Jeff Bezos phone hack claim blaming crown prince is a ‘total lie,’ Saudi’s al-Jubeir says

Explosive allegations that tie Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to the hacking of Amazon CEO and billionaire Jeff Bezos’ phone are “nonsense,” Saudi Arabia’s minister of state for foreign affairs said on Thursday. “It was based on false and unproven allegations, people trying to sensationalize something that is pure fiction.” I can’t read people’s minds, but I do know it’s a total fabrication, a total lie. Bezos, through his security consultant Gavin de Becker, has flatly accused the Saudi


Explosive allegations that tie Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to the hacking of Amazon CEO and billionaire Jeff Bezos’ phone are “nonsense,” Saudi Arabia’s minister of state for foreign affairs said on Thursday.
“It was based on false and unproven allegations, people trying to sensationalize something that is pure fiction.”
I can’t read people’s minds, but I do know it’s a total fabrication, a total lie.
Bezos, through his security consultant Gavin de Becker, has flatly accused the Saudi
Jeff Bezos phone hack claim blaming crown prince is a ‘total lie,’ Saudi’s al-Jubeir says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, claim, saudis, saudi, crown, hack, target, trying, lie, prince, blaming, bezos, investigation, jeff, allegations, total, phone


Jeff Bezos phone hack claim blaming crown prince is a 'total lie,' Saudi's al-Jubeir says

Explosive allegations that tie Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to the hacking of Amazon CEO and billionaire Jeff Bezos’ phone are “nonsense,” Saudi Arabia’s minister of state for foreign affairs said on Thursday.

“Total nonsense — this story was out almost a year ago, it was debunked, we rejected it completely,” Adel al-Jubeir told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

“It was based on false and unproven allegations, people trying to sensationalize something that is pure fiction.”

The comments come in response to the release of a 2019 report based on forensic analysis by advisory firm FTI Consulting, which was hired by Bezos to investigate an apparent hack of his phone and the exfiltration of reams of personal data, including nude photos sent to a mistress.

Asked where he thought the allegations in the report originated, al-Jubeir replied, “You’ll have to ask the people who wrote it. I can’t read people’s minds, but I do know it’s a total fabrication, a total lie. Whoever is putting this out is trying to put Saudi Arabia in a bad light.”

The Amazon CEO, one of the world’s richest men, also owns the Washington Post. The newspaper became a target of Saudi internet attack campaigns for carrying out highly critical coverage of the kingdom after the murder of one of its columnists, Jamal Khashoggi, by Saudi operatives in October of 2018.

Bezos, through his security consultant Gavin de Becker, has flatly accused the Saudi government of wanting to do him harm. De Becker alleged last March that the Saudis had “access to Bezos’s phone, and gained private information” and that the government was “intent on harming Jeff Bezos since . . . the Post began its relentless coverage” of the brutal murder of Khashoggi.

U.N. experts on Wednesday called for an immediate investigation into the “possible involvement” of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the hacking.

“The alleged hacking of Mr. Bezos’s phone, and those of others, demands immediate investigation by U.S. and other relevant authorities, including investigation of the continuous, multi-year, direct and personal involvement of the Crown Prince in efforts to target perceived opponents,” the U.N. special rapporteurs said in a statement.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, claim, saudis, saudi, crown, hack, target, trying, lie, prince, blaming, bezos, investigation, jeff, allegations, total, phone


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Here’s how the Saudis allegedly hacked Jeff Bezos’ phone, and how to protect yourself

Bandar Algaloud | Anadolu Agency | Getty ImagesToday, the U.N. called for an investigation into allegations that the crown prince of Saudi Arabia personally facilitated a hack on Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos’ mobile phone. According to the allegations, Bezos’ phone was hacked using malicious software delivered in a WhatsApp message that came directly from Crown Prince Mohammed’s phone in November 2018. Saudi agents murdered Khashoggi in the Saudi consulate in Istanbul in October 2018 at the direction o


