The top 10 public US colleges that pay off the most

Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 10 U.S. public colleges that pay off the most:1. The large public university offers more than 180 majors and is known for its computer science program. The public university offers 263 degree programs, enrolls 29,026 undergraduate students and is known for its athletics program. The public university, which is located in Williamsburg, Virginia, is often referred to as a “Public Ivy.” Michigan Technological UniversityMichigan Technical University Jcvert


Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 10 U.S. public colleges that pay off the most:1. The large public university offers more than 180 majors and is known for its computer science program. The public university offers 263 degree programs, enrolls 29,026 undergraduate students and is known for its athletics program. The public university, which is located in Williamsburg, Virginia, is often referred to as a “Public Ivy.” Michigan Technological UniversityMichigan Technical University Jcvert
The top 10 public US colleges that pay off the most Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, university, alumni, college, school, net, salary, experience, pay, cost, public, colleges, average


The top 10 public US colleges that pay off the most

Then, using data from PayScale’s College Salary Report, we divided net cost by graduates’ expected annual earnings, which was calculated based on the median salary of graduates with less than five years of experience as well as those with 10 or more years of experience. The ranking gives greater weight to workers’ earnings in the years immediately after college, when individuals are the most impacted by college costs and student debt. (You can read our full methodology here.) The top public university on our list is the University of Washington in Seattle, a school where the average net cost for in-state students from families that make between $48,001 and $75,000 per year is $8,984 and the median salary for alumni with 10 or more years of experience is $111,800. Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 10 U.S. public colleges that pay off the most:

1. University of Washington, Seattle

University of Washington Nikko Hellstern | Getty Images

The University of Washington, Seattle, is the flagship school of the University of Washington school system. The large public university offers more than 180 majors and is known for its computer science program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,984

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $59,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $111,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $85,850

2. University of Washington, Bothell

University of Washington Bothell Photo: Joe Mabel | Wikipedia CC

Also a member of the University of Washington school system, the University of Washington, Bothell, is a public university that offers roughly 55 degree programs and enrolls just 5,411 undergraduate students. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,767

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $58,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $104,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $81,150

3. Massachusetts Maritime Academy

A Google Earth view of the Massachusetts Maritime Academy. Source: Google Earth

Massachusetts Maritime Academy is a public college located in Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, that offers bachelor’s and master’s of science degrees in marine engineering fields. Many MMA students choose to volunteer for military service, though it is not a requirement. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,235

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $67,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $114,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $90,900

4. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

University of Michigan tiny-al | Getty Images

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, is the flagship campus of the University of Michigan school system. The public university offers 263 degree programs, enrolls 29,026 undergraduate students and is known for its athletics program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,106

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $62,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $107,900

Salary average, early and mid career: $84,950

5. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

Georgia Tech

Georgia Institute of Technology, often referred to as “Georgia Tech,” is a public university located in Atlanta. The school offers technology-focused education to more than 25,000 undergraduate and graduate students across six colleges and 28 schools focusing on business, computing, design, engineering, the liberal arts and sciences. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,284

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $70,800

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $131,900

Salary average, early and mid career: $101,350

6. Purdue University, West Lafayette

Purdue University Michael Hickey/Getty Images

Purdue University’s campus in West Lafayette, Indiana, is the flagship campus of the Purdue University system. The public university enrolls 32,672 undergraduate students. Known for its strong engineering program, 28% of undergraduate students at Purdue study in the College of Engineering. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,828

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $60,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $105,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $83,000

7. College of William and Mary

College of William and Mary Will Pryce/Construction Photography/Avalon/Getty Images

Founded in 1693, the College of William and Mary is the second-oldest college in the country. The public university, which is located in Williamsburg, Virginia, is often referred to as a “Public Ivy.” The school offers a joint degree program with University of St. Andrews in Scotland. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $11,320

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,100

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $113,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $85,350

8. Michigan Technological University

Michigan Technical University Jcvertin | Wikipedia CC

Michigan Technological University is a public university located in Houghton, Michigan. The technology-focused school is made up of seven colleges and schools including a College of Computing, a College of Engineering and a School of Business and Economics. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,080

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $64,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $110,200

