Former Villanova football player sues NCAA for minimum wage violations

A former Villanova University football player filed a class-action lawsuit against the NCAA and many of its Division I member schools over minimum wage violations, just over a week after the NCAA announced it would allow student-athletes to profit off their name, image and likeness. “They pay the students who tear the tickets and sell popcorn at our games,” Johnson said in the statement. “The least that the NCAA can do for those who bring so much money to the NCAA and its schools would be to pay


A former Villanova University football player filed a class-action lawsuit against the NCAA and many of its Division I member schools over minimum wage violations, just over a week after the NCAA announced it would allow student-athletes to profit off their name, image and likeness.
“They pay the students who tear the tickets and sell popcorn at our games,” Johnson said in the statement.
“The least that the NCAA can do for those who bring so much money to the NCAA and its schools would be to pay
Former Villanova football player sues NCAA for minimum wage violations Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: elly cosgrove
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, statement, wage, filed, schools, violations, minimum, ncaa, johnson, studentathletes, player, football, lawsuit, sues, athletes, villanova, pay


Former Villanova football player sues NCAA for minimum wage violations

Isaiah Wright #13 of the Temple Owls runs with the ball and is tackled by Trey Johnson #3 of the Villanova Wildcats at Lincoln Financial Field on September 9, 2017 in Philadelphia.

A former Villanova University football player filed a class-action lawsuit against the NCAA and many of its Division I member schools over minimum wage violations, just over a week after the NCAA announced it would allow student-athletes to profit off their name, image and likeness.

Trey Johnson, who went on to play professionally for the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Denver Broncos and now plays for the Canadian Football League, seeks to hold the NCAA and its member schools accountable for refusing to pay student athletes, according to a released statement.

The lawsuit, which was filed Wednesday, also highlights the fact that the governing body has compared its collegiate athletes “to prisoners in arguing that athletes should not have to be paid anything for their work.”

The suit was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania and its main argument is that student-athletes are student employees just like, if not more than, the work-study students employed to work at games.

“They pay the students who tear the tickets and sell popcorn at our games,” Johnson said in the statement. “The least that the NCAA can do for those who bring so much money to the NCAA and its schools would be to pay them the minimum wage.”

Johnson, who played football for Villanova from the 2013 season through the 2016 season, said in the statement that the case “is not about being paid hundreds of thousands of dollars” and is not being limited to the select few athletes that can receive endorsement deals.

“This complaint is filed by lawyers who have already sued unsuccessfully on this subject,” Donald Remy, NCAA chief operating office and chief legal officer, said in a statement. “Importantly, it ignores previous court rulings that student-athletes are not university employees. The NCAA remains confident that courts will continue to uphold the precedent set by prior decisions.”

This lawsuit comes in the wake of a recent unanimous vote by the NCAA to allow college athletes to profit off of their name, image and likeness. The governing organization announced on Oct. 29 that it’s starting the process to allow college athletes to be compensated, though the NCAA’s three divisions must still craft their own rules and detail the specifics.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: elly cosgrove
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, statement, wage, filed, schools, violations, minimum, ncaa, johnson, studentathletes, player, football, lawsuit, sues, athletes, villanova, pay


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Harvard’s endowment is worth $40 billion—here’s how it’s spent

But in the school’s 2018-2019 financial report , Harvard stressed that the endowment does not give the school full financial freedom. Harvard’s endowment is made up of more than 13,000 individual funds invested as a single entity and is overseen by the Harvard Management Company. Last year, the school borrowed $1.9 billion from the endowment to cover some of the school’s operating costs. Additionally, many schools — including Harvard — see their endowments as a way to assure that they will remai


But in the school’s 2018-2019 financial report , Harvard stressed that the endowment does not give the school full financial freedom.
Harvard’s endowment is made up of more than 13,000 individual funds invested as a single entity and is overseen by the Harvard Management Company.
Last year, the school borrowed $1.9 billion from the endowment to cover some of the school’s operating costs.
Additionally, many schools — including Harvard — see their endowments as a way to assure that they will remai
Harvard’s endowment is worth $40 billion—here’s how it’s spent Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, schools, billionheres, harvards, spent, worth, harvard, financial, funds, including, used, students, school, endowment, costs


Harvard's endowment is worth $40 billion—here's how it's spent

“There is a common misconception that endowments, including Harvard’s, can be accessed like bank accounts, used for anything at any time as long as funds are available,” reads the report . “In reality, Harvard’s flexibility in spending from the endowment is limited by the fact that it is designed to last forever, which is crucial for an institution intended to serve generations of students and pursue research on big questions—questions that cannot be answered in one lifetime.”

