Saudi Arabia is slashing oil shipments to US, a tactic that boosts prices and may rile Trump

Saudi Arabia is slashing shipments of crude to the United States, a move that appears calibrated to boost oil prices after a swift and punishing sell-off. The firm’s loading estimate suggests that U.S. imports of Saudi crude oil could soon fall toward the lowest levels on record. Sending fewer barrels to the United States means U.S. crude stockpiles are more likely to drop, and shrinking inventories tend to push up oil prices. The maneuver shows how Saudi Arabia’s efforts to manage the oil marke


Saudi Arabia is slashing shipments of crude to the United States, a move that appears calibrated to boost oil prices after a swift and punishing sell-off. The firm’s loading estimate suggests that U.S. imports of Saudi crude oil could soon fall toward the lowest levels on record. Sending fewer barrels to the United States means U.S. crude stockpiles are more likely to drop, and shrinking inventories tend to push up oil prices. The maneuver shows how Saudi Arabia’s efforts to manage the oil marke
Saudi Arabia is slashing oil shipments to US, a tactic that boosts prices and may rile Trump Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-16  Authors: tom dichristopher, heinz-peter bader
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shipments, slashing, market, states, united, saudis, saudi, boosts, crude, oil, output, arabia, tactic, rile, trump, prices


Saudi Arabia is slashing oil shipments to US, a tactic that boosts prices and may rile Trump

Saudi Arabia is slashing shipments of crude to the United States, a move that appears calibrated to boost oil prices after a swift and punishing sell-off.

The move could put the kingdom at loggerheads with President Donald Trump, who wants to drive down energy costs for Americans and frequently accuses the Saudi-led OPEC cartel of jacking up oil prices.

The Saudis are loading fewer barrels on ships bound for the United States this month, continuing a trend that began in September, according to an analysis by tanker-tracking firm ClipperData. The firm’s loading estimate suggests that U.S. imports of Saudi crude oil could soon fall toward the lowest levels on record.

Sending fewer barrels to the United States means U.S. crude stockpiles are more likely to drop, and shrinking inventories tend to push up oil prices. It’s a tactic the Saudis used last year to amplify their main strategy for draining a global crude glut and propping up the market: cutting output alongside fellow OPEC members, Russia and several other producers.

The maneuver shows how Saudi Arabia’s efforts to manage the oil market have evolved. During the 2014-2016 oil price crash, traders closely monitored weekly U.S. stockpile data to see whether oversupply was shrinking or growing. As the world’s biggest exporter, Saudi Arabia realized it could nudge the data in a direction that boosts the cost of crude.

“It worked so well in 2017 for [the Saudis] to cut flows to the U.S. because people could see the inventories dropping because U.S. data is so timely and transparent,” said Matt Smith, head of commodities research at ClipperData.

“The markets have become more transparent through tanker tracking,” Smith said. “You can see those changes being implemented more, and [the Saudis are] aware of that.”

November’s drop in Saudi barrels bound for the United States follows a six-week oil market rout that saw prices plunge 25 percent into bear market territory. It also comes after Saudi Energy Minister Khalid al-Falih warned on Monday that OPEC, Russia and several other producers may soon launch a fresh round of price-boosting output cuts.

Shortly after Falih issued the warning, Trump took to Twitter to voice his disapproval with that plan.

But Saudi Arabia may not be swayed by Trump’s pressure campaign. In recent days, Smith and other energy analysts have claimed that Trump essentially duped OPEC and its allies into raising output earlier this year.

The analysts say Trump’s threats to impose harsh sanctions on Iran, OPEC’s third-biggest producer, played a part in convincing the producers to stop capping output and start pumping more oil. But Trump ultimately allowed some of Iran’s biggest customers to keep importing its oil, which meant the oil squeeze the alliance feared never materialized.

