Author Ryan Holiday: How ‘stillness’ can help you become a better investor

But developing a sense of “stillness” may help you do it, says author Ryan Holiday. Being disciplined, even-keeled, and less emotional about your money can help with investing, too. One role model in investing stillness: Legendary investor Warren Buffett, who has called the stock market “a device for transferring money from the impatient to the patient.” Buffett “has to be really patient, which requires stillness,” Holiday says. Ryan Holiday Author, ‘Stillness Is the Key’Putting your finances on


But developing a sense of “stillness” may help you do it, says author Ryan Holiday. Being disciplined, even-keeled, and less emotional about your money can help with investing, too. One role model in investing stillness: Legendary investor Warren Buffett, who has called the stock market “a device for transferring money from the impatient to the patient.” Buffett “has to be really patient, which requires stillness,” Holiday says. Ryan Holiday Author, ‘Stillness Is the Key’Putting your finances on
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: sam becker, ramit sethi, anna-louise jackson
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Author Ryan Holiday: How 'stillness' can help you become a better investor

Staying focused on your investment goals while ignoring the ups and downs of the market isn’t easy. But developing a sense of “stillness” may help you do it, says author Ryan Holiday. Holiday’s new book, “Stillness Is the Key,” highlights how numerous historical figures — including JFK, Johnny Cash, and Leonardo da Vinci — used a strategic sense of patience, among other things, to achieve their goals. Being disciplined, even-keeled, and less emotional about your money can help with investing, too. “We know that the best investment strategy is long term. It’s indifferent to the day-to-day fluctuations of the market. It’s not emotional. It’s logical. It’s value-based,” Holiday tells Grow. The most dangerous aspect of investing, he says, is that investors “get way too excited when things are good. This is where bubbles and irrational exuberance comes from.”

One role model in investing stillness: Legendary investor Warren Buffett, who has called the stock market “a device for transferring money from the impatient to the patient.” Buffett “has to be really patient, which requires stillness,” Holiday says. “It requires him to see things that other people don’t see. It requires him to be wrong for extended periods of time, until he’s proven right.” Developing a sense of stillness and discipline like Buffett’s takes practice. Here are two ways you can strengthen this attribute as an investor:

Take emotion out of investment decisions

Feelings, both good and bad, can cause investors to make rash decisions. The goal is “not being jerked around by your emotions,” Holiday says, and “having some semblance of self-control.” In practice, this means that you don’t panic if the markets start to fall — and you don’t get giddy if they continue to climb. You try to keep your head down and stick to your plan, no matter what’s going on in the news.

We know that the best investment strategy is long term: It’s indifferent to the day-to-day fluctuations of the market. It’s not emotional. It’s logical. Ryan Holiday Author, ‘Stillness Is the Key’

Putting your finances on autopilot can help you take the emotion out of your investing decisions. Setting up recurring contributions to your investment or retirement accounts can keep you consistent and ensure that you’re benefiting from dollar-cost averaging, too. You can also work on building up your emergency fund and even try writing yourself a motivation letter to help you keep a steady emotional state when the markets get bumpy.

Limit how frequently you monitor your portfolio


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: sam becker, ramit sethi, anna-louise jackson
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Serena Williams on financial abuse: ‘When you recognize the signs, you can change the pattern’

And up to 99% percent of survivors have also experienced financial abuse. In honor of National Domestic Violence Awareness Month this October, the Allstate Foundation partnered with tennis star Serena Williams to raise awareness of financial abuse. The warning signs of financial abuse”What’s difficult is that financial abuse can take on many forms,” says Francis. While cases of financial abuse frequently affect women, the elderly are also susceptible. The National Council on Aging reports that e


And up to 99% percent of survivors have also experienced financial abuse. In honor of National Domestic Violence Awareness Month this October, the Allstate Foundation partnered with tennis star Serena Williams to raise awareness of financial abuse. The warning signs of financial abuse”What’s difficult is that financial abuse can take on many forms,” says Francis. While cases of financial abuse frequently affect women, the elderly are also susceptible. The National Council on Aging reports that e
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: mariam abdallah, ivana pino, sam becker, lisa ferber
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Serena Williams on financial abuse: 'When you recognize the signs, you can change the pattern'

In the United States, more than 10 million victims experience domestic violence annually from their intimate partner, which is an average of 20 people every minute, according to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. And up to 99% percent of survivors have also experienced financial abuse. In honor of National Domestic Violence Awareness Month this October, the Allstate Foundation partnered with tennis star Serena Williams to raise awareness of financial abuse. “Not being able to use your credit cards, having to show receipts for every little dime that you spend, having freedom of choice taken away from you. Those are all signs,” Williams told Woman’s Day. “It’s important to use my voice to shine a spotlight on the barriers women can face when they’re trying to leave.” Abusers may try to control how the victim can access or use cash, bank accounts, or credit cards. They can also limit the victim’s earning potential by preventing them from going to work or applying for a job. “Financial abuse occurs in a relationship where your partner is withholding information about the finances to essentially keep the victim in the dark,” says certified financial planner Stacy Francis, the president and chief executive of Francis Financial in New York.

The warning signs of financial abuse

“What’s difficult is that financial abuse can take on many forms,” says Francis. “Many people who actually are victims are unaware that this is a form of abuse.” Controlling behavior can start with one partner cutting the other off from financial matters and decisions and giving them less and less money to spend on themselves and the children. “For example,” Francis says, “a food allowance or clothing allowance that is just not doable. Then the victim has to come back to their partner and say, ‘I don’t have enough money for the kids’ shoes for school, or for groceries for the week.’ And it creates a power dynamic where the partner has the power. And they have the power because they control all the money.”

Serena Williams and daughter Alexis Olympia during the S by Serena Williams Runway Show on September 10, 2019, in New York City. Thomas Concordia | Getty Images

That dynamic also exists when the victim is belittled, manipulated, and made to feel less capable when it comes to money. While cases of financial abuse frequently affect women, the elderly are also susceptible. The National Council on Aging reports that elder financial abuse and fraud costs its victims about $36.5 billion per year. If you or a loved one are experiencing financial abuse, here are some tips to help you protect yourself:

Review a copy of your credit report

“Many times, individuals will find out later on that credit cards, other types of debts, and home equity lines of credit, have been taken out in their name by their abuser,” Francis says. Under federal law, you can obtain a free copy of your credit report every 12 months from each of the three bureaus: Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax. Make sure you recognize all the debts listed. If you don’t, dig further to find out how they got onto your card.

Many people who actually are victims are unaware that this is a form of abuse. Stacy Francis President and CEO of Francis Financial

Save and use cash

“Using a debit or credit card is going to allow your abuser to track you,” says Francis. Going mostly or entirely cash-only allows you to operate in the world without leaving a trail.

Educate yourself about your income


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: mariam abdallah, ivana pino, sam becker, lisa ferber
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You can start teaching even little kids about money, experts say — here’s how

Most parents wait until their kids are teenagers before discussing money with them, according to T. Rowe Price’s 10th Annual Parents, Kids & Money Survey. By age 6, kids generally understand that some bills or coins are smaller than others, and more money is needed to afford something more valuable. “Give them the opportunity to make choices about how to best spend their money,” suggests Marguerita Cheng, chief executive officer at Blue Ocean Global Wealth. Give them the opportunity to make choi


Most parents wait until their kids are teenagers before discussing money with them, according to T. Rowe Price’s 10th Annual Parents, Kids & Money Survey. By age 6, kids generally understand that some bills or coins are smaller than others, and more money is needed to afford something more valuable. “Give them the opportunity to make choices about how to best spend their money,” suggests Marguerita Cheng, chief executive officer at Blue Ocean Global Wealth. Give them the opportunity to make choi
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: ivana pino, sofia pitt, sam becker, lisa ferber
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You can start teaching even little kids about money, experts say — here's how

Most parents wait until their kids are teenagers before discussing money with them, according to T. Rowe Price’s 10th Annual Parents, Kids & Money Survey. That’s a mistake, says Nikhol Bentley, a math teacher at Gilbert Stuart Middle School in Providence, Rhode Island. “People tend to sell kids short,” says Bentley. “They are extremely smart, and letting them be part of the financial conversations at home is a good way to make sure that they’re able to make smarter financial choices when they’re older.” Teaching your child concepts like spending, saving, and earning can help them establish good financial habits that can last them the rest of their lives. And there are age-appropriate ways to get started early on. The National Education Association (NEA) provides lesson plans for teaching financial literacy to children as young as 4, and there are ways to lay the groundwork with even younger kids.

Counting

Around age 2, your child may be able to sound out different numbers, recognize numerals, or count out a sequence of numbers that they’ve heard over and over again. By age 4, most children are counting up to 10 or even beyond, according to LeapFrog, which helps parents use technology as a learning tool. Counting is the first step in building and strengthening math skills in the classroom. It’s basic but absolutely necessary. Parents can help reinforce this skill by encouraging their child count everyday items like crayons or the number of apples or bananas you pick up at the grocery store.

