Why hot stocks like Tesla and Virgin Galactic may not actually be wise investments

If you’ve paid attention to the stock market recently, you’ve likely seen that Tesla stock is in high demand. Spaceflight company Virgin Galactic is also blasting off, as the stock’s price has tripled over the past three months. For example, already this month, Tesla stock tumbled 17% in one day while Virgin Galactic fell more than 8%. If you’re drawn to investing in space companies like Virgin Galactic, for instance, the Procure Space ETF could be of interest. SmileDirectClubIPO price: $23Total


If you’ve paid attention to the stock market recently, you’ve likely seen that Tesla stock is in high demand.
Spaceflight company Virgin Galactic is also blasting off, as the stock’s price has tripled over the past three months.
For example, already this month, Tesla stock tumbled 17% in one day while Virgin Galactic fell more than 8%.
If you’re drawn to investing in space companies like Virgin Galactic, for instance, the Procure Space ETF could be of interest.
SmileDirectClubIPO price: $23Total
Why hot stocks like Tesla and Virgin Galactic may not actually be wise investments Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-25  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tesla, investments, investors, stock, galactic, stocks, hot, price, virgin, market, return, ipo, actually, wise


Why hot stocks like Tesla and Virgin Galactic may not actually be wise investments

If you’ve paid attention to the stock market recently, you’ve likely seen that Tesla stock is in high demand. So far this year, Tesla shares have more than doubled in value, rocketing from $424 to over $900 as of February 20. And Tesla isn’t alone. Spaceflight company Virgin Galactic is also blasting off, as the stock’s price has tripled over the past three months. Seeing stock prices surge in value during short periods of time can give some investors a serious case of FOMO. But it’s also important to remember that these types of dramatic price jumps are often followed by declines. For example, already this month, Tesla stock tumbled 17% in one day while Virgin Galactic fell more than 8%. News headlines may make it appear that you’re missing out on big returns when stocks see huge growth over a short period of time. Keep in mind, though, that timing the market to maximize your return is almost impossible, even for professional traders. It’s smartest not to try to pick winners, in other words. That’s why experts recommend that you let the market play out before making a decision to buy, rather than trying to chase a hot stock when it’s surging. Or better yet, invest in the market itself, through index funds that track the performance of major market benchmarks. Investing a significant portion of your portfolio in individual stocks comes with considerable risk.

Betting on individual stocks is ‘a dicey game’

Sure, Tesla’s stock is soaring now, but plenty of people still expect the company will fail. Some traders place bets that the stock will tumble, what’s known as “shorts,” and therefore stand to lose billions of dollars if share prices continue to rise. This dynamic is what makes the stock market especially risky when investing in individual companies: Nobody knows what’s going to happen. “It’s a dicey game” for investors to try and pick winning stocks, says Scott Colbert, chief economist at Missouri-based Commerce Trust Company.

Video by Jason Armesto Take Tesla, for example: “Tesla went public when it was nothing; there were no sales, it was all just [looking at] the future,” Colbert says. “Now, they sold 367,000 cars last year. The people who bought in early had to ride a roller coaster. They had to stick with it for 12 years, but now it’s paying off in spades.” Even so, it was a long wait for those investors to get to that payoff, and it was far from guaranteed. In fact, research shows that most investments in newly public companies lose money after five years.

How to hedge your bets

Because investing significant amounts of money in individual stocks — like Tesla or Virgin Galactic, or a market mainstay like Coca-Cola — is so risky, experts recommend that the typical investor instead look at more diversified products, like mutual funds or exchange-traded funds (ETFs). If you’re drawn to investing in space companies like Virgin Galactic, for instance, the Procure Space ETF could be of interest. It contains 32 aerospace and defense stocks, including Virgin Galactic, allowing investors to add the company to their portfolio while hedging some of the risks and getting exposure to the broader industry. And for investors interested in Tesla, there are more than 100 ETFs that count the stock among their holdings.

Video by Stephen Parkhurst

How the hottest IPO stocks of 2019 are faring now

Hot stocks have no guarantee of delivering big or even positive returns to investors. While a few have soared, like Beyond Meat, several high-profile companies that went public last year saw, such as Uber and Lyft, saw their stocks fizzle, or at least not live up to the hype. Here’s a look at how some of the most talked-about IPOs of 2019 look two months into 2020, based on their IPO price and the price as of the market open on the week of February 18.

