UK’s Boris Johnson has surprised everyone: Economist

UK’s Boris Johnson has surprised everyone: Economist2 Hours AgoTim Harcourt of UNSW Business School says the European Commission has “clearly come to their senses” and tried to come up with a compromise that will allow a Brexit deal to go through.


UK’s Boris Johnson has surprised everyone: Economist2 Hours AgoTim Harcourt of UNSW Business School says the European Commission has “clearly come to their senses” and tried to come up with a compromise that will allow a Brexit deal to go through.
UK’s Boris Johnson has surprised everyone: Economist Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, surprised, hours, boris, come, economist, uks, harcourt, johnson, unsw, senses, tried, school


UK's Boris Johnson has surprised everyone: Economist

UK’s Boris Johnson has surprised everyone: Economist

2 Hours Ago

Tim Harcourt of UNSW Business School says the European Commission has “clearly come to their senses” and tried to come up with a compromise that will allow a Brexit deal to go through.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, surprised, hours, boris, come, economist, uks, harcourt, johnson, unsw, senses, tried, school


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Chicago teachers strike highlights America’s top 3 economic threats

The Chicago teachers strike that began earlier this week comes pretty darn close to encapsulating all of America’s most daunting economic challenges. Even the father of the New Deal knew the economic dangers of allowing public workers to unionize. The second obvious national problem the Chicago teachers strike shines a light on is the fact that the cost of higher education is becoming less justified for more and more liberal arts graduates. It’s likely that many of those striking Chicago teacher


The Chicago teachers strike that began earlier this week comes pretty darn close to encapsulating all of America’s most daunting economic challenges.
Even the father of the New Deal knew the economic dangers of allowing public workers to unionize.
The second obvious national problem the Chicago teachers strike shines a light on is the fact that the cost of higher education is becoming less justified for more and more liberal arts graduates.
It’s likely that many of those striking Chicago teacher
Chicago teachers strike highlights America’s top 3 economic threats Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: jake novak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, threats, americas, public, lightfoot, school, chicago, strike, teachers, student, economic, highlights, simply


Chicago teachers strike highlights America's top 3 economic threats

The Chicago teachers strike that began earlier this week comes pretty darn close to encapsulating all of America’s most daunting economic challenges.

Two of those economic challenges connected to the strike are easy to point out. First, the nationwide financial crisis facing city after city because of unsustainable public employee costs is nothing short of an economic ticking time bomb. Cities like Chicago are already facing massive budget crises and a pension bill they simply will not be able to pay.

New Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot is vowing to stand firm against the costly demands from the teachers union. But if history serves as any guide Lightfoot will cave eventually. In so doing, Lightfoot will join an endless list of elected leaders who give away taxpayer money in a way no private citizen would with their own cash or corporate boss would do with company funds.

Even the father of the New Deal knew the economic dangers of allowing public workers to unionize. President Franklin Roosevelt blocked federal workers from unionizing in the 1930s and his guidance kept that ban in place until President John F. Kennedy greenlit the move in 1962.

The second obvious national problem the Chicago teachers strike shines a light on is the fact that the cost of higher education is becoming less justified for more and more liberal arts graduates. Teachers’ salaries aren’t even close to keeping up with the inflation in tuition costs for the bachelor’s and/or master’s degrees needed to get public school teaching certifications. The average college graduate is now burdened with a higher-than-ever student loan debt of $29,200. It’s likely that many of those striking Chicago teachers simply need to make more money to pay off those debts.

But the third threat is a bit harder to see. It has to do with the cost of childcare and how that misdirects our educational priorities.

Microsoft founder Bill Gates is among business leaders calling out the poor overall quality of U.S. public education.

