How researchers are trying to save the Great Barrier Reef

A kaleidoscope of color, the Great Barrier Reef is a natural wonder. Attracting tourists from around the world, it also makes a substantial contribution to the country’s economy: Over 5.6 billion Australian dollars (around $3.71 billion) each year, according to the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, or GBRMPA. Challenging timesAll is not well, however, with the GBRMPA describing climate change as “the greatest threat to the Great Barrier Reef and coral reefs worldwide.” Getting clues from


A kaleidoscope of color, the Great Barrier Reef is a natural wonder.
Attracting tourists from around the world, it also makes a substantial contribution to the country’s economy: Over 5.6 billion Australian dollars (around $3.71 billion) each year, according to the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, or GBRMPA.
Challenging timesAll is not well, however, with the GBRMPA describing climate change as “the greatest threat to the Great Barrier Reef and coral reefs worldwide.”
Getting clues from
How researchers are trying to save the Great Barrier Reef Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coral, save, barrier, trying, reefs, australia, number, reef, bleaching, studies, corals, researchers, great


How researchers are trying to save the Great Barrier Reef

A kaleidoscope of color, the Great Barrier Reef is a natural wonder. Located in waters off the coast of Queensland, Australia, it boasts a wide variety of life, from soft and hard coral to fish, molluscs, plankton, whales and dolphins. Attracting tourists from around the world, it also makes a substantial contribution to the country’s economy: Over 5.6 billion Australian dollars (around $3.71 billion) each year, according to the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, or GBRMPA. While they may be beautiful to look at, coral reefs act as crucial tools in protecting the environment. As the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has noted, “the coral reef structure buffers shorelines against waves, storms, and floods” which in turn helps to “prevent loss of life, property damage, and erosion.”

Challenging times

All is not well, however, with the GBRMPA describing climate change as “the greatest threat to the Great Barrier Reef and coral reefs worldwide.” The past few years have seen a number of challenging developments that highlight the fragility of the reef. In 2017, for instance, scientists in Australia recorded “severe” coral bleaching across large parts of the reef for the second time in 12 months. At the time, James Cook University (JCU) in Australia said that aerial surveys had shown that the middle third of the reef had seen the most intense bleaching, while in 2016 bleaching had hit the northern third the hardest. Bleaching takes place when “abnormal” conditions — such as increased sea temperatures — result in coral getting rid of very small photosynthetic algae, according to JCU and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, which is located there. When this happens, the corals “bleach”, turning white. While they can recover if the sea temperature falls again, they can die if it doesn’t. The impact of the above was still being felt years later. In April 2019, research published in the journal Nature painted a stark picture. “Dead corals don’t make babies,” Terry Hughes, lead author of the paper and director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, said in a statement. “The number of new corals settling on the Great Barrier Reef declined by 89 percent following the unprecedented loss of adult corals from global warming in 2016 and 2017,” he added.

Getting clues from nature

Peter Mumby is chief scientist at the Great Barrier Reef Foundation, a charity whose aim is to protect the reef. “The research that my team does is to predict how do reefs respond to climate change and how can the management that people implement take us on a better path,” he told CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy.” Mumby went on to explain that his first project with the Foundation was an initiative that looked to build up some understanding of the reef’s resilience. “One of the things I was quite proud of that the project achieved was to understand how connected the Great Barrier Reef is,” he said. “We found that if you can act to protect a relatively small and manageable number of reefs, the ability for that benefit to then translate to affect half of the Great Barrier Reef is considerable,” he added.