Consequently, the producers put even more oil into a market that is swinging toward oversupply, giving traders another reason to sell off crude futures and push prices lower.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-16  Authors: tom dichristopher, heinz-peter bader
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shipments, slashing, market, states, united, saudis, saudi, boosts, crude, oil, output, arabia, tactic, rile, trump, prices


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

CIA reportedly determines Saudi crown prince ordered Khashoggi’s death

The CIA has determined that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered the assassination of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, NBC News reported Friday, citing a person briefed on the CIA’s assessment. The Washington Post, which first reported the CIA findings, said the U.S. intelligence agency has high confidence in its findings. The Saudi Embassy in Washington denied the report. Khashoggi died after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, on Oct. 2. Saudi Arabia has said that Khashoggi


The CIA has determined that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered the assassination of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, NBC News reported Friday, citing a person briefed on the CIA’s assessment. The Washington Post, which first reported the CIA findings, said the U.S. intelligence agency has high confidence in its findings. The Saudi Embassy in Washington denied the report. Khashoggi died after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, on Oct. 2. Saudi Arabia has said that Khashoggi
CIA reportedly determines Saudi crown prince ordered Khashoggi’s death Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-16  Authors: christine wang, ted kemp, bandar algaloud, saudi kingdom council, anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, determines, consulate, washington, died, findings, saudi, death, crown, khashoggi, prince, khashoggis, reportedly, cia, reported, nbc, ordered, embassy


CIA reportedly determines Saudi crown prince ordered Khashoggi's death

The CIA has determined that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered the assassination of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, NBC News reported Friday, citing a person briefed on the CIA’s assessment.

The CIA declined NBC News’ request for comment Friday night.

The Washington Post, which first reported the CIA findings, said the U.S. intelligence agency has high confidence in its findings. Khashoggi was a resident of the United States from Saudi Arabia, and he was a columnist for the Washington Post.

The Saudi Embassy in Washington denied the report.

“The claims in this purported assessment are false,” the embassy said in a statement. “We have and continue to hear various theories without seeing the primary basis for these speculations.”

Khashoggi died after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, on Oct. 2. Saudi Arabia has said that Khashoggi died in an altercation at the consulate, but its explanations around the journalist’s death have changed more than once.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-16  Authors: christine wang, ted kemp, bandar algaloud, saudi kingdom council, anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, determines, consulate, washington, died, findings, saudi, death, crown, khashoggi, prince, khashoggis, reportedly, cia, reported, nbc, ordered, embassy


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Aramco may list downstream oil assets after acquiring chemical firm SABIC, strategists say

Saudi Aramco may consider spinning off its growing downstream division, which includes oil refining assets, a business where the oil giant is investing heavily to meet rising fuel demand in Asia, strategists said. Aramco must first complete its planned acquisition of a strategic stake in Saudi petrochemical maker SABIC before deciding whether to list its downstream business. No decision has been made and Saudi Aramco declined to comment on what it called “rumors or speculation.” That will be a l


Saudi Aramco may consider spinning off its growing downstream division, which includes oil refining assets, a business where the oil giant is investing heavily to meet rising fuel demand in Asia, strategists said. Aramco must first complete its planned acquisition of a strategic stake in Saudi petrochemical maker SABIC before deciding whether to list its downstream business. No decision has been made and Saudi Aramco declined to comment on what it called “rumors or speculation.” That will be a l
Aramco may list downstream oil assets after acquiring chemical firm SABIC, strategists say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: sri jegarajah, reza getty images, -bryan goh, bordier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, say, downstream, reserves, transparency, sabic, strategists, firm, oil, chemical, aramco, list, assets, saudi, stock, size, business


Aramco may list downstream oil assets after acquiring chemical firm SABIC, strategists say

Saudi Aramco may consider spinning off its growing downstream division, which includes oil refining assets, a business where the oil giant is investing heavily to meet rising fuel demand in Asia, strategists said.

Aramco must first complete its planned acquisition of a strategic stake in Saudi petrochemical maker SABIC before deciding whether to list its downstream business. No decision has been made and Saudi Aramco declined to comment on what it called “rumors or speculation.”

Riyadh-listed SABIC, the world’s fourth-biggest petrochemicals company, is 70 percent owned by the Public Investment Fund (PIF), Saudi Arabia’s top sovereign wealth fund. It has a market capitalization of 385.2 billion Saudi riyals ($103 billion).