So what are we getting for that $694.1 billion in public school spending, ($12,201 per student), every year in America?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: jake novak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, threats, americas, public, lightfoot, school, chicago, strike, teachers, student, economic, highlights, simply


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Warren Buffett: This is the ‘most surprising’ lesson I didn’t learn in business school

‘The institutional imperative’The “most surprising discovery,” he wrote, is “the overwhelming importance in business of an unseen force that we might call ‘the institutional imperative.’ In business school, I was given no hint of the imperative’s existence, and I did not intuitively understand it when I entered the business world.” The billionaire continued: “I then thought that decent, intelligent and experienced managers would automatically make rational business decisions. Instead, rationalit


‘The institutional imperative’The “most surprising discovery,” he wrote, is “the overwhelming importance in business of an unseen force that we might call ‘the institutional imperative.’
In business school, I was given no hint of the imperative’s existence, and I did not intuitively understand it when I entered the business world.”
The billionaire continued: “I then thought that decent, intelligent and experienced managers would automatically make rational business decisions.
Instead, rationalit
Warren Buffett: This is the ‘most surprising’ lesson I didn’t learn in business school Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: tom popomaronis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, surprising, matter, school, managers, lesson, learned, trend, business, companies, buffett, institutional, imperative, products, didnt, warren, learn


Warren Buffett: This is the 'most surprising' lesson I didn't learn in business school

Great leaders think differently. But take a cursory glance at the majority of consumer products around you, and you’ll see an interesting trend you might not have noticed before: in nearly every industry, from automobiles to computers to clothing, companies tend to produce products that are extremely similar to those of their competitors. Sure, sometimes it’s because there’s plenty of space in the market. But other times, it’s just a blatant attempt to cash in on a trend and boost short-term earnings. And it’s not just products, either — it’s branding, politicizing, team structuring. Companies copy each other in all kinds of ways. Warren Buffett addressed this occurrence in his 1989 letter to Berkshire Hathaway shareholders, in which he reflected on the hard lessons he learned about investing and managing in the preceding 25 years.

‘The institutional imperative’

The “most surprising discovery,” he wrote, is “the overwhelming importance in business of an unseen force that we might call ‘the institutional imperative.’ In business school, I was given no hint of the imperative’s existence, and I did not intuitively understand it when I entered the business world.” The billionaire continued: “I then thought that decent, intelligent and experienced managers would automatically make rational business decisions. But I learned over time that isn’t so. Instead, rationality frequently wilts when the institutional imperative comes into play.” Buffett explained that the institutional imperative can manifest when, for example, “any business craving of the leader, however foolish, will be quickly supported by detailed rate-of-return and strategic studies prepared by his troops.” It can also occur when “executives mindlessly imitate the behavior of their peer companies — whether they are expanding, acquiring, setting executive compensation or whatever — no matter how foolish it may be to do so.”

Why it can be problematic

This force can drive leaders, even the ones with top credentials, to adopt misguided approaches purely because everyone else is doing it. Why does this happen? Buffett noted that much of it has to do with managers having poor capital management skills, along with the tendency to seize upon any evidence or data — no matter how inaccurate — that supports their resistance to change.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: tom popomaronis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, surprising, matter, school, managers, lesson, learned, trend, business, companies, buffett, institutional, imperative, products, didnt, warren, learn


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‘This Is Us’ star Sterling K. Brown wants to live to 100 using this fitness routine

In real life, Brown works out for a different reason: He wants to live to 100, according to Men’s Health. Brown, 43, started to think about longevity when his father died from a heart attack at age 45. “I think when Pops passed, I had sort of a recognition of the fact that 45 was young,” he told Men’s Health. Along with fitness, Brown meditates for 20 minutes a day, and eats a nutrient-rich diet, he told Men’s Health. “It’s easier to maintain a level of fitness than it is to lose it and try to g