Salary average, early and mid career: $87,400

9. University of California, Los Angeles

UCLA Al Seib | Los Angeles Times | Getty Images

One of the most selective schools in the University of California school system, the University of California, Los Angeles, is known for its strong athletics department. The most popular majors at UCLA are biology, business economics, political science, psychology and psychobiology. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,416

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $60,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $118,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $89,250

10. Baruch College

CUNY Bernard M Baruch College Ben Hider/Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, university, alumni, college, school, net, salary, experience, pay, cost, public, colleges, average


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Brexit is going to continue to be a ‘big mess’: Professor

Brexit is going to continue to be a ‘big mess’: Professor14 Hours AgoJames Crabtree of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy discusses next steps for the European Central Bank and Brexit. He says Europe is increasingly divided.


Brexit is going to continue to be a ‘big mess’: Professor14 Hours AgoJames Crabtree of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy discusses next steps for the European Central Bank and Brexit. He says Europe is increasingly divided.
Brexit is going to continue to be a ‘big mess’: Professor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, school, public, continue, big, steps, professor14, yew, going, lee, brexit, professor, kuan, mess, policy


Brexit is going to continue to be a 'big mess': Professor

Brexit is going to continue to be a ‘big mess’: Professor

14 Hours Ago

James Crabtree of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy discusses next steps for the European Central Bank and Brexit. He says Europe is increasingly divided.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, school, public, continue, big, steps, professor14, yew, going, lee, brexit, professor, kuan, mess, policy


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Clayton Christensen Institute co-founder: This equation reveals how much you should borrow for college

“If you’re in that realm, you’re going to have problems in the long-run.” It’s a smart way to avoid taking on more debt than graduates will be able to handle paying back in the future. But Michael Horn, economist and co-founder of the Clayton Christensen Institute, tells CNBC Make It that there’s a simple way students can predict roughly how much they can afford to borrow for college. “If you’re taking out $80,000 in debt to go to law school for example, and you’re going to a top law school, tha


“If you’re in that realm, you’re going to have problems in the long-run.” It’s a smart way to avoid taking on more debt than graduates will be able to handle paying back in the future. But Michael Horn, economist and co-founder of the Clayton Christensen Institute, tells CNBC Make It that there’s a simple way students can predict roughly how much they can afford to borrow for college. “If you’re taking out $80,000 in debt to go to law school for example, and you’re going to a top law school, tha
Clayton Christensen Institute co-founder: This equation reveals how much you should borrow for college Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taking, institute, work, equation, students, clayton, school, student, christensen, college, borrow, youre, going, cofounder, schools, reveals, debt


Clayton Christensen Institute co-founder: This equation reveals how much you should borrow for college

“You really want to be mindful that you’re not crossing that threshold of payments that are just going to crush your income because they’re taking up, say, 20, 30% of your monthly paycheck,” he says. “If you’re in that realm, you’re going to have problems in the long-run.”

It’s a smart way to avoid taking on more debt than graduates will be able to handle paying back in the future.

“As students look at the equation for how much they should borrow when they go to college, they ought to be thinking of the total debt that they take on as not being more than 10 to 15% of what their earnings are going to be when they leave college,” says Horn.

But Michael Horn, economist and co-founder of the Clayton Christensen Institute, tells CNBC Make It that there’s a simple way students can predict roughly how much they can afford to borrow for college.

The cost of attending college today is a daunting prospect. According to the College Board’s 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report , from 1988 to 2018, sticker prices tripled at public four-year schools and doubled at public two-year and private non-profit four-year schools, and many students use some kind of student loan to finance their degrees.

Students should think about what they want to study, research how much graduates at a given school in that major make, and not take on more than 10 to 15% of that amount in debt.

For example, according to PayScale, the average salary for an individual with a Bachelor of Engineering degree from New York University is about $91,296 per year. That means a student could plan to take on up to $13,694 (roughly 15% of their projected future salary) in loans to finance this degree.

However, the average salary for a worker with a Bachelor of Social Work degree from New York University is about $50,008 per year, so based on Horn’s recommendation, students should only take on about $7,501 in loans. Additionally, many social work opportunities require students to earn additional accreditation such as a master’s degree, and students should consider these costs as well.

