Applying for college can be expensive. Here’s how to save

As college costs rise, some students apply to a laundry list of schools to increase their odds of getting into one they can afford. The average college application costs around $50, according to SavingForCollege.com. A third of students apply to six or more colleges, and 15% apply to 10 or more. That will not only help keep costs under control but also force students to whittle down their list of schools. “Students should craft their college lists carefully, identifying a small set of colleges w


As college costs rise, some students apply to a laundry list of schools to increase their odds of getting into one they can afford. The average college application costs around $50, according to SavingForCollege.com. A third of students apply to six or more colleges, and 15% apply to 10 or more. That will not only help keep costs under control but also force students to whittle down their list of schools. “Students should craft their college lists carefully, identifying a small set of colleges w
Applying for college can be expensive. Here’s how to save Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: annie nova, jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apply, schools, save, college, costs, kantrowitz, heres, application, colleges, applying, expensive, students, list, whittle


Applying for college can be expensive. Here's how to save

As college costs rise, some students apply to a laundry list of schools to increase their odds of getting into one they can afford. Yet doing so can leave families with another large tab.

“Application fees quickly add up to thousands of dollars if you apply to dozens of colleges,” said Mark Kantrowitz, publisher of SavingforCollege.com.

The average college application costs around $50, according to SavingForCollege.com. At some colleges you can expect to pay much more — Stanford University’s application fee, for example, is $90.

A third of students apply to six or more colleges, and 15% apply to 10 or more.

Families should decide on a budget for college applications — say, $250, says Kantrowitz. That will not only help keep costs under control but also force students to whittle down their list of schools. “Students should craft their college lists carefully, identifying a small set of colleges where they have a good chance of being admitted,” he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: annie nova, jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apply, schools, save, college, costs, kantrowitz, heres, application, colleges, applying, expensive, students, list, whittle


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Clayton Christensen Institute co-founder: This equation reveals how much you should borrow for college

“If you’re in that realm, you’re going to have problems in the long-run.” It’s a smart way to avoid taking on more debt than graduates will be able to handle paying back in the future. But Michael Horn, economist and co-founder of the Clayton Christensen Institute, tells CNBC Make It that there’s a simple way students can predict roughly how much they can afford to borrow for college. “If you’re taking out $80,000 in debt to go to law school for example, and you’re going to a top law school, tha


“If you’re in that realm, you’re going to have problems in the long-run.” It’s a smart way to avoid taking on more debt than graduates will be able to handle paying back in the future. But Michael Horn, economist and co-founder of the Clayton Christensen Institute, tells CNBC Make It that there’s a simple way students can predict roughly how much they can afford to borrow for college. “If you’re taking out $80,000 in debt to go to law school for example, and you’re going to a top law school, tha
Clayton Christensen Institute co-founder: This equation reveals how much you should borrow for college Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taking, institute, work, equation, students, clayton, school, student, christensen, college, borrow, youre, going, cofounder, schools, reveals, debt


Clayton Christensen Institute co-founder: This equation reveals how much you should borrow for college

“You really want to be mindful that you’re not crossing that threshold of payments that are just going to crush your income because they’re taking up, say, 20, 30% of your monthly paycheck,” he says. “If you’re in that realm, you’re going to have problems in the long-run.”

It’s a smart way to avoid taking on more debt than graduates will be able to handle paying back in the future.

“As students look at the equation for how much they should borrow when they go to college, they ought to be thinking of the total debt that they take on as not being more than 10 to 15% of what their earnings are going to be when they leave college,” says Horn.

But Michael Horn, economist and co-founder of the Clayton Christensen Institute, tells CNBC Make It that there’s a simple way students can predict roughly how much they can afford to borrow for college.

The cost of attending college today is a daunting prospect. According to the College Board’s 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report , from 1988 to 2018, sticker prices tripled at public four-year schools and doubled at public two-year and private non-profit four-year schools, and many students use some kind of student loan to finance their degrees.

Students should think about what they want to study, research how much graduates at a given school in that major make, and not take on more than 10 to 15% of that amount in debt.

