These stocks could benefit from Trump’s Mueller win

One of Trump’s long-held goals that has been pushed aside is his trillion-dollar infrastructure plan. The president said just last week that he and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi are still talking about an elusive infrastructure deal. Strategas has an infrastructure basket consisting of about 20 companies in traditional highway infrastructure that could benefit from any deal. The member stocks include pipeline services company Aegion Corp., general contractor Granite Construction, engineering compan


One of Trump’s long-held goals that has been pushed aside is his trillion-dollar infrastructure plan. The president said just last week that he and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi are still talking about an elusive infrastructure deal. Strategas has an infrastructure basket consisting of about 20 companies in traditional highway infrastructure that could benefit from any deal. The member stocks include pipeline services company Aegion Corp., general contractor Granite Construction, engineering compan
These stocks could benefit from Trump’s Mueller win Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: yun li, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, week, plan, democrats, benefit, highway, company, mueller, uses, win, unlikely, president, trumps, infrastructure


These stocks could benefit from Trump's Mueller win

One of Trump’s long-held goals that has been pushed aside is his trillion-dollar infrastructure plan. Although the plan is somewhat supported on both sides of the political aisle, the parties diverge on how to fund the pricey investment.

However, infrastructure is still on Trump’s mind. The president said just last week that he and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi are still talking about an elusive infrastructure deal.

Strategas has an infrastructure basket consisting of about 20 companies in traditional highway infrastructure that could benefit from any deal. The portfolio was created in 2008 to play President Barack Obama’s stimulus in 2009, and the constituents have gained with the passage of highway bills over the years, according to Strategas.

The member stocks include pipeline services company Aegion Corp., general contractor Granite Construction, engineering company KBR and building material company Simpson Manufacturing.

However, a large bipartisan infrastructure bill is unlikely if Trump uses the Mueller outcome against the Democrats, and they in turn keep their intense investigations of the president.

“Is it time for infrastructure? Democrats and the administration are very far apart,” James Pethokoukis, economic analyst at the American Enterprise Institute, said on CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Monday. “I highly doubt we are going to see anything like that. Maybe if this was like the beginning of last year, now that we are deep into the election season, I don’t think so.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: yun li, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, week, plan, democrats, benefit, highway, company, mueller, uses, win, unlikely, president, trumps, infrastructure


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Trump’s bold claims about cutting red tape give Democrats a possible weapon in 2020 election

President Donald Trump is happy to boast that he slashes more regulations than any president who preceded him. He literally cut red tape in the White House in December 2017 while standing before stacks of paper representing rules. Democratic candidates aim to turn Trump’s rhetoric about regulation against him as they try to deny him a second term next year. Lacking signature achievements beyond the GOP tax law, Trump wants to attribute a strong economy — his best selling point — in part to his p


President Donald Trump is happy to boast that he slashes more regulations than any president who preceded him. He literally cut red tape in the White House in December 2017 while standing before stacks of paper representing rules. Democratic candidates aim to turn Trump’s rhetoric about regulation against him as they try to deny him a second term next year. Lacking signature achievements beyond the GOP tax law, Trump wants to attribute a strong economy — his best selling point — in part to his p
Trump’s bold claims about cutting red tape give Democrats a possible weapon in 2020 election Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-24  Authors: jacob pramuk, saul loeb, getty images, brian snyder
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cutting, election, rules, red, trumps, claims, weapon, big, tape, rhetoric, regulation, law, possible, regulations, bold, democrats, cut, trump, president


Trump's bold claims about cutting red tape give Democrats a possible weapon in 2020 election

President Donald Trump is happy to boast that he slashes more regulations than any president who preceded him. He literally cut red tape in the White House in December 2017 while standing before stacks of paper representing rules.

The president may want to tread carefully on the issue as the 2020 election nears. Democratic candidates aim to turn Trump’s rhetoric about regulation against him as they try to deny him a second term next year.