Of course, this math is dependent on a student having a clear understanding of what they plan to pursue after college, something that can be challenging for many young people. Other factors students need to consider include a school’s reputation for graduating successful alumni, as well as its rate of on-time graduations.

“If you’re taking out $80,000 in debt to go to law school for example, and you’re going to a top law school, that’s probably a reasonable investment,” says Horn. “If you’re going to a bottom-third law school, a question you ought to be asking yourself is, ‘Is this worth it?’

“The most crippling debt is when you don’t complete. If [students] don’t complete, it can be crippling because they’re not going to have the wage bump from getting that college credential and so you’re going to be earning roughly as much as someone with a high school diploma is, but you have taken out $10,000 in debt.”

Horn emphasizes that debt totals have a significant impact on the financial lives of borrowers.

“Paying not just the debt back but also the interest on top of it, that can be really punishing to make the books work as you’re trying to think through raising a family, owning a home maybe in the future and other life decisions.”

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Don’t miss:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taking, institute, work, equation, students, clayton, school, student, christensen, college, borrow, youre, going, cofounder, schools, reveals, debt


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Nearly half of students at five top MBA programs borrow at least $100,000 to finance their degree

Bloomberg Businessweek surveyed more than 10,000 2018 graduates of MBA programs from 126 schools about the amount of debt they piled on earning their degrees. The survey found that almost half of students at leading business schools around the world borrowed at least $100,000 to finance their MBA. U.S. News says that, “among the 10 highest-ranked public B-schools, the average in-state tuition for full-time MBA students was slightly more than $42,000 per year.” 2 Stanford University, the average


Bloomberg Businessweek surveyed more than 10,000 2018 graduates of MBA programs from 126 schools about the amount of debt they piled on earning their degrees. The survey found that almost half of students at leading business schools around the world borrowed at least $100,000 to finance their MBA. U.S. News says that, “among the 10 highest-ranked public B-schools, the average in-state tuition for full-time MBA students was slightly more than $42,000 per year.” 2 Stanford University, the average
Nearly half of students at five top MBA programs borrow at least $100,000 to finance their degree Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, school, half, finance, survey, nearly, programs, 100000, graduates, borrow, business, degree, university, mba, schools, students, stanford


Nearly half of students at five top MBA programs borrow at least $100,000 to finance their degree

A degree from a top business school has long been seen as a direct path to a job at a top company, but new data demonstrates just how much it costs to pursue that route. Bloomberg Businessweek surveyed more than 10,000 2018 graduates of MBA programs from 126 schools about the amount of debt they piled on earning their degrees. The survey found that almost half of students at leading business schools around the world borrowed at least $100,000 to finance their MBA. According to the survey, at minimum 40% of MBA graduates from U.S. News & World Report’s top-ranking business programs — those at Duke, Dartmouth, University of Michigan, Cornell and University of Chicago — reported incurring at least $100,000 in debt. That percentage drops a bit at nine other top MBA programs – including those at MIT, University of Pennsylvania, NYU and Northwestern University – where around a third of recent graduates borrowed at least $100,000 to finance their degrees.

University of Michigan students are seen in the Stephen M. Ross School of Business in Ann Arbor Rebecca Cook | Reuters

Conventional wisdom has held that the price tag on an MBA, however high, tends to be worth it. According to U.S. News & World Report, tuition for traditional full-time (two year) MBA students surpassed $50,000 per year at the top 15 ranked MBA programs in the 2019 Best Business Schools rankings – with some schools exceeding $70,000 annually. Prices at public schools, particularly for in-state students, tend to be lower. U.S. News says that, “among the 10 highest-ranked public B-schools, the average in-state tuition for full-time MBA students was slightly more than $42,000 per year.” But Bloomberg’s survey results illustrate just how steep the debt eager entrepreneurs and executives undertake to advance their careers. Graduates of the 26 schools where at least 20% of students report having had to borrow six-figure sums disclose median starting pay ranging from $80,000 to $140,000. “The survey data puts into stark relief just how much of a return some students need to justify their debt-financed investment,” Bloomberg reports. Students see a clear connection between the cost of their degree and the benefit. Mike Sanchez, a 32-year-old investment banker at Citigroup and 2018 graduate of University of Chicago Booth School of Business, told Bloomberg that he didn’t consider the $110,000 in student loans he took out to finance the program a hindrance. Booth reports its median starting salary for last year’s graduates was $130,000. Based on a 2018 report by QS Quacquarelli Symonds, a higher education data and research company, U.S. News reported that, “within 10 years of earning an MBA degree, the average MBA grad from either a U.S. or international business school had an estimated decade-long return on investment of $390,751, even after subtracting the tuition and opportunity costs of attending an MBA program.” At top business schools, like No. 2 Stanford University, the average decade-long ROI of an MBA degree exceeds $1 million.