“The first step will be completing the acquisition of the 70 percent of SABIC held by PIF and integrating that into Aramco’s petrochemical operations. That will be a lengthy and complicated business given the size of SABIC,” said Robin Mills, CEO of Qamar Energy, and a former Shell executive.

“After that, yes, there could be an offering of additional stock in a merged downstream unit either on Tadawul (Saudi’s stock exchange) or an international exchange,” Mills said. “This would sidestep many of the concerns on listing the full company over transparency, reserves, political exposure, sensitivity to oil price, country exposure and the large size of the unit.”

Restructuring the Aramco listing along those lines may make it more appealing to potential investors who have voiced skepticism about the transparency of the kingdom’s crude oil reserves, the long-term viability of the oil industry and the balance between investor and Saudi national priorities.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: sri jegarajah, reza getty images, -bryan goh, bordier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, say, downstream, reserves, transparency, sabic, strategists, firm, oil, chemical, aramco, list, assets, saudi, stock, size, business


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Saudi public prosecutor seeks death penalty in Khashoggi murder case

Saudi Arabia’s public prosecutor said on Thursday he was seeking the death penalty for five out of 11 suspects charged in the murder of prominent journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Khashoggi, a critic of Saudi policy, was killed in the country’s Istanbul consulate on Oct. 2 after a struggle by a lethal injection dose and his body was dismembered and taken out of the building, he told reporters in Riyadh.


Saudi Arabia’s public prosecutor said on Thursday he was seeking the death penalty for five out of 11 suspects charged in the murder of prominent journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Khashoggi, a critic of Saudi policy, was killed in the country’s Istanbul consulate on Oct. 2 after a struggle by a lethal injection dose and his body was dismembered and taken out of the building, he told reporters in Riyadh.
Saudi public prosecutor seeks death penalty in Khashoggi murder case Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, death, penalty, prosecutor, seeks, seeking, suspects, murder, case, struggle, riyadh, told, reporters, taken, saudi, public, khashoggi


Saudi public prosecutor seeks death penalty in Khashoggi murder case

Saudi Arabia’s public prosecutor said on Thursday he was seeking the death penalty for five out of 11 suspects charged in the murder of prominent journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Khashoggi, a critic of Saudi policy, was killed in the country’s Istanbul consulate on Oct. 2 after a struggle by a lethal injection dose and his body was dismembered and taken out of the building, he told reporters in Riyadh.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, death, penalty, prosecutor, seeks, seeking, suspects, murder, case, struggle, riyadh, told, reporters, taken, saudi, public, khashoggi


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Canada may slap their own sanctions on Saudis

Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland on Thursday welcomed U.S. Treasury sanctions on 17 Saudi officials for their role in the killing last month of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, and said Canada was weighing similar action. “Canada welcomes the U.S. action,” Freeland told reporters after touring a factory in Port Colborne, Ontario, adding that Canada will be “actively considering” similar sanctions in coming days. Khashoggi was murdered at the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul on Oct


Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland on Thursday welcomed U.S. Treasury sanctions on 17 Saudi officials for their role in the killing last month of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, and said Canada was weighing similar action. “Canada welcomes the U.S. action,” Freeland told reporters after touring a factory in Port Colborne, Ontario, adding that Canada will be “actively considering” similar sanctions in coming days. Khashoggi was murdered at the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul on Oct
Canada may slap their own sanctions on Saudis Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: bernard weil, toronto star, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rights, serious, sanctions, treasury, saudi, canada, saudis, similar, human, minister, trudeau, slap


Canada may slap their own sanctions on Saudis

Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland on Thursday welcomed U.S. Treasury sanctions on 17 Saudi officials for their role in the killing last month of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, and said Canada was weighing similar action.

“Canada welcomes the U.S. action,” Freeland told reporters after touring a factory in Port Colborne, Ontario, adding that Canada will be “actively considering” similar sanctions in coming days.