In real life, Brown works out for a different reason: He wants to live to 100, according to Men’s Health.
Brown, 43, started to think about longevity when his father died from a heart attack at age 45.
“I think when Pops passed, I had sort of a recognition of the fact that 45 was young,” he told Men’s Health.
Along with fitness, Brown meditates for 20 minutes a day, and eats a nutrient-rich diet, he told Men’s Health.
“It’s easier to maintain a level of fitness than it is to lose it and try to g
‘This Is Us’ star Sterling K. Brown wants to live to 100 using this fitness routine Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, live, school, sterling, fitness, browns, routine, trying, using, lifting, mens, brown, wants, 100, think, star


'This Is Us' star Sterling K. Brown wants to live to 100 using this fitness routine

On the NBC show “This Is Us,” Sterling K. Brown’s character Randall Pearson is an avid runner who turns to cardio to relieve anxiety and stress. In real life, Brown works out for a different reason: He wants to live to 100, according to Men’s Health.

Brown, 43, started to think about longevity when his father died from a heart attack at age 45. “I think when Pops passed, I had sort of a recognition of the fact that 45 was young,” he told Men’s Health.

Growing up, fitness was always part of Brown’s life: He played football and basketball and was into lifting weights.

When Brown entered grad school for acting at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, one of his professors told him that he should change his routine because his muscular build was interfering with his ability to physically portray emotions. So, he switched to yoga and cardio and put lifting on pause.

Nowadays, Brown’s daily hour-long workout routine involves running several miles, doing calisthenics (dynamic bodyweight exercises), as well as strength-training exercises such as chin-ups and Russian twists. He also plays basketball and has competed in triathlons.

Along with fitness, Brown meditates for 20 minutes a day, and eats a nutrient-rich diet, he told Men’s Health. Many of these habits come from the book “Healthy at 100” by John Robbins, which Brown read when he was in his 30s.

“It’s easier to maintain a level of fitness than it is to lose it and try to get it back,” Brown told Men’s Health. “You want to do enough that you feel like you’ve done something, but not so much that you don’t wanna do it again tomorrow. So it’s not about trying to kill yourself. It’s about trying to give yourself the inspiration to continue.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, live, school, sterling, fitness, browns, routine, trying, using, lifting, mens, brown, wants, 100, think, star


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No certainty that an election would solve Brexit difficulties: Prof

No certainty that an election would solve Brexit difficulties: Prof4 Hours AgoIain Begg of the London School of Economics says none of what was in the Queen’s Speech has any realistic chance of being passed in the British parliament, and it was all “a bit of a charade.”


No certainty that an election would solve Brexit difficulties: Prof4 Hours AgoIain Begg of the London School of Economics says none of what was in the Queen’s Speech has any realistic chance of being passed in the British parliament, and it was all “a bit of a charade.”
No certainty that an election would solve Brexit difficulties: Prof Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, solve, realistic, london, brexit, parliament, certainty, hours, difficulties, election, prof4, speech, queens, school, passed, prof


No certainty that an election would solve Brexit difficulties: Prof

No certainty that an election would solve Brexit difficulties: Prof

4 Hours Ago

Iain Begg of the London School of Economics says none of what was in the Queen’s Speech has any realistic chance of being passed in the British parliament, and it was all “a bit of a charade.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, solve, realistic, london, brexit, parliament, certainty, hours, difficulties, election, prof4, speech, queens, school, passed, prof


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You can trick yourself into saving more. Here’s how

If you’re like a lot of people, you know you need to save more. Now, research has found that taking just two additional steps could help turn that intention into a reality. The Chazen Institute at Columbia Business School found that people are more likely to stick to saving if they got certain support to back their financial goals. Because they are self-employed, one of the most powerful ways of socking away money — automating their savings — does not always work, because their income fluctuates


If you’re like a lot of people, you know you need to save more. Now, research has found that taking just two additional steps could help turn that intention into a reality. The Chazen Institute at Columbia Business School found that people are more likely to stick to saving if they got certain support to back their financial goals. Because they are self-employed, one of the most powerful ways of socking away money — automating their savings — does not always work, because their income fluctuates
You can trick yourself into saving more. Here’s how Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, saving, savings, need, trick, work, columbia, away, heres, money, help, workedand, school, youre


You can trick yourself into saving more. Here's how

If you’re like a lot of people, you know you need to save more.