Bandar Algaloud | Anadolu Agency | Getty ImagesToday, the U.N. called for an investigation into allegations that the crown prince of Saudi Arabia personally facilitated a hack on Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos’ mobile phone.
According to the allegations, Bezos’ phone was hacked using malicious software delivered in a WhatsApp message that came directly from Crown Prince Mohammed’s phone in November 2018.
Saudi agents murdered Khashoggi in the Saudi consulate in Istanbul in October 2018 at the direction o
Here’s how the Saudis allegedly hacked Jeff Bezos’ phone, and how to protect yourself Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: kate fazzini
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Here's how the Saudis allegedly hacked Jeff Bezos' phone, and how to protect yourself

Mohammad bin Salman Al Saud and Jeff Bezos pose for a photo during his visit in in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on November 9, 2016. Bandar Algaloud | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images

Today, the U.N. called for an investigation into allegations that the crown prince of Saudi Arabia personally facilitated a hack on Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos’ mobile phone. The report, which is based on research Bezos commissioned, alleges that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman may have personally been involved in a complex hacking campaign against Bezos, which started with a friendly dinner and exchange of phone numbers between the two in 2018. The report shows how outsiders can monitor seemingly private phone messages. However, while tools like those described in the report exist, they are costly and rarely used against normal citizens. Moreover, it’s worth keeping in mind that Bezos himself commissioned the report and there may be alternative explanations for how information about his personal life leaked.

What happened?

According to the allegations, Bezos’ phone was hacked using malicious software delivered in a WhatsApp message that came directly from Crown Prince Mohammed’s phone in November 2018. The two of them had met and exchanged phone numbers in the spring of that year. In November of 2018, Bezos allegedly received a text from Crown Prince Mohammed’s WhatsApp number again, this time with a picture of a woman resembling Sanchez “months before the Bezos affair was known publicly,” according to the report. Bezos would later preempt a National Enquirer story on the affair in a post on Medium, which also was the first time he mentioned a possible connection between the hack and Saudi Arabia. The Saudis apparently targeted Bezos because he owns The Washington Post, which published work from Jamal Khashoggi, a Saudi dissident. Saudi agents murdered Khashoggi in the Saudi consulate in Istanbul in October 2018 at the direction of the crown prince, according to the CIA. After initial denials, the Saudis have acknowledged the murder and sentenced several people to death for it, but denied that Crown Prince Mohammed knew about it. The report says the hack used the software of an Israeli company called NSO Group, which sells a software platform known as Pegasus. This platform allows governments to access internet-connected devices. The company says it only sells its products to government agencies pursuing information from the devices of criminals and terrorists. Human rights activists, however, have said the software is used much more widely and to target attorneys, journalists and dissidents who oppose various governments that have contracted with NSO Group, an allegation put forth in the report today. NSO Group has denied its software was involved. “As we stated unequivocally in April 2019 to the same false assertion, our technology was not used in this instance. We know this because of how our software works and our technology cannot be used on U.S. phone numbers. Our products are only used to investigate terror and serious crime. Any suggestion that NSO is involved is defamatory and the company will take legal counsel to address this.” Saudi Arabia has called the allegations “absurd” and has also characterized the killing of Khashoggi as a “rogue operation.”

Not a worry for most of us

NSO Group isn’t the only company that makes this type of software. There are numerous other companies that have used differing versions of malicious code, delivered via text or call. These programs let outsiders compromise mobile devices by sending errant information through loopholes in these communication programs. In some cases, respondents don’t even need to answer the call or text in order for the phone to be compromised. Once the phone is compromised, the attackers can download a wide array of information from it. This seems to be what happened in the case of Bezos’ phone, as subsequent messages suggested that Crown Prince Mohammed was aware of Bezos’ affair and impending divorce, according to the U.N. report. While real, these types of hacks are exceedingly rare. The software required to carry them out is extremely costly, and companies such as Facebook, which owns WhatsApp, and Apple are usually quick to patch the holes that these programs exploit. These types of hacks have targeted attorneys and other professionals representing controversial figures, however. Anyone in a position connected to politically controversial figures — including bankers, accountants, political advisors, speechwriters and so on — should be concerned about having their communications monitored in this way. If you’re in this boat, make sure you routinely update your phone and all its software, especially with all security-related updates, and consider consulting with a cybersecurity expert who can help you tailor a security plan. Share your phone number very selectively only with people who absolutely need it, and consider conducting private or sensitive business on a device that’s separate from your day-to-day phone. But for most of us, these types of hacks are a very remote concern and easily remedied by updating messaging software on a regular schedule.