Graduating Stanford University students are shown before the start of the 123rd Stanford commencement ceremony, June 15, 2014, in Stanford, Calif. Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, school, half, finance, survey, nearly, programs, 100000, graduates, borrow, business, degree, university, mba, schools, students, stanford


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

McDonald’s and Burger King are facing calls to scrap plastic toys in kids’ meal deals

The plastic toys given away with children’s fast food meals are under fire. McDonald’s and Burger King are the target of a petition started by two British school children who criticize the companies for giving away the toys that they say are put in the trash after only being used briefly. McDonald’s Happy Meal and Burger King’s Kids’ Meal include a main meal, side, drink and a toy, which is often linked to movie releases. The children, aged 9 and 7, wrote that they learnt about pollution at scho


The plastic toys given away with children’s fast food meals are under fire. McDonald’s and Burger King are the target of a petition started by two British school children who criticize the companies for giving away the toys that they say are put in the trash after only being used briefly. McDonald’s Happy Meal and Burger King’s Kids’ Meal include a main meal, side, drink and a toy, which is often linked to movie releases. The children, aged 9 and 7, wrote that they learnt about pollution at scho
McDonald’s and Burger King are facing calls to scrap plastic toys in kids’ meal deals Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, school, wrote, children, burger, away, started, deals, calls, mcdonalds, kids, toys, meal, facing, petition, plastic, king, scrap


McDonald's and Burger King are facing calls to scrap plastic toys in kids' meal deals

The plastic toys given away with children’s fast food meals are under fire.

McDonald’s and Burger King are the target of a petition started by two British school children who criticize the companies for giving away the toys that they say are put in the trash after only being used briefly.

McDonald’s Happy Meal and Burger King’s Kids’ Meal include a main meal, side, drink and a toy, which is often linked to movie releases.

“We like to go to eat at Burger King and McDonald’s, but children only play with the plastic toys they give us for a few minutes before they get thrown away and harm animals and pollute the sea,” wrote Ella and Caitlin Wood on a Change.org petition page, which has more than 335,000 signatures.

The children, aged 9 and 7, wrote that they learnt about pollution at school and recycle at home. “But we want to do more, which is why we started this petition. It’s not enough to make recyclable plastic toys — big, rich companies shouldn’t be making toys out of plastic at all,” they wrote.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, school, wrote, children, burger, away, started, deals, calls, mcdonalds, kids, toys, meal, facing, petition, plastic, king, scrap


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Many high school students don’t understand how the college financial aid process works

Students’ knowledge of the financial aid process is “shockingly low.” That’s the takeaway from a new study by ACT, which in April 2018 surveyed about 1,200 high school students who were registered to take the standardized test. Yet most students don’t understand the basic workings of financial aid, which includes grants, scholarships, work study and loans. More than 70% of students didn’t know that loans from the government for undergraduate students are subsidized, meaning interest doesn’t accr


Students’ knowledge of the financial aid process is “shockingly low.” That’s the takeaway from a new study by ACT, which in April 2018 surveyed about 1,200 high school students who were registered to take the standardized test. Yet most students don’t understand the basic workings of financial aid, which includes grants, scholarships, work study and loans. More than 70% of students didn’t know that loans from the government for undergraduate students are subsidized, meaning interest doesn’t accr
Many high school students don’t understand how the college financial aid process works Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, student, loans, college, study, financial, process, didnt, center, high, aid, economic, dont, know, students, understand, school, works


Many high school students don't understand how the college financial aid process works

Students’ knowledge of the financial aid process is “shockingly low.”

That’s the takeaway from a new study by ACT, which in April 2018 surveyed about 1,200 high school students who were registered to take the standardized test.