Yet actually following through on that goal can be easier said than done.

Now, research has found that taking just two additional steps could help turn that intention into a reality.

The Chazen Institute at Columbia Business School found that people are more likely to stick to saving if they got certain support to back their financial goals.

More from Personal Finance:

Here’s how to feel richer with money you already have

How much more you need in retirement savings, based on age

Why millions of Americans are only $400 away from hardship

Researchers at the school studied low-income microcredit bank clients in Chile. These entrepreneurs operate small businesses and tend to borrow money regularly.

Because they are self-employed, one of the most powerful ways of socking away money — automating their savings — does not always work, because their income fluctuates.

So the researchers at Columbia set out to see if other methods of encouraging savings worked.

And the strategies they identified could also help you accumulate a bigger cash cushion.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, saving, savings, need, trick, work, columbia, away, heres, money, help, workedand, school, youre


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WeWork will close its private school in 2020 as it looks to cut costs

WeWork is shutting down early education school WeGrow later this year, in what represents the latest cost-cutting measure by the struggling office-sharing company. A WeWork spokesperson told CNBC that WeGrow will continue to operate through the remainder of the 2019-20 school year. The elementary school is located in New York’s Chelsea neighborhood and charges as much as $42,000 per year in tuition. “WeWork and the families of WeGrow students are engaging in discussions with interested parties r


WeWork is shutting down early education school WeGrow later this year, in what represents the latest cost-cutting measure by the struggling office-sharing company. A WeWork spokesperson told CNBC that WeGrow will continue to operate through the remainder of the 2019-20 school year. The elementary school is located in New York’s Chelsea neighborhood and charges as much as $42,000 per year in tuition. “WeWork and the families of WeGrow students are engaging in discussions with interested parties r
WeWork will close its private school in 2020 as it looks to cut costs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, operate, spokesperson, families, looks, efforts, close, 2020, ipo, school, private, wegrow, costs, students, cut, wework, company


WeWork will close its private school in 2020 as it looks to cut costs

WeWork is shutting down early education school WeGrow later this year, in what represents the latest cost-cutting measure by the struggling office-sharing company.

The news was first reported by The Huffington Post.

A WeWork spokesperson told CNBC that WeGrow will continue to operate through the remainder of the 2019-20 school year. The elementary school is located in New York’s Chelsea neighborhood and charges as much as $42,000 per year in tuition.

“As part of the company’s efforts to focus on its core business, WeWork has informed the families of WeGrow students that we will not operate WeGrow after this school year,” the spokesperson said in a statement. “WeWork and the families of WeGrow students are engaging in discussions with interested parties regarding plans for WeGrow for the following school year.”

The move follows additional efforts by WeWork’s new co-CEOs, Artie Minson and Sebastian Gunningham, to trim the fat at the company. Since Adam Neumann exited the company in September, the company has put three companies up for sale, including event organizing platform Meetup, office management company Managed by Q and marketing company Conductor, according to The Information.

According to a separate report in The Information, WeWork could further reduce costs by slashing up to one-third of the company’s workers, or roughly 5,000 employees.

Late last month, WeWork withdrew its IPO filing amid sharp criticism from investors, mounting losses and a dwindling IPO valuation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, operate, spokesperson, families, looks, efforts, close, 2020, ipo, school, private, wegrow, costs, students, cut, wework, company


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Florida is scooping up huge amounts of data on schoolchildren, including security camera footage and discipline records, and researchers are worried

Ora Tanner discusses research on the data collection and collation of information about schoolchildren in Florida at an October 1 Aspen Institute event. Researchers from the Aspen Institute are raising concerns about a Florida initiative meant to collect and collate huge amounts of data on schoolchildren in the state, according to a report released Thursday. Florida schools are now required to collect, store and crunch data on students in the name of predicting school shootings. The Florida Scho