SmileDirectClub

IPO price: $23

Total return since IPO: -42.3%

Lyft

IPO price: $72

Total return since IPO: -38.1%

Slack

IPO price: $42

Total return since IPO: -33.1%

Uber

IPO price: $42

Total return since IPO: -6%

Peloton

IPO price: $29

Total return since IPO: -5.2%

Pinterest

IPO price: $19

Total return since IPO: 22.1%

Chewy

IPO price: $22

Total return since IPO: 29.7%

Zoom

IPO price: $36

Total return since IPO: 259%

Beyond Meat


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-25  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tesla, investments, investors, stock, galactic, stocks, hot, price, virgin, market, return, ipo, actually, wise


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How a ‘superhero’ CEO has made a living helping over 1,000 people find jobs

In West Virginia, coal is as deeply entwined and entrenched in the geographic landscape, the sweeping, rolling Appalachian Mountains, as it is in the culture of the region. His aim: helping the down-and-out and unemployed in rural West Virginia develop skills and find new career paths. To date, Coalfield Development has created 225 full-time jobs and trained more than 1,000 workers. Developing the Coalfield formulaDennison spends his days overseeing Coalfield Development and its dozen or so subs


In West Virginia, coal is as deeply entwined and entrenched in the geographic landscape, the sweeping, rolling Appalachian Mountains, as it is in the culture of the region.
His aim: helping the down-and-out and unemployed in rural West Virginia develop skills and find new career paths.
To date, Coalfield Development has created 225 full-time jobs and trained more than 1,000 workers.
Developing the Coalfield formulaDennison spends his days overseeing Coalfield Development and its dozen or so subs
How a ‘superhero’ CEO has made a living helping over 1,000 people find jobs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-15  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, superhero, development, helping, jobs, coalfield, west, ceo, coal, organization, 1000, appalachia, living, virginia, dennison, stewart, job


How a 'superhero' CEO has made a living helping over 1,000 people find jobs

In West Virginia, coal is as deeply entwined and entrenched in the geographic landscape, the sweeping, rolling Appalachian Mountains, as it is in the culture of the region. It’s how millions of people earn and have earned a living. Coal “has a cultural power,” says Brandon Dennison, a 33-year-old native West Virginian. Dennison is the founder and CEO of Coalfield Development Corporation, a community-based nonprofit business incubator located in the tiny Appalachian town of Wayne, West Virginia, 140 miles east of Lexington, Kentucky. “Coal mining is a job people are really, really proud of,” he says. “There’s a pride that a lot of modern America was built on coal.” But as coal production has declined significantly in recent years, so has the number of coal mining jobs. When those jobs disappear, the communities dependent upon them often suffer. A recent report from the Appalachian Regional Commission shows that dozens of counties in the area are at “distressed” economic levels, meaning that their economies are among the worst 10% in the U.S. As much of the world moves on from coal, Dennison has taken on the job of helping coal-dependent communities pivot, too. His aim: helping the down-and-out and unemployed in rural West Virginia develop skills and find new career paths. To date, Coalfield Development has created 225 full-time jobs and trained more than 1,000 workers.

Developing the Coalfield formula

Dennison spends his days overseeing Coalfield Development and its dozen or so subsidiaries. Those include the construction and real estate firm Revitalize Appalachia, carpentry company Saw’s Edge Woodshop, solar enterprise Rewire Appalachia (recently acquired by Solar Holler), and a sustainable agricultural operation called Refresh Appalachia. The organization’s goal is to train, retrain, or otherwise prepare West Virginians for a different economy, one that’s shifted away from coal production. Coalfield helps by finding and hiring unemployed people, enrolling them in community colleges, and allowing them to build skills on the job while also earning a degree.

Brandon Dennison. Courtesy Coalfield Development

Over time, the combo has distilled into what Coalfield refers to as the “33-6-3 model.” That means that workers devote 33 hours per week training on the job, six hours per week doing schoolwork to earn an associate’s degree, and three hours devoted to personal development coaching. “That degree will benefit our workers for the rest of their lives, even if they weren’t working with us,” says Dennison.

Growing up in coal country

Even as a child, Dennison saw that there were deep, systemic issues in and around Appalachia. His parents taught at Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia, providing a layer of economic security that many of his peers lacked. At one point, for instance, he realized that some of his schoolmates were living in abject poverty. Some didn’t even have running water. Those early experiences left an impression on Dennison, and it’s one of the primary motivators that led him to start his organization in his home state. “The more I traveled, the more I felt connected to West Virginia,” he says. “West Virginia was really my place. It’s where I belong, and I feel like I can have the greatest impact right in my own backyard.”

