challenges teachers across the United States face.
The median annual salary for primary school teachers in the United States is $56,790, while the salary increases to $60,320 for high school teachers, according to 2018 data from the Bureau of
Chicago teachers’ strike continues to cancel class for over 360,000 students—here’s how much teachers are paid in the US Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-22  Authors: carmin chappell
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, public, cancel, class, according, salary, teachers, union, demands, strike, paid, chicago, 360000, pay, studentsheres, continues, school, district


Chicago teachers' strike continues to cancel class for over 360,000 students—here's how much teachers are paid in the US

Over 25,000 teachers in Chicago went on strike on October 17, forcing the cancellation of classes for over 361,000 students in the country’s third-largest school district. The strikes came after the Chicago Teachers Union failed to negotiate an agreement with the district over pay and working conditions. The teachers are prepared to go on strike until their demands are met, bringing the public school system to a grinding halt. As the strike continues into a new week, the union’s demands highlight the financial challenges teachers across the United States face.

Teachers demand better pay, more staff

The union demands that the school district “stop short-changing the people who make our schools work” and raise salaries across the board. The teachers also want the school district to hire more staff “in all the areas that impact children’s learning” such as social workers, counselors and nurses. Overcrowded classrooms are another major concern for the union, which supports hard caps on class sizes. The union says that schools currently have as many as 40 students in a single class. The school system has pushed back against these demands. Chicago Public Schools says that its initial compensation agreement, which was rejected by the union, included “the most generous offers in the district’s history.”

Nationwide teacher pay is growing slowly

The complaints of low pay by Chicago’s striking teachers are rooted in evidence. The United States lags behind its peers, including Canada and Australia, in terms of teacher salaries, according to data from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The median annual salary for primary school teachers in the United States is $56,790, while the salary increases to $60,320 for high school teachers, according to 2018 data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. But the median figure is not completely representative of the whole story: The bottom 10% of teachers earn less than $40,000 annually. While wages across different occupations have seen steady growth since the recession, the average teacher salary has actually decreased by 3% over the past decade when adjusted for inflation, according to the National Education Association. Chicago Public School teachers earn a starting salary of just under $53,000 annually, the Chicago Tribune reports. In a rule unique to Chicago, public school teachers are required to live in the city proper, where the cost of living is greater than the surrounding suburbs. In fact, Chicago’s cost of living is 23% higher than the national average, according to data from salary site PayScale.

Other financial burdens faced by teachers


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-22  Authors: carmin chappell
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, public, cancel, class, according, salary, teachers, union, demands, strike, paid, chicago, 360000, pay, studentsheres, continues, school, district


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