Almost two-thirds of workers say they would trust a robot over their manager

Much talk of workplace automation paints a picture of an apocalyptic stand-off between humans and their robot replacements. In fact, as many as 64% of workers say they would trust a robot over their manager, based on the joint study from U.S. technology company Oracle and research firm Future Workplace. Meanwhile, more than half say they have already turned to a robot for advice instead of their manager. The phenomenon is especially pronounced in Asia, where employees expressed a disproportionat


Much talk of workplace automation paints a picture of an apocalyptic stand-off between humans and their robot replacements. In fact, as many as 64% of workers say they would trust a robot over their manager, based on the joint study from U.S. technology company Oracle and research firm Future Workplace. Meanwhile, more than half say they have already turned to a robot for advice instead of their manager. The phenomenon is especially pronounced in Asia, where employees expressed a disproportionat
Almost two-thirds of workers say they would trust a robot over their manager Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trusting, say, employees, trust, technology, workplacein, robots, robot, zealand, manager, workers, workplace, twothirds


Almost two-thirds of workers say they would trust a robot over their manager

Much talk of workplace automation paints a picture of an apocalyptic stand-off between humans and their robot replacements.

But the ultimate relationship may be much more harmonious, according to a new report, which suggests that many employees are embracing artificial intelligence (AI) in the workplace.

In fact, as many as 64% of workers say they would trust a robot over their manager, based on the joint study from U.S. technology company Oracle and research firm Future Workplace. Meanwhile, more than half say they have already turned to a robot for advice instead of their manager.

The phenomenon is especially pronounced in Asia, where employees expressed a disproportionate distrust in their human colleagues when compared to technology. For example, 89% of workers in India and 88% of those in China admitted to trusting robots over their managers.

The two gargantuan labor forces were joined by workers in Singapore (83%), Brazil (78%), Japan (76%), Australia and New Zealand (58%), the U.S. (57%), the U.K. (54%) and France (56%) in trusting robots over their managers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trusting, say, employees, trust, technology, workplacein, robots, robot, zealand, manager, workers, workplace, twothirds


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Airbus is undervalued and looks more cash-rich than Boeing, Barclays analysts say

The immediate future for Airbus looks “brighter than ever” thanks to a mature portfolio offering reliable cash flow over the next five years, according to equity analysts at Barclays. “Central to our investment thesis on Airbus is our view that the scale and predictability of its FCF (free cash flow) is superior to Boeing, yet Airbus trades at a much larger than normal discount to Boeing,” Barclays aerospace analysts said in a new research note Monday. On Tuesday morning, Airbus stock was priced


The immediate future for Airbus looks “brighter than ever” thanks to a mature portfolio offering reliable cash flow over the next five years, according to equity analysts at Barclays. “Central to our investment thesis on Airbus is our view that the scale and predictability of its FCF (free cash flow) is superior to Boeing, yet Airbus trades at a much larger than normal discount to Boeing,” Barclays aerospace analysts said in a new research note Monday. On Tuesday morning, Airbus stock was priced
Airbus is undervalued and looks more cash-rich than Boeing, Barclays analysts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, say, boeing, barclays, euros, range, undervalued, flow, mature, cash, share, analysts, airbus, price, cashrich, looks


Airbus is undervalued and looks more cash-rich than Boeing, Barclays analysts say

The immediate future for Airbus looks “brighter than ever” thanks to a mature portfolio offering reliable cash flow over the next five years, according to equity analysts at Barclays. “Central to our investment thesis on Airbus is our view that the scale and predictability of its FCF (free cash flow) is superior to Boeing, yet Airbus trades at a much larger than normal discount to Boeing,” Barclays aerospace analysts said in a new research note Monday. Under new coverage of Airbus shares, led by Paris-based analyst Milene Kerner, the bank put a price target of 155 euros ($171) per share with an “overweight” rating. On Tuesday morning, Airbus stock was priced on the French CAC-40 at just over 119 euros per share.

By comparison, Boeing’s current share price is $372 and has risen nearly 16% year-to-date. The researchers believe Airbus’s range of jet planes “should outgrow” Boeing’s by 2024, aided by the U.S. planemaker’s frustration over its grounded 737 Max plane as well as challenges getting its new 777X into commercial service. Barclays believe Airbus’s “more mature” product range would guarantee smoother income and free cash flow could triple from 3 billion euros in 2018 to around 9 billion euros in 2024. “The cash flow profile at Airbus is now becoming more predictable and robust compared with that of Boeing,” the bank said.