I feel like I can have the greatest impact right in my own backyard. Brandon Dennison Founder and CEO, Coalfield Development

After earning a graduate degree from Indiana University, he came back to West Virginia and started working as a grant writer and consultant. Meanwhile, he patched together a mix of grants, donor fundraising, and loans to kick-start Coalfield Development. The organization officially launched in 2010, engaging mostly in small-scale community projects. Coalfield’s first big project was refurbishing an old building in Wayne. That renovation included training workers in clean, energy-efficient construction and destruction techniques, to turn the old residential building into new apartments. Coalfield blossomed into other business areas, creating companies under its nonprofit umbrella that worked in different sectors, such as clothing production and solar panel installation. By 2016, Dennison was able to transition to Coalfield full time. He now earns $80,000 per year running the company.

Expanding Coalfield’s reach

Coalfield was originally focused on helping young people build skills and earn degrees. But after the company opened up opportunities to out-of-work coal miners, Dennison says, it started getting attention — and, crucially, funding — from outside of the state. Carter Stewart, a board member at Coalfield Development and a managing director of the Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation, which provided Coalfield with funding, says that the organization stood out among the many others that come to them for money. Stewart says that’s because Coalfield has an innovative approach to solving problems, and it’s a model that can be adopted elsewhere. Dennison, in particular, won over the DRK Foundation. “We found Brandon to be a very thoughtful, charismatic, passionate leader,” Stewart says. “He’s very much a humble leader with an iron will who’s willing to walk through walls to make sure his organization succeeds.”

He’s very much a humble leader with an iron will who’s willing to walk through walls to make sure his organization succeeds. Carter Stewart Managing director, Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation

‘He’s a superhero in West Virginia’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-15  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, superhero, development, helping, jobs, coalfield, west, ceo, coal, organization, 1000, appalachia, living, virginia, dennison, stewart, job


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6 brilliant strategies that helped these people pay off more than $800,000 in debt

The couple, who live in Exeter, Rhode Island, say they used this simple tool to help them tackle student loan debt. “I’m a very visual person, and my wife is very visual,” David told Grow earlier this year. Read more: How tidying up her life and her money helped a 34-year-old pay off $43,500 in debt in 3 years3. Using a cash-only spending strategy, Epperson was able to pay off $20,000 in student loan and auto loan debt in just one year. “I would look at my credit card bill and not even remember


The couple, who live in Exeter, Rhode Island, say they used this simple tool to help them tackle student loan debt.
“I’m a very visual person, and my wife is very visual,” David told Grow earlier this year.
Read more: How tidying up her life and her money helped a 34-year-old pay off $43,500 in debt in 3 years3.
Using a cash-only spending strategy, Epperson was able to pay off $20,000 in student loan and auto loan debt in just one year.
“I would look at my credit card bill and not even remember
6 brilliant strategies that helped these people pay off more than $800,000 in debt Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-06  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brilliant, helped, read, pay, told, loan, 800000, strategies, grow, student, money, debt, things


6 brilliant strategies that helped these people pay off more than $800,000 in debt

Getting out of debt isn’t easy. It usually requires a lot of time and sacrifice. But having a game plan can make the process easier no matter how much you owe. If you’re not sure where to start, consider these six success stories about paying off debt with the help of simple tricks, tools, and strategies. All told, these people have paid off, collectively, more than $800,000 in debt.

1. Visualize your debt

An $18 dry-erase board proved to be a good investment for David and Alana Almonte. The couple, who live in Exeter, Rhode Island, say they used this simple tool to help them tackle student loan debt. “I’m a very visual person, and my wife is very visual,” David told Grow earlier this year. So he decided that a good method to help them ditch their debt was to track the total on a board in their kitchen. That daily reminder nudged them to spend less, helping them pay off $18,000 from 2016 to 2018. More from Grow:

How someone just out of college saved $100,000 in 3 years

Suze Orman: ‘Tell everybody how much money you’re making’

9 highest-paying health-care jobs that don’t require an MD

David and Alana Almonte. Courtesy David Almonte

2. Organize your home

Abigail Ness, a 34-year-old research analyst from Nampa, Idaho, took inspiration from decluttering guru Marie Kondo and used home organization as a way to improve her finances. She made an inventory of her belongings, which led her to change her shopping habits and reduce unnecessary purchases. “I made it my mission to be resourceful with the things I already own,” Ness told Grow earlier this year. Getting organized helped her pay off $43,500 in debt over three years. Read more: How tidying up her life and her money helped a 34-year-old pay off $43,500 in debt in 3 years