But in the school’s 2018-2019 financial report , Harvard stressed that the endowment does not give the school full financial freedom.

Harvard’s endowment is made up of more than 13,000 individual funds invested as a single entity and is overseen by the Harvard Management Company.

Harvard Magazine and The Harvard Crimson report that the fund’s total value during the 2019 fiscal year is $40.9 billion — a $1.7 billion increase from the previous year.

Last year, the school borrowed $1.9 billion from the endowment to cover some of the school’s operating costs. About 35% of the school’s annual operating budget is covered this way. The remaining costs are covered by a combination of sources including student income (tuition paid by students) and donations made directly to the school, as opposed to those made towards the school’s endowment.

The school’s latest financial report states that 30% of endowment spending is flexible, while the remaining 70% is allocated to various costs. Twenty-four percent of endowment spending is used for professorships, 19% is used on scholarships and student support, 7% is used on research costs, 4% goes toward the school’s libraries and museums, 2% goes toward faculty and teaching, 1% is used for construction and 9% is used for “other” costs.

According to Harvard, “the two largest categories of funds support faculty and students, including professorships and financial aid for undergraduates, graduate fellowships, and student life and activities.”

During the 2016-2017 school year, Harvard committed $414 million toward financial aid, including roughly $175 million in need-based aid for undergraduates.

The school reports that about 70% of Harvard students receive some form of financial aid, and 55% of Harvard students receive need-based scholarship aid with average grant totals around $53,000.

While Harvard College enrolls 6,699 undergraduate students, the school also enrolls some 13,120 graduate and professional students. With such a large number of graduate students, it is unsurprising that the school uses some of the funds from its endowment toward this student population.

Fellowship amounts and totals vary by department and program, but students can search and apply for Harvard’s graduate fellowships using the school’s CARAT database.

Additionally, many schools — including Harvard — see their endowments as a way to assure that they will remain in operation for years to come.

in 2018, Harvard’s endowment was worth $39.2 billion, and the school used $1.8 billion from the fund to cover the University’s costs. According to The Washington Post, “At that spending rate, and assuming inflation of 2%, the endowment will have to generate a return of 7% a year just to maintain its value in today’s dollars, or 2.5 percentage points a year more than it generated over the last decade.”

Harvard’s endowment provided a 10% return in 2018 — but just 6.5% this year.

Representatives for the Harvard Management Company confirmed to CNBC Make It that these figures are accurate but declined to comment further.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, schools, billionheres, harvards, spent, worth, harvard, financial, funds, including, used, students, school, endowment, costs


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Why college tuition keeps rising

At private four-year schools, average tuition and fees rose 26% over the last decade. Tuition plus fees at four-year public schools, which were harder hit, jumped 35% over the same period. Today, tuition accounts for about half of college revenue, while state and local governments provide the other half. Meanwhile, the cost of attending a four-year public college or university has grown significantly faster than income over the same time period. Rising tuition leaves many students and their fami


At private four-year schools, average tuition and fees rose 26% over the last decade.
Tuition plus fees at four-year public schools, which were harder hit, jumped 35% over the same period.
Today, tuition accounts for about half of college revenue, while state and local governments provide the other half.
Meanwhile, the cost of attending a four-year public college or university has grown significantly faster than income over the same time period.
Rising tuition leaves many students and their fami
Why college tuition keeps rising Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, half, tuition, college, students, keeps, rising, state, families, nearly, public, schools, fouryear


Why college tuition keeps rising

When that funding goes down it puts pressure on schools with limited options — they can cut campus budgets, admit more students who need less aid or raise tuition, said Michael Mitchell, lead author of the report and the senior director of equity and inclusion at CBPP.