Regardless of economic background, most families pointed to price as a very important consideration in choosing a college. Yet most students don’t understand the basic workings of financial aid, which includes grants, scholarships, work study and loans.

More than 70% of students didn’t know that loans from the government for undergraduate students are subsidized, meaning interest doesn’t accrue on them while the student is enrolled in college.

Most students also didn’t know that student loans can be repaid on an “income-driven ” plan, in which their monthly payments are capped at a percentage of their income.

Another recent study by the National Center for Education Statistics found that just 11% of ninth graders can correctly estimate the tuition and fees for one year at a public four-year college in their state. Around 57% overestimated the costs, and 32% underestimated them.

“The findings highlight an urgent need for more financial literacy-specific interventions, especially in light of the economic stakes at hand,” said Jim Larimore, chief officer for ACT’s Center for Equity in Learning.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, student, loans, college, study, financial, process, didnt, center, high, aid, economic, dont, know, students, understand, school, works


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Harris says busing should be considered, not mandated

On Wednesday, though, Harris characterized busing as a choice local school districts have, not the responsibility of the federal government. Harris said she benefited from busing as an elementary school student in Berkeley, California, in the early 1970s. Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) speaks during a television interview after the second night of the first Democratic presidential debate on June 27, 2019 in Miami, Florida. After a Democratic Party picnic Wednesday in


On Wednesday, though, Harris characterized busing as a choice local school districts have, not the responsibility of the federal government. Harris said she benefited from busing as an elementary school student in Berkeley, California, in the early 1970s. Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) speaks during a television interview after the second night of the first Democratic presidential debate on June 27, 2019 in Miami, Florida. After a Democratic Party picnic Wednesday in
Harris says busing should be considered, not mandated Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-04
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, presidential, mandated, harris, federal, support, considered, school, black, democratic, busing, debate, biden


Harris says busing should be considered, not mandated

On Wednesday, though, Harris characterized busing as a choice local school districts have, not the responsibility of the federal government.

“That’s where the federal government must step in,” Harris said, looking at Biden and winning a burst of applause from the auditorium in Miami.

Harris had a breakthrough moment at the candidates’ first debate when she criticized Biden for his opposition to mandatory school busing when he was a senator in the 1970s. Harris said she benefited from busing as an elementary school student in Berkeley, California, in the early 1970s.

Sen. Kamala Harris said Wednesday that busing students should be considered by school districts trying to desegregate their locations — not the federal mandate she appeared to support in pointedly criticizing rival Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden last week.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) speaks during a television interview after the second night of the first Democratic presidential debate on June 27, 2019 in Miami, Florida.

Busing, while not central to the Democratic primary, has become a proxy issue for the debate between Biden and Harris over race as well as broader questions about whether the 76-year-old former vice president is out of step with his party.

After a Democratic Party picnic Wednesday in West Des Moines, Harris was asked by reporters whether she supports federally mandated busing.

“I think of busing as being in the toolbox of what is available and what can be used for the goal of desegregating America’s schools,” she responded.

Asked to clarify whether she supports federally mandated busing, she replied, “I believe that any tool that is in the toolbox should be considered by a school district.”

In a tweet Wednesday, Biden deputy campaign manager Kate Bedingfield knocked Harris for her response, writing, “It’s disappointing that Senator Harris chose to distort Vice President Biden’s position on busing — particularly now that she is tying herself in knots trying not to answer the very question she posed to him!”

Harris’ comments Wednesday were far from the indictment she delivered during the debate last week.

Under attack on the debate stage, Biden appeared stunned and dismissed Harris’ comments as a mischaracterization of his positions. He has notably begun his remarks to fundraisers by talking about how civil rights spurred his entry into public life more than 45 years ago.

To be sure, Biden’s record on busing is complicated.

Biden has insisted he only opposed busing ordered by the federal Education Department, and said allowing local governments and school districts to implement busing was “one of the things I argued for” at the time.

During an appearance at a conference last week in Chicago, Biden told the audience he “never, never, never, ever opposed voluntary busing.”

But Biden was an outspoken opponent of federally mandated busing in the 1970s and ’80s, sponsoring a congressional measure that would have limited funding for federal busing efforts.