Khashoggi was murdered at the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2, and the U.S. Treasury on Thursday announced sanctions targeting Saudi nationals, not the Riyadh government. The sanctions limit access to the U.S. financial system and freeze the individuals’ assets.

Freeland said Canada is considering the same kind of targeted sanctions implemented under the Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act, which targets perpetrators of serious human rights abuses and corruption.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has promised there would be “consequences” for the murder, and he has said Ottawa is reviewing export permits to Saudi Arabia.

Opposition critics and human rights groups say that if Trudeau is serious about standing up for human rights, he should cancel a $13 billion contract for armored vehicles built in Canada by U.S.-based General Dynamics.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: bernard weil, toronto star, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rights, serious, sanctions, treasury, saudi, canada, saudis, similar, human, minister, trudeau, slap


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Trump admin considers Khashoggi murder, trying to extradite Gulen

The effort is intended to get the Turkish leader to ease pressure on Saudi Arabia over the killing of dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi. It is at least the second time the White House has sought to remove Fethullah Gulen, a cleric living in exile in Pennsylvania. Gulen has denied involvement and to date the U.S. has not found Turkey’s case compelling enough to warrant extradition. The renewed efforts, however, come as Trump administration officials are seeking to placate Erdogan over Khashogg


The effort is intended to get the Turkish leader to ease pressure on Saudi Arabia over the killing of dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi. It is at least the second time the White House has sought to remove Fethullah Gulen, a cleric living in exile in Pennsylvania. Gulen has denied involvement and to date the U.S. has not found Turkey’s case compelling enough to warrant extradition. The renewed efforts, however, come as Trump administration officials are seeking to placate Erdogan over Khashogg
Trump admin considers Khashoggi murder, trying to extradite Gulen Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: tucker higgins, thomas urbain, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, turkish, considers, trying, admin, khashoggi, erdogan, saudi, request, administration, gulen, nbc, trump, white, extradite, officials, murder, turkey


Trump admin considers Khashoggi murder, trying to extradite Gulen

The Trump administration is seeking ways to extradite an enemy of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, NBC News reported Thursday, citing two senior U.S. officials and two other people briefed on the requests. The effort is intended to get the Turkish leader to ease pressure on Saudi Arabia over the killing of dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

It is at least the second time the White House has sought to remove Fethullah Gulen, a cleric living in exile in Pennsylvania. In President Donald Trump’s first days in office, his administration asked the Department of Justice to look into the matter, NBC News has reported.

Turkey has accused Gulen of participating in a failed 2016 coup plot. Gulen has denied involvement and to date the U.S. has not found Turkey’s case compelling enough to warrant extradition.

The first request was made under the short-lived tenure of national security advisor Michael Flynn, who came under scrutiny from special counsel Robert Mueller for an alleged plot to kidnap Gulen and deliver him to Turkey in exchange for millions of dollars. Flynn pleaded guilty to lying to federal investigators in a separate matter.

The renewed efforts, however, come as Trump administration officials are seeking to placate Erdogan over Khashoggi’s murder. Saudi Arabia is a key U.S. ally and its de facto leader, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, is close to White House advisor Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in law.

It is widely believed that the murder could not have been orchestrated without the approval of the crown prince, and Erdogan has said he has evidence that it was ordered from the “highest levels” of the Saudi government. Erdogan has not accused anyone by name. He has repeatedly said he does not believe King Salman was involved.

Trump administration officials reportedly requested last month that the Justice Department and FBI reopen Turkey’s extradition case for the cleric. The officials also asked the Department of Homeland Security for information about Gulen’s legal status, including his green card, NBC News reported. None of those government agencies responded to a request for comment Thursday. The White House did not respond to a request for comment.

Turkey and the United States also reportedly discussed sending Gulen to South Africa, though that plan was ultimately scrapped.

The requests were met with fierce pushback from career officials.

“At first there were eye rolls, but once they realized it was a serious request, the career guys were furious,” a senior U.S. official involved in the process told the outlet.