3. Adopt a one-income lifestyle

Bernadette and AJ Maulion of Charlotte, North Carolina, realized they would need to cut their spending significantly to quickly pay off their more than $300,000 in student loan and mortgage debt. So they made a plan to only live off of one income — AJ’s $91,000 salary. To keep their bills in line with that single-income strategy, they sold many of their possessions, including one of their two cars and unneeded furniture and clothing. “Seeing how much I was paid for things [I sold] and how much they depreciated deterred me from wanting to buy things,” Bernadette told Grow earlier this year. Read more: How a one-income, minimalist lifestyle helped a couple pay off $300,000 in debt in 3 years

Courtesy Bernadette Joy Maulion and AJ Maulion

4. Use cash — and only cash

Cash is king for 23-year-old Kristy Epperson of Dayton, Ohio. Using a cash-only spending strategy, Epperson was able to pay off $20,000 in student loan and auto loan debt in just one year. By ditching plastic, Epperson found that she was more mindful about where and when she spent money. That helped her avoid online shopping and ordering takeout. “I would look at my credit card bill and not even remember some of the charges,” she told Grow. Read more: How going cash-only helped this 23-year-old pay off $20,000 in debt in one year

5. Communicate about money with your partner

After their honeymoon in 2014, Michael and Taylor Lacy of Houston, Texas, realized they were $61,000 in debt. That didn’t sit well with the newlyweds, who became motivated to pay it off as efficiently as possible. The couple made a budget and had monthly money meetings to discuss their saving and spending habits. They credit their candid conversations with helping them stay on track even through setbacks like a job loss. Read more: How marrying their finances helped newlyweds pay off $61,000 in under 2 years

Taylor and Michael Lacy. Courtesy Michael Lacy

6. Account for every dollar you spend


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-06  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brilliant, helped, read, pay, told, loan, 800000, strategies, grow, student, money, debt, things


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How to avoid money mistakes, from the author of ‘The Dumb Things Smart People Do With Their Money’

Even smart people can do dumb things when it comes to money. In “The Dumb Things Smart People Do With Their Money,” she outlines 13 common and costly financial mistakes people make, like investing in complicated financial products they may not understand, including precious metals or reverse mortgages. Why it’s so easy to make money mistakesOver the years, Schlesinger says, she couldn’t understand “why is it that I’m hearing from these incredibly smart people who consistently do dumb things with


Even smart people can do dumb things when it comes to money.
In “The Dumb Things Smart People Do With Their Money,” she outlines 13 common and costly financial mistakes people make, like investing in complicated financial products they may not understand, including precious metals or reverse mortgages.
Why it’s so easy to make money mistakesOver the years, Schlesinger says, she couldn’t understand “why is it that I’m hearing from these incredibly smart people who consistently do dumb things with
How to avoid money mistakes, from the author of ‘The Dumb Things Smart People Do With Their Money’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-05  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, avoid, easy, money, schlesinger, ways, dumb, author, financial, emotions, smart, mistakes, decisions, things


How to avoid money mistakes, from the author of 'The Dumb Things Smart People Do With Their Money'

Even smart people can do dumb things when it comes to money. Money can be complicated, and it’s a topic many people are uncomfortable discussing with their friends or family. As a result, it’s easy to make a financial misstep that can have a domino effect. Like not saving enough, early enough, for retirement. We all make mistakes, though, and many are easy to avoid or to bounce back from. That’s the message certified financial planner and CBS business analyst Jill Schlesinger is trying to convey in her new book. In “The Dumb Things Smart People Do With Their Money,” she outlines 13 common and costly financial mistakes people make, like investing in complicated financial products they may not understand, including precious metals or reverse mortgages.

Why it’s so easy to make money mistakes

Over the years, Schlesinger says, she couldn’t understand “why is it that I’m hearing from these incredibly smart people who consistently do dumb things with their money?” The primary reason we make bad decisions with our money, Schlesinger says, is because we’re human. We make decisions based on a number of factors, like emotions, gut feelings, and superstition. “We’re not programmed to make good financial decisions,” Schlesinger says. “We are emotional beings. We’re not algorithms. Even when we have the best information, our instincts and emotions lead us astray.”