Trump campaigned on chopping regulations, arguing fewer rules would boost businesses and the economy. He has made some significant changes — rolling back Obama administration efforts to limit emissions from coal-burning power plants and automobiles, among other steps. The president also backed a law to scrap some bank rules passed after the 2008 financial crisis. While bank stocks took a beating in December along with the broader market, the Financial Select Sector SPDR ETF — which counts the largest U.S. banks among its top holdings — has climbed nearly 10 percent since Trump took office.

The deregulation message features prominently in his re-election rhetoric. In his State of the Union address last month, Trump claimed his administration “has cut more regulations in a short period of time than any other administration during its entire tenure.”

The president has actually done more to slow the pace of new regulations, or ease enforcement of current rules, than cut them entirely, according to several experts who track regulation. But that has not stopped both Republicans and Democrats from acting like he has taken more drastic steps to slash government rules.

Whether to put new limits on companies could become a point of conflict in the 2020 election. Lacking signature achievements beyond the GOP tax law, Trump wants to attribute a strong economy — his best selling point — in part to his push to cut regulations on businesses. At the same time, Trump’s rhetoric could boost one of Democrats’ main arguments: that the president has crafted his policy to help big business rather than consumers and the working class.

“Inflating what he’s done on the regulatory front is to his advantage,” said Cary Coglianese, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania Law School and director of its regulation program. “But on the other hand, progressives will embrace that narrative too, to paint Republicans as being in the pocket of big business, of contributing to a system that’s rigged in favor of the big banks, big insurance companies, big pharmaceutical companies.”

The argument becomes harder for Democrats to make if the economy and job market remain strong as November 2020 nears. A recent pickup in U.S. wage growth — which had previously lagged despite solid job creation — could only help Trump’s re-election case.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-24  Authors: jacob pramuk, saul loeb, getty images, brian snyder
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cutting, election, rules, red, trumps, claims, weapon, big, tape, rhetoric, regulation, law, possible, regulations, bold, democrats, cut, trump, president


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GOP uses Green New Deal to hurt Democrats as it plots to retake California House seats

LOS ANGELES — Republicans are already plotting to retake some of the California congressional seats they lost in 2018 to Democrats, and one of the hot-button issues they’re talking about is the Green New Deal. “These California Democrats can’t run on rhetoric anymore, they have to run on their record,” said National Republican Congressional Committee spokeswoman Torunn Sinclair. As of this week, at least three Republican congressional candidates have announced plans to unseat California Democrat


LOS ANGELES — Republicans are already plotting to retake some of the California congressional seats they lost in 2018 to Democrats, and one of the hot-button issues they’re talking about is the Green New Deal. “These California Democrats can’t run on rhetoric anymore, they have to run on their record,” said National Republican Congressional Committee spokeswoman Torunn Sinclair. As of this week, at least three Republican congressional candidates have announced plans to unseat California Democrat
GOP uses Green New Deal to hurt Democrats as it plots to retake California House seats Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: jeff daniels, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, green, congressional, gop, house, harder, hurt, uses, retake, plots, republican, porter, california, deal, district, seats, levin, democrats


GOP uses Green New Deal to hurt Democrats as it plots to retake California House seats

LOS ANGELES — Republicans are already plotting to retake some of the California congressional seats they lost in 2018 to Democrats, and one of the hot-button issues they’re talking about is the Green New Deal.

“These California Democrats can’t run on rhetoric anymore, they have to run on their record,” said National Republican Congressional Committee spokeswoman Torunn Sinclair. “Supporting socialist policies like the Green New Deal and Medicare for All with no regard for cost or the impact it will have on Californians is irresponsible, and will ultimately cost them their reelection.”

Last November, Democrats won a clean sweep of all seven GOP-held congressional districts in California that Democrat Hillary Clinton carried in the 2016 presidential election. The win included four GOP-held seats in Orange County, a traditionally conservative Republican bastion in the southern part of the state.

“Orange County is no longer a ‘red’ county,” said Fred Smoller, a Chapman University political science professor. “That’s a tremendous change because of the youth and the Latinos who now make up such a large percentage of the population.”