The issue spilled into Iowa as Harris and Biden returned Wednesday for the first time since the debate. Both will need some success in Iowa’s leadoff nominating caucuses to build momentum heading into South Carolina, the first Southern primary, where they are vying aggressively for a robust African American voting bloc.

Biden and Harris also have been aggressively courting members of the Congressional Black Caucus, with Harris edging Biden in endorsements, picking up support from Reps. Bobby Rush of Illinois and Frederica Wilson of Florida. Biden last week landed the support of popular Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms.

In Iowa, where African Americans are a small minority, endorsements from black leaders are magnified. Harris got the backing of two popular black ministers after her debate performance last week.

Appearing Wednesday evening in Waterloo, Iowa’s most densely African American city, Biden received the backing of one of that city’s most influential black ministers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-04
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, presidential, mandated, harris, federal, support, considered, school, black, democratic, busing, debate, biden


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Michigan Rep. Amash says he’s quitting Republican Party

Kamala Harris says busing should be considered, not mandatedSen. Kamala Harris said that busing students should be considered by school districts trying to desegregate their locations — not the federal mandate she appeared to support… Politicsread more


Kamala Harris says busing should be considered, not mandatedSen. Kamala Harris said that busing students should be considered by school districts trying to desegregate their locations — not the federal mandate she appeared to support… Politicsread more
Michigan Rep. Amash says he’s quitting Republican Party Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-04  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mandatedsen, kamala, students, party, michigan, harris, supportpoliticsread, amash, trying, considered, school, hes, mandate, busing, rep, republican, quitting


Michigan Rep. Amash says he's quitting Republican Party

Kamala Harris says busing should be considered, not mandated

Sen. Kamala Harris said that busing students should be considered by school districts trying to desegregate their locations — not the federal mandate she appeared to support…

Politics

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-04  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mandatedsen, kamala, students, party, michigan, harris, supportpoliticsread, amash, trying, considered, school, hes, mandate, busing, rep, republican, quitting


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Microsoft co-founders Bill Gates and Paul Allen got ‘busted’ in high school for exploiting a bug in the computer system

Microsoft co-founders Bill Gates and Paul Allen first met as teenagers in the late 1960s at Lakeside School in Seattle, when Gates was in eighth grade and Allen was in tenth grade. “Our school, Lakeside, held a rummage sale and used the proceeds to buy a teletype terminal. “The only way for us to get computer time was by exploiting a bug in the system.” And without Allen, Gates said after his former peer and friend died of cancer last year, “personal computing would not have existed.” Don’t miss


Microsoft co-founders Bill Gates and Paul Allen first met as teenagers in the late 1960s at Lakeside School in Seattle, when Gates was in eighth grade and Allen was in tenth grade. “Our school, Lakeside, held a rummage sale and used the proceeds to buy a teletype terminal. “The only way for us to get computer time was by exploiting a bug in the system.” And without Allen, Gates said after his former peer and friend died of cancer last year, “personal computing would not have existed.” Don’t miss
Microsoft co-founders Bill Gates and Paul Allen got ‘busted’ in high school for exploiting a bug in the computer system Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-02  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, system, philanthropy, busted, cofounders, paul, high, microsoft, exploiting, school, gates, lakeside, terminal, company, computer, allen


Microsoft co-founders Bill Gates and Paul Allen got 'busted' in high school for exploiting a bug in the computer system

Microsoft co-founders Bill Gates and Paul Allen first met as teenagers in the late 1960s at Lakeside School in Seattle, when Gates was in eighth grade and Allen was in tenth grade.

It was a computer terminal that first “brought us together,” Gates said of his late friend at the Forbes Philanthropy Summit in New York, where Allen was posthumously awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award for Philanthropy. “Our school, Lakeside, held a rummage sale and used the proceeds to buy a teletype terminal. We were obsessed with it.”

Computer terminals were rare at the time, and as a result, “it was really expensive to use — $40 an hour,” Gates said. “The only way for us to get computer time was by exploiting a bug in the system.”

They “eventually got busted,” he added, “but that led to our first official partnership between Paul and me: We worked out a deal with the company to use computers for free if we would identify problems.”