Ora Tanner discusses research on the data collection and collation of information about schoolchildren in Florida at an October 1 Aspen Institute event. Researchers from the Aspen Institute are raising concerns about a Florida initiative meant to collect and collate huge amounts of data on schoolchildren in the state, according to a report released Thursday. Florida schools are now required to collect, store and crunch data on students in the name of predicting school shootings. The Florida Scho
Florida is scooping up huge amounts of data on schoolchildren, including security camera footage and discipline records, and researchers are worried Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, florida, schools, school, institute, researchers, initiative, huge, worried, footage, scooping, records, security, information, data, schoolchildren, research, students, including


Florida is scooping up huge amounts of data on schoolchildren, including security camera footage and discipline records, and researchers are worried

Ora Tanner discusses research on the data collection and collation of information about schoolchildren in Florida at an October 1 Aspen Institute event.

Researchers from the Aspen Institute are raising concerns about a Florida initiative meant to collect and collate huge amounts of data on schoolchildren in the state, according to a report released Thursday.

Florida schools are now required to collect, store and crunch data on students in the name of predicting school shootings. The Florida Schools Safety Portal, or FSSP, executive order was issued by Gov. Ron DeSantis earlier this year in response to the 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.

The initiative comes at a time when large social media companies and app developers have encountered withering criticism and regulatory scrutiny over their collection of children’s data and possible violations of students’ privacy in using that data improperly.

“No evidence-based research has demonstrated that a data-driven surveillance system such as the FSSP will be effective in preventing school violence. In addition, no information is publicly available about how the database was designed, developed, or tested,” according to preliminary findings by researchers.

The Florida Department of Education did not immediately respond to requests for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, florida, schools, school, institute, researchers, initiative, huge, worried, footage, scooping, records, security, information, data, schoolchildren, research, students, including


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25-year-old tech founder is helping teach everyday Americans how to invest

Learning to think like an investor at a young age, he says, helped him become a tech entrepreneur. Gage, 25, is one of the founders of Rapunzl Investments, a mobile app that lets users simulate stock trading in real time. Gage believes that his platform can help young people who lack formal financial education make better decisions and start investing for their future. Starting in first grade, students learn core financial tenets like investing and entrepreneurship and get hands-on experience in


Learning to think like an investor at a young age, he says, helped him become a tech entrepreneur. Gage, 25, is one of the founders of Rapunzl Investments, a mobile app that lets users simulate stock trading in real time. Gage believes that his platform can help young people who lack formal financial education make better decisions and start investing for their future. Starting in first grade, students learn core financial tenets like investing and entrepreneurship and get hands-on experience in
25-year-old tech founder is helping teach everyday Americans how to invest Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, invest, investing, everyday, rapunzl, gage, founder, stock, app, helping, tech, money, users, school, 25yearold, ariel, teach, americans, financial


25-year-old tech founder is helping teach everyday Americans how to invest

Like a lot of kids, Myles Gage was into sneakers when he was growing up. But his mom suggested an unusual rule: For every pair of Nikes that Gage owned, he should own a share of Nike stock. Learning to think like an investor at a young age, he says, helped him become a tech entrepreneur. Gage, 25, is one of the founders of Rapunzl Investments, a mobile app that lets users simulate stock trading in real time. The platform makes a game out of the markets: Users get $10,000 fictitious dollars to buy and sell stocks, which helps them learn how the markets work and start to experience the excitement and potential benefit of investing. Gage believes that his platform can help young people who lack formal financial education make better decisions and start investing for their future.

Learning early to be ‘financially literate’

Gage says his parents made a lot of financial mistakes and they wanted to make sure their kids didn’t follow in their footsteps: “They wanted us to be financially literate and in a position to make better decisions.” That’s partly why Gage’s mother, who worked for the Chicago Parks District, found a way to get him and his brother, Mario, into Ariel Community Academy, a specialized public school for students K-8 with a focus on financial education. Starting in first grade, students learn core financial tenets like investing and entrepreneurship and get hands-on experience investing in stocks. Attending Ariel made a huge difference in Gage’s life: “The only reason I know about the stock market is because of Ariel Community Academy,” he says.

The only reason I know about the stock market is because of Ariel Community Academy. Myles Gage CFO, Rapunzl Investments

That knowledge paid off: It helped Gage win a full-ride scholarship to the University of Chicago Laboratory School, a prestigious private high school. “I wrote an essay about how I planned to finance my college tuition. And the main point of that was that I was going to liquidate my stock portfolio,” he says. “I don’t think the judges were expecting a 14-year-old to be talking about liquidating a portfolio, let alone one from the south side of Chicago.”

The origins of Rapunzl

As a high school freshman in 2008, Gage immediately bonded with another student, Brian Curcio. While discussing the stock market and the budding financial crisis, the two came up with the idea of a stock market game, using fictional money, to teach people how the markets work. Over the next few years, the economy recovered. Some investors, who had money to buy stocks when the markets bottomed out, started to see strong returns. Average Americans, however, were often missing out. Gage didn’t think that profits should belong only to a select few, hidden away at the top of a tower like the character of Rapunzel in the 1812 Brothers Grimm fairy tale. Rapunzl the app, Gage and Curcio decided, would make investing accessible. It would give anybody the chance to learn, to figure out how the stock markets work. Then, when users were comfortable, they could actually start investing.

How the app got funded

Through their college years, the two met frequently to refine the concept for Rapunzl. They settled on an idea that would allow users to simulate a stock portfolio without risking real money. But to make their idea come to life, real money is exactly what the two young entrepreneurs needed. So, after graduating in 2016, they organized their ideas and started looking around for seed funding.

Myles Gage with Rapunzl cofounder Brian Curcio. Courtesy Rapunzl Investments LLC

“We put a mini-pitch deck together and shopped it around to our friends and family, and were able to muster up funds to develop a prototype,” Gage says. They hired a Canadian developer who created an early version of the app and made it available for download in April 2017. Around that time, Rapunzl also did another round of fundraising, which netted the company enough money to continue perfecting the platform. Several months later, the founders brought in a third partner, Chris Thomas, as the company’s CTO.

‘Our country needs more innovative approaches like Rapunzl’

To attract users and take aim at their mission of creating a new generation of confident, financially literate investors, Gage and the team headed back to school — literally. Rapunzl partnered with the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and started sponsoring conferences, plus essay and investing competitions at schools around the Chicago area. The team also met with John Rogers, the chairman and CEO of Ariel Investments — which also funds and sponsors Ariel Community Academy — who agreed to sponsor the competitions and provide prize money. In 2018, Rapunzl was involved in competitions in more than 70 Chicago-area schools, comprising more than 2,000 students.

Our country needs more innovative approaches like Rapunzl that aim to tackle financial illiteracy and close the achievement gap. Arne Duncan Former U.S. Secretary of Education

Rapunzl is building on its success in Chicago schools by expanding. Last year, it sponsored competitions in Los Angeles, Boston, and New York, with plans for more cities next year, and colleges, too. It has even managed to catch the attention of former U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. “Our country needs more innovative approaches like Rapunzl that aim to tackle financial illiteracy and close the achievement gap,” Duncan said, following an announcement about Rapunzl partnering with investing firm Wedbush. Duncan, who doesn’t have any current connection to the app, did play a role in developing the curriculum at Ariel Community Academy.

The app and its founders hope to make a difference

So far, the Rapunzl team has focused their efforts on generating interest in the platform and getting young users hooked on trading. The app doesn’t currently drive revenue, though, and Gage is hopeful that will change. He says at some point in 2020, the platform will be monetized through affiliate marketing and premium subscriptions.