Eco-friendly business


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coral, save, barrier, trying, reefs, australia, number, reef, bleaching, studies, corals, researchers, great


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How much you need to save every month to earn $40,000 a year in interest alone for retirement

And if they plan to stop working in their 60s, that leaves a huge variable of how many years of retirement they will need to fund. An “interest-only” retirement plan removes one of the biggest fears about life after leaving your job: Will my money outlast me? NerdWallet crunched the numbers, and we can tell you how much you need to save to get $40,000 every year in retirement, without taking a bite out of your principal. For investing, we assume an annual 6% return when you are saving and a more


And if they plan to stop working in their 60s, that leaves a huge variable of how many years of retirement they will need to fund.
An “interest-only” retirement plan removes one of the biggest fears about life after leaving your job: Will my money outlast me?
NerdWallet crunched the numbers, and we can tell you how much you need to save to get $40,000 every year in retirement, without taking a bite out of your principal.
For investing, we assume an annual 6% return when you are saving and a more
How much you need to save every month to earn $40,000 a year in interest alone for retirement Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: robert exley jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, social, interestonly, numbers, retire, month, 40000, security, earn, interest, save, retirement, need, money, plan


How much you need to save every month to earn $40,000 a year in interest alone for retirement

Most Americans are confident they will be able to retire comfortably.

A 2019 study by the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies and the Aegon Center for Longevity and Retirement found that 63% of U.S. workers are confident that they will be able to fully retire and still live well.

And if they plan to stop working in their 60s, that leaves a huge variable of how many years of retirement they will need to fund.

An “interest-only” retirement plan removes one of the biggest fears about life after leaving your job: Will my money outlast me?

Because if you can save enough now, you can fund your retirement by living off your returns without ever touching your nest egg.

NerdWallet crunched the numbers, and we can tell you how much you need to save to get $40,000 every year in retirement, without taking a bite out of your principal.

First, some ground rules. The numbers assume you will retire at 65 and have no money in savings now.

For investing, we assume an annual 6% return when you are saving and a more conservative 3% rate for your interest-only retirement. We do not factor in inflation, taxes or any additional income you may get from Social Security and your 401(k).

Check out this video to learn more.

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Disclosure: NBCUniversal and Comcast Ventures are investors in Acorns.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: robert exley jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, social, interestonly, numbers, retire, month, 40000, security, earn, interest, save, retirement, need, money, plan


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How to earn $40,000 in interest every year in retirement

How to earn $40,000 in interest every year in retirementAn “interest-only” retirement plan can fund your golden years without draining your savings, but you will need to save a lot of money to make it possible. NerdWallet crunched the numbers, and we can tell you how much you need to save every month, broken down by age, to get $40,000 every year in an “interest-only” retirement. Check out this video to learn how to make it a reality.


How to earn $40,000 in interest every year in retirementAn “interest-only” retirement plan can fund your golden years without draining your savings, but you will need to save a lot of money to make it possible.
NerdWallet crunched the numbers, and we can tell you how much you need to save every month, broken down by age, to get $40,000 every year in an “interest-only” retirement.
Check out this video to learn how to make it a reality.
How to earn $40,000 in interest every year in retirement Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, video, interestonly, savings, reality, tell, 40000, earn, interest, save, retirement, need, retirementan


How to earn $40,000 in interest every year in retirement

How to earn $40,000 in interest every year in retirement

An “interest-only” retirement plan can fund your golden years without draining your savings, but you will need to save a lot of money to make it possible. NerdWallet crunched the numbers, and we can tell you how much you need to save every month, broken down by age, to get $40,000 every year in an “interest-only” retirement. Check out this video to learn how to make it a reality.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, video, interestonly, savings, reality, tell, 40000, earn, interest, save, retirement, need, retirementan


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28-year-old millionaire: ‘The slow way to wealth is to save’

“The slow way to wealth is to save.” It’s a lot easier to make more money than to save more. Plus, if you make a lot, “it’s a lot easier to save anyways,” he says. “Meanwhile, the wealthy are focusing their energy on not just earning — but earning a lot of money.” The wealthy are focusing their energy on not just earning — but earning a lot of money.