Skepticism warranted


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, phone, heres, jeff, hacked, crown, bezos, nso, saudis, prince, report, used, protect, information, software, saudi, allegedly


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Saudi crown prince reported to be behind Jeff Bezos hack

Saudi crown prince reported to be behind Jeff Bezos hackCNBC’s Robert Frank and The Verge’s Nilay Patel discuss reports that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman was involved in the hack of Jeff Bezos’ phone.


Saudi crown prince reported to be behind Jeff Bezos hackCNBC’s Robert Frank and The Verge’s Nilay Patel discuss reports that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman was involved in the hack of Jeff Bezos’ phone.
Saudi crown prince reported to be behind Jeff Bezos hack Cached Page below :
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Saudi crown prince reported to be behind Jeff Bezos hack

Saudi crown prince reported to be behind Jeff Bezos hack

CNBC’s Robert Frank and The Verge’s Nilay Patel discuss reports that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman was involved in the hack of Jeff Bezos’ phone.


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‘Not worried at all’ about attracting international visitors, says Saudi tourism chief

Despite ongoing unrest in the Middle East, Saudi Arabia’s tourism chief said the kingdom is “very safe” and he doesn’t see the disorder impacting tourist arrivals. “I’m not worried at all because Saudi Arabia is very safe,” Ahmad Al-Khatib, chairman of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage, told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble on Tuesday. “If we look at the 1.6 billion travelers, I don’t believe more than 10 percent would feel that Saudi Arabia is not safe.” He also said he hasn’t heard of


Despite ongoing unrest in the Middle East, Saudi Arabia’s tourism chief said the kingdom is “very safe” and he doesn’t see the disorder impacting tourist arrivals.
“I’m not worried at all because Saudi Arabia is very safe,” Ahmad Al-Khatib, chairman of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage, told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble on Tuesday.
“If we look at the 1.6 billion travelers, I don’t believe more than 10 percent would feel that Saudi Arabia is not safe.”
He also said he hasn’t heard of
‘Not worried at all’ about attracting international visitors, says Saudi tourism chief Cached Page below :
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'Not worried at all' about attracting international visitors, says Saudi tourism chief

Despite ongoing unrest in the Middle East, Saudi Arabia’s tourism chief said the kingdom is “very safe” and he doesn’t see the disorder impacting tourist arrivals.

“I’m not worried at all because Saudi Arabia is very safe,” Ahmad Al-Khatib, chairman of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage, told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble on Tuesday.

When asked about ballistic missiles from Yemen and potentially Iran or Iraq that are in range of the country, he said he expects “things will … settle and slow down in Yemen” and the situation will improve.

“I don’t see it impacting,” he said. “If we look at the 1.6 billion travelers, I don’t believe more than 10 percent would feel that Saudi Arabia is not safe.”

He also said he hasn’t heard of anyone deciding not to visit because of the instability in the region.

The kingdom announced last September that it would be launching its first-ever tourist visas in a bid to boost tourism. Before then, foreign visitors were almost exclusively religious pilgrims.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: abigail ng
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UN calls for investigation into alleged Saudi crown prince involvement in Bezos phone hack

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — UN experts have called for an immediate investigation into the “possible involvement” of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the hacking of Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos’ iPhone in 2018. “The alleged hacking of Mr. Bezos’s phone, and those of others, demands immediate investigation by U.S. and other relevant authorities, including investigation of the continuous, multi-year, direct and personal involvement of the Crown Prince in efforts to target perceived opponents.”


DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — UN experts have called for an immediate investigation into the “possible involvement” of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the hacking of Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos’ iPhone in 2018.
“The alleged hacking of Mr. Bezos’s phone, and those of others, demands immediate investigation by U.S. and other relevant authorities, including investigation of the continuous, multi-year, direct and personal involvement of the Crown Prince in efforts to target perceived opponents.”
UN calls for investigation into alleged Saudi crown prince involvement in Bezos phone hack Cached Page below :
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Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, phone, alleged, used, involvement, prince, bezoss, washington, calls, post, investigation, bezos, hack, crown, saudi


UN calls for investigation into alleged Saudi crown prince involvement in Bezos phone hack

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — UN experts have called for an immediate investigation into the “possible involvement” of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the hacking of Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos’ iPhone in 2018.

“The information we have received suggests the possible involvement of the Crown Prince in surveillance of Mr. Bezos, in an effort to influence, if not silence, The Washington Post’s reporting on Saudi Arabia,” UN special rapporteurs said in a statement Wednesday.

“The alleged hacking of Mr. Bezos’s phone, and those of others, demands immediate investigation by U.S. and other relevant authorities, including investigation of the continuous, multi-year, direct and personal involvement of the Crown Prince in efforts to target perceived opponents.”

The statement from UN’s human rights body centers on forensic investigations into the claim by Bezos — one of the world’s wealthiest men and owner of the Washington Post — that the Saudi government orchestrated a cyberattack against him to extract large amounts of data from his phone, including nude photos sent to his mistress.

The UN special rapporteurs, who are appointed by the world body but operate independently, made the statement after reviewing the 2019 forensic analysis carried out by Washington-based business advisory firm FTI Consulting on behalf of the American billionaire. Their statements follow earlier investigations into the killing and dismemberment of Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

FTI consulting could not detail the specific spyware used in the attack, but said its experts had “medium to high confidence” that Bezos’ iPhone was hacked by malware coming from a Whatsapp account used by the Saudi crown prince.

“Based upon the results of a full forensic examination of the logical file system of Bezos’s phone, including network analysis, and an in-depth investigation conducted over several months, FTI reports with medium to high confidence that Bezos’s IPhone X was compromised via malware sent from a WhatsApp account used by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman,” the report said, according to an excerpt published by the Financial Times.

Riyadh has consistently rejected the accusations, and the Saudi embassy in Washington on Wednesday called the allegations “absurd.”

Bezos, through his security consultant Gavin de Becker, has flatly accused the Saudi government of wanting to do him harm. De Becker in March of 2019 alleged that the Saudis had “access to Bezos’s phone, and gained private information” and that the government was “intent on harming Jeff Bezos since . . . the Post began its relentless coverage” of the brutal murder in October 2018 of Khashoggi, a Saudi journalist critical of the kingdom’s monarchy. Khashoggi was a contributing writer for the Post with U.S. residency.

Riyadh said the killing was the result of a “rogue operation” that did not involve the crown prince, contradicting the CIA’s reported conclusion from late 2018 that implicated Bin Salman as being involved.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: natasha turak
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Security consultants hired by Jeff Bezos think his phone might have been hacked by Saudi crown prince, report says

Jeff Bezos, founder and chief executive officer of Amazon.com Inc., listens during an Economic Club of Washington discussion in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018. An outside investigation ordered by Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos concluded that a WhatsApp account connected to Mohammed bin Salman, the crown prince of Saudi Arabia, could have been involved in a hack of Bezos’ smartphone, the Financial Times reported on Tuesday. The researchers had a “medium to high degree of confidence” o


Jeff Bezos, founder and chief executive officer of Amazon.com Inc., listens during an Economic Club of Washington discussion in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018.
An outside investigation ordered by Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos concluded that a WhatsApp account connected to Mohammed bin Salman, the crown prince of Saudi Arabia, could have been involved in a hack of Bezos’ smartphone, the Financial Times reported on Tuesday.
The researchers had a “medium to high degree of confidence” o
Security consultants hired by Jeff Bezos think his phone might have been hacked by Saudi crown prince, report says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: jordan novet
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Security consultants hired by Jeff Bezos think his phone might have been hacked by Saudi crown prince, report says

Jeff Bezos, founder and chief executive officer of Amazon.com Inc., listens during an Economic Club of Washington discussion in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018.