Courtesy Rapunzl Investments LLC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, invest, investing, everyday, rapunzl, gage, founder, stock, app, helping, tech, money, users, school, 25yearold, ariel, teach, americans, financial


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Elizabeth Warren defends her story about losing a teaching job because of pregnancy

Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren stuck to her story Tuesday about losing her first teaching job because of pregnancy amid new scrutiny of her account. “When I was 22 and finishing my first year of teaching, I had an experience millions of women will recognize. By June I was visibly pregnant—and the principal told me the job I’d already been promised for the next year would go to someone else,” wrote Warren, who is 70. The story about losing her teaching job falls into a sequenc


Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren stuck to her story Tuesday about losing her first teaching job because of pregnancy amid new scrutiny of her account. “When I was 22 and finishing my first year of teaching, I had an experience millions of women will recognize. By June I was visibly pregnant—and the principal told me the job I’d already been promised for the next year would go to someone else,” wrote Warren, who is 70. The story about losing her teaching job falls into a sequenc
Elizabeth Warren defends her story about losing a teaching job because of pregnancy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: jacob pramuk
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Elizabeth Warren defends her story about losing a teaching job because of pregnancy

Democratic Presidential hopeful US Senator from Massachusetts Elizabeth Warren speaks during the SEIU Unions for All Summit in Los Angeles, California on October 4, 2019.

Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren stuck to her story Tuesday about losing her first teaching job because of pregnancy amid new scrutiny of her account.

Recent reports have cast doubts on the story, which the senator from Massachusetts has highlighted on the campaign trail as a key part of her background. In a pair of tweets Tuesday, Warren — one of the leading candidates aiming to challenge President Donald Trump for the White House next year — stood by her account of how she lost the position.

“When I was 22 and finishing my first year of teaching, I had an experience millions of women will recognize. By June I was visibly pregnant—and the principal told me the job I’d already been promised for the next year would go to someone else,” wrote Warren, who is 70.

She continued: “This was 1971, years before Congress outlawed pregnancy discrimination—but we know it still happens in subtle and not-so-subtle ways. We can fight back by telling our stories. I tell mine on the campaign trail, and I hope to hear yours.”

Warren has run for the White House as a champion for labor and women’s issues, arguing for systemic change to boost workers. The story about losing her teaching job falls into a sequence of events that Warren says helped to push her toward law school and eventually the Senate.

A recent surge in national polls has Warren jockeying for position with former Vice President Joe Biden at the front of the Democratic pack.

Several reports have put new skepticism on Warren’s story. In a 2007 interview at the University of California at Berkeley, she did not specifically say the New Jersey school where she worked hired a different teacher because of her pregnancy.

I was married at nineteen and graduated from college after I’d married, and my first year post-graduation I worked in a public school system with the children with disabilities. I did that for a year, and then that summer I didn’t have the education courses, so I was on an “emergency certificate,” it was called. I went back to graduate school and took a couple of courses in education and said, “I don’t think this is going to work out for me.” I was pregnant with my first baby, so I had a baby and stayed home for a couple of years, and I was really casting about, thinking, “What am I going to do?”

A Washington Free Beacon story published Monday also raised questions about Warren’s story. The news outlet writes that the Riverdale Board of Education in New Jersey approved Warren for a second year of teaching in a two-day-per-week job, according to school board meeting minutes.

Two months later, the minutes show Warren’s resignation was “accepted with regret,” according to the Free Beacon report.

Before she tweeted Tuesday morning, Warren first defended her story in an interview with CBS News on Monday. She said, “All I know is I was 22 years old, I was six months pregnant, and the job that I had been promised for the next year was going to someone else.”

In a statement to CBS, the senator also explained the differences between how she described her departure from teaching in 2007 and the story she told when she became a more public figure.

“After becoming a public figure I opened up more about different pieces in my life, and this was one of them. I wrote about it in my book when I became a U.S. senator,” she said.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warren, public, job, going, teaching, pregnancy, school, defends, senator, wrote, losing, elizabeth, warrens, education


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