Separately, the U.S. and Turkey also discussed a possible deal involving the release of Turkish banker Mehmet Hakan Atilla, who was sentenced in May to nearly three years in prison for conspiring to violate U.S. sanctions against Iran. Erdogan has criticized Atilla’s prosecution.

Khashoggi, a Washington Post contributor and U.S. resident, was allegedly killed last month at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. Saudi prosecutors announced Thursday that they had charged 11 individuals in connection with the killing and were seeking the death penalty in five of those cases. Turkey has demanded that the individuals be charged under Turkish law.

Read the full report at NBC News.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: tucker higgins, thomas urbain, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, turkish, considers, trying, admin, khashoggi, erdogan, saudi, request, administration, gulen, nbc, trump, white, extradite, officials, murder, turkey


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Oil falls as Trump raps OPEC’s supply cut plan, global markets skid

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil futures were at $59.15 per barrel at 0214 GMT, down 78 cents, or 1.3 percent from their last settlement. International benchmark Brent crude oil futures were at $69.47 per barrel, down 65 cents, or 0.9 percent, from their last close. “Sky-high production in the U.S., coupled with incremental barrels coming from Saudi Arabia and Russia is starting to impact oil market balances. As such, crude oil inventories are starting to increase once again,” Bank o


U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil futures were at $59.15 per barrel at 0214 GMT, down 78 cents, or 1.3 percent from their last settlement. International benchmark Brent crude oil futures were at $69.47 per barrel, down 65 cents, or 0.9 percent, from their last close. “Sky-high production in the U.S., coupled with incremental barrels coming from Saudi Arabia and Russia is starting to impact oil market balances. As such, crude oil inventories are starting to increase once again,” Bank o
Oil falls as Trump raps OPEC’s supply cut plan, global markets skid Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, global, skid, plan, production, million, oil, falls, saudi, crude, opec, starting, market, raps, supply, markets, trump, opecs


Oil falls as Trump raps OPEC's supply cut plan, global markets skid

Oil prices fell by around 1 percent on Tuesday, with Brent crude sliding below $70 and WTI below $60 per barrel, after U.S. President Donald Trump put pressure on OPEC not to cut supply to prop up the market.

The fall came amid a broad market selloff in Asia and before that on Wall Street, while the U.S.-dollar hit a 16-month high on Tuesday, making oil imports more expensive for any country using other currencies at home.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil futures were at $59.15 per barrel at 0214 GMT, down 78 cents, or 1.3 percent from their last settlement.

International benchmark Brent crude oil futures were at $69.47 per barrel, down 65 cents, or 0.9 percent, from their last close.

Both oil price benchmarks have shed more than 20 percent in value since early October.

“Sky-high production in the U.S., coupled with incremental barrels coming from Saudi Arabia and Russia is starting to impact oil market balances. As such, crude oil inventories are starting to increase once again,” Bank of America Merrill Lynch said in a note.

The bank added that it expected U.S. crude production, already at a record 11.6 million barrels per day (bpd), to break through 12 million bpd in 2019, making the United States “energy independent”.

Top crude exporter Saudi Arabia has watched with alarm how supply is starting to outpace consumption, fearing a repeat of 2014’s price crash.

Saudi Energy Minister Khalid al-Falih said on Monday the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) agreed there was a need to cut oil supply next year by around 1 million bpd from October levels to prevent oversupply.

Dutch bank ING said given the abundance of global supply as well as the threat of an economic slowdown, “cuts over 2019 are unavoidable …(as) it is becoming clearer that as we move closer towards 2019, the market will see a sizeable surplus at least over the first half of 2019.”

U.S. President Donald Trump, however, did not like the rhetoric coming from his political ally in Saudi Arabia.

“Hopefully, Saudi Arabia and OPEC will not be cutting oil production. Oil prices should be much lower based on supply!” Trump said in a Twitter post on Monday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, global, skid, plan, production, million, oil, falls, saudi, crude, opec, starting, market, raps, supply, markets, trump, opecs


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

John Bolton on Khashoggi killing, North Korea and South China Sea

Khashoggi, a U.S. resident, was killed at the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul last month. Riyadh has denied that claim, but Saudi Arabia has changed its story about the murder more than once, and the country’s public prosecutor in late October called the killing “premeditated.” Saudi Arabian officials are still investigating the case, and the U.S. will follow that very closely, Bolton added. Trump has previously expressed his desire to protect the U.S.-Saudi relationship, especially its comm


Khashoggi, a U.S. resident, was killed at the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul last month. Riyadh has denied that claim, but Saudi Arabia has changed its story about the murder more than once, and the country’s public prosecutor in late October called the killing “premeditated.” Saudi Arabian officials are still investigating the case, and the U.S. will follow that very closely, Bolton added. Trump has previously expressed his desire to protect the U.S.-Saudi relationship, especially its comm
John Bolton on Khashoggi killing, North Korea and South China Sea Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: nyshka chandran, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, john, arabia, north, washington, khashoggi, arabian, south, killing, sea, saudi, relationship, korea, china, month, bolton


John Bolton on Khashoggi killing, North Korea and South China Sea

Who is MBS? The Prince at the center of Saudi Arabia’s controversy 11:10 AM ET Fri, 19 Oct 2018 | 03:57

Turkey’s president said his country sent audio that allegedly captures the killing of the Washington Post journalist Khashoggi to countries including Canada, Great Britain, France, Germany and Saudi Arabia.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau confirmed on Monday that Canada’s intelligence agencies have listened to the Khashoggi tape.

Bolton spoke to reporters in Singapore, where he and Vice President Mike Pence are attending the ASEAN-U.S. Summit and the East Asia Summit.

Khashoggi, a U.S. resident, was killed at the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul last month. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has said the assassination was ordered by the “highest levels” of Saudi government.

Riyadh has denied that claim, but Saudi Arabia has changed its story about the murder more than once, and the country’s public prosecutor in late October called the killing “premeditated.”

The U.S. president, Donald Trump, expects the truth to come out eventually, Bolton claimed. Saudi Arabian officials are still investigating the case, and the U.S. will follow that very closely, Bolton added.

Trump has previously expressed his desire to protect the U.S.-Saudi relationship, especially its commercial relationship, even as his administration comes under severe pressure to punish oil-rich Saudi Arabia. Last month, Washington revoked visas for several Saudis implicated in Khashoggi’s killing and barred others from obtaining documents for U.S. travel.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: nyshka chandran, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, john, arabia, north, washington, khashoggi, arabian, south, killing, sea, saudi, relationship, korea, china, month, bolton


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Trump nominates Gen. John Abizaid as US ambassador to Saudi Arabia

President Donald Trump has picked Gen. John Abizaid to be the next U.S. ambassador to Saudi Arabia, the White House said Tuesday. Abizaid retired from the U.S. Army in 2007 after 34 years of service. The retired general has received the Defense Distinguished Service Medal, the Army Distinguished Service Medal, Legion of Merit, and the Bronze Star. Abizaid is a distinguished graduate of West Point and holds a masters degree in Middle Eastern Studies from Harvard University. The U.S. has since sai


President Donald Trump has picked Gen. John Abizaid to be the next U.S. ambassador to Saudi Arabia, the White House said Tuesday. Abizaid retired from the U.S. Army in 2007 after 34 years of service. The retired general has received the Defense Distinguished Service Medal, the Army Distinguished Service Medal, Legion of Merit, and the Bronze Star. Abizaid is a distinguished graduate of West Point and holds a masters degree in Middle Eastern Studies from Harvard University. The U.S. has since sai
Trump nominates Gen. John Abizaid as US ambassador to Saudi Arabia Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: christine wang, mandel ngan, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, medal, khashoggis, service, distinguished, john, abizaid, gen, nominates, khashoggi, arabia, west, retired, saudi, ambassador, trump


Trump nominates Gen. John Abizaid as US ambassador to Saudi Arabia

President Donald Trump has picked Gen. John Abizaid to be the next U.S. ambassador to Saudi Arabia, the White House said Tuesday.