An outside investigation ordered by Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos concluded that a WhatsApp account connected to Mohammed bin Salman, the crown prince of Saudi Arabia, could have been involved in a hack of Bezos’ smartphone, the Financial Times reported on Tuesday.

The report offers one explanation of how the National Enquirer, a tabloid, obtained and published text messages Bezos had sent to his mistress, Lauren Sanchez. Around that time, Jeff and MacKenzie Bezos said they were splitting up after being married for 25 years.

The Saudi embassy in the U.S. dismissed the report, calling it “absurd” on Twitter, and asked for an investigation on the claims.

Bezos’ phone received a video file from bin Salman’s WhatsApp account after the two men had exchanged numbers at a dinner held in Los Angeles, according to Tuesday’s report. The researchers had a “medium to high degree of confidence” of the link, the Financial Times said.

The report, led by FTI Consulting, comes almost a year after Bezos’ security chief, Gavin de Becker, said last March that the company’s investigators had come to believe Saudis had access to Bezos’ phone.

Bezos, the world’s richest man, also owns The Washington Post, which published columns from Jamal Khashoggi, who had criticized bin Salman. Khashoggi was killed by Saudi agents inside the country’s embassy in Turkey in October 2018.

An Amazon spokesperson didn’t respond to a request for comment.

Read the full Financial Times report here.

WATCH: Saudis accessed Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos’ phone and gained private data, security chief says


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: jordan novet
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Citi explains why there’s an ‘ultimate cap’ on oil prices

That shift is coming at a time when global oil supply is running ahead of demand, which is already weighing down on energy prices, David Bailin, chief investment officer at Citi Private Bank, said on Thursday. As evidence of the limited upside in oil prices, Bailin pointed to last year’s drones attack on the world’s largest oil processing facility in Saudi Arabia. The attack on two Saudi Aramco facilities — claimed by Iran-aligned Yemen’s Houthi rebels — cut Saudi oil production by half and the


That shift is coming at a time when global oil supply is running ahead of demand, which is already weighing down on energy prices, David Bailin, chief investment officer at Citi Private Bank, said on Thursday.
As evidence of the limited upside in oil prices, Bailin pointed to last year’s drones attack on the world’s largest oil processing facility in Saudi Arabia.
The attack on two Saudi Aramco facilities — claimed by Iran-aligned Yemen’s Houthi rebels — cut Saudi oil production by half and the
Citi explains why there’s an ‘ultimate cap’ on oil prices Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: yen nee lee
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Citi explains why there's an 'ultimate cap' on oil prices

The cost of producing electricity from solar energy has in the last two years been lower than that of fossil fuels — and that “permanent change” will limit how high oil prices can climb, according to Citi.

That shift is coming at a time when global oil supply is running ahead of demand, which is already weighing down on energy prices, David Bailin, chief investment officer at Citi Private Bank, said on Thursday.

As evidence of the limited upside in oil prices, Bailin pointed to last year’s drones attack on the world’s largest oil processing facility in Saudi Arabia. The attack on two Saudi Aramco facilities — claimed by Iran-aligned Yemen’s Houthi rebels — cut Saudi oil production by half and the world’s daily output by 5%.

“We saw an 11-day impact in the markets: The initial spike of as much as 8% in oil prices, and then it was 4% and then ultimately down to zero,” Bailin told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Asia.”

“It’s going to take something much bigger to make a permanent impact on oil prices and have them sustainably higher than that,” he added.