As of this week, at least three Republican congressional candidates have announced plans to unseat California Democrats who flipped GOP House seats in 2018. The state’s 2020 primary election will be held in March on Super Tuesday.

Democrats targeted include two U.S. House members from Orange County: Mike Levin of San Juan Capistrano and Katie Porter of Irvine. And GOP challengers are believed to be close to announcing runs in other districts, too.

In February, Levin threw his support behind the Green New Deal, the plan by Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York to tackle climate change.

“Climate change is the defining issue of our generation, and we must act now to address this crisis before it is too late,” Levin said in February after joining a group of House Democrats in introducing the Green New Deal resolution.

Levin, a former environmental attorney, declined an interview request for this story.

“Mike is very much about the government being the answer to every problem and every challenge,” said Republican Brian Maryott, mayor of San Juan Capistrano and a GOP candidate running to unseat Levin in California’s 49th Congressional District. “He has voted for the Green New Deal, which is preposterous. And he clearly supports and voted for a nationalized health care system — something I think would be a huge, huge mistake.”

Maryott said he’s raised almost $100,000 since announcing his candidacy March 5, adding, “we have a long way to go. Ultimately, it’s going to take $2.5 million to $3 million to be competitive with Mike next year.”

Among other things, the Green New Deal sets a target of “net-zero” greenhouse gases in 10 years.

“The Green New Deal certainly doesn’t reflect our community,” said Republican Don Sedgwick, a Laguna Hills city council member and small business owner who is running to unseat Porter in California’s 45th Congressional District. “I expect that Katie Porter will embrace the Green New Deal, because she’s a protege of Elizabeth Warren and very close with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Kamala Harris — and all those folks are proponents of the plan.”

Porter’s campaign didn’t respond to a request for comment.

At a town hall held Feb. 19, though, Porter fielded a question about the Green New Deal resolution. She stopped short of a full endorsement but agreed that “climate change is an urgent issue and requires bold action.”

Prior to entering Congress, Porter was a law professor at University of California at Irvine.

Sedgwick, who describes himself as a “family-values” candidate, said he launched his bid for the 45th District a few weeks ago and is confident “we will be able to fund a strong campaign.”

Up in the state’s agriculture-laden Central Valley, meantime, a Republican who finished third in the 2018 primary has entered the 2020 race to challenge freshman Democratic Congressman Josh Harder in California’s 10th Congressional District.

“Here in our district, Josh Harder is very quickly earning the reputation of being the ‘AOC of the West Coast,’ ” said Ted Howze, a Republican challenging Harder in 2020. “That’s because he is the face of Medicare for All, socialized medicine, and the Green New Deal.”

Howze, a veterinarian who works in the dairy industry, describes the Green New Deal proposal as “an economic killer” and is critical of its message to agriculture about the industry being a climate polluter. According to the Republican, “California farmers are already on the cutting edge of environmental technology.”

For his part, Harder has focused more on health-care reform and not the climate issue. The former venture capitalist joined a group of colleagues last month in introducing legislation for Medicare for All. Harder wasn’t available for an interview.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: jeff daniels, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, green, congressional, gop, house, harder, hurt, uses, retake, plots, republican, porter, california, deal, district, seats, levin, democrats


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Why Facebook’s A.I. didn’t detect the New Zealand mosque shooting video

Facebook explained why its artificial intelligence tools failed to detect the video of the New Zealand mosque shooting livestreamed on its site last week before being viewed 4,000 times. “[T]his particular video did not trigger our automatic detection systems,” Facebook wrote. It also said it will explore whether its AI can be used in livestreamed videos. Facebook said it will also work to more quickly review livestreamed videos, which it has done for videos reported for people who film suicide.