The friends continued working together after high school: In 1974, the summer after Gates’ freshman year at Harvard, they were both computer programmers at software company Honeywell. And in 1975, when Gates was 19, he dropped out of his sophomore year of college to launch Microsoft, now a trillion dollar company, with Allen.

Gates, who stepped down as Microsoft’s CEO in 2000 and now runs one of the world’s biggest nonprofits with his wife, Melinda, owes a lot to his high school: “If there had been no Lakeside, there would have been no Microsoft,” he said in a 2005 speech at Lakeside School.

And without Allen, Gates said after his former peer and friend died of cancer last year, “personal computing would not have existed.”

Don’t miss: What Microsoft billionaire Bill Gates was doing at 20 years old

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-02  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, system, philanthropy, busted, cofounders, paul, high, microsoft, exploiting, school, gates, lakeside, terminal, company, computer, allen


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Meet the 18-year-old who helped wipe out $6.7 million in medical debt

To help connect her donated dollars with those in need, Zames coordinated with the nonprofit RIP Medical Debt. The organization locates unpaid medical debt and then uses charitable donations to forgive old, outstanding debts for pennies on the dollar. That enabled RIP Medical Debt to purchase and abolish $6.7 million in old medical debt from Onondaga, Madison and Oneida counties near Syracuse, New York. How RIP Medical Debt worksIn the U.S., approximately 79 million people have unpaid medical bi


To help connect her donated dollars with those in need, Zames coordinated with the nonprofit RIP Medical Debt. The organization locates unpaid medical debt and then uses charitable donations to forgive old, outstanding debts for pennies on the dollar. That enabled RIP Medical Debt to purchase and abolish $6.7 million in old medical debt from Onondaga, Madison and Oneida counties near Syracuse, New York. How RIP Medical Debt worksIn the U.S., approximately 79 million people have unpaid medical bi
Meet the 18-year-old who helped wipe out $6.7 million in medical debt Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 18yearold, campaign, meet, zames, project, rip, debt, times, helped, medical, school, wipe, eraser, 67, million


Meet the 18-year-old who helped wipe out $6.7 million in medical debt

A wave of letters sealed in canary yellow envelopes will descend upon Syracuse, New York, and the surrounding region in just a few weeks. They contain good news for the recipients: Thanks to the efforts of a local high school senior, their medical debt has been wiped out. While some high school seniors were slacking off during their final months of school, Talia Zames, 18, launched a campaign to raise $15,000 in an effort to pay off old medical debt from those in her own community. To help connect her donated dollars with those in need, Zames coordinated with the nonprofit RIP Medical Debt. The organization locates unpaid medical debt and then uses charitable donations to forgive old, outstanding debts for pennies on the dollar. In 2016, the nonprofit gained national prominence after “Last Week Tonight with John Oliver” worked with RIP to wipe out $15 million worth of medical debt for approximately 9,000 people, a stunt that John Oliver claimed was the biggest giveaway on television. Zames’ months-long “Project Eraser” campaign did not quite hit Oliver’s level, but she did surpass her initial goal, raising $20,000 in total. That enabled RIP Medical Debt to purchase and abolish $6.7 million in old medical debt from Onondaga, Madison and Oneida counties near Syracuse, New York. The recipients will be receiving letters in the mail from RIP around July 12. “People care. If you’re willing to put yourself out there and make those speeches, make those [social media] posts and talk to anyone you can, people can see how passionate you are…and they’re going to want to help you,” Zames tells CNBC Make It.

How the project got started

It was Zames’s grandmother who actually sparked the idea for a campaign. In December, she read a New York Times article that profiled two women in Ithaca, New York, who raised enough to wipe out $1.5 million in medical debt. “That’s when I first heard about RIP,” Zames says. “I started looking into it and realized I could start my own campaign to raise money to erase local debt.” The issue hit home for the teen. Seven years ago, her family experienced how much a trip to the emergency room could cost when one of her younger sisters, just 5 years old at the time, was rushed to the hospital. The medical bills for the visit totaled over $150,000, Zames details in a video she created to support the fundraiser. Her parents had medical insurance, but the deductible and related bills still totaled about $30,000, Zames says. Her family was able to pay off the bills over the course of the next year, but others are not so fortunate. Over half a million families say medical bills were a major factor in their decision to file for bankruptcy, according to recent academic research that analyzed bankruptcies from 2013 to 2016. Zames reached out to RIP Medical Debt and, with the organization’s help, started building out a fundraising game plan. “I’m a planner,” Zames says. “I needed to have it all laid out, so I sat down and listed all the possible things I could think of to raise $15,000.” A little more than a month after she heard first heard about RIP Debt in the New York Times, Zames launched her own campaign in mid-January 2019. The goal was to raise $15,000 to abolish about $1 million in medical debt.