It wasn’t always that way. Over the last decade, deep cuts in state funding for higher education have contributed to significant tuition increases and pushed more of the costs of college onto students, according to a new analysis by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a nonpartisan research group based in Washington, D.C.

A college education is now the second-largest expense an individual is likely to make in a lifetime — right after purchasing a home.

Tuition has historically risen about 3% a year, according to the College Board. During the Great Recession, declining public funds caused tuition to skyrocket. At private four-year schools, average tuition and fees rose 26% over the last decade. Tuition plus fees at four-year public schools, which were harder hit, jumped 35% over the same period.

In some states, such as Louisiana and Arizona, tuition has more than doubled.

As of 2018, overall state funding for public two- and four-year colleges was more than $6.6 billion below what it was in 2008 just before the recession fully took hold, after adjusting for inflation, the CBPP analysis found.

Today, tuition accounts for about half of college revenue, while state and local governments provide the other half. But roughly three decades ago, the split was much different, with tuition providing just about a quarter of revenue and state and local governments picking up the rest.

Meanwhile, the cost of attending a four-year public college or university has grown significantly faster than income over the same time period.

Because so few families can shoulder the burden, they have increasingly turned to federal and private aid to help foot the bills.

More than 8 in 10 families tap scholarships and grants — money that does not have to be repaid — to help cover the cost.

More than half of families borrow, or take out loans, according to Sallie Mae’s most recent “How America Pays for College” report, pushing outstanding student debt to a stunning $1.6 trillion.

Among the almost 70% of students who borrow for school, the typical senior now graduates with nearly $30,000 in debt.

More from Personal Finance:

Forget SATs, colleges want to know if you are a good person

Tuition-free college is now a reality in nearly 20 states

Applying to college early isn’t always the best move

Although getting a college degree becomes increasingly important for those aiming to get ahead in today’s economy, price has become a bigger consideration among students and parents.

Now, financial concerns govern decision-making for nearly 8 in 10 families, Sallie Mae found, outweighing even academics when choosing a school.

“This impact is especially true for low-income students,” Mitchell said.

Rising tuition leaves many students and their families with either insurmountable student loan debt or unable to afford college altogether, he added.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, half, tuition, college, students, keeps, rising, state, families, nearly, public, schools, fouryear


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Florida and NY push bills to compete with California’s NCAA ‘pay to play’ law

Florida’s proposal mirrors California’s new law in prohibiting the NCAA from retaliating against collegiate athletes who make money outside their schools. While it’s also aimed at keeping California from siphoning off the state’s best collegiate athletes, it takes a different approach. Parker said he thought the California law that was signed last month “did something really great. California’s Fair Pay To Play Act prevents the NCAA from punishing schools that allow paid student athletes partici


Florida’s proposal mirrors California’s new law in prohibiting the NCAA from retaliating against collegiate athletes who make money outside their schools.
While it’s also aimed at keeping California from siphoning off the state’s best collegiate athletes, it takes a different approach.
Parker said he thought the California law that was signed last month “did something really great.
California’s Fair Pay To Play Act prevents the NCAA from punishing schools that allow paid student athletes partici
Florida and NY push bills to compete with California’s NCAA ‘pay to play’ law Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: jabari young
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, law, florida, schools, studentathletes, legislation, collegiate, compete, push, california, york, states, play, pay, californias, ncaa, athletes, bills


Florida and NY push bills to compete with California's NCAA 'pay to play' law

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis threw his support Thursday behind two bills allowing college athletes to make money from endorsement deals, joining New York in pushing for quick legislation responding to California’s new “Fair Pay to Play” law.

California’s new law, signed by Gov. Gavin Newsom on Sept. 30, threatens to upend the National Collegiate Athletic Association and has touched off a race by states to adopt similar changes so they don’t lose top sports talent to the West Coast. Florida’s proposal mirrors California’s new law in prohibiting the NCAA from retaliating against collegiate athletes who make money outside their schools.