Abizaid retired from the U.S. Army in 2007 after 34 years of service. At the time of his retirement, Abizaid was the longest serving commander of U.S. Central Command, from July 2003 and March 2007.

The retired general has received the Defense Distinguished Service Medal, the Army Distinguished Service Medal, Legion of Merit, and the Bronze Star. Abizaid is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and consults on a number of international and national security issues.

He also served as director of strategic plans and policy on the Joint Staff as well as director of the Joint Staff.

Abizaid is a distinguished graduate of West Point and holds a masters degree in Middle Eastern Studies from Harvard University. He was previously the distinguished chair of the Combating Terrorism Center at West Point.

Abizaid’s nomination comes in the wake of international outrage over the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, who was also a U.S. resident. Khashoggi died at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul last month.

While the U.S. revoked visas for several Saudi citizens implicated in Khashoggi’s death, the Trump administration faced criticism for being too soft in its initial response to the reports of the journalist’s alleged murder.

The U.S. has since said it will look into the circumstances of Khashoggi’s death independently from Saudi Arabia’s own investigation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: christine wang, mandel ngan, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, medal, khashoggis, service, distinguished, john, abizaid, gen, nominates, khashoggi, arabia, west, retired, saudi, ambassador, trump


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Trump warns OPEC against cutting oil production: ‘Prices should be much lower based on supply’

“Hopefully, Saudi Arabia and OPEC will not be cutting oil production. Oil prices should be much lower based on supply!” Trump’s latest broadside comes on the heels of a sharp pullback in oil prices that has seen U.S. crude plunge into a bear market and post its longest losing streak on record. The sudden drop in oil prices from four-year highs just last month has forced OPEC and a group of crude exporters including Russia to rethink how they are managing the market. On Sunday, a committee repres


“Hopefully, Saudi Arabia and OPEC will not be cutting oil production. Oil prices should be much lower based on supply!” Trump’s latest broadside comes on the heels of a sharp pullback in oil prices that has seen U.S. crude plunge into a bear market and post its longest losing streak on record. The sudden drop in oil prices from four-year highs just last month has forced OPEC and a group of crude exporters including Russia to rethink how they are managing the market. On Sunday, a committee repres
Trump warns OPEC against cutting oil production: ‘Prices should be much lower based on supply’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: tom dichristopher, essam al-sudani
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, opec, cutting, oil, group, lower, crude, tweeted, production, warns, prices, saudi, supply, president, based, trump


Trump warns OPEC against cutting oil production: 'Prices should be much lower based on supply'

President Donald Trump on Monday tweeted that he hopes OPEC does not cut oil output, the same day Saudi Arabia’s energy minister said the cartel and its allies may need to throttle back production by about 1 million barrels per day.

“Hopefully, Saudi Arabia and OPEC will not be cutting oil production. Oil prices should be much lower based on supply!” he wrote on Twitter.

The tweet marks Trump’s latest attempt to influence OPEC policy on Twitter. The president has tweeted at the 15-nation producer group several times this year, blaming it for rising oil prices and ordering its members to take steps to tamp down the cost of crude.

Trump’s latest broadside comes on the heels of a sharp pullback in oil prices that has seen U.S. crude plunge into a bear market and post its longest losing streak on record. Prices tumbled over the last five weeks as global equity markets sold off, crude supplies rose and the outlook for growth in oil demand weakened.

The sudden drop in oil prices from four-year highs just last month has forced OPEC and a group of crude exporters including Russia to rethink how they are managing the market.

On Sunday, a committee representing the group said oil supply is growing faster than demand, suggesting the alliance may have to launch a fresh round of production cuts. The same day, Saudi Energy Minister Khalid al Falih said the kingdom’s oil shipments would fall by 500,000 bpd in December.

On Monday, Falih told an oil conference in Abu Dhabi that technical analysis suggests “there will need to be a reduction of supply from October levels approaching a million barrels” from the alliance.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: tom dichristopher, essam al-sudani
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, opec, cutting, oil, group, lower, crude, tweeted, production, warns, prices, saudi, supply, president, based, trump


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post