A shift from oil, natural gas and coal to solar power in electricity generation will be “the ultimate cap” on prices of fossil fuels, said the CIO.

“We believe that’s a permanent change. In fact, our clients were investing in that as an unstoppable trend because now you can identify that cost point, it’s a great opportunity,” he said.

A report released last year by the International Renewable Energy Agency predicted that electricity generated by onshore wind and solar will be consistently cheaper than any fossil fuel source starting 2020, reported Reuters. The agency is an inter-governmental body that aims to help countries transition to sustainable energy sources.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: yen nee lee
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The killing of Iran’s top general was a ‘wake-up call’ to Tehran, Saudi prince says

The U.S. airstrike that killed Iran’s top commander showed Tehran that it can’t get away with its provocations, but won’t stop the country from continuing with its agenda, a former chief of Saudi intelligence told CNBC. “This was a sort of a wake-up call to the Iranian government and the Iranian leadership that they can’t get away with it.” That’s because the Iranian leadership has an “agenda and a project,” he said. Tehran has used “surrogates” such as Hezbollah in Lebanon and the Houthis in Ye


The U.S. airstrike that killed Iran’s top commander showed Tehran that it can’t get away with its provocations, but won’t stop the country from continuing with its agenda, a former chief of Saudi intelligence told CNBC.
“This was a sort of a wake-up call to the Iranian government and the Iranian leadership that they can’t get away with it.”
That’s because the Iranian leadership has an “agenda and a project,” he said.
Tehran has used “surrogates” such as Hezbollah in Lebanon and the Houthis in Ye
The killing of Iran’s top general was a ‘wake-up call’ to Tehran, Saudi prince says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: abigail ng
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The killing of Iran's top general was a 'wake-up call' to Tehran, Saudi prince says

The U.S. airstrike that killed Iran’s top commander showed Tehran that it can’t get away with its provocations, but won’t stop the country from continuing with its agenda, a former chief of Saudi intelligence told CNBC.

“The taking out of (Qasem) Soleimani definitely has been an important step to check at least some of the ambitions of Iran after its very provocative actions in the past year,” Saudi Arabian Prince Turki Al-Faisal told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble.

“The attacks on the oil tankers, culminating in the attack on the Aramco facilities, and there was no response,” he said. “This was a sort of a wake-up call to the Iranian government and the Iranian leadership that they can’t get away with it.”

Tehran has denied involvement in both incidents.

However, Al-Faisal said the death of Soleimani would not halt Iran’s “agenda.

“It definitely was a very important step,” he said. “Whether it would stop further activities by Iran to use the methods that Soleimani was very clever in using — I don’t think so.”

That’s because the Iranian leadership has an “agenda and a project,” he said. “That project is to be the dominant representative, if you like, of all of Islam in the world.”

Tehran has used “surrogates” such as Hezbollah in Lebanon and the Houthis in Yemen to advance its project, he said.

“That is going to continue,” he predicted. “Maybe less efficiently than when Soleimani was alive, but inevitably, equally terroristic and, in my view, evil in its intent.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: abigail ng
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Saudi energy minister on Trump’s actions in the Middle East: ‘He can do whatever he wishes’

Saudi Arabia’s Energy Minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman said Monday that President Donald Trump should be able to do as he chooses when it comes to international security. Speaking during a panel session at the International Petroleum Technology Conference (IPTC) in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, Abdulaziz said: “The president of the United States is the president of the United States, he can do whatever he wishes.” Abdulaziz’s comments come as energy market participants continue to closely monitor h


Saudi Arabia’s Energy Minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman said Monday that President Donald Trump should be able to do as he chooses when it comes to international security.
Speaking during a panel session at the International Petroleum Technology Conference (IPTC) in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, Abdulaziz said: “The president of the United States is the president of the United States, he can do whatever he wishes.”
Abdulaziz’s comments come as energy market participants continue to closely monitor h
Saudi energy minister on Trump’s actions in the Middle East: ‘He can do whatever he wishes’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: sam meredith
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Saudi energy minister on Trump's actions in the Middle East: 'He can do whatever he wishes'

Saudi Arabia’s Energy Minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman said Monday that President Donald Trump should be able to do as he chooses when it comes to international security.