For example, according to PayScale, the average salary for an individual with a Bachelor of Engineering degree from New York University is about $91,296 per year. That means a student could plan to take on up to $13,694 (roughly 15% of their projected future salary) in loans to finance this degree.

However, the average salary for a worker with a Bachelor of Social Work degree from New York University is about $50,008 per year, so based on Horn’s recommendation, students should only take on about $7,501 in loans. Additionally, many social work opportunities require students to earn additional accreditation such as a master’s degree, and students should consider these costs as well.

Of course, this math is dependent on a student having a clear understanding of what they plan to pursue after college, something that can be challenging for many young people. Other factors students need to consider include a school’s reputation for graduating successful alumni, as well as its rate of on-time graduations.

“If you’re taking out $80,000 in debt to go to law school for example, and you’re going to a top law school, that’s probably a reasonable investment,” says Horn. “If you’re going to a bottom-third law school, a question you ought to be asking yourself is, ‘Is this worth it?’

“The most crippling debt is when you don’t complete. If [students] don’t complete, it can be crippling because they’re not going to have the wage bump from getting that college credential and so you’re going to be earning roughly as much as someone with a high school diploma is, but you have taken out $10,000 in debt.”

Horn emphasizes that debt totals have a significant impact on the financial lives of borrowers.

“Paying not just the debt back but also the interest on top of it, that can be really punishing to make the books work as you’re trying to think through raising a family, owning a home maybe in the future and other life decisions.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: abigail hess
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Nearly half of students at five top MBA programs borrow at least $100,000 to finance their degree

Bloomberg Businessweek surveyed more than 10,000 2018 graduates of MBA programs from 126 schools about the amount of debt they piled on earning their degrees. The survey found that almost half of students at leading business schools around the world borrowed at least $100,000 to finance their MBA. U.S. News says that, “among the 10 highest-ranked public B-schools, the average in-state tuition for full-time MBA students was slightly more than $42,000 per year.” 2 Stanford University, the average


Bloomberg Businessweek surveyed more than 10,000 2018 graduates of MBA programs from 126 schools about the amount of debt they piled on earning their degrees. The survey found that almost half of students at leading business schools around the world borrowed at least $100,000 to finance their MBA. U.S. News says that, “among the 10 highest-ranked public B-schools, the average in-state tuition for full-time MBA students was slightly more than $42,000 per year.” 2 Stanford University, the average
Nearly half of students at five top MBA programs borrow at least $100,000 to finance their degree Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, school, half, finance, survey, nearly, programs, 100000, graduates, borrow, business, degree, university, mba, schools, students, stanford


Nearly half of students at five top MBA programs borrow at least $100,000 to finance their degree

A degree from a top business school has long been seen as a direct path to a job at a top company, but new data demonstrates just how much it costs to pursue that route. Bloomberg Businessweek surveyed more than 10,000 2018 graduates of MBA programs from 126 schools about the amount of debt they piled on earning their degrees. The survey found that almost half of students at leading business schools around the world borrowed at least $100,000 to finance their MBA. According to the survey, at minimum 40% of MBA graduates from U.S. News & World Report’s top-ranking business programs — those at Duke, Dartmouth, University of Michigan, Cornell and University of Chicago — reported incurring at least $100,000 in debt. That percentage drops a bit at nine other top MBA programs – including those at MIT, University of Pennsylvania, NYU and Northwestern University – where around a third of recent graduates borrowed at least $100,000 to finance their degrees.