Spending and earning

Children can loosely understand the concept of income early on, says Bentley: As soon as they start school, or even before, they can grasp how currency works. Though they’re not actually exchanging goods for money, they can show they understand value by trading Pokemon cards with each other, for example. “They learn to share, trade cards or toys for things that they want, or some teachers will have some sort of ticket system that reinforces this concept of saving up your tickets for rewards or what it means to not have enough,” says Bentley. By age 6, kids generally understand that some bills or coins are smaller than others, and more money is needed to afford something more valuable. “Any type of reward system helps emphasize this idea of currency, and kids will pick up on the fact that there are certain things they need to do or behaviors they need to manage in order to earn that extra ‘income,'” explains Bentley. The goal isn’t to teach them not to spend but to show them how to spend wisely so they end up feeling satisfied. “Give them the opportunity to make choices about how to best spend their money,” suggests Marguerita Cheng, chief executive officer at Blue Ocean Global Wealth. “Maybe it’s letting them pick out a reasonably priced souvenir on a family vacation. They are capable of understanding and retaining these things.”

Saving

Two in three parents give their child an allowance, shelling out an average of $30 per week, according to a recent survey of 1,002 adults conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. But only 3% of parents report that their kids primarily save what they get. Encouragement from parents, though, can make a difference.

Give them the opportunity to make choices about how to best spend their money. Marguerita Cheng chief executive officer at Blue Ocean Global Wealth

Bentley suggests one helpful exercise to help even younger children get used to saving: Let your child pick out a toy at the store. Explain how much it costs, and emphasize that they’ll need to save up their own money if they want to take it home. However old your child is when you start offering an allowance, make sure to give them a consistent amount on a consistent basis, “because it’s like getting a paycheck,” Paul Golden, managing director at the National Endowment for Financial Education told Grow earlier this year.

Avoiding conversations about money can cost you


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: ivana pino, sofia pitt, sam becker, lisa ferber
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In a falling rate environment, a different kind of CD can protect your savings

The Federal Reserve is expected to cut interest rates again later this month. High-yield savings accounts, which are generally offered by internet-only banks or subsidiaries, make you more money. Savings account yields have been decreasing as a result, although as an October MagnifyMoney.com report points out, online savings accounts “haven’t yet fallen as far.” This summer, Goldman Sachs’ Marcus and Ally cut their savings rates for the first time, each by 0.1%. In fact, traders are betting with


The Federal Reserve is expected to cut interest rates again later this month. High-yield savings accounts, which are generally offered by internet-only banks or subsidiaries, make you more money. Savings account yields have been decreasing as a result, although as an October MagnifyMoney.com report points out, online savings accounts “haven’t yet fallen as far.” This summer, Goldman Sachs’ Marcus and Ally cut their savings rates for the first time, each by 0.1%. In fact, traders are betting with
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: bob sullivan, alizah salario, sam becker, lisa ferber
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In a falling rate environment, a different kind of CD can protect your savings

The Federal Reserve is expected to cut interest rates again later this month. As rates fall, securing a steady return through a low-commitment certification of deposit (CD) is becoming a more appealing option for savers. With a traditional CD, you can’t withdraw money for a predetermined length of time – like six months, 12 months, or even five years – without paying for the privilege. But some banks are offering no-penalty CDs that do away with that caveat. Savers benefit from a fixed interest rate for a set period, and you can withdraw without penalty. “In a falling rate environment, it’s a good option,” Ken Tumin, founder of DepositAccounts.com, told Grow earlier this year.

Falling interest rates can affect your savings

Savings accounts don’t usually provide much interest. The average traditional savings account pays roughly 0.09% annually, according to the FDIC. That’s 9 cents for every $100 after one year. High-yield savings accounts, which are generally offered by internet-only banks or subsidiaries, make you more money. Right now, rates hover around 2% at Ally bank, Barclay’s, and Discover, so savers earn about $2 for every $100 annually. If your emergency fund holds $10,000, you’ll earn about $200 each year in a high-yield account.

The Fed has cut rates twice this year, in July and September, however. Savings account yields have been decreasing as a result, although as an October MagnifyMoney.com report points out, online savings accounts “haven’t yet fallen as far.” This summer, Goldman Sachs’ Marcus and Ally cut their savings rates for the first time, each by 0.1%. After further cuts, as of early October, both offer 1.9% yields. Market observers expect more rate cuts in the next few months. In fact, traders are betting with about 83% probability that central bankers will cut interest rates when they meet later this month. That means, even with a high-yield account, you could earn less interest on your savings. That can make CDs a more attractive option.

CDs help you lock in a rate


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: bob sullivan, alizah salario, sam becker, lisa ferber
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‘Million Dollar Listing’ star Ryan Serhant: The best piece of investing advice I ever got

Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell It Like Serhant,” knows a thing or two about money — he spends his time selling high-end real estate to some of the richest people in the world, after all. Serhant’s investing advice: ‘Invest in things you know’The best piece of investment advice I was ever given was to invest in things you know. And that includes investing in technology, investing in people who are inventors and creating things — both p


Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell It Like Serhant,” knows a thing or two about money — he spends his time selling high-end real estate to some of the richest people in the world, after all. Serhant’s investing advice: ‘Invest in things you know’The best piece of investment advice I was ever given was to invest in things you know. And that includes investing in technology, investing in people who are inventors and creating things — both p
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'Million Dollar Listing' star Ryan Serhant: The best piece of investing advice I ever got

Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell It Like Serhant,” knows a thing or two about money — he spends his time selling high-end real estate to some of the richest people in the world, after all. But when it comes to his own money, he’s fairly conservative. He saves a lot, and he knows the value of a dollar. When it comes to investing, he sticks to a pretty simple strategy: Invest in what you know. Serhant recently sat down with the Grow team to discuss the most valuable investing advice he’s received, how he learned about money at a young age, and more. Here is his story, as told to senior reporter Sam Becker.

Serhant’s investing advice: ‘Invest in things you know’

The best piece of investment advice I was ever given was to invest in things you know. Things you use. Things you could see yourself using; things you actually like. Don’t invest in stuff that doesn’t interest you, because then you’re not going to follow up on it. You’re not going to be as active an investor. So, I invest in things or products that I enjoy, use, or think are really interesting. And that includes investing in technology, investing in people who are inventors and creating things — both physical products as well as software — [and] investing in real estate.

When it comes to real estate, I used to really think that to be a wise investor, you have to invest what you actually have to spend, so don’t spend more than you can afford. But I’ve found that to be incorrect. The best investments I’ve made are the ones that actually push me outside of my comfort level. Because you need to work more. You need to do more to actually get a return on this investment. And that’s worked really, really well for me.

‘The best investment I ever made’

The best investment I ever made: I invest in my business all the time. I invested in our YouTube vlog, and I think it’s funny because before I started the vlog on YouTube, everyone thought it was stupid and crazy. Including me. Actually, mostly me. I thought it was dumb. Just another form of social media. I was just sick and tired of it and I had no idea what it was going to do to our business. But it is a massive way of driving business and driving brand awareness. So, by investing the money that I did into the vlog, more people buy my book, more people buy the course, more people reach out to me to buy and sell homes.

Don’t invest in stuff that doesn’t interest you, because then you’re not going to follow up on it. You’re not going to be as active an investor. Ryan Serhant Real estate broker, author, and TV star

How being ‘broke’ led to his real estate career


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3 ways to help your kids make the most of their allowance

If you want your kids to save part or all of their allowance, make it easy for them. But only 3% of parents report that their kids primarily save their allowance, a figure that the AICPA finds “concerning.” “It’s still parents who have the most influence [on kids’ money habits]. Graphic preview What kids earn The top-paying chores for kids in the U.S. kiersten schmidt/grow Rooster MoneyHere are three ways you can use an allowance to teach your kids about money management and help them to make th


If you want your kids to save part or all of their allowance, make it easy for them. But only 3% of parents report that their kids primarily save their allowance, a figure that the AICPA finds “concerning.” “It’s still parents who have the most influence [on kids’ money habits]. Graphic preview What kids earn The top-paying chores for kids in the U.S. kiersten schmidt/grow Rooster MoneyHere are three ways you can use an allowance to teach your kids about money management and help them to make th
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3 ways to help your kids make the most of their allowance

If you want your kids to save part or all of their allowance, make it easy for them. Consider getting them a savings jar or even opening them a bank account. Two in three parents give their child an allowance. They dole out an average of $30 per week, according to a recent survey of 1,002 adults conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, and in many cases the money is linked to the completion of household chores. But only 3% of parents report that their kids primarily save their allowance, a figure that the AICPA finds “concerning.” Nearly all, or 92%, of parents say it’s important for their child to learn how to manage money, and helping your kids become savers early on is a great way to make that happen. By saving a third of a $30 weekly allowance, your child would be able to sock away over $500 every year. “It’s a missed opportunity, generally, if you’re not taking to your kids about money,” says Paul Golden, managing director at the National Endowment for Financial Education. “It’s still parents who have the most influence [on kids’ money habits]. They’re the front line of defense.”