Speaking during a panel session at the International Petroleum Technology Conference (IPTC) in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, Abdulaziz said: “The president of the United States is the president of the United States, he can do whatever he wishes.”

He’s “certainly” not accountable to me or “anybody in this room,” he added.

Abdulaziz’s comments come as energy market participants continue to closely monitor heightened tensions in the Middle East.

The U.S. killed Iranian military commander Qasem Soleimani earlier this month, triggering a dramatic escalation that many feared could result in a widening regional conflict.

Iran, an arch-rival of Saudi Arabia in the region, responded to the U.S. attack by launching missiles at two military bases housing U.S. troops in Iraq.

Iran’s supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has since said the missile attacks were a “slap on the face” of the U.S., but such military actions were “not enough.”

The situation remains tense, but both sides have sought to back off from intensifying the conflict over recent days.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: sam meredith
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US calls shooting by Saudi officer in Florida ‘act of terrorism,’ expels 21 Saudi students from training

A general view of the atmosphere at the Pensacola Naval Air Station following a shooting on December 06, 2019 in Pensacola, Florida. The attack brought fresh complications to U.S.-Saudi relations at a time of heightened tensions between the United States and Iran, Saudi Arabia’s regional rival. Saudi Air Force Second Lieutenant Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, 21, was fatally shot by a deputy sheriff during the Dec. 6 incident at the facility in Pensacola, Florida. During a news conference, Barr – the


A general view of the atmosphere at the Pensacola Naval Air Station following a shooting on December 06, 2019 in Pensacola, Florida.
The attack brought fresh complications to U.S.-Saudi relations at a time of heightened tensions between the United States and Iran, Saudi Arabia’s regional rival.
Saudi Air Force Second Lieutenant Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, 21, was fatally shot by a deputy sheriff during the Dec. 6 incident at the facility in Pensacola, Florida.
During a news conference, Barr – the
US calls shooting by Saudi officer in Florida ‘act of terrorism,’ expels 21 Saudi students from training Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expels, officer, act, students, barr, terrorism, air, investigation, trainees, calls, shooting, states, united, pensacola, saudi, florida, naval, training


US calls shooting by Saudi officer in Florida 'act of terrorism,' expels 21 Saudi students from training

A general view of the atmosphere at the Pensacola Naval Air Station following a shooting on December 06, 2019 in Pensacola, Florida. The second shooting on a U.S. Naval Base in a week has left three dead plus the suspect and seven people wounded.

The fatal shooting of three Americans by a Saudi Air Force officer at a Florida naval base last month was “an act of terrorism,” U.S. Attorney General William Barr said on Monday, adding that 21 Saudi military trainees will be pulled out of the United States following an investigation into the incident.

The attack brought fresh complications to U.S.-Saudi relations at a time of heightened tensions between the United States and Iran, Saudi Arabia’s regional rival. Saudi Air Force Second Lieutenant Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, 21, was fatally shot by a deputy sheriff during the Dec. 6 incident at the facility in Pensacola, Florida.

During a news conference, Barr – the top U.S. law enforcement official – said there was no evidence of assistance by other Saudi trainees or that any of them had knowledge in advance of the attack.

“This was an act of terrorism,” Barr said. “The evidence showed that the shooter was motivated by jihadist ideology. During the course of the investigation, we learned that the shooter posted a message on Sept. 11 of this year stating, ‘The countdown has begun.”‘

Barr added that Alshamrani also visited the New York City memorial to the victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the United States and posted anti-American, anti-Israeli and jihadi messages on social media, including two hours before the attack.

Saudi Arabia provided “complete and total support” to the American investigation of the incident, Barr said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expels, officer, act, students, barr, terrorism, air, investigation, trainees, calls, shooting, states, united, pensacola, saudi, florida, naval, training


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