‘Striking’ discount


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, say, boeing, barclays, euros, range, undervalued, flow, mature, cash, share, analysts, airbus, price, cashrich, looks


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Women live paycheck to paycheck roughly 5 times as often as men—here’s why

Almost half of Americans say they live paycheck to paycheck. But women are roughly five times more likely to say they fall into this cycle than men. “That leads to lifetime earnings being lower and savings being lower,” Gould says. “Women may feel more secure with more savings, and therefore they feel they live paycheck to paycheck,” Gould says. MetLife’s research generally found that women feel less in control of their finances than men and fewer women feel on track to achieve their financial g


Almost half of Americans say they live paycheck to paycheck. But women are roughly five times more likely to say they fall into this cycle than men. “That leads to lifetime earnings being lower and savings being lower,” Gould says. “Women may feel more secure with more savings, and therefore they feel they live paycheck to paycheck,” Gould says. MetLife’s research generally found that women feel less in control of their finances than men and fewer women feel on track to achieve their financial g
Women live paycheck to paycheck roughly 5 times as often as men—here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, women, feel, pay, live, men, stoddardgraham, gould, say, lower, roughly, menheres, paycheck, times, paid


Women live paycheck to paycheck roughly 5 times as often as men—here's why

Almost half of Americans say they live paycheck to paycheck. But women are roughly five times more likely to say they fall into this cycle than men. Of the 43% of Americans who say they live paycheck to paycheck, 85% are women, according to a new poll from insurance and employee benefits provider MetLife of over 8,000 U.S. adults over the age of 18. This trend is driven by a “a perfect storm of factors,” Loi Stoddard-Graham, MetLife’s vice president of planning and business development, tells CNBC Make It. The pay disparity between men and women certainly plays a major role, Stoddard-Graham says. While there is a “sizable pay gap,” the disparity goes beyond just the fact that women are paid less than men for comparable jobs, Elise Gould, senior economist with the nonpartisan think tank the Economic Policy Institute, tells Make It. Women’s lower lifetime earnings can be attributed to the fact that the occupations that women enter tend to be paid less than fields that are traditionally male-dominated. Because women are more likely to work in minimum-wage and lower-income occupations than men, they may also face more erratic schedules that could lead to a less stable paycheck. Plus, the positions men take are also generally more likely to evolve into manager and executive roles. “That leads to lifetime earnings being lower and savings being lower,” Gould says.

Click to expand the chart.

Women carry more responsibility

The reason so many women face economic instability is tied to more than just pay. Stoddard-Graham says that women often carry more responsibility when it comes to caring for their loved ones and extended families, for example. “There’s what’s happening in the labor market and then there’s what’s happening at home,” Gould says. Research shows that women disproportionately take on more household responsibilities, even when there are no kids in the household, she says. And many women are forced to take time out of the workforce because they can’t afford child care costs. That, studies have shown, hits women’s careers and lifetime earning potential. “Not having paid parental leave or affordable, high-quality child care is a disproportionate burden on mothers and therefore a disproportionate burden on women,” Gould says. Another reason for the stark difference in answers between men and women could be how the question is interpreted and how secure people feel financially when answering. “Women may feel more secure with more savings, and therefore they feel they live paycheck to paycheck,” Gould says. MetLife’s research generally found that women feel less in control of their finances than men and fewer women feel on track to achieve their financial goals.

Breaking free of the cycle


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, women, feel, pay, live, men, stoddardgraham, gould, say, lower, roughly, menheres, paycheck, times, paid


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Trump needs more than a ‘phase one’ US-China trade deal to boost 2020 odds, GOPers say

President Donald Trump has hailed the partial trade agreement with China as the “greatest and biggest deal ever made for our Great Patriot Farmers.” And Trump will need a better one if he hopes to use it to boost his reelection odds, according to Republican and Democratic strategists. Only a real resolution of the trade war, not a sweet sounding press release, will matter,” Sabato said. The trade war between the U.S. and China has been particularly damaging to states dominated by farm and manufa