Graphic preview What kids earn The top-paying chores for kids in the U.S. kiersten schmidt/grow Rooster Money

Here are three ways you can use an allowance to teach your kids about money management and help them to make the most of it over time.

1. Set kids up to be savers

Encouraging your kid to save even part of their allowance can help them establish healthy financial habits. Start by conditioning your kids to automatically save a certain amount each month because “then they don’t miss it,” says Golden. With younger children, Golden suggests using a savings jar so they can see the money building up. Then, once your child starts asking about how banks work, consider opening a savings account. Pay attention to their cues and take advantage of their interest, he says. “Once you’ve started with the habit of saving when you’re young, you start seeing what saving [money] actually does for you,” Clark D. Randall, a certified financial planner and the founder of Financial Enlightenment in Dallas, Texas, told Grow earlier this year. Parents are usually the No. 1 money influence on their kids. In a recent survey of “supersavers,” or people who put an impressive share of their income away for retirement, 80% gave credit to their parents for positively influencing their savings habits.

It’s a missed opportunity, generally, if you’re not taking to your kids about money. Paul Golden Managing director, National Endowment for Financial Education

2. Teach them to budget

Instead of saving, kids, like many adults, put money toward the things they want in the moment. In the AICPA’s survey, parents reported that kids spend most of their allowance money on outings with friends (47%) followed by digital devices and downloads (37%) and toys (33%). Learning to budget, though, will allow your child to think about all what they want to prioritize in the coming week, month, or year. If there’s something expensive your child really wants, you can drive home the connection between spending and earning by explaining how budgeting can help them meet their goals. Let’s say they want a $200 tablet but they end up blowing their allowance each week going out with friends. By setting aside, say, $20 of their $30 allowance, they can count on getting what they want in only 10 weeks. If they want it sooner, they can sock away the full $30 each week. And if they continue to splurge instead of save, don’t get mad. “It’s OK to make mistakes,” says Golden. “That starts to condition us as adults. There’s not some fairy that will come down and get you through till the next paycheck” when you’re an adult, either. So the best time for kids to trip up is when parents are there to guide and counsel them, and help them figure out what to do better going forward.

3. Help them differentiate between wants and needs

By helping them learn to budget for short- and long-term goals at a young age, you’re setting your kids up to tell the difference between wants and needs, explains Golden. Older kids may have to cover bills for the first time. “Once you have teens, they have to start prioritizing things they’ve never done [before], like putting gas in the car or paying for auto insurance,” he says. Condition kids to put money aside by encouraging them to save and budget starting at a young age, and they’ll be prepared to put their needs first. That, in turn, can help them avoid certain pitfalls of overspending, like winding up without money for gas.

Bonus advice: How much to give and how to set an example


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October can be spooky for investors — here’s why experts say not to worry

October has a spooky reputation with investors, but experts say there’s no need to fear the stock market. This month has sometimes been horrifying, historically: Over the past century, three of the darkest days on Wall Street all happened during October. That day, now known as “Black Monday,” “was the worst single-day drop, percentage-wise, in history.” There’s another reason October has a bad reputation, says Lambert: “Market volatility, historically, is higher” in October. “Volatility implies


October has a spooky reputation with investors, but experts say there’s no need to fear the stock market. This month has sometimes been horrifying, historically: Over the past century, three of the darkest days on Wall Street all happened during October. That day, now known as “Black Monday,” “was the worst single-day drop, percentage-wise, in history.” There’s another reason October has a bad reputation, says Lambert: “Market volatility, historically, is higher” in October. “Volatility implies
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October can be spooky for investors — here's why experts say not to worry

October has a spooky reputation with investors, but experts say there’s no need to fear the stock market.

This month has sometimes been horrifying, historically: Over the past century, three of the darkest days on Wall Street all happened during October.

“The big one is October 1987, when the Dow plunged 22% in a single day,” says Jason Lambert, the president and CEO of Northwest Financial & Tax Solutions, near Portland, Oregon. That day, now known as “Black Monday,” “was the worst single-day drop, percentage-wise, in history.”

The Great Depression began after a market crash in October 1929 and the financial crisis that sparked the Great Recession started with an October market meltdown in 2008.

There’s another reason October has a bad reputation, says Lambert: “Market volatility, historically, is higher” in October. “Volatility implies fear,” he says, “even if it doesn’t mean that the market is moving up or down.”


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25-year-old tech founder is helping teach everyday Americans how to invest

Learning to think like an investor at a young age, he says, helped him become a tech entrepreneur. Gage, 25, is one of the founders of Rapunzl Investments, a mobile app that lets users simulate stock trading in real time. Gage believes that his platform can help young people who lack formal financial education make better decisions and start investing for their future. Starting in first grade, students learn core financial tenets like investing and entrepreneurship and get hands-on experience in


Learning to think like an investor at a young age, he says, helped him become a tech entrepreneur. Gage, 25, is one of the founders of Rapunzl Investments, a mobile app that lets users simulate stock trading in real time. Gage believes that his platform can help young people who lack formal financial education make better decisions and start investing for their future. Starting in first grade, students learn core financial tenets like investing and entrepreneurship and get hands-on experience in
25-year-old tech founder is helping teach everyday Americans how to invest Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, invest, investing, everyday, rapunzl, gage, founder, stock, app, helping, tech, money, users, school, 25yearold, ariel, teach, americans, financial


25-year-old tech founder is helping teach everyday Americans how to invest

Like a lot of kids, Myles Gage was into sneakers when he was growing up. But his mom suggested an unusual rule: For every pair of Nikes that Gage owned, he should own a share of Nike stock. Learning to think like an investor at a young age, he says, helped him become a tech entrepreneur. Gage, 25, is one of the founders of Rapunzl Investments, a mobile app that lets users simulate stock trading in real time. The platform makes a game out of the markets: Users get $10,000 fictitious dollars to buy and sell stocks, which helps them learn how the markets work and start to experience the excitement and potential benefit of investing. Gage believes that his platform can help young people who lack formal financial education make better decisions and start investing for their future.

Learning early to be ‘financially literate’

Gage says his parents made a lot of financial mistakes and they wanted to make sure their kids didn’t follow in their footsteps: “They wanted us to be financially literate and in a position to make better decisions.” That’s partly why Gage’s mother, who worked for the Chicago Parks District, found a way to get him and his brother, Mario, into Ariel Community Academy, a specialized public school for students K-8 with a focus on financial education. Starting in first grade, students learn core financial tenets like investing and entrepreneurship and get hands-on experience investing in stocks. Attending Ariel made a huge difference in Gage’s life: “The only reason I know about the stock market is because of Ariel Community Academy,” he says.

The only reason I know about the stock market is because of Ariel Community Academy. Myles Gage CFO, Rapunzl Investments

That knowledge paid off: It helped Gage win a full-ride scholarship to the University of Chicago Laboratory School, a prestigious private high school. “I wrote an essay about how I planned to finance my college tuition. And the main point of that was that I was going to liquidate my stock portfolio,” he says. “I don’t think the judges were expecting a 14-year-old to be talking about liquidating a portfolio, let alone one from the south side of Chicago.”

The origins of Rapunzl

As a high school freshman in 2008, Gage immediately bonded with another student, Brian Curcio. While discussing the stock market and the budding financial crisis, the two came up with the idea of a stock market game, using fictional money, to teach people how the markets work. Over the next few years, the economy recovered. Some investors, who had money to buy stocks when the markets bottomed out, started to see strong returns. Average Americans, however, were often missing out. Gage didn’t think that profits should belong only to a select few, hidden away at the top of a tower like the character of Rapunzel in the 1812 Brothers Grimm fairy tale. Rapunzl the app, Gage and Curcio decided, would make investing accessible. It would give anybody the chance to learn, to figure out how the stock markets work. Then, when users were comfortable, they could actually start investing.

How the app got funded

Through their college years, the two met frequently to refine the concept for Rapunzl. They settled on an idea that would allow users to simulate a stock portfolio without risking real money. But to make their idea come to life, real money is exactly what the two young entrepreneurs needed. So, after graduating in 2016, they organized their ideas and started looking around for seed funding.

Myles Gage with Rapunzl cofounder Brian Curcio. Courtesy Rapunzl Investments LLC

“We put a mini-pitch deck together and shopped it around to our friends and family, and were able to muster up funds to develop a prototype,” Gage says. They hired a Canadian developer who created an early version of the app and made it available for download in April 2017. Around that time, Rapunzl also did another round of fundraising, which netted the company enough money to continue perfecting the platform. Several months later, the founders brought in a third partner, Chris Thomas, as the company’s CTO.