“Other people make a lot of money using their name, image and likeness but they under current NCAA rules are not permitted to do that,” DeSantis told reporters Thursday, according to the Florida publication the Tallahassee Democrat. “When I look to see good policy ideas, California usually is not the first place I look, but I think California is on the right track.”

New York state Sen. Kevin S. Parker introduced his own legislation earlier this month. While it’s also aimed at keeping California from siphoning off the state’s best collegiate athletes, it takes a different approach.

Parker said he thought the California law that was signed last month “did something really great. But you know with New York, you have to go big or go home. We had to punch it up a little and really go for it.”

His legislation would require all NCAA schools in New York to set aside 15% of their revenue from athletic ticket sales and divide it among student athletes.

“I think providing real income for student-athletes was really going for it,” he said of the “New York collegiate athletic participation compensation act.”

California’s Fair Pay To Play Act prevents the NCAA from punishing schools that allow paid student athletes participate in sports. The legislation, which takes effect in 2023, sets some parameters around the endorsement deals. It prohibits players from signing contracts that conflict with other university sponsorships.

Parker’s bill also calls for a financial education and a portion of the school’s sports revenue to be set aside for wages while the other half of the 15% will go into a health and savings account, which is designed to assist athletes should they suffer severe injuries while participating in the NCAA events. The state senator believes this aspect of the legislation is “a game-changer.”

The NCAA has already established a working group led by Ohio State Athletic Director Gene Smith to look at the California law. Former NBA player and sportscaster Len Elmore said as many as 20 other states, including New York, are already beginning to study how to establish their proposals to allow student-athletes to earn money while playing.

Elmore, speaking at a sports business conference at Columbia University on Friday, said some states hope to get a jump start on California by having their own competing laws in place as early as next year. That would create chaos in collegiate sports, Elmore said, and could threaten the future of the NCAA.

“I see, essentially, the demise of the NCAA if this continues without any type of uniformity,” he said.

Currently, there are 58 NCAA schools in California, and once the law goes into effect, student-athletes will be able to accept deals and have agents represent them.

The student-athletes “are getting a $100,000 education, and then the university is getting tens of millions of dollars, and the NCAA is getting billions of dollars. Check my math, but that doesn’t sound fair to me,” Parker said. “This is about economic equity, and I do think that student-athletes have the right to profit off their own name, image, and likeness,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: jabari young
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, law, florida, schools, studentathletes, legislation, collegiate, compete, push, california, york, states, play, pay, californias, ncaa, athletes, bills


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The 10 best universities in the world, according to US News & World Report

Today, U.S. News & World Report released its sixth annual Best Global Universities ranking. Universities in the United States earned eight of the top 10 spots, further solidifying America’s reputation as home to some of the strongest schools in the world. For their 2020 list, U.S. News evaluated 1,500 schools — an increase from the 1,250 schools evaluated last year — across 81 countries. The ranking takes 13 different variables that measure academic research into consideration, including academi


Today, U.S. News & World Report released its sixth annual Best Global Universities ranking.
Universities in the United States earned eight of the top 10 spots, further solidifying America’s reputation as home to some of the strongest schools in the world.
For their 2020 list, U.S. News evaluated 1,500 schools — an increase from the 1,250 schools evaluated last year — across 81 countries.
The ranking takes 13 different variables that measure academic research into consideration, including academi
The 10 best universities in the world, according to US News & World Report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-22  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worldfor, academic, world, according, reputation, evaluated, ranking, best, schools, global, report, universities


The 10 best universities in the world, according to US News & World Report

Today, U.S. News & World Report released its sixth annual Best Global Universities ranking. Universities in the United States earned eight of the top 10 spots, further solidifying America’s reputation as home to some of the strongest schools in the world.

For their 2020 list, U.S. News evaluated 1,500 schools — an increase from the 1,250 schools evaluated last year — across 81 countries.

The ranking takes 13 different variables that measure academic research into consideration, including academic reputation, international collaboration, publications and citations. In order to gather information in these categories, U.S. News partnered with Clarivate Analytics to survey 26,810 professors, researchers, senior administrators, students and university employees from across the globe.