President Donald Trump has hailed the partial trade agreement with China as the “greatest and biggest deal ever made for our Great Patriot Farmers.” And Trump will need a better one if he hopes to use it to boost his reelection odds, according to Republican and Democratic strategists. Only a real resolution of the trade war, not a sweet sounding press release, will matter,” Sabato said. The trade war between the U.S. and China has been particularly damaging to states dominated by farm and manufa
Trump needs more than a ‘phase one’ US-China trade deal to boost 2020 odds, GOPers say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, trade, war, wall, boost, say, phase, odds, deal, agreement, needs, gopers, republican, voters, think, uschina, white


Trump needs more than a 'phase one' US-China trade deal to boost 2020 odds, GOPers say

President Donald Trump, right, shakes hands with Liu He, China’s vice premier, during a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, D.C., on Friday, Oct. 11, 2019.

President Donald Trump has hailed the partial trade agreement with China as the “greatest and biggest deal ever made for our Great Patriot Farmers.”

The unwritten agreement, announced on Friday after high-level talks between the two superpowers, has so far been described only in vague terms, and is expected to come in phases. And Trump will need a better one if he hopes to use it to boost his reelection odds, according to Republican and Democratic strategists.

“Trump won the big three (MI PA WI) by a grand total of 77,000 votes. It doesn’t take much of a shift to reverse that,” Larry Sabato, a leading elections analyst and director of the Center for Politics at the University of Virginia, said in an email, referring to Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

“As the old saying goes, you can’t eat hope. Only a real resolution of the trade war, not a sweet sounding press release, will matter,” Sabato said.

The trade war between the U.S. and China has been particularly damaging to states dominated by farm and manufacturing economies, where the president’s 2016 margin was in some places thin. State polls show that his standing in those states, which include Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, has soured since he took office. Trump, however, remains the favorite for 2020 in betting markets.

According to the White House, phase one will be written over the next few weeks and will include Chinese purchases of up to $50 billion in American agricultural goods. So far, though, Wall Street analysts and Chinese state media have been skeptical about the prospects that the deal will move the countries closer to an effective truce in their damaging trade war, which has rattled markets and threatened global growth.

Republican strategists and experts also agree that more is needed. Until the trade agreement wins over Wall Street and the broader business community, it’s unlikely to matter to everyday voters who generally vote based on economic conditions, they said.

“This trade deal is being sold as something that will help America and the economy. It needs to do all those things,” said Matt Gorman, a former communications director for the National Republican Congressional Committee. “It’s more about the outcome than the process.”

Carlos Curbelo, a Republican former congressman from Florida, said he expected few voters will look at the details of the deal itself. But, he said, they will be paying attention to what happens to unemployment numbers and the balances of their 401(k) retirement accounts. On that front, he said, he was skeptical.

“I don’t think this partial agreement is enough, because it does not provide the economy and the markets the long-term certainty that they seek,” Curbelo said. “There was some early optimism and enthusiasm, but I think as more details emerge, we are seeing that early energy start to wane.”

Markets initially soared on news of the trade deal before losing much of their gains in short order after Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told CNBC on Monday that tariffs slated for December will still go into effect without another agreement. Friday’s deal also left in place tariffs from September on a broad range of Chinese-made consumer items.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, trade, war, wall, boost, say, phase, odds, deal, agreement, needs, gopers, republican, voters, think, uschina, white


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Macro headwinds are a buying opportunity for these stocks, Wall Street analysts say

Wall Street has doubts after partial trade deal: ‘I don’t think…Today’s rally clearly indicates that the market is happy for the moment with just a partial deal. But the Dow gave up 200 of its 500-point gain in the final half hour as… Trader Talk with Bob Pisaniread more


Wall Street has doubts after partial trade deal: ‘I don’t think…Today’s rally clearly indicates that the market is happy for the moment with just a partial deal. But the Dow gave up 200 of its 500-point gain in the final half hour as… Trader Talk with Bob Pisaniread more
Macro headwinds are a buying opportunity for these stocks, Wall Street analysts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, headwinds, buying, stocks, deal, trade, wall, thinktodays, rally, say, partial, pisaniread, moment, macro, analysts, street, opportunity, talk


Macro headwinds are a buying opportunity for these stocks, Wall Street analysts say

Wall Street has doubts after partial trade deal: ‘I don’t think…

Today’s rally clearly indicates that the market is happy for the moment with just a partial deal. But the Dow gave up 200 of its 500-point gain in the final half hour as…