We are emotional beings. We’re not algorithms. Even when we have the best information, our instincts and emotions lead us astray. Jill Schlesinger CFP

Very few people are able to examine their every financial move with deep analytical insight and steely resolve. Instead, some people blow their budgets ordering takeout, because they’re hungry and feeling lazy. Or they see the market dropping and follow through on the urge to sell, despite the fact that experts say panicked selling is a move that can cost you a lot of money. They might fall into mental traps, or get led into overspending by social media.

Video by Ian Wolsten Luckily, there are ways to make smarter decisions more of the time.

3 ways to make smarter money choices


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-05  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, avoid, easy, money, schlesinger, ways, dumb, author, financial, emotions, smart, mistakes, decisions, things


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How this 37-year-old makes $34,000 per year in extra income—as an Airbnb host

His main Airbnb property, the Yellow House, is bringing in tens of thousands of dollars a year. In 2018, renting out the house brought in $34,000 in revenue — around four times as much as the average Airbnb property. Pierson started to host visitors through Couchsurfing.com and eventually, after realizing it could help him pay his rent, booking guests on Airbnb. “That was the point when a light bulb went off and I started looking for a house,” Pierson says. While the typical rate for The Yellow


His main Airbnb property, the Yellow House, is bringing in tens of thousands of dollars a year.
In 2018, renting out the house brought in $34,000 in revenue — around four times as much as the average Airbnb property.
Pierson started to host visitors through Couchsurfing.com and eventually, after realizing it could help him pay his rent, booking guests on Airbnb.
“That was the point when a light bulb went off and I started looking for a house,” Pierson says.
While the typical rate for The Yellow
How this 37-year-old makes $34,000 per year in extra income—as an Airbnb host Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, started, 34000, athens, weekends, pierson, incomeas, 37yearold, house, airbnb, extra, makes, property, host, pay, yellow, help


How this 37-year-old makes $34,000 per year in extra income—as an Airbnb host

“You might as well call me Cinderella, because sometimes I feel like all I do is clean,” says Jon Pierson, a 37-year-old Airbnb host living in Athens, Georgia. But all that cleaning pays off, as Pierson has been able to adopt Airbnb as a lucrative side gig. His main Airbnb property, the Yellow House, is bringing in tens of thousands of dollars a year. In 2018, renting out the house brought in $34,000 in revenue — around four times as much as the average Airbnb property. He’s on pace to beat that in 2019. Over the years, Pierson has worked at nonprofits in Albuquerque, as a park ranger in Yellowstone, and for the United States Forest Service in Arizona. These days, he’s a part-time marketer at a music venue, a county landscaping supervisor and a dad to his 8-year-old son, Benjamin, who lives with his mom in Athens. But on top of dad-duty and working two other jobs, Pierson finds himself constantly scrubbing, mopping, and dusting to maintain his status as an Airbnb Superhost.

Pierson’s long, winding road to Airbnb

At 20, after dropping out of college in Maine, Pierson rode his bike across the country via the Trans-America Trail, sleeping on strangers’ couches. That trip, which took him across 15 states and added up to more than 4,000 miles, “changed my life,” he says. More from Grow:

How an extra $25 per month can help you pay off debt faster

How a 31-year-old launched a $225,000 dog-care business

Doing this after your interview can boost your chances of getting hired He eventually earned a bachelor’s degree in parks and recreation management from Northern Arizona University in 2008, at age 26. After a few years working in forests and parks, Pierson moved to Chattanooga, Tennessee, where he thought back to his bicycle trip across the country and decided to start hosting travelers. “So many people would stop and offer me a meal or a bed or a shower,” he says. “I wanted to give back, karmically.” Pierson started to host visitors through Couchsurfing.com and eventually, after realizing it could help him pay his rent, booking guests on Airbnb. “I stumbled across Airbnb and started offering my spare bedroom. From there, I started offering my whole place,” he says, “to help pay the bills.” But he ran into trouble when his landlord caught wind of the activity, which violated his lease. “I was a Superhost at that point; I had a great reputation on Airbnb,” he says. He made a deal with his landlord to let him fulfill his remaining reservations, but the landlord wouldn’t renew the lease. “That was the point when a light bulb went off and I started looking for a house,” Pierson says.

At peak times, he can charge $700 a night

Pierson moved to Athens and, with a relative’s help, cobbled together a down payment so he could purchase The Yellow House, a 15-year-old, 1,000-square-foot, two-bedroom cottage, for $127,000. He completed it with used furniture bought for $3,000 and put the house up for rent on Airbnb for $100 per night. “I closed on a Monday, my first guests arrived on Thursday,” he says. “I wasted no time.” Pierson himself became something of a nomad, staying with friends and sometimes at the house when it wasn’t booked.

Jon Pierson’s Yellow House

Pierson’s Airbnb business and his new home, Athens, were a perfect fit. The city has a population of around 125,000 and is home to the University of Georgia, which can attract tens of thousands of visitors on weekends for graduations and football games. Events like those helped make The Yellow House so lucrative. While the typical rate for The Yellow House is now $175 per night, football weekends can raise the rate much higher. For an upcoming game this September between Georgia and Notre Dame, the house booked a year in advance for $700 per night. Graduation weekends fetch similar rates. “I make half my annual mortgage in six weekends,” he says. Pierson’s been so successful on Airbnb that he’s even started managing profiles for other hosts. For 20% of each booking fee, Pierson launches a host’s profile, has professional photographs taken of the property, manages the calendar, and coordinates with all of the guests and cleaning crews. Doing it all generally takes between 10 and 15 hours per week. On a busy weekend, Pierson says he could be running up to six Airbnb stays simultaneously. “That’s where you make your money,” he says.

Pierson’s advice for running an Airbnb


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, started, 34000, athens, weekends, pierson, incomeas, 37yearold, house, airbnb, extra, makes, property, host, pay, yellow, help


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What it’s really like to be a food scientist at a big company like Kraft Heinz

Inside the consumer science labKimmins, 43, is the senior manager of sensory and consumer science at Kraft Heinz sensory testing labs in Glenview, Illinois. Kimmins makes six figures working with marketing insights specialists at Kraft Heinz. Kraft Heinz. Kraft Heinz. Courtesy Kraft Heinz


Inside the consumer science labKimmins, 43, is the senior manager of sensory and consumer science at Kraft Heinz sensory testing labs in Glenview, Illinois.
Kimmins makes six figures working with marketing insights specialists at Kraft Heinz.
Kraft Heinz.
Kraft Heinz.
Courtesy Kraft Heinz
What it’s really like to be a food scientist at a big company like Kraft Heinz Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-18  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, products, consumer, try, product, big, heinz, company, really, scientist, ideas, working, kimmins, kraft, food, science


What it's really like to be a food scientist at a big company like Kraft Heinz

For most of human history, people ate what was available: Root vegetables that could easily be collected, wild game that could easily be trapped or hunted, livestock that was easily domesticated and bred. Even if you were to go grocery shopping 150 years ago, your options would have been limited to products like beans and dried meat. These days, a walk through a grocery store is like a jaunt through Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory — at least compared to the past. Almost anything you could want is readily available, and it’s often quite affordable. Products that were unimaginable a century ago are now commonplace, like Cocoa Puffs cereal, Hot Pockets, and Fruit by the Foot. That’s in part because of people like Emily Kimmins.

Inside the consumer science lab

Kimmins, 43, is the senior manager of sensory and consumer science at Kraft Heinz sensory testing labs in Glenview, Illinois. Kimmins makes six figures working with marketing insights specialists at Kraft Heinz. She’s been there since 2018, taking cues from interviews and roundtables with consumers (some of whom are professional taste-testers), and turning those ideas into marketable products. Her job is to literally come up with new foods.

Kraft Heinz. Courtesy Kraft Heinz

A typical day might include brainstorming new ideas, taking feedback from the company’s product marketing professionals, and directing product development teams who devise and design new recipes and product names by turning those ideas into reality. “Our role is to help the product development teams understand how to make the best product … to help them understand the target consumer — what they’re looking for,” says Kimmins. A large part of that is putting yourself in the consumer’s shoes and thinking about a product’s physical dimensions and what it looks, tastes, and smells like. Her team usually juggles several projects at once. One recent example: Kimmins and her team set out to create a fast, healthy, and hot breakfast product that people could make in a few minutes. They decided on ingredients (eggs and veggies), and a way to package and cook it. The result is Just Crack an Egg, a refrigerated bowl of potatoes, vegetables, and cheese that a consumer adds an egg to and then microwaves. The result is a hot breakfast scramble in a bowl that requires minimal effort. From idea to shelf, Just Crack an Egg took two years. “That [product] went through the whole process,” Kimmins says. “We had an idea that we wanted to give people a fresh breakfast — we tried a lot of different options, and that’s the one that ended up going to market.” Some products, though, take as little as six months.

How creating flavors became ‘a really good playground’

Though Kimmins has been working at Kraft Heinz for only a couple of years, she’s worked in the industry for more than 18 years. An Illinois native, she moved to Ohio with her family as a young teenager and attended the University of Toledo, where she earned a biology degree. She loved science and decided to build a career earning six figures as a scientist. But food wasn’t at the forefront of her mind — in fact, she didn’t know what she wanted to do, so she signed up with a temp agency, figuring she could try out various science-based jobs to see what she liked best. The first position she got was at a four-week stint at Procter & Gamble lab in Cincinnati working on dentures. “I had to make really strong coffee and tea to try and stain the dentures, and try to keep the panelists entertained,” she says. That gave her a taste of how product developers work with consumers, though, and she took a job at Givaudan, a Swiss company that creates flavors and fragrances for food manufacturers, where she worked for eight years.

Kraft Heinz. Courtesy Kraft Heinz


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-18  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, products, consumer, try, product, big, heinz, company, really, scientist, ideas, working, kimmins, kraft, food, science


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How the FIRE movement can help you achieve your money goals, whether or not you want to retire early

Save and invest enough money to become financially independent and leave the 9-to-5 workforce while you’re still (relatively) young: Sounds exciting, maybe, but also daunting. “FIRE” stands for “financial independence, retire early.” Video by Stephen ParkhurstWhat FIRE means in practice depends on the personThe FIRE movement generally requires some sacrifices. The biggest challenge on the financial independence path was to choose to live my life differently than the other people in my life. “You


Save and invest enough money to become financially independent and leave the 9-to-5 workforce while you’re still (relatively) young: Sounds exciting, maybe, but also daunting.
“FIRE” stands for “financial independence, retire early.”
Video by Stephen ParkhurstWhat FIRE means in practice depends on the personThe FIRE movement generally requires some sacrifices.
The biggest challenge on the financial independence path was to choose to live my life differently than the other people in my life.
“You
How the FIRE movement can help you achieve your money goals, whether or not you want to retire early Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, goals, help, job, financial, achieve, movement, life, retire, independence, different, early, author, save, goal


How the FIRE movement can help you achieve your money goals, whether or not you want to retire early

Save and invest enough money to become financially independent and leave the 9-to-5 workforce while you’re still (relatively) young: Sounds exciting, maybe, but also daunting. The challenges haven’t stopped a small but growing group of supersavers — along with some more famous devotees — from becoming part of the “FIRE” movement. And they want you to know that you can do it, too. “FIRE” stands for “financial independence, retire early.” The gist of the concept, and the movement it spawned, is that you save as much of your income as you possibly can, typically at least 50%. The goal is to reach a state of financial independence — wherein you would have enough money to sustain yourself without any additional income — and then quit your job to do something you like more. Many FIRE proponents plan to exit the workforce in their 30s or 40s. Even if that isn’t a goal that resonates with or seems possible for you, there’s a lot you can learn from these supersavers about how to get better at money and feel more in control of your own financial situation.

Video by Stephen Parkhurst

What FIRE means in practice depends on the person

The FIRE movement generally requires some sacrifices. You may need to pick up another job or side hustle, eliminate vacations and social spending, and refuse to give into lifestyle creep. “The biggest challenge on the financial independence path was to choose to live my life differently than the other people in my life,” says Grant Sabatier, a FIRE advocate and the author of the book “Financial Freedom.” “My friends were all going out, spending a ton of money — I lived in a crappy apartment and drove a crappy car.” FIRE can also mean different things to different people. While some find it a useful framework for getting ahead in their retirement planning, prioritizing financial independence allows others to quit a job they hate and instead pursue less lucrative work they enjoy.

The biggest challenge on the financial independence path was to choose to live my life differently than the other people in my life. Grant Sabatier Author and FIRE advocate

Although author Ramit Sethi, who wrote the book “I Will Teach You To Be Rich,” is supportive of the FIRE movement in general, and of other frameworks that help people save more money, he says it’s also important to keep your end goal in mind. It may not necessarily be a good idea to retire at 35 only to sit in your house and watch TV for the rest of your life, for example. Instead, he suggests, you could strive to free yourself up from a career you may not enjoy and focus on what you want to do. “You can find a different job,” he says. “You can become an entrepreneur.” How easy it is to try to make FIRE work will depend on your personal financial situation. If you’re a high earner living in a low-cost area, for example, and you don’t have a lot of debt, you may be able to maximize your saving and investing if you make a few smart money moves. The average American has to contend with stagnant wages and rising expenses for essentials like health care and housing costs, though, making it a struggle to put money away at all. The typical adult also has nearly $30,000 in debt to pay off, not counting mortgages.

Smart money moves for anyone who wants more freedom


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, goals, help, job, financial, achieve, movement, life, retire, independence, different, early, author, save, goal


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From musician-activist to lawmaker: What it’s really like to be an NYC councilman

Brannan, a 41-year-old first-term city councilman from Bay Ridge, represents New York City’s 43rd district, comprising the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Bay Ridge, Bensonhurst, Bath Beach, and Dyker Heights. Like all other New York City council members, he now earns an annual salary of $148,500 for trying to solve problems for his constituents. Before running for office, Brannan was most well-known for being a member of two hardcore bands, Indecision (which he started in high school) and, later, Mos


Brannan, a 41-year-old first-term city councilman from Bay Ridge, represents New York City’s 43rd district, comprising the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Bay Ridge, Bensonhurst, Bath Beach, and Dyker Heights.
Like all other New York City council members, he now earns an annual salary of $148,500 for trying to solve problems for his constituents.
Before running for office, Brannan was most well-known for being a member of two hardcore bands, Indecision (which he started in high school) and, later, Mos
From musician-activist to lawmaker: What it’s really like to be an NYC councilman Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, councilman, represents, music, really, musicianactivist, lawmaker, working, city, nyc, musician, office, brannan, try, york


From musician-activist to lawmaker: What it's really like to be an NYC councilman

Justin Brannan will be the first to tell you that the life of a city councilman in New York City isn’t glamorous — and neither is his windowless office across the street from City Hall in Manhattan. “I only come here if I have to,” he says. “I’d rather be in the district.” Brannan, a 41-year-old first-term city councilman from Bay Ridge, represents New York City’s 43rd district, comprising the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Bay Ridge, Bensonhurst, Bath Beach, and Dyker Heights. Like all other New York City council members, he now earns an annual salary of $148,500 for trying to solve problems for his constituents. His professional life could hardly be more different than it was in his 20s and early 30s, when he focused on playing music, touring the world, championing for issues he cared about and working several jobs throughout New York City to be able to make rent.

From the touring van to City Hall

Growing up, Brannan says, he never saw himself as a politician. In fact, he spent much of his youth taking aim at authority as an activist and musician. As a high school student in the ’90s, Brannan started a hardcore punk band with some older friends, and began playing shows and hanging out at music venues and other places around New York City. During this time, he says, that he became involved in AIDS awareness campaigns, as well as social justice and animal rights activism. Before running for office, Brannan was most well-known for being a member of two hardcore bands, Indecision (which he started in high school) and, later, Most Precious Blood. While Brannan’s time as a musician gave him a chance to tour all over the world and experience different cultures, it wasn’t lucrative. He was mostly concerned with how he was going to pay the next months’ rent — and his tuition — as he worked toward an undergraduate degree in journalism at Fordham University.

Justin Brannan. Courtesy Office of Councilman Justin Brannan

After graduating, he continued to play music while working a variety of low-wage jobs in his 20s and 30s including stints on Wall Street working in the mail room at Bear Stearns and later, as an announcer with a local radio station in New York. He eventually found a job that allowed him to earn some more money while also allowing him to tap into his activist roots: Brannan ended up working for his local city councilman, Vincent Gentile, as his director of communications and legislative affairs. When Gentile decided to retire in 2017, Brannan made the decision to run for his seat — and he narrowly won.

‘I’m actually going to try to get some of this stuff done’

As a city councilman, Brannan represents more than 160,000 people. “More people than Mayor Pete represents!” he says. Perhaps more importantly, his new job gives him the ability to try and take aim at some of the societal issues that he’s cared about since he was a broke activist and musician. “The things that were important to me at 17,” like social justice and animal rights issues, “those things are still important to me,” Brannan says. “Now I have a chance to actually write laws — I’m actually going to try to get some of this stuff done.”

Justin Brannan. Courtesy Office of Councilman Justin Brannan


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, councilman, represents, music, really, musicianactivist, lawmaker, working, city, nyc, musician, office, brannan, try, york


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