You can read more about U.S. News’ methodology here.

Here are the 10 best global universities, according to U.S. News:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-22  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worldfor, academic, world, according, reputation, evaluated, ranking, best, schools, global, report, universities


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The 10 best global universities outside of the US, according to US News & World Report

On Tuesday, U.S. News & World Report released its sixth annual Best Global Universities ranking. American universities dominated the list, earning eight of the top 10 spots, but the ranking — which emphasizes academic research — also highlighted top-notch schools from around the world. “The Best Global Universities rankings give these students a starting point for their search. The ranking takes 13 different variables that measure academic research into consideration, including academic reputati


On Tuesday, U.S. News & World Report released its sixth annual Best Global Universities ranking.
American universities dominated the list, earning eight of the top 10 spots, but the ranking — which emphasizes academic research — also highlighted top-notch schools from around the world.
“The Best Global Universities rankings give these students a starting point for their search.
The ranking takes 13 different variables that measure academic research into consideration, including academic reputati
The 10 best global universities outside of the US, according to US News & World Report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-22  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ranking, students, research, schools, world, universities, best, global, academic, according, outside, report, list, rankings


The 10 best global universities outside of the US, according to US News & World Report

On Tuesday, U.S. News & World Report released its sixth annual Best Global Universities ranking. American universities dominated the list, earning eight of the top 10 spots, but the ranking — which emphasizes academic research — also highlighted top-notch schools from around the world.

“Many prospective students are looking to other countries for their education,” said Anita Narayan, managing editor of education at U.S. News in a statement. “The Best Global Universities rankings give these students a starting point for their search. In addition to the rankings, students should also consider their fluency in the language of instruction, the fields of study that the school offers and the costs that come from studying in another country.”

For their 2020 list, U.S. News evaluated 1,500 schools — an increase from the 1,250 schools evaluated last year — across 81 countries.

The ranking takes 13 different variables that measure academic research into consideration, including academic reputation, international collaboration, publications and citations. In order to gather information in these categories, U.S. News partnered with Clarivate Analytics to survey 26,810 professors, researchers, senior administrators, students and university employees from across the globe.

You can read more about U.S. News’ methodology here.

Here are the 10 best global universities outside of the U.S., according to U.S. News:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-22  Authors: abigail hess
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Elizabeth Warren’s education plan would massively increase funding and her wealth tax would pay for it

The funding can also go toward paying for supplies and resources so teachers don’t have to pay extra out-of-pocket costs. Presidential hopeful Sen. Elizabeth Warren on Monday released an education plan that aims to quadruple public education funding with a focus on allocating more resources to lower-income students and increasing teacher pay. She has also envisioned using the wealth tax’s proceeds to pay for tuition-free public college education, abolishing student debt and a universal child-car


The funding can also go toward paying for supplies and resources so teachers don’t have to pay extra out-of-pocket costs.
Presidential hopeful Sen. Elizabeth Warren on Monday released an education plan that aims to quadruple public education funding with a focus on allocating more resources to lower-income students and increasing teacher pay.
She has also envisioned using the wealth tax’s proceeds to pay for tuition-free public college education, abolishing student debt and a universal child-car
Elizabeth Warren’s education plan would massively increase funding and her wealth tax would pay for it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-21  Authors: yelena dzhanova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plan, massively, schools, public, pay, warrens, elizabeth, billion, tax, education, students, funding, wealth, teachers, increase


Elizabeth Warren's education plan would massively increase funding and her wealth tax would pay for it

A $450 billion infusion into the system over the next decade will encourage schools to use it in part to pay teachers a higher salary and close the educator pay gap, according to her campaign. The funding can also go toward paying for supplies and resources so teachers don’t have to pay extra out-of-pocket costs.

Warren’s plan, which her campaign says would be paid for by her proposed 2% wealth tax on people whose net worth is more than $50 million, focuses on desegregation, affordability and expansion into programs for students with special needs.

Presidential hopeful Sen. Elizabeth Warren on Monday released an education plan that aims to quadruple public education funding with a focus on allocating more resources to lower-income students and increasing teacher pay.

In its entirety, her education proposal calls for $800 billion more in funding, which would account for the remaining balance of the revenue she says her wealth tax will raise, The Wall Street Journal reported. She has also envisioned using the wealth tax’s proceeds to pay for tuition-free public college education, abolishing student debt and a universal child-care program.

Warren’s campaign estimates her wealth tax, which rises to 3% on net worth of $1 billion and above, will raise $2.75 trillion over 10 years.

Warren said her administration would cover up to 40% of any additional costs for educating students with disabilities, the amount that Congress originally intended for coverage when it first proposed this policy in 1975.

Other proposals include:

“Excellence grants” of $100 billion that will go toward expanding resources and activities for students, with the goal of “25,000 public schools transition[ing] to the community school framework by 2030.”

A $50 billion investment into school infrastructure, but there’s no indication of whether the money will be spread out over a period of time or given in one lump sum.

Housing grants of $10 billion to build parks and schools if cities and states eliminate restrictive zoning laws.

A $25 billion fund for health-care access and expanding service at existing clinics.

Warren also took a shot at Education Secretary Betsy DeVos for not having a background in public education. The candidate said her Education secretary would in fact have such a background.

The plan from the Massachusetts senator also takes aim at charter schools. She would end federal funding for the expansion of charter schools and ban for-profit charters.

Warren’s plan has received support from teachers union the National Education Association.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-21  Authors: yelena dzhanova
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Applying to college early isn’t always the best move

This month, thousands of high school students will submit their early action and early-decision applications to colleges. Early-decision applicants were accepted 62% of the time, versus 52% for all applicants, according to the National Association for College Admission Counseling’s most recent State of College Admission report. By many measures, applying early helps the prospective college student as well as the schools they wish to attend, yet the advantages are not shared equally. Whether it’s


This month, thousands of high school students will submit their early action and early-decision applications to colleges.
Early-decision applicants were accepted 62% of the time, versus 52% for all applicants, according to the National Association for College Admission Counseling’s most recent State of College Admission report.
By many measures, applying early helps the prospective college student as well as the schools they wish to attend, yet the advantages are not shared equally.
Whether it’s
Applying to college early isn’t always the best move Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-19  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, applying, best, students, applicants, admission, college, schools, greenberg, decision, student, isnt, early, yield


Applying to college early isn't always the best move

This month, thousands of high school students will submit their early action and early-decision applications to colleges.

By demonstrating a preference to a particular school, studies have shown, an early application can give you a leg up, which goes a long way with competition that’s as fierce as it has ever been.

Early-decision applicants were accepted 62% of the time, versus 52% for all applicants, according to the National Association for College Admission Counseling’s most recent State of College Admission report.

By many measures, applying early helps the prospective college student as well as the schools they wish to attend, yet the advantages are not shared equally.

Whether it’s nonbinding early action or early decision, which is binding, the deadlines for these types of applications are typically between Nov. 1 and Nov.15, or even earlier for rolling admission.

For colleges, enticing students to apply early has several benefits, which is why more schools, including Tulane University and the University of Michigan, offer the option.

“A lot of schools are trying to jump ahead of other schools by presenting the application options sooner,” said Eric Greenberg, president of Greenberg Educational Group, a New York-based consulting firm.

“As a practical matter, if a student applies early and gets in, it’s much more likely they will say yes and apply to fewer schools at regular decision,” Greenberg said.

Increasing the likelihood that a student will say yes improves a college’s yield — or the percent of students who choose to enroll after being admitted — which is an important statistic for schools.

After Tulane announced in 2016 it was adding an early decision option, the number of applicants spiked and its admission rate fell, making it even more selective. That caused Tulane’s yield to improve dramatically.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-19  Authors: jessica dickler
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Florida is scooping up huge amounts of data on schoolchildren, including security camera footage and discipline records, and researchers are worried

Ora Tanner discusses research on the data collection and collation of information about schoolchildren in Florida at an October 1 Aspen Institute event. Researchers from the Aspen Institute are raising concerns about a Florida initiative meant to collect and collate huge amounts of data on schoolchildren in the state, according to a report released Thursday. Florida schools are now required to collect, store and crunch data on students in the name of predicting school shootings. The Florida Scho


Ora Tanner discusses research on the data collection and collation of information about schoolchildren in Florida at an October 1 Aspen Institute event. Researchers from the Aspen Institute are raising concerns about a Florida initiative meant to collect and collate huge amounts of data on schoolchildren in the state, according to a report released Thursday. Florida schools are now required to collect, store and crunch data on students in the name of predicting school shootings. The Florida Scho
Florida is scooping up huge amounts of data on schoolchildren, including security camera footage and discipline records, and researchers are worried Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, florida, schools, school, institute, researchers, initiative, huge, worried, footage, scooping, records, security, information, data, schoolchildren, research, students, including


Florida is scooping up huge amounts of data on schoolchildren, including security camera footage and discipline records, and researchers are worried

Ora Tanner discusses research on the data collection and collation of information about schoolchildren in Florida at an October 1 Aspen Institute event.

Researchers from the Aspen Institute are raising concerns about a Florida initiative meant to collect and collate huge amounts of data on schoolchildren in the state, according to a report released Thursday.

Florida schools are now required to collect, store and crunch data on students in the name of predicting school shootings. The Florida Schools Safety Portal, or FSSP, executive order was issued by Gov. Ron DeSantis earlier this year in response to the 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.

The initiative comes at a time when large social media companies and app developers have encountered withering criticism and regulatory scrutiny over their collection of children’s data and possible violations of students’ privacy in using that data improperly.

“No evidence-based research has demonstrated that a data-driven surveillance system such as the FSSP will be effective in preventing school violence. In addition, no information is publicly available about how the database was designed, developed, or tested,” according to preliminary findings by researchers.

The Florida Department of Education did not immediately respond to requests for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, florida, schools, school, institute, researchers, initiative, huge, worried, footage, scooping, records, security, information, data, schoolchildren, research, students, including


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The 20 best MBA programs of 2019, according to WalletHub

U.S. business schools are seeing a drop in applications. According to a survey of 1,087 graduate business programs at 363 business schools by the Graduate Management Admission Council, 70% of two-year full-time MBA programs in the United States saw a decline in application volume in 2018. Harvard Business School, Stanford’s Graduate School of Business and The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania all saw decreases in applications that year. The result is WalletHub’s Best MBA Programs


U.S. business schools are seeing a drop in applications. According to a survey of 1,087 graduate business programs at 363 business schools by the Graduate Management Admission Council, 70% of two-year full-time MBA programs in the United States saw a decline in application volume in 2018. Harvard Business School, Stanford’s Graduate School of Business and The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania all saw decreases in applications that year. The result is WalletHub’s Best MBA Programs
The 20 best MBA programs of 2019, according to WalletHub Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, business, graduate, 2019, schools, graduates, average, school, mba, according, best, wallethub, programs


The 20 best MBA programs of 2019, according to WalletHub

U.S. business schools are seeing a drop in applications. According to a survey of 1,087 graduate business programs at 363 business schools by the Graduate Management Admission Council, 70% of two-year full-time MBA programs in the United States saw a decline in application volume in 2018.

Harvard Business School, Stanford’s Graduate School of Business and The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania all saw decreases in applications that year.

But earning an MBA can still pay off big for graduates. According to the nonprofit National Association of Colleges and Employers, the average starting salary for MBA graduates from the class of 2019 is $84,580, some $25,000 more than the average for graduates with bachelor’s degrees in business.

To determine which business schools pay off the most for students, WalletHub compared nearly 100 schools across 10 key metrics including tuition, the average base salary for graduates and gender diversity. They then scored the schools, with the highest possible score being 100. The result is WalletHub’s Best MBA Programs of 2019.

Here are the best business schools of 2019, according to WalletHub:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, business, graduate, 2019, schools, graduates, average, school, mba, according, best, wallethub, programs


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