Facebook explained why its artificial intelligence tools failed to detect the video of the New Zealand mosque shooting livestreamed on its site last week before being viewed 4,000 times. “[T]his particular video did not trigger our automatic detection systems,” Facebook wrote. It also said it will explore whether its AI can be used in livestreamed videos. Facebook said it will also work to more quickly review livestreamed videos, which it has done for videos reported for people who film suicide.
Why Facebook’s A.I. didn’t detect the New Zealand mosque shooting video Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: lauren feiner, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, videos, ai, shooting, content, mosque, video, detect, company, facebooks, zealand, livestreamed, didnt, review, facebook, systems


Why Facebook's A.I. didn't detect the New Zealand mosque shooting video

Facebook explained why its artificial intelligence tools failed to detect the video of the New Zealand mosque shooting livestreamed on its site last week before being viewed 4,000 times. A suspected gunman killed 50 people in an attack on two mosques in the area.

The video was removed by Facebook after being flagged for the first time by a user 29 minutes after the stream began, the company said in a blog post Wednesday night. Several social media platforms removed the original video from their sites, but quickly saw copies pop up at a clip with which their moderation systems couldn’t keep up. Users also altered the video to slow down automatic detection.

Facebook has relied on a mix of AI and human review to assess and remove content that violates its policies, and has largely seen success when it comes to removing porn and terrorist propaganda from its site. But Facebook said in the post that training AI to detect mass shooting videos is more challenging than training it to detect nudity because it relies on a vast amount of content to learn from. On Tuesday, a congressman asked Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and other tech leaders to brief lawmakers on how the New Zealand video spread while other terrorist content has been largely removed.

“[T]his particular video did not trigger our automatic detection systems,” Facebook wrote. “To achieve that we will need to provide our systems with large volumes of data of this specific kind of content, something which is difficult as these events are thankfully rare. Another challenge is to automatically discern this content from visually similar, innocuous content – for example if thousands of videos from live-streamed video games are flagged by our systems, our reviewers could miss the important real-world videos where we could alert first responders to get help on the ground.”

Facebook said it will take steps to beef up its detection technology. The company said it used an “experimental audio-based technology which we had been building to identify variants of the video.” It also said it will explore whether its AI can be used in livestreamed videos.

Facebook said it will also work to more quickly review livestreamed videos, which it has done for videos reported for people who film suicide. The company will expand its categories for accelerated review to include a video like the one from New Zealand.

One strategy Facebook said would not be an effective solution is adding a time delay to live videos. Facebook said the sheer volume of daily broadcasts means this strategy would not get to the core of the problem and that this would only further delay user reports that help it detect harmful content or report criminal activity to the police.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: lauren feiner, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, videos, ai, shooting, content, mosque, video, detect, company, facebooks, zealand, livestreamed, didnt, review, facebook, systems


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Why Facebook’s A.I. didn’t detect the New Zealand mosque shooting video

Facebook explained why its artificial intelligence tools failed to detect the video of the New Zealand mosque shooting livestreamed on its site last week before being viewed 4,000 times. “[T]his particular video did not trigger our automatic detection systems,” Facebook wrote. It also said it will explore whether its AI can be used in livestreamed videos. Facebook said it will also work to more quickly review livestreamed videos, which it has done for videos reported for people who film suicide.


Facebook explained why its artificial intelligence tools failed to detect the video of the New Zealand mosque shooting livestreamed on its site last week before being viewed 4,000 times. “[T]his particular video did not trigger our automatic detection systems,” Facebook wrote. It also said it will explore whether its AI can be used in livestreamed videos. Facebook said it will also work to more quickly review livestreamed videos, which it has done for videos reported for people who film suicide.
Why Facebook’s A.I. didn’t detect the New Zealand mosque shooting video Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: lauren feiner, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, videos, ai, shooting, content, mosque, video, detect, company, facebooks, zealand, livestreamed, didnt, review, facebook, systems


Why Facebook's A.I. didn't detect the New Zealand mosque shooting video

Facebook explained why its artificial intelligence tools failed to detect the video of the New Zealand mosque shooting livestreamed on its site last week before being viewed 4,000 times. A suspected gunman killed 50 people in an attack on two mosques in the area.

The video was removed by Facebook after being flagged for the first time by a user 29 minutes after the stream began, the company said in a blog post Wednesday night. Several social media platforms removed the original video from their sites, but quickly saw copies pop up at a clip with which their moderation systems couldn’t keep up. Users also altered the video to slow down automatic detection.

Facebook has relied on a mix of AI and human review to assess and remove content that violates its policies, and has largely seen success when it comes to removing porn and terrorist propaganda from its site. But Facebook said in the post that training AI to detect mass shooting videos is more challenging than training it to detect nudity because it relies on a vast amount of content to learn from. On Tuesday, a congressman asked Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and other tech leaders to brief lawmakers on how the New Zealand video spread while other terrorist content has been largely removed.

“[T]his particular video did not trigger our automatic detection systems,” Facebook wrote. “To achieve that we will need to provide our systems with large volumes of data of this specific kind of content, something which is difficult as these events are thankfully rare. Another challenge is to automatically discern this content from visually similar, innocuous content – for example if thousands of videos from live-streamed video games are flagged by our systems, our reviewers could miss the important real-world videos where we could alert first responders to get help on the ground.”

Facebook said it will take steps to beef up its detection technology. The company said it used an “experimental audio-based technology which we had been building to identify variants of the video.” It also said it will explore whether its AI can be used in livestreamed videos.

Facebook said it will also work to more quickly review livestreamed videos, which it has done for videos reported for people who film suicide. The company will expand its categories for accelerated review to include a video like the one from New Zealand.

One strategy Facebook said would not be an effective solution is adding a time delay to live videos. Facebook said the sheer volume of daily broadcasts means this strategy would not get to the core of the problem and that this would only further delay user reports that help it detect harmful content or report criminal activity to the police.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

WATCH: Here’s how to buy a gun in these five countries


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: lauren feiner, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, videos, ai, shooting, content, mosque, video, detect, company, facebooks, zealand, livestreamed, didnt, review, facebook, systems


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Large fund firms’ support for combating climate change is all talk

Climate change questions don’t get more fundamental than this one: How much time is left to act before it is too late? Before he died, Vanguard Group founder Jack Bogle said one of the biggest issues the index fund would face in the future is its societal influence. BlackRock, the world’s largest asset manager, and Vanguard Group, the creator of the index fund, manage more than $11 trillion combined. And their market influence continues to grow: Vanguard has attracted roughly $1 trillion in the


Climate change questions don’t get more fundamental than this one: How much time is left to act before it is too late? Before he died, Vanguard Group founder Jack Bogle said one of the biggest issues the index fund would face in the future is its societal influence. BlackRock, the world’s largest asset manager, and Vanguard Group, the creator of the index fund, manage more than $11 trillion combined. And their market influence continues to grow: Vanguard has attracted roughly $1 trillion in the
Large fund firms’ support for combating climate change is all talk Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: eric rosenbaum, getty images, pickstock, matthew davidson, eyeem, hero images, laflor, saul loeb, afp
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, firms, companies, change, fund, vanguard, talk, funds, large, index, combating, trillion, shareholder, climate, sustainability, support, vote, showing


Large fund firms' support for combating climate change is all talk

Climate change questions don’t get more fundamental than this one: How much time is left to act before it is too late?

Right now the difficulty of answering that question is showing up in a place where many individuals are heavily invested in getting the answer right: The index funds responsible for meeting millions of Americans personal financial goals, from saving for a house, to a child’s education, and a secure retirement.

Before he died, Vanguard Group founder Jack Bogle said one of the biggest issues the index fund would face in the future is its societal influence. Specifically, he meant the need to vote proxies on complex issues such as sustainability at annual meetings held by every publicly traded company and on behalf of so many individual fund shareholders.

BlackRock, the world’s largest asset manager, and Vanguard Group, the creator of the index fund, manage more than $11 trillion combined. Just in ETFs, they manage roughly $2.5 trillion. And their market influence continues to grow: Vanguard has attracted roughly $1 trillion in the past three years alone.

“Larger mutual funds companies, like Vanguard, Fidelity, BlackRock and State Street Global Advisors, can move the market,” said Mindy Lubber, CEO and president of Ceres, a nonprofit organization that works with big investors and companies on sustainability. “They can take a shareholder resolution from 10 percent to 40 percent.”

In 2017 both companies voted to require ExxonMobil to produce a report on climate change, a watershed moment showing what can occur when index funds punch their weight in proxy voting.

Yet shareholder advocates say there have not been nearly enough of those ExxonMobil vote moments.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: eric rosenbaum, getty images, pickstock, matthew davidson, eyeem, hero images, laflor, saul loeb, afp
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Reports of a possible halt in US-North Korea talks send defense stocks soaring

Defense-related stocks listed in South Korea and Japan surged by more than 20 percent on Friday following reports that North Korea may suspend nuclear talks with the U.S.At the same time, shares of South Korean firms with exposure to North Korea plunged. The two-day summit was cut short on the final day after both side failed to agree on denuclearizing North Korea and lifting economic sanctions on Pyongyang. After Choe’s comments were reported on Friday, shares of several Asia-listed defense com


Defense-related stocks listed in South Korea and Japan surged by more than 20 percent on Friday following reports that North Korea may suspend nuclear talks with the U.S.At the same time, shares of South Korean firms with exposure to North Korea plunged. The two-day summit was cut short on the final day after both side failed to agree on denuclearizing North Korea and lifting economic sanctions on Pyongyang. After Choe’s comments were reported on Friday, shares of several Asia-listed defense com
Reports of a possible halt in US-North Korea talks send defense stocks soaring Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: yen nee lee, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, korea, reports, defense, usnorth, soaring, korean, stocks, hyundai, south, hanil, halt, send, talks, shares, japan, possible, north


Reports of a possible halt in US-North Korea talks send defense stocks soaring

Defense-related stocks listed in South Korea and Japan surged by more than 20 percent on Friday following reports that North Korea may suspend nuclear talks with the U.S.

At the same time, shares of South Korean firms with exposure to North Korea plunged.

North Korean Vice Foreign Minister Choe Son Hui said at a news conference that her country has “no intention to yield” to demands made by the U.S. She added that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un could rethink a moratorium on missile launches and that he will make an official announcement soon on his position regarding talks with the U.S.

Kim met U.S. President Donald Trump last month in the Vietnamese capital of Hanoi. The two-day summit was cut short on the final day after both side failed to agree on denuclearizing North Korea and lifting economic sanctions on Pyongyang.

After Choe’s comments were reported on Friday, shares of several Asia-listed defense companies jumped.

In South Korea, shares of Victek and Hanil Forging Industrial had risen 24.07 percent and 20.62 percent, respectively, by Friday’s close. Over in Japan, Ishikawa Seisakusho ended the session 25.64 percent higher.

Meanwhile, South Korean stocks exposed to North Korea plunged after the news: Hanil Hyundai Cement ended Friday 8.77 percent lower, and Hyundai Elevator declined by 6.9 percent.

In broader markets, South Korea’s Kospi closed 0.95 percent higher and Japan’s Nikkei 225 index rose 0.77 percent. In the currencies space, the Korean won weakened against the U.S. dollar by around 0.1 percent, while the Japanese yen — typically seen as a safe haven — traded flat against the greenback.

— Reuters contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: yen nee lee, saul loeb, afp, getty images
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Trump says he is in ‘no rush’ to complete US-China trade deal

U.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday he was in no rush to complete a trade pact with China and insisted that any deal include protection for intellectual property, a major sticking point between the two sides during months of negotiations. “I think President Xi saw that I’m somebody that believes in walking when the deal is not done, and you know there’s always a chance it could happen and he probably wouldn’t want that,” Trump said. China has not made any public comment confirming Xi i


U.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday he was in no rush to complete a trade pact with China and insisted that any deal include protection for intellectual property, a major sticking point between the two sides during months of negotiations. “I think President Xi saw that I’m somebody that believes in walking when the deal is not done, and you know there’s always a chance it could happen and he probably wouldn’t want that,” Trump said. China has not made any public comment confirming Xi i
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, completed, trade, meeting, uschina, summit, xi, president, property, deal, rush, complete, inperson, trump


Trump says he is in 'no rush' to complete US-China trade deal

U.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday he was in no rush to complete a trade pact with China and insisted that any deal include protection for intellectual property, a major sticking point between the two sides during months of negotiations.

Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping had been expected to hold a summit at the president’s Mar-a-Lago property in Florida later this month, but no date has been set for a meeting and no in-person talks between their trade teams have been held in more than two weeks.

The president, speaking to reporters at the White House, said he thought there was a good chance a deal would be made, in part because China wanted one after suffering from U.S. tariffs on its goods.

But he acknowledged Xi may be wary of coming to a summit without an agreement in hand after seeing Trump end a separate summit in Vietnam with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un without a peace deal.

“I think President Xi saw that I’m somebody that believes in walking when the deal is not done, and you know there’s always a chance it could happen and he probably wouldn’t want that,” Trump said.

China has not made any public comment confirming Xi is considering going to meet Trump in Florida or elsewhere.

The president, who likes to emphasize his own deal-making abilities, said an agreement to end a months-long trade war could be finished ahead of a presidential meeting or completed in-person with his counterpart.

“We could do it either way. We could have the deal completed and come and sign, or we could get the deal almost completed and negotiate some of the final points. I would prefer that,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: saul loeb, afp, getty images
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Trump tweets ‘VETO!’ after Senate votes to block his border emergency declaration

The Senate voted Thursday to block President Donald Trump’s national emergency declaration over the southern border, a sharp bipartisan rebuke of the president’s flex of executive power. Trump plans to reject the bill, which the Democratic-held House has already passed. Neither chamber appears to have enough support to overcome Trump’s opposition with a two-thirds majority vote. It is unclear now if House leaders will push for a vote to override the president’s veto. Trump publicly lobbied the G


The Senate voted Thursday to block President Donald Trump’s national emergency declaration over the southern border, a sharp bipartisan rebuke of the president’s flex of executive power. Trump plans to reject the bill, which the Democratic-held House has already passed. Neither chamber appears to have enough support to overcome Trump’s opposition with a two-thirds majority vote. It is unclear now if House leaders will push for a vote to override the president’s veto. Trump publicly lobbied the G
Trump tweets ‘VETO!’ after Senate votes to block his border emergency declaration Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: jacob pramuk, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, votes, block, vote, house, veto, emergency, tweets, passed, resolution, senate, declaration, trump, voted, republicans, presidents, support, border


Trump tweets 'VETO!' after Senate votes to block his border emergency declaration

The Senate voted Thursday to block President Donald Trump’s national emergency declaration over the southern border, a sharp bipartisan rebuke of the president’s flex of executive power.

The chamber comfortably passed the measure in a 59-41 vote. Twelve Republicans who worried about executive overreach supported it in an embarrassing blow to the president.

Trump plans to reject the bill, which the Democratic-held House has already passed. In one tweet after the vote, he simply said, “VETO!” In a subsequent message, he said he looks “forward to VETOING the just passed Democrat inspired Resolution,” thanking Republicans “who voted to support Border Security and our desperately needed WALL!”

The veto would be the first of his presidency. Neither chamber appears to have enough support to overcome Trump’s opposition with a two-thirds majority vote.

It is unclear now if House leaders will push for a vote to override the president’s veto. Rep. Joaquin Castro, a Texas Democrat who introduced the House resolution, told reporters Thursday that he will push for another vote even though it will be “very tough” to reach a veto-proof majority. He called it a “consequential constitutional vote.”

Trump publicly lobbied the GOP to support his declaration in recent days. Republican lawmakers who voted to terminate Trump’s action voiced concerns not only about presidents circumventing Congress’ appropriations power, but also the prospect of Democratic administrations declaring emergencies on other topics in the future.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: jacob pramuk, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, votes, block, vote, house, veto, emergency, tweets, passed, resolution, senate, declaration, trump, voted, republicans, presidents, support, border


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Some in GOP buck Trump, counter Green New Deal with climate plans

But ever since the New York Democrat began promoting the idea late last year, a growing number of House GOP lawmakers have been increasingly willing to say those four little words: “Climate change is real.” “This is an extremely important subject,” Carter said during a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on the Environment and Climate Change hearing on February 6, adding that climate change “is real” and is “something that we have to address.” That’s why we back sensible, realistic, and effec


But ever since the New York Democrat began promoting the idea late last year, a growing number of House GOP lawmakers have been increasingly willing to say those four little words: “Climate change is real.” “This is an extremely important subject,” Carter said during a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on the Environment and Climate Change hearing on February 6, adding that climate change “is real” and is “something that we have to address.” That’s why we back sensible, realistic, and effec
Some in GOP buck Trump, counter Green New Deal with climate plans Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-11  Authors: allan smith, alex wong, getty images news, getty images, saul loeb, afp, simon dawson, bloomberg, matthew busch, roger wright
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, scientists, ranking, climate, energy, house, member, deal, buck, republicans, plans, change, subcommittee, gop, trump, green, counter


Some in GOP buck Trump, counter Green New Deal with climate plans

Republicans have trashed the Green New Deal — Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s proposal to eliminate greenhouse gas emissions and create a renewable energy economy — as unrealistic, unaffordable and ill-conceived.

But ever since the New York Democrat began promoting the idea late last year, a growing number of House GOP lawmakers have been increasingly willing to say those four little words: “Climate change is real.” And they’re warning the rest of their party that Republicans must push for alternative solutions before it’s too late.

Reps. John Shimkus (R-Illinois), the ranking member of the House Energy and Commerce’s Environment and Climate Change subcommittee, Billy Long (R-Missouri), Bill Flores (R-Texas), Buddy Carter (R-Georgia) and Anthony Gonzalez (R-Ohio), among others, made their views plain during a pair of hearings on the topic in early February.

“This is an extremely important subject,” Carter said during a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on the Environment and Climate Change hearing on February 6, adding that climate change “is real” and is “something that we have to address.”

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Shimkus, along with Rep. Greg Walden (R-Oregon), the ranking member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, and Fred Upton (R-Michigan), the ranking member of the House Energy and Commerce’s Energy subcommittee, argued in a Feb. 13 opinion article that the Green New Deal would have “potentially devastating consequences on our national debt and on our economy.”

“Americans deserve better. That’s why we back sensible, realistic, and effective policies to tackle climate change,” they wrote.

It’s a position that contradicts President Donald Trump, who continues to doubt the veracity of climate science — so much so that his administration plans to name a group of selected scientists to reassess it’s earlier dire analysis of climate change. According to The Washington Post, the group of scientists would include those who question just how severe climate change really is and the extent to which humans contribute to it. According to Bloomberg, the Trump administration will seek drastic cuts to the Department of Energy’s renewable energy budget as part of the president’s fiscal year 2020 budget request, set to be released Monday.

But polling shows the Republican Party’s aversion to acknowledging climate change is increasingly falling out of favor. An NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll released on March 4 showed that 63 percent of adults felt that the GOP’s positions on climate change were outside the mainstream, compared to 54 percent who said so when asked in October 2015. On fiscal issues, immigration and abortion — three other issues that adults were asked about in both the polls — the difference between 2015 and 2019 was negligible or nonexistent.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-11  Authors: allan smith, alex wong, getty images news, getty images, saul loeb, afp, simon dawson, bloomberg, matthew busch, roger wright
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, scientists, ranking, climate, energy, house, member, deal, buck, republicans, plans, change, subcommittee, gop, trump, green, counter


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