Trader Talk with Bob Pisani

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, headwinds, buying, stocks, deal, trade, wall, thinktodays, rally, say, partial, pisaniread, moment, macro, analysts, street, opportunity, talk


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Macro headwinds are a buying opportunity for these stocks, Wall Street analysts say

Wall Street has doubts after partial trade deal: ‘I don’t think…Today’s rally clearly indicates that the market is happy for the moment with just a partial deal. But the Dow gave up 200 of its 500-point gain in the final half hour as… Trader Talk with Bob Pisaniread more


Wall Street has doubts after partial trade deal: ‘I don’t think…Today’s rally clearly indicates that the market is happy for the moment with just a partial deal. But the Dow gave up 200 of its 500-point gain in the final half hour as… Trader Talk with Bob Pisaniread more
Macro headwinds are a buying opportunity for these stocks, Wall Street analysts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, headwinds, buying, stocks, deal, trade, wall, thinktodays, rally, say, partial, pisaniread, moment, macro, analysts, street, opportunity, talk


Macro headwinds are a buying opportunity for these stocks, Wall Street analysts say

Wall Street has doubts after partial trade deal: ‘I don’t think…

Today’s rally clearly indicates that the market is happy for the moment with just a partial deal. But the Dow gave up 200 of its 500-point gain in the final half hour as…

Trader Talk with Bob Pisani

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, headwinds, buying, stocks, deal, trade, wall, thinktodays, rally, say, partial, pisaniread, moment, macro, analysts, street, opportunity, talk


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You can start teaching even little kids about money, experts say — here’s how

Most parents wait until their kids are teenagers before discussing money with them, according to T. Rowe Price’s 10th Annual Parents, Kids & Money Survey. By age 6, kids generally understand that some bills or coins are smaller than others, and more money is needed to afford something more valuable. “Give them the opportunity to make choices about how to best spend their money,” suggests Marguerita Cheng, chief executive officer at Blue Ocean Global Wealth. Give them the opportunity to make choi


Most parents wait until their kids are teenagers before discussing money with them, according to T. Rowe Price’s 10th Annual Parents, Kids & Money Survey. By age 6, kids generally understand that some bills or coins are smaller than others, and more money is needed to afford something more valuable. “Give them the opportunity to make choices about how to best spend their money,” suggests Marguerita Cheng, chief executive officer at Blue Ocean Global Wealth. Give them the opportunity to make choi
You can start teaching even little kids about money, experts say — here’s how Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: ivana pino, sofia pitt, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, parents, bentley, understand, heres, little, kids, theyre, money, spend, say, start, pick, experts, financial, teaching, child


You can start teaching even little kids about money, experts say — here's how

Most parents wait until their kids are teenagers before discussing money with them, according to T. Rowe Price’s 10th Annual Parents, Kids & Money Survey. That’s a mistake, says Nikhol Bentley, a math teacher at Gilbert Stuart Middle School in Providence, Rhode Island. “People tend to sell kids short,” says Bentley. “They are extremely smart, and letting them be part of the financial conversations at home is a good way to make sure that they’re able to make smarter financial choices when they’re older.” Teaching your child concepts like spending, saving, and earning can help them establish good financial habits that can last them the rest of their lives. And there are age-appropriate ways to get started early on. The National Education Association (NEA) provides lesson plans for teaching financial literacy to children as young as 4, and there are ways to lay the groundwork with even younger kids.

Counting

Around age 2, your child may be able to sound out different numbers, recognize numerals, or count out a sequence of numbers that they’ve heard over and over again. By age 4, most children are counting up to 10 or even beyond, according to LeapFrog, which helps parents use technology as a learning tool. Counting is the first step in building and strengthening math skills in the classroom. It’s basic but absolutely necessary. Parents can help reinforce this skill by encouraging their child count everyday items like crayons or the number of apples or bananas you pick up at the grocery store.

Spending and earning

Children can loosely understand the concept of income early on, says Bentley: As soon as they start school, or even before, they can grasp how currency works. Though they’re not actually exchanging goods for money, they can show they understand value by trading Pokemon cards with each other, for example. “They learn to share, trade cards or toys for things that they want, or some teachers will have some sort of ticket system that reinforces this concept of saving up your tickets for rewards or what it means to not have enough,” says Bentley. By age 6, kids generally understand that some bills or coins are smaller than others, and more money is needed to afford something more valuable. “Any type of reward system helps emphasize this idea of currency, and kids will pick up on the fact that there are certain things they need to do or behaviors they need to manage in order to earn that extra ‘income,'” explains Bentley. The goal isn’t to teach them not to spend but to show them how to spend wisely so they end up feeling satisfied. “Give them the opportunity to make choices about how to best spend their money,” suggests Marguerita Cheng, chief executive officer at Blue Ocean Global Wealth. “Maybe it’s letting them pick out a reasonably priced souvenir on a family vacation. They are capable of understanding and retaining these things.”