“The slow way to wealth is to save.”
It’s a lot easier to make more money than to save more.
Plus, if you make a lot, “it’s a lot easier to save anyways,” he says.
“Meanwhile, the wealthy are focusing their energy on not just earning — but earning a lot of money.”
The wealthy are focusing their energy on not just earning — but earning a lot of money.
28-year-old millionaire: ‘The slow way to wealth is to save’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lot, chidester, rich, earning, save, wealth, money, income, pay, 28yearold, wealthy, millionaire, way, slow


28-year-old millionaire: 'The slow way to wealth is to save'

Tanner Chidester’s net worth crossed $1 million before his 28th birthday, thanks to the two, seven-figure businesses he built: Fit Warrior and Elite CEOs. Having started from scratch, the self-made millionaire has learned that if you want to get rich, “it’s a lot easier to make more money than to save more,” he tells CNBC Make It. “The slow way to wealth is to save.” It took Chidester, now 28, a few years to actually figure out how to make money. When he was 22, he dropped out of Texas A&M his senior year to start a business creating personalized fitness and eating plans. The former Division 1 college football player made just $2,000 off the programs his first two years. To pay the bills, he worked six-hour shifts at Olive Garden.

It’s a lot easier to make more money than to save more. Tanner Chidester Founder and CEO of Fit Warrior and Elite CEOs.

It wasn’t until he took a course about how to build an online training business that he started to see results. “That’s when I learned that people will pay high ticket prices — high ticket meaning $1,500 plus — for a service,” says Chidester, who was 25 at the time. “I was selling my fitness programs for like 40 bucks. That’s when I learned, Oh, people will pay me $1,500 for my service.” Chidester homed in on one-on-one coaching, which people will shell out four figures for, he realized. As soon as he increased his prices, he started seeing big money: He made $10,000 in one week. Eventually, he worked his way up to making between $30,000 and $50,000 a month. By 27, he was a millionaire. While saving money is important, he says, focusing on earning is a more efficient path to building wealth. Plus, if you make a lot, “it’s a lot easier to save anyways,” he says. “If you make $3,000 a month, at the end of the day, you can only save $500 or $1,000, max — you have to pay for rent, food.” But, if you increase your income, you’ll have more left over after your fixed costs to save.

Tanner Chidester teaches business owners and fitness trainers how to grow their businesses Source: Tanner Chidester

Chidester isn’t the only self-made millionaire who encourages this kind of thinking. Grant Cardone, who was deep in debt before building a multi million-dollar fortune, says the only way to get really, really rich is to focus on earning. “I can promise that you will not get rich by skipping your daily latte,” he writes for CNBC Make It. “If you don’t have income, then there is no money to save.” Rather than giving up coffee or avocado toast, “you need to get your mind focused on income,” says Cardone. “Increase your income enough and you will be able to save something substantial.” Steve Siebold, who studied wealthy people for more than 25 years for his book “How Rich People Think,” brings up a similar point. “The masses are so focused on clipping coupons and living frugally they miss major opportunities,” he writes. “Meanwhile, the wealthy are focusing their energy on not just earning — but earning a lot of money.”

The wealthy are focusing their energy on not just earning — but earning a lot of money. Steve Siebold author, professional speaker


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lot, chidester, rich, earning, save, wealth, money, income, pay, 28yearold, wealthy, millionaire, way, slow


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‘It’s hard to frugal your way to early retirement,’ says self-made millionaire who retired at 34

To save on essentials like housing, food, utilities and transportation, you move from a vibrant metro area to a cheaper city. To save on essentials like housing, food, utilities and transportation, you move from a vibrant metro area to a cheaper city. I’ve met a lot of couples who delayed starting a family in order to save money — only to find that, once they’ve hit their late-40s, their ability to naturally conceive has plummeted. I’ve met a lot of couples who delayed starting a family in order


To save on essentials like housing, food, utilities and transportation, you move from a vibrant metro area to a cheaper city.
To save on essentials like housing, food, utilities and transportation, you move from a vibrant metro area to a cheaper city.
I’ve met a lot of couples who delayed starting a family in order to save money — only to find that, once they’ve hit their late-40s, their ability to naturally conceive has plummeted.
I’ve met a lot of couples who delayed starting a family in order
‘It’s hard to frugal your way to early retirement,’ says self-made millionaire who retired at 34 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-19  Authors: sam dogen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, selfmade, retired, retirement, way, hard, living, things, save, rent, start, money, cheaper, millionaire, frugal, wealth, place, early


'It's hard to frugal your way to early retirement,' says self-made millionaire who retired at 34