Talia Zames, 18, her mother and younger sisters during the kickoff of the Project Eraser fundraiser.

How RIP Medical Debt works

In the U.S., approximately 79 million people have unpaid medical bills or debt problems, according to the health nonprofit the Commonwealth Fund. And in many cases, that debt is not held by the hospital or doctor’s office that the patient originally visited. Instead, that debt is typically bought and sold several times over — some debts have changed hands upwards of four times. When debt is sold multiple times, it’s usually sold at a discount because it can be increasingly difficult for the collection agency to get paid. That represents an opportunity for RIP, which was founded in 2014 by two former debt collectors who wanted to work on a project to forgive debt, rather than collect on it. RIP is able to swoop in and offer to buy up the debt at a deep discount with donations from individuals like Zames. Typically, a $1 donation can be used to buy $100 in medical debt. In Zames’ case, RIP found that the debt was pretty old in the counties she wanted to target, so they hoped to leverage the donations to wipe out a bit more than average. The nonprofit, working in partnership with TransUnion, focuses on identifying, verifying and buying up the medical debt of those who are in the most dire need. Typically, it aims to wipe out debt for individuals who are earning less than two times the federal poverty level, which varies by state and household size, but is around $25,750 for a family of four. RIP also focuses on wiping out debt for those who are facing financial hardship or insolvency. Over the course of five years, RIP has raised enough money to wipe out $675 million of medical debt for over 200,000 people. And that debt forgiveness is tax-free for the recipients, Daniel Lempert, a spokesman for RIP, tells CNBC Make It.

Raising money and awareness

With the help of RIP, Zames spent several hours in January setting up a fundraising website, creating social media pages and shooting a video for Project Eraser. She and her mom even created a bunch of Project Eraser T-shirts with iron-on decals to help spread the word. But the teen also went beyond the online appeals: Zames wanted to get her classmates, teachers and school faculty involved with the project as well. She attends Christian Brothers Academy in Syracuse, which is a private school with a dress code. But each month, students are allowed to dress down if they donate to a charitable cause. Zames capitalized on this, giving a speech to her entire school about Project Eraser and how medical debt affects so many Americans. “Before I started the campaign, I didn’t understand medical bills and medical debt, so I just wanted my fellow classmates, and even my teachers, to understand what I was doing,” Zames says.

People care. If you’re willing to put yourself out there and make those speeches, make those [social media] posts and talk to anyone you can, people can see how passionate you are…and they’re going to want to help you. Talia Zames

Her initiative paid off. The school raised $2,300 for Project Eraser, which was one of the largest single-source donations of her entire campaign. It was so successful, she gave another speech at her local synagogue, and even helped her younger sister give a similar presentation at her elementary school. At the end of February, Zames coordinated with her favorite restaurant, Panera, to host a community fundraiser night. For every person who ordered food or drinks at Panera on that night and mentioned Project Eraser, the restaurant donated a portion of the sale to Zames’ cause. The event raised about $200, but more importantly to Zames, it allowed her friends and those who couldn’t afford to donate directly to her campaign to participate by simply ordering a meal. “I got to have dinner with friends and erase medical debt at the same time,” she says. Zames, who is heading to the Rochester Institute of Technology this fall, says her biggest takeaway from the project is the impact a single person, even a teenager, can make. “At first I was really terrified [about hitting such a big goal]; I had a lot of learning to do, a lot of trial-and-error,” she says. But the success she experienced with her first activist project has her already eyeing more opportunities. “I could definitely see myself getting more involved in the future,” Zames says. Don’t miss: Nearly 25% of Americans are going into debt trying to pay for necessities like food Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 18yearold, campaign, meet, zames, project, rip, debt, times, helped, medical, school, wipe, eraser, 67, million


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post