Saving

Two in three parents give their child an allowance, shelling out an average of $30 per week, according to a recent survey of 1,002 adults conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. But only 3% of parents report that their kids primarily save what they get. Encouragement from parents, though, can make a difference.

Give them the opportunity to make choices about how to best spend their money. Marguerita Cheng chief executive officer at Blue Ocean Global Wealth

Bentley suggests one helpful exercise to help even younger children get used to saving: Let your child pick out a toy at the store. Explain how much it costs, and emphasize that they’ll need to save up their own money if they want to take it home. However old your child is when you start offering an allowance, make sure to give them a consistent amount on a consistent basis, “because it’s like getting a paycheck,” Paul Golden, managing director at the National Endowment for Financial Education told Grow earlier this year.

Avoiding conversations about money can cost you


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: ivana pino, sofia pitt, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, parents, bentley, understand, heres, little, kids, theyre, money, spend, say, start, pick, experts, financial, teaching, child


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Iranian officials say two rockets struck an Iranian tanker traveling through the Red Sea off the coast of Saudi Arabia

Two missiles struck an Iranian tanker traveling through the Red Sea off the coast of Saudi Arabia on Friday, Iranian officials said, the latest incident in the region amid months of heightened tensions between Tehran and the U.S. There was no word from Saudi Arabia on the reported attack and Saudi officials did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Iranian state television said the explosion damaged two storerooms aboard the unnamed oil tanker and caused an oil leak into the Red Sea n


Two missiles struck an Iranian tanker traveling through the Red Sea off the coast of Saudi Arabia on Friday, Iranian officials said, the latest incident in the region amid months of heightened tensions between Tehran and the U.S. There was no word from Saudi Arabia on the reported attack and Saudi officials did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Iranian state television said the explosion damaged two storerooms aboard the unnamed oil tanker and caused an oil leak into the Red Sea n
Iranian officials say two rockets struck an Iranian tanker traveling through the Red Sea off the coast of Saudi Arabia Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, struck, say, port, tanker, officials, red, oil, attack, tankers, iran, near, iranian, traveling, rockets, sea, saudi


Iranian officials say two rockets struck an Iranian tanker traveling through the Red Sea off the coast of Saudi Arabia

Two missiles struck an Iranian tanker traveling through the Red Sea off the coast of Saudi Arabia on Friday, Iranian officials said, the latest incident in the region amid months of heightened tensions between Tehran and the U.S.

There was no word from Saudi Arabia on the reported attack and Saudi officials did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Oil prices spiked by 2% on the news.

Iranian state television said the explosion damaged two storerooms aboard the unnamed oil tanker and caused an oil leak into the Red Sea near the Saudi port city of Jiddah.

The state-run IRNA news agency, quoting Iran’s National Iranian Tanker Co., identified the stricken vessel as the Sabity. That vessel last turned on its tracking devices in August near the Iranian port city of Bandar Abbas, according to data from MarineTraffic.com. Iranian tankers routinely turn off their trackers as U.S. sanctions target the sale of Iran’s crude oil.

“The oil tanker named SABITY belonging to the company sustained damages to the body when it was hit by missiles 60 miles (96 kilometers) from the Saudi port city of Jiddah,” IRNA said.

The agency did not say whom Iranian officials suspect of launching the missiles.

Lt. Pete Pagano, a spokesman for the U.S. Navy’s 5th Fleet overseeing the Mideast, said authorities there were “aware of reports of this incident,” but declined to comment further.

Benchmark Brent crude oil rose over 2% in trading Friday to reach some $60.40 a barrel.

The reported attack comes after the U.S. has alleged that in past months Iran attacked oil tankers near the Strait of Hormuz, at the mouth of the Persian Gulf, something denied by Tehran.

Friday’s incident could push tensions between Iran and the U.S. even higher, more than a year after President Donald Trump unilaterally withdrew America from the nuclear deal and imposed sanctions now crushing Iran’s economy.

The mysterious attacks on oil tankers near the Strait of Hormuz, Iran shooting down a U.S. military surveillance drone and other incidents across the wider Middle East followed Trump’s decision.

The latest assault saw Saudi Arabia’s vital oil industry come under a drone-and-cruise-missile attack, halving the kingdom’s output. The U.S. has blamed Iran for the attack, something denied by Tehran. Yemen’s Houthi rebels, whom the kingdom is fighting in a yearslong war, claimed that assault, though analysts say the missiles used in the attack wouldn’t have the range to reach the sites from Yemen.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, struck, say, port, tanker, officials, red, oil, attack, tankers, iran, near, iranian, traveling, rockets, sea, saudi


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Not the time to sell the pound yet, says Wells Fargo

Not the time to sell the pound yet, says Wells Fargo4 Hours AgoThe pound rallied on positive news around a possible Brexit deal. Brendan McKenna of Wells Fargo Securities says the situation is still too uncertain to say that there’s a selling opportunity in the pound sterling.


Not the time to sell the pound yet, says Wells Fargo4 Hours AgoThe pound rallied on positive news around a possible Brexit deal. Brendan McKenna of Wells Fargo Securities says the situation is still too uncertain to say that there’s a selling opportunity in the pound sterling.
Not the time to sell the pound yet, says Wells Fargo Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, uncertain, securities, pound, theres, situation, fargo, sell, wells, sterling, say, selling


Not the time to sell the pound yet, says Wells Fargo

Not the time to sell the pound yet, says Wells Fargo

4 Hours Ago

The pound rallied on positive news around a possible Brexit deal. Brendan McKenna of Wells Fargo Securities says the situation is still too uncertain to say that there’s a selling opportunity in the pound sterling.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, uncertain, securities, pound, theres, situation, fargo, sell, wells, sterling, say, selling


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SoftBank’s Masayoshi Son mulls more cautious investment strategy for Vision Fund 2 as market shuns Uber and WeWork, sources say

SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son is considering changing his Vision Fund investment strategy to concentrate on companies with clearer pathways to profitability and public offerings, according to people familiar with the matter. Son plans to slow the pace of investment for Vision Fund 2 compared with his first $100 billion Vision Fund, which has deployed about $80 billion in less than three years. The change is driven by the market’s response to past Vision Fund investments. SoftBank, in conjunction wi


SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son is considering changing his Vision Fund investment strategy to concentrate on companies with clearer pathways to profitability and public offerings, according to people familiar with the matter. Son plans to slow the pace of investment for Vision Fund 2 compared with his first $100 billion Vision Fund, which has deployed about $80 billion in less than three years. The change is driven by the market’s response to past Vision Fund investments. SoftBank, in conjunction wi
SoftBank’s Masayoshi Son mulls more cautious investment strategy for Vision Fund 2 as market shuns Uber and WeWork, sources say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shuns, shift, mulls, sources, strategy, fund, profitability, son, say, plans, wework, softbank, billion, public, softbanks, uber, vision, investment, investments


SoftBank's Masayoshi Son mulls more cautious investment strategy for Vision Fund 2 as market shuns Uber and WeWork, sources say

SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son is considering changing his Vision Fund investment strategy to concentrate on companies with clearer pathways to profitability and public offerings, according to people familiar with the matter.

Son plans to slow the pace of investment for Vision Fund 2 compared with his first $100 billion Vision Fund, which has deployed about $80 billion in less than three years. He will target companies that can achieve profitability more quickly, said the people, who asked not to be named because the discussions are private.

The change is driven by the market’s response to past Vision Fund investments. The failure of WeWork to go public, combined with the lackluster performances of other SoftBank investments, such as Uber and Slack, has put the Vision Fund under a microscope as it attempts to raise billions more for a second fund. SoftBank, in conjunction with the Vision Fund, has invested about $10.6 billion in WeWork.

Son plans to take an even more active role with the selection of new investments as scrutiny on Vision Fund 2 intensifies, said the people. However, his shift in focus should be viewed as temporary and could shift if market conditions change, two of the people said.

A SoftBank Vision Fund spokesman declined to comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shuns, shift, mulls, sources, strategy, fund, profitability, son, say, plans, wework, softbank, billion, public, softbanks, uber, vision, investment, investments


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