‘Our country needs more innovative approaches like Rapunzl’

To attract users and take aim at their mission of creating a new generation of confident, financially literate investors, Gage and the team headed back to school — literally. Rapunzl partnered with the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and started sponsoring conferences, plus essay and investing competitions at schools around the Chicago area. The team also met with John Rogers, the chairman and CEO of Ariel Investments — which also funds and sponsors Ariel Community Academy — who agreed to sponsor the competitions and provide prize money. In 2018, Rapunzl was involved in competitions in more than 70 Chicago-area schools, comprising more than 2,000 students.

Our country needs more innovative approaches like Rapunzl that aim to tackle financial illiteracy and close the achievement gap. Arne Duncan Former U.S. Secretary of Education

Rapunzl is building on its success in Chicago schools by expanding. Last year, it sponsored competitions in Los Angeles, Boston, and New York, with plans for more cities next year, and colleges, too. It has even managed to catch the attention of former U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. “Our country needs more innovative approaches like Rapunzl that aim to tackle financial illiteracy and close the achievement gap,” Duncan said, following an announcement about Rapunzl partnering with investing firm Wedbush. Duncan, who doesn’t have any current connection to the app, did play a role in developing the curriculum at Ariel Community Academy.

The app and its founders hope to make a difference

So far, the Rapunzl team has focused their efforts on generating interest in the platform and getting young users hooked on trading. The app doesn’t currently drive revenue, though, and Gage is hopeful that will change. He says at some point in 2020, the platform will be monetized through affiliate marketing and premium subscriptions.

Courtesy Rapunzl Investments LLC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, invest, investing, everyday, rapunzl, gage, founder, stock, app, helping, tech, money, users, school, 25yearold, ariel, teach, americans, financial


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With Parmesan, pinot noir and more hit by new tariffs, here’s how to save on wine and cheese

The Trump administration is imposing a 25% tariff on European Union products like Spanish, French, and German wines, and Italian cheeses. In this case, starting on October 18, companies will have to pay more to import wine and cheese from certain European countries. WineThe items selected for this round of tariffs are “very specific and targeted,” says Gary Itkin, general manager and buyer at Bottlerocket Wine & Spirit. So while the price of French champagne won’t rise, because it’s a sparkling


The Trump administration is imposing a 25% tariff on European Union products like Spanish, French, and German wines, and Italian cheeses. In this case, starting on October 18, companies will have to pay more to import wine and cheese from certain European countries. WineThe items selected for this round of tariffs are “very specific and targeted,” says Gary Itkin, general manager and buyer at Bottlerocket Wine & Spirit. So while the price of French champagne won’t rise, because it’s a sparkling
With Parmesan, pinot noir and more hit by new tariffs, here’s how to save on wine and cheese Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07  Authors: aditi shrikant, sam becker, alizah salario
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, noir, tariffs, hit, wont, pinot, wines, save, parmesan, riesling, prices, itkin, heres, wine, region, products, cheese, youre


With Parmesan, pinot noir and more hit by new tariffs, here's how to save on wine and cheese

The Trump administration is imposing a 25% tariff on European Union products like Spanish, French, and German wines, and Italian cheeses. Tariffs are taxes placed on imported products. In this case, starting on October 18, companies will have to pay more to import wine and cheese from certain European countries. In response, retailers usually charge higher prices in stores, so individual American shoppers get charged more. If you’re a fan of chardonnay or cheese plates, here’s what you need to know about how tariffs could affect you, and how you can still manage to save money on the products you love.

Wine

The items selected for this round of tariffs are “very specific and targeted,” says Gary Itkin, general manager and buyer at Bottlerocket Wine & Spirit. They include any still wine from France, Spain, or Germany. So while the price of French champagne won’t rise, because it’s a sparkling wine, rosé from the Provence region of France will. The tariff will also be applied to still wine from France’s Bordeaux region, known for malbec and cabernet sauvignon, along with wine from the Burgundy region, which includes pinot noir and chardonnay. Other popular, affected wines are Rioja from Spain or riesling from Germany. Consider stocking up on these bottles now, Itkin says, as prices could rise within the next couple weeks. “On an everyday level, people buy so much rosé and so many lovely white wines like Sancerre,” he says. “Those prices will be going up. … These are wines that typically sell in the $15 to $35 range, so add 25% — that’s a big chunk.”

English cheddar and Stilton are two key items that will see price increases coming down the pike. Steve Millard SVP of Merchandising and Operations at Murray’s Cheese

Because the composition of wine is so dependent on the environment and soil, finding a true substitute is impossible, Itkin says. But, he says, there are some good alternatives that won’t be subject to tariffs. If you’re a fan of German riesling, he suggests trying riesling from the Finger Lakes region in New York, like Dr. Frank’s semi-dry riesling, which retails for $15.99. And instead of a Bordeaux malbec, you can try one from Argentina, like Bodega Norton Reserve, which retails for $19.99 at Total Wine.

Cheese


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07  Authors: aditi shrikant, sam becker, alizah salario
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, noir, tariffs, hit, wont, pinot, wines, save, parmesan, riesling, prices, itkin, heres, wine, region, products, cheese, youre


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4 ways to save money on housing, even as costs keep going up

“Total housing costs shouldn’t exceed 28%,” says Heather Winston, a certified financial planner at retirement plan provider Principal, referring to the “28/36 rule” used by some advisors to help determine home affordability. How to save money on housingHere are some ways you may be able to save some money whether you’re a homeowner or a renter. Invest in upgrades Making some small changes around the house may help you save money on your utility bills. You can use your negotiation skills to save


“Total housing costs shouldn’t exceed 28%,” says Heather Winston, a certified financial planner at retirement plan provider Principal, referring to the “28/36 rule” used by some advisors to help determine home affordability. How to save money on housingHere are some ways you may be able to save some money whether you’re a homeowner or a renter. Invest in upgrades Making some small changes around the house may help you save money on your utility bills. You can use your negotiation skills to save
4 ways to save money on housing, even as costs keep going up Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, housing, costs, negotiate, youre, utility, going, rent, upgrades, ways, consider, money, save, shouldnt


4 ways to save money on housing, even as costs keep going up

Housing can be the single biggest monthly expense in your budget. Your rent or mortgage payment can eat up a significant portion of your income, and it can be particularly difficult to figure out how to spend less on where you live. In some places, especially cities with high rents and astronomical home prices, keeping housing costs manageable is incredibly difficult. Ideally, experts say you should be spending only around a quarter of your income on housing-related costs. “Total housing costs shouldn’t exceed 28%,” says Heather Winston, a certified financial planner at retirement plan provider Principal, referring to the “28/36 rule” used by some advisors to help determine home affordability. “That’s superhard, especially for young people in an expensive real estate market,” Winston says.

How to save money on housing

Here are some ways you may be able to save some money whether you’re a homeowner or a renter. 1. Consider refinancing The current economic environment is friendly to homeowners looking to refinance, so it may be a good idea to consider your options. Mortgage rates are falling, which opens up an opportunity for homeowners to refinance and potentially lower your payments. Rates are 1.25 percentage points lower than they were in October 2018, which could save those with a $300,000 mortgage as much as $2,700 per year.

2. Invest in upgrades Making some small changes around the house may help you save money on your utility bills. Salvador Nobre Veiga, a 32-year-old living in Pennsylvania, told Grow earlier this year that he was able to reduce his annual utility costs by 66% by making upgrades to his house. For Nobre Veiga, investing in additional insulation, energy-efficient light bulbs, and a smart thermostat saved him hundreds of dollars per year. These are upgrades you can consider, too, whether you’re a homeowner or a renter. Utility bills cost the average household in the U.S. around $2,000 per year, so a few small upgrades can potentially save you hundreds of dollars annually. 3. Negotiate You can negotiate the price of almost anything. The trouble is, many people find it uncomfortable, so they just accept the terms they’re offered. But you shouldn’t be afraid to ask for a better deal. You can use your negotiation skills to save money in other areas, too. Homeowners can negotiate with their insurance companies or contractors to save money on certain bills. Renters may be able to negotiate reductions in rent in exchange for making upgrades or repairs to properties, or in exchange for signing longer leases. It never hurts to ask — just remember to be nice.

4. Consider moving If you run out of options and can’t find a way for your current living situation to make financial sense, it may be in your best interest to move. For renters, this will be easier — though you still may have to pay a fee if you break your lease. But even that might save you money if you can find a significantly less expensive place to rent or share. Selling a house is a much bigger project, and it can take both an emotional and a financial toll. You can always look at other options, such as selling equity in your home to help you get by, before deciding to put your home on the market. Even if you’re open to moving, make sure you shift to a place you can better afford so you won’t end up finding yourself in a worse, or equally difficult, situation. And you probably shouldn’t hold out hope that your rent or home prices will decrease in the near future.

Housing costs keep going up


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, housing, costs, negotiate, youre, utility, going, rent, upgrades, ways, consider, money, save, shouldnt


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