University of Michigan students are seen in the Stephen M. Ross School of Business in Ann Arbor Rebecca Cook | Reuters

Conventional wisdom has held that the price tag on an MBA, however high, tends to be worth it. According to U.S. News & World Report, tuition for traditional full-time (two year) MBA students surpassed $50,000 per year at the top 15 ranked MBA programs in the 2019 Best Business Schools rankings – with some schools exceeding $70,000 annually. Prices at public schools, particularly for in-state students, tend to be lower. U.S. News says that, “among the 10 highest-ranked public B-schools, the average in-state tuition for full-time MBA students was slightly more than $42,000 per year.” But Bloomberg’s survey results illustrate just how steep the debt eager entrepreneurs and executives undertake to advance their careers. Graduates of the 26 schools where at least 20% of students report having had to borrow six-figure sums disclose median starting pay ranging from $80,000 to $140,000. “The survey data puts into stark relief just how much of a return some students need to justify their debt-financed investment,” Bloomberg reports. Students see a clear connection between the cost of their degree and the benefit. Mike Sanchez, a 32-year-old investment banker at Citigroup and 2018 graduate of University of Chicago Booth School of Business, told Bloomberg that he didn’t consider the $110,000 in student loans he took out to finance the program a hindrance. Booth reports its median starting salary for last year’s graduates was $130,000. Based on a 2018 report by QS Quacquarelli Symonds, a higher education data and research company, U.S. News reported that, “within 10 years of earning an MBA degree, the average MBA grad from either a U.S. or international business school had an estimated decade-long return on investment of $390,751, even after subtracting the tuition and opportunity costs of attending an MBA program.” At top business schools, like No. 2 Stanford University, the average decade-long ROI of an MBA degree exceeds $1 million.

Graduating Stanford University students are shown before the start of the 123rd Stanford commencement ceremony, June 15, 2014, in Stanford, Calif. Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: elizabeth gravier
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This 26-year-old entrepreneur wants to turn high school gamers into professional esports stars

Delane Parnell sees the future of the billion-dollar esports industry — and, it’s still in high school. Parnell, 26, is the founder and CEO of PlayVS, a Santa Monica-based tech start-up that has raised $46 million from high profile investors to create officially sanctioned high school esports leagues that can turn teen gamers into varsity athletes. Through an exclusive partnership with the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS), PlayVS (pronounced “play versus”) is the offi


Delane Parnell sees the future of the billion-dollar esports industry — and, it’s still in high school. Parnell, 26, is the founder and CEO of PlayVS, a Santa Monica-based tech start-up that has raised $46 million from high profile investors to create officially sanctioned high school esports leagues that can turn teen gamers into varsity athletes. Through an exclusive partnership with the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS), PlayVS (pronounced “play versus”) is the offi
This 26-year-old entrepreneur wants to turn high school gamers into professional esports stars Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, esports, parnell, players, wants, leagues, skills, high, professional, gamers, playvs, industry, schools, turn, entrepreneur, 26yearold, school, stars


This 26-year-old entrepreneur wants to turn high school gamers into professional esports stars

Delane Parnell sees the future of the billion-dollar esports industry — and, it’s still in high school.

Parnell, 26, is the founder and CEO of PlayVS, a Santa Monica-based tech start-up that has raised $46 million from high profile investors to create officially sanctioned high school esports leagues that can turn teen gamers into varsity athletes. Through an exclusive partnership with the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS), PlayVS (pronounced “play versus”) is the official operator of esports in high schools in 15 U.S. states, so far.

“Obviously, there’s a lot of excitement and momentum around esports today,” Parnell tells CNBC Make It, referring to the fact that esports is already a billion-dollar industry where the top professional gamers rake in millions.

“But, what people don’t really recognize is that esports really only exist at the pro level.”

Professional esports leagues and tournaments have a global audience of roughly 380 million viewers, according to industry research firm Newzoo. But Parnell — a college dropout who furiously networked his way into a tech career — had formed and sold his own esports team, so he realized that the growing esports business would soon need a talent pipeline where amateur players could hone their competitive gaming skills to maybe one day go professional.

With that in mind, Parnell launched PlayVS in early 2018. PlayVS partnered with the NFHS (essentially the NCAA of high school), as well as video game publishers like Riot Games to make sure that high school gamers across the U.S. can form teams at their schools, receive coaching and compete against rivals at other schools in much the same way that teen football players do.

The primary product that PlayVS offers is its software platform that schools or parents pay $64 a season for students (13 and over) to access from their schools’ libraries or computer labs. It serves as the high school esports leagues’ defacto version of everything from practice space and playing field to league administration office. Schools can use the software to get a local team coach certified by PlayVS, while student players log on to hone their skills and compete against rival schools. PlayVS’ platform also tracks the students’ gaming skills, allowing them to keep track of their progress during practice and tally points and wins during competitions.