An abundance mindset can make you rich faster

Life is harder when you only focus on saving money

All those financial gurus who preach that ditching your $5-latte-a-day habit could substantially grow your wealth — and even make you a millionaire, thanks to compound interest — are simply wrong. Let’s be realistic: You’d have to forgo a lot of lattes and need a very high annual return to turn those dollar bill savings into $1 million. I’m not saying you should be wasteful with your money. During the initial stages of my early retirement plan, I stayed in on most nights, ate on an incredibly low budget and shared a studio apartment. But that strategy only lasted for so long. Based on my own experience — and from what readers of Financial Samurai, my finance blog, have shared with me — here are some potential downsides of trying to frugal your way to early retirement: You get bored. To save on essentials like housing, food, utilities and transportation, you move from a vibrant metro area to a cheaper city. But after some time, things get dull and you start to miss the tremendous amount of culture, diversity and entertainment that were once at your fingertips.

To save on essentials like housing, food, utilities and transportation, you move from a vibrant metro area to a cheaper city. But after some time, things get dull and you start to miss the tremendous amount of culture, diversity and entertainment that were once at your fingertips. You get lonely . While the benefits of relocating to a place with low costs of living is nice, you find it hard to meet new people. (Trust me, the older you get, the truer this becomes.) As a result, your social life slowly dwindles, along with your network of friends and contacts that took years to build.

. While the benefits of relocating to a place with low costs of living is nice, you find it hard to meet new people. (Trust me, the older you get, the truer this becomes.) As a result, your social life slowly dwindles, along with your network of friends and contacts that took years to build. Living arrangements become uncomfortable . To save on rent, you and your partner decide to live in a shoebox apartment. But everything is so cramped that you begin to feel suffocated. Also, because there isn’t enough room for personal space, you both find yourselves bickering more than usual.

. To save on rent, you and your partner decide to live in a shoebox apartment. But everything is so cramped that you begin to feel suffocated. Also, because there isn’t enough room for personal space, you both find yourselves bickering more than usual. You miss out on real estate gains . Since renting a place is initially cheaper than buying, you talk yourself into doing the former. But this ultimately means missing out on homeowner advantages like fixed-rate mortgages, tax incentives, equity buildup and profits after selling. While real estate isn’t for everyone and doesn’t always guarantee wealth, the return on rent is always zero.

. Since renting a place is initially cheaper than buying, you talk yourself into doing the former. But this ultimately means missing out on homeowner advantages like fixed-rate mortgages, tax incentives, equity buildup and profits after selling. While real estate isn’t for everyone and doesn’t always guarantee wealth, the return on rent is always zero. You make less money . Typically, one of the biggest benefits of living in a high-cost city is having access to a wealth of job opportunities with higher pay. If you leave for a cheaper area, those options are no longer available. My advice? Tough it out; stay for as long as possible so you can earn your maximum income potential. Then start thinking about whether it makes sense to move.

. Typically, one of the biggest benefits of living in a high-cost city is having access to a wealth of job opportunities with higher pay. If you leave for a cheaper area, those options are no longer available. My advice? Tough it out; stay for as long as possible so you can earn your maximum income potential. Then start thinking about whether it makes sense to move. You miss the window for having kids . I’ve met a lot of couples who delayed starting a family in order to save money — only to find that, once they’ve hit their late-40s, their ability to naturally conceive has plummeted. They then have to spend tens of thousands of dollars on medical treatments. But even so, there’s no promise things will work out as planned.

. I’ve met a lot of couples who delayed starting a family in order to save money — only to find that, once they’ve hit their late-40s, their ability to naturally conceive has plummeted. They then have to spend tens of thousands of dollars on medical treatments. But even so, there’s no promise things will work out as planned. You can’t afford to have kids. Most people don’t realize that raising children requires a tremendous amount of time and money — until they do the math and discover that the hundreds of dollars saved doesn’t come close to what they need to support a child. Even if you don’t have the financial resources, but decide to become parents anyway, you can kiss early retirement goodbye. (My wife and I have two kids and pay $2,380 per month for a platinum healthcare, not to mention the monthly childcare and preschool expenses — which, depending on where you live, can easily cost up to $2,500 per child.)

The smarter early retirement strategy


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-19  Authors: sam dogen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, selfmade, retired, retirement, way, hard, living, things, save, rent, start, money, cheaper, millionaire, frugal, wealth, place, early


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3 easy ways to save an extra $250 per month, according to shopping experts

Here are three easy ways you can free up $250 in your budget per month. The average consumer spends $237.33 each month on subscriptions, according to a July 2018 survey from Waterstone Group that looked at the monthly budgets of 2,500 consumers. A smart place to start: Generic or store brand products that experts say are a good value. Negotiate your billsThe average cost for pay TV, such as cable or satellite, is about $107 a month, according to Leichtman Research Group. Where to start if you wa


Here are three easy ways you can free up $250 in your budget per month.
The average consumer spends $237.33 each month on subscriptions, according to a July 2018 survey from Waterstone Group that looked at the monthly budgets of 2,500 consumers.
A smart place to start: Generic or store brand products that experts say are a good value.
Negotiate your billsThe average cost for pay TV, such as cable or satellite, is about $107 a month, according to Leichtman Research Group.
Where to start if you wa
3 easy ways to save an extra $250 per month, according to shopping experts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-18  Authors: ivana pino
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 250, average, gym, experts, extra, month, easy, according, start, subscriptions, money, shopping, save, generic, ways, monthly


3 easy ways to save an extra $250 per month, according to shopping experts

Scraping together extra savings to put towards retirement or a vacation fund can seem like a tall order, but netting more each month is possible with a little creative trimming. Here are three easy ways you can free up $250 in your budget per month.

1. Cancel subscriptions you don’t use

Review your monthly bank statement for recurring charges, like subscriptions you may have forgotten you signed up for or no longer want. While $5 a month for music streaming you rarely use may not seem like a lot, that’s an extra $60 per year. The same goes for other monthly charges, like unused, or underused, gym memberships. Depending on your location and membership, belonging to a gym can set you back anywhere from $10 per month at Planet Fitness, for example, to $300 per month at upscale clubs like Equinox. If you aren’t hitting the weight room regularly, it might be worth cutting ties with your gym and taking a run or following along with a workout video on YouTube instead. More from Grow:

9 highest-paying jobs you can get with a bachelor’s degree

3 ways to do your taxes for free—it can save you up to $250

A money expert reveals the best ‘way to get rich’ In all, 84% of people underestimate their spending on subscriptions—with roughly of them half off by $100 or more. The average consumer spends $237.33 each month on subscriptions, according to a July 2018 survey from Waterstone Group that looked at the monthly budgets of 2,500 consumers. Make sure you’re actually getting something you value for your money.

2. Go generic

We all have our preferences, whether it’s for a favorite cereal or two-ply toilet paper. But one simple way to save money regularly is to look to store brands and generics, which typically cost about half the price of name-brand items, according to a report from Policygenius. Start by making a list of items you purchase frequently and figure out where you’re willing to budge. A smart place to start: Generic or store brand products that experts say are a good value. “I have no shame about buying generic peanut butter or whatever it is, as long as the quality is the same as the name brand—and in many cases, it is,” says Trae Bodge, smart shopping expert at Truetrae.com. “You can save yourself 20% or 30% on a generic brand.” If your annual grocery budget is about $4,015 (the national average), you could save up to 30%, or about $100 each month, by switching to generics.

3. Negotiate your bills

The average cost for pay TV, such as cable or satellite, is about $107 a month, according to Leichtman Research Group. Review your monthly internet, phone and cable bills to check for any unexplained increases in your plan or expired introductory offers. Then call customer service to try to negotiate your bill. Emphasize that you’d like a better deal on your service. If that fails, ask to speak with their retention department, whose job it is to keep customers and will likely be willing to help. Do this for a few bills, and you could save over $50 each month. You can also try negotiating on memberships like your gym, Bodge says: “‘If I take fewer classes, can you reduce my rate? Can you validate my parking?’ Be sure to ask lots of questions about how you can trim your bill.”

Where to start if you want to save money


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-18  Authors: ivana pino
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 250, average, gym, experts, extra, month, easy, according, start, subscriptions, money, shopping, save, generic, ways, monthly


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Walmart changed the way it buys shopping bags and saved $60 million—and that’s just one way it cut costs

Because of its scale as the world’s biggest retailer, Walmart can save millions of dollars by making even the slightest tweaks to how it runs its business. It will save $60 million annually by changing its process for buying shopping bags, CFO Brett Biggs said Tuesday, during a meeting with investors in New York. It is also cutting the cost of the vests its workers wear by 15% by making them out of recyclable materials, he said. And Walmart is on track to save $100 million annually by centralizi


Because of its scale as the world’s biggest retailer, Walmart can save millions of dollars by making even the slightest tweaks to how it runs its business.
It will save $60 million annually by changing its process for buying shopping bags, CFO Brett Biggs said Tuesday, during a meeting with investors in New York.
It is also cutting the cost of the vests its workers wear by 15% by making them out of recyclable materials, he said.
And Walmart is on track to save $100 million annually by centralizi
Walmart changed the way it buys shopping bags and saved $60 million—and that’s just one way it cut costs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-18  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, making, stores, million, thats, earnings, saved, buys, scale, meeting, walmart, way, save, costs, process, cut, saving, millionand, changed, shopping


Walmart changed the way it buys shopping bags and saved $60 million—and that's just one way it cut costs

Because of its scale as the world’s biggest retailer, Walmart can save millions of dollars by making even the slightest tweaks to how it runs its business.

It will save $60 million annually by changing its process for buying shopping bags, CFO Brett Biggs said Tuesday, during a meeting with investors in New York.

It is also cutting the cost of the vests its workers wear by 15% by making them out of recyclable materials, he said.

And Walmart is on track to save $100 million annually by centralizing how it maintains the equipment in its stores to be more energy efficient, according to Biggs.

“You can take a lot of small projects. … You can scale them across the business, and they can lead to impressive savings,” the CFO explained. “We are bending the curve on expenses.”

Walmart had said at its 2019 annual shareholders meeting in Bentonville, Arkansas, that it would save at least $30 million for the year by swapping out existing stepping stools in its distribution centers with a lighter-weight version.

It had also previously said it was saving $200 million by changing the light bulbs in its stores and parking lots, and saving $20 million by using a new new floor wax.

That all adds up.

The company also said Tuesday that its “Fast Unloader” technology, which scans and sorts packages as they come off trucks and is in more than 1,700 Walmart stores today, shaves about a third of the time off the truck unloading process when it requires 100% human labor.

Biggs’ comments come on the heels of Walmart reporting fiscal fourth-quarter earnings that missed analysts’ estimates, hurt by weak sales of holiday toys and apparel.

Walmart shares were last up about 1%. The stock has climbed a little more than 19% over the past 12 months. Walmart has a market cap of about $338.4 billion.

Read the full earnings press release from Walmart.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-18  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, making, stores, million, thats, earnings, saved, buys, scale, meeting, walmart, way, save, costs, process, cut, saving, millionand, changed, shopping


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3 ways to do your taxes for free — it can save you up to $250

If you haven’t done your taxes yet, there’s one important question to ask yourself before you file: Are you eligible for free tax prep? Free FileLow- and moderate-income taxpayers, those earning about $69,000 or less a year, can take advantage of Free File, a partnership between the IRS and the Free File Alliance, a nonprofit group of about a dozen tax-prep service providers. Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) provides free tax assistance to people who are age 60 and older. In addition to thes


If you haven’t done your taxes yet, there’s one important question to ask yourself before you file: Are you eligible for free tax prep?
Free FileLow- and moderate-income taxpayers, those earning about $69,000 or less a year, can take advantage of Free File, a partnership between the IRS and the Free File Alliance, a nonprofit group of about a dozen tax-prep service providers.
Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) provides free tax assistance to people who are age 60 and older.
In addition to thes
3 ways to do your taxes for free — it can save you up to $250 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-15  Authors: alizah salario, mike alfred, michelle gielan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taxes, help, taxpayers, limited, programs, walker, ways, prep, free, file, return, save, tax, 250


3 ways to do your taxes for free — it can save you up to $250

If you haven’t done your taxes yet, there’s one important question to ask yourself before you file: Are you eligible for free tax prep? Millions of taxpayers are but don’t take advantage. It costs an average of $176 to have a professional prepare a federal Form 1040 and a state return if you’re taking the standard deduction, according to the National Society of Accountants. If you’re itemizing, the average is $246. The more complicated your return, the higher the price. Depending on your income and other elements of your tax situation, you may be eligible for free help. Here are three resources to consider.

1. Free File

Low- and moderate-income taxpayers, those earning about $69,000 or less a year, can take advantage of Free File, a partnership between the IRS and the Free File Alliance, a nonprofit group of about a dozen tax-prep service providers. Free File is designed so that about 7 in 10 taxpayers, or roughly 100 million people, qualify. But in 2017, only about 3 million people used it. “You can file in certain situations both your federal and your state [return], depending on if your state qualifies,” explains April Walker, the American Institute of CPAs’ lead manager for tax practice & ethics. “If you’re at or below that [$69,000] number, then definitely it’s a great option for you.” To get started, go to the IRS Free File site, where, after plugging in key information, you’ll be redirected to a software provider’s site to complete your return. “It’ll tell you which of the offers are available to you,” says Walker. Keep in mind, however, that eligibility is often limited to those with straightforward returns, meaning they have W-2 income, limited investment income, and are claiming the standard deduction.

Video by Stephen Parkhurst

2. Volunteer assistance programs

IRS-certified volunteers provide tax assistance through two programs that operate out of community centers, senior centers, local libraries, schools, and elsewhere: Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) offers free tax help to those who generally make $56,000 or less, or those taxpayers with disabilities or whose English language skills are limited. You can find a VITA location near you by using the program’s locator tool.

offers free tax help to those who generally make $56,000 or less, or those taxpayers with disabilities or whose English language skills are limited. You can find a VITA location near you by using the program’s locator tool. Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) provides free tax assistance to people who are age 60 and older. In addition to these IRS-affiliated programs, other organizations may provide free tax help in your area. AARP’s Tax-Aide program, for example, offers free tax preparation help to anyone but caters specifically to those 50 and older. Note that volunteer programs generally require you make an appointment, and you’ll need to come prepared with your key tax forms. Try to make an appointment sooner rather than later, too. “If you wait until the last minute, you may not be able to get an appointment,” says Walker. “It can also cause you to scramble for the information. Early prep is the best course of action.”

If you wait until the last minute, you may not be able to get an appointment. It can also cause you to scramble for the information. Early prep is the best course of action. April Walker AICPA

3. Free versions of tax prep software


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-15  Authors: alizah salario, mike alfred, michelle gielan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taxes, help, taxpayers, limited, programs, walker, ways, prep, free, file, return, save, tax, 250


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This easy life skill can help you save money, says expert at Good Housekeeping

You don’t want these items ruined by a careless tip of a wine glass or a rogue child with a marker. If picking up this life skill means you can replace fewer shirts, skip a few trips to the dry cleaner, or avoid buying a slipcover for your sofa, you can save $150 a year, easy. “For a tannin stain, hot water works very well, but if it’s a fat or a protein, use cold water,” she says. Upholstery stains can be trickier than clothes, because they can soak through to areas that are tough to clean. App


You don’t want these items ruined by a careless tip of a wine glass or a rogue child with a marker.
If picking up this life skill means you can replace fewer shirts, skip a few trips to the dry cleaner, or avoid buying a slipcover for your sofa, you can save $150 a year, easy.
“For a tannin stain, hot water works very well, but if it’s a fat or a protein, use cold water,” she says.
Upholstery stains can be trickier than clothes, because they can soak through to areas that are tough to clean.
App
This easy life skill can help you save money, says expert at Good Housekeeping Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-14  Authors: lisa ferber, michelle gielan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, expert, maker, good, stains, help, sofa, cleaning, towel, works, stain, dont, upholstery, easy, save, skill, life, housekeeping, clean


This easy life skill can help you save money, says expert at Good Housekeeping

A cotton shirt at the Gap runs about $50, while a sofa at Ikea can easily cost $400. Carpet your living room with a $2.59 per square foot variety from Home Depot, and materials could run $800. You don’t want these items ruined by a careless tip of a wine glass or a rogue child with a marker. Becoming a whiz at stain removal and prevention helps you stretch the life of those items and avoid spending money on a replacement, says Carolyn Forte, director of the home appliances and cleaning products lab at Good Housekeeping magazine. “Maintenance cleaning” helps too, she says: It’s “going to prolong your investment.” If picking up this life skill means you can replace fewer shirts, skip a few trips to the dry cleaner, or avoid buying a slipcover for your sofa, you can save $150 a year, easy. Here are some expert tips:

For your clothing

Limit the stain’s power. Cleaning expert Melissa Maker, host of the Clean My Space channel on YouTube, says the important thing is to start working on a stain as early as possible, which can help curb the damage. “You want to remove whatever you can,” says Maker. For example, use the dull edge of a knife to scrape off cheese, wax, or peanut butter. For the leftover stain, “take a paper towel and press, but not rub, and move the towel a few times so you get a clean area.” Know your stain type. The best way to treat a stain depends on the substance that caused it. Stains fall into three main categories, Maker says: There’s oil/fat (like butter or olive oil), protein (like milk or blood), and tannins (like juice and wine). “For a tannin stain, hot water works very well, but if it’s a fat or a protein, use cold water,” she says. Find the right stain remover. Maker likes to use a high-quality eucalyptus essential oil called Thursday Plantation. “This will work on almost any material. Not silk, but any cotton or polyester,” she says. “It’s a solvent and it will help remove stains. Throw it into the wash and it should come out clean. If not, you can do it a second time.” OxiClean Versatile and OxiClean Baby can also combat several stain types across the three categories. And Maker says a good dish soap, such as Dawn, works well too. Be prepared to experiment. “People can get discouraged when they don’t get something out the first time,” says Maker. “But I’ve gone back and then a stain comes right out, so be patient.”

For your upholstery

Stop stains before they happen. Upholstery stains can be trickier than clothes, because they can soak through to areas that are tough to clean. Unless your couch cushions have removable covers, for example, you can’t toss them in the washing machine. “What I would focus on is preventative treatments,” says Maker. “If you are having people over where you know there might be food passed around, you might want to take some blankets that are nice enough and casually drape them over the upholstery. That way you have a layer to absorb any drops, and the sofa can be safe. So it’s a nice, cozy solution.”

People can get discouraged when they don’t get something out the first time. But I’ve gone back and then a stain comes right out, so be patient. Melissa Maker host of the Clean My Space channel on YouTube

This also goes for any potentially messy activities, like letting your kids make an art project or bringing in a pro to give the living room a fresh coat of paint. “I paint my nails on the sofa, and I set up a towel,” she says. “Just make sure you have something that you don’t care about and use that as prevention. It’s always easier to prevent than to fix.” Test cleaning methods before you commit. Before you attack a stain on your upholstery directly, “you have to test it in a hidden area first to make sure it works with your particular fabric,” Maker says. Otherwise you risk that the treatment will create more noticeable damage than the stain. “Mix dish soap and hydrogen peroxide in equal parts, and apply to the surface,” she says. “Use a very small amount, and once you blot it out you need a very thin amount on the stain.” Apply the solution with a small, clean toothbrush, and use the mixture sparingly to avoid a leftover ring of product.

For your carpet

Stain protection starts at your front door. Forte says you should do whatever you can to keep outside dirt from touching your carpet: “Mats on the doors in and out. Shoes at the doors work great,” she says. “When you think about what’s on the bottom of your shoes, you don’t want that in your house.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-14  Authors: lisa ferber, michelle gielan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, expert, maker, good, stains, help, sofa, cleaning, towel, works, stain, dont, upholstery, easy, save, skill, life, housekeeping, clean


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