“All of that activity happens online,” Parnell tells CNBC Make It.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, esports, parnell, players, wants, leagues, skills, high, professional, gamers, playvs, industry, schools, turn, entrepreneur, 26yearold, school, stars


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Mark Cuban: ‘Big name’ colleges aren’t always worth the price—here’s why

Ivy League institutions like Harvard, Yale and Princeton come with prestige — but they also come with a hefty sticker price. At Yale, tuition alone for the 2019-2020 school year is $55,500. After tacking on expenses like room and board, it costs nearly $76,000 to attend. Cuban, now 60, started college at the University of Pittsburgh but transferred to Indiana University after his freshman year. At Indiana, he worked various jobs, from giving dance lessons to hosting disco parties, to help pay fo


Ivy League institutions like Harvard, Yale and Princeton come with prestige — but they also come with a hefty sticker price. At Yale, tuition alone for the 2019-2020 school year is $55,500. After tacking on expenses like room and board, it costs nearly $76,000 to attend. Cuban, now 60, started college at the University of Pittsburgh but transferred to Indiana University after his freshman year. At Indiana, he worked various jobs, from giving dance lessons to hosting disco parties, to help pay fo
Mark Cuban: ‘Big name’ colleges aren’t always worth the price—here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mark, big, cuban, colleges, arent, youre, schools, lot, student, worth, university, tuition, priceheres, school, yale, college


Mark Cuban: 'Big name' colleges aren't always worth the price—here's why

Ivy League institutions like Harvard, Yale and Princeton come with prestige — but they also come with a hefty sticker price.

At Yale, tuition alone for the 2019-2020 school year is $55,500. After tacking on expenses like room and board, it costs nearly $76,000 to attend. That’s before factoring in any grants, scholarships or financial aid that students may receive.

If attending a “big name” school means you’re going to wind up with a lot of student loan debt, it may not be worth it, says self-made billionaire Mark Cuban: “There isn’t a lot of value add from big name schools for freshman or sophomore classes, particularly when a motivated student can augment their studies with free online courses from the big names,” he tweeted this week.

At the end of the day, whether you’re considering an Ivy or not, “the most important criteria when choosing a college is affordability,” the tech entrepreneur said. “Go to a school you can afford. A community college that offers transferable credits is always smart.”

Cuban, now 60, started college at the University of Pittsburgh but transferred to Indiana University after his freshman year. He picked IU’s Kelley School of Business without ever seeing the campus because it had the cheapest tuition among the top 10 business programs at the time, according to the school’s website.

At Indiana, he worked various jobs, from giving dance lessons to hosting disco parties, to help pay for his tuition.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: kathleen elkins
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Brown University costs $73,892 a year—but here’s how much students actually pay

The rising cost of college can make earning an advanced degree seem out of reach for many students today. According to the College Board’s 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report, from 1988 to 2018, prices tripled at public four-year schools and doubled at public two-year and private non-profit four-year schools. In particular, private schools often get significant attention for having sky-high “sticker prices,” which include tuition, fees, room and board. But when the College Board broke down wha


The rising cost of college can make earning an advanced degree seem out of reach for many students today. According to the College Board’s 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report, from 1988 to 2018, prices tripled at public four-year schools and doubled at public two-year and private non-profit four-year schools. In particular, private schools often get significant attention for having sky-high “sticker prices,” which include tuition, fees, room and board. But when the College Board broke down wha
Brown University costs $73,892 a year—but here’s how much students actually pay Cached Page below :
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Brown University costs $73,892 a year—but here's how much students actually pay

The rising cost of college can make earning an advanced degree seem out of reach for many students today.

According to the College Board’s 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report, from 1988 to 2018, prices tripled at public four-year schools and doubled at public two-year and private non-profit four-year schools.

In particular, private schools often get significant attention for having sky-high “sticker prices,” which include tuition, fees, room and board. But when the College Board broke down what the average net price of college is today – taking scholarships and grants into account – they found that students typically pay less than the published price.

Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, reports that the cost to attend for the 2018-2019 academic year included $54,320 for tuition, $9,120 for rooming, $5,550 for boarding, $,2,017 for personal expenses, $1,595 for books and $1,236 for fees — totaling roughly $73,892.

But for some students, the cost of attending Brown is significantly less.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: abigail hess
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Its costs $73,160 a year to go to MIT—but here’s how much students actually pay

Over the past several decades, the cost of attending college — any type of college — has increased significantly. According to the College Board’s 2018 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report, from 1988 to 2018, sticker prices tripled at public four-year schools and doubled at public two-year and private non-profit four-year schools. Despite these costs, earning a four-year degree — especially at a top-ranking university — continues to be a high-yield investment. In 2018, college graduates earned


Over the past several decades, the cost of attending college — any type of college — has increased significantly. According to the College Board’s 2018 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report, from 1988 to 2018, sticker prices tripled at public four-year schools and doubled at public two-year and private non-profit four-year schools. Despite these costs, earning a four-year degree — especially at a top-ranking university — continues to be a high-yield investment. In 2018, college graduates earned
Its costs $73,160 a year to go to MIT—but here’s how much students actually pay Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, public, college, schools, costs, mitbut, pay, 73160, 2018, heres, students, mit, graduates, fouryear, investment, salaries, earning, actually


Its costs $73,160 a year to go to MIT—but here's how much students actually pay

Over the past several decades, the cost of attending college — any type of college — has increased significantly.

According to the College Board’s 2018 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report, from 1988 to 2018, sticker prices tripled at public four-year schools and doubled at public two-year and private non-profit four-year schools.

Despite these costs, earning a four-year degree — especially at a top-ranking university — continues to be a high-yield investment. In 2018, college graduates earned weekly wages that were 80 percent higher than those of high school graduates.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is widely regarded as one of the most prestigious schools in the world and its graduates earn some of the highest salaries. According to an analysis from salary comparison site PayScale, MIT graduates are the second highest-earning workers in the country, with early-career salaries of about $83,600 on average and mid-career salaries of about $150,400 on average.

But earning an MIT diploma requires meeting rigorous academic standards and a significant financial investment. Today, the cost of attending MIT is about $73,160 per year. Exactly how much student spends earning an MIT diploma however, can vary dramatically and many students end up paying far less.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: abigail hess
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Transferring to your dream college? Ask these 3 questions

Hero Images | Getty ImagesIf your high-school senior didn’t make the cut at his dream college this spring, then a transfer might be in the cards. Alternatively, they might be making the leap from a community college to a four-year university, which can bring in additional complexity. Maybe your student plans on completing the fall semester at one school and transferring to another school in the spring. “With state and federal aid, if you’re transferring mid-year, you get whatever is left over at


Hero Images | Getty ImagesIf your high-school senior didn’t make the cut at his dream college this spring, then a transfer might be in the cards. Alternatively, they might be making the leap from a community college to a four-year university, which can bring in additional complexity. Maybe your student plans on completing the fall semester at one school and transferring to another school in the spring. “With state and federal aid, if you’re transferring mid-year, you get whatever is left over at
Transferring to your dream college? Ask these 3 questions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: darla mercado
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Transferring to your dream college? Ask these 3 questions

Hero Images | Getty Images

If your high-school senior didn’t make the cut at his dream college this spring, then a transfer might be in the cards. Just make sure you don’t botch it. On average, colleges offered admission to 62% of transfer applicants in fall of 2017, according to the National Association for College Admission Counseling. In comparison, they offered a seat to an average of 65% of first-time freshmen, the association found. There are multiple reasons why students might want to make a switch from one school to the next. Perhaps they didn’t find the appropriate fit at their first institution.

“It’s very common for a college freshman to question whether he or she should be at that particular college,” said Eric Greenberg, president of Greenberg Educational Group in New York. “The questions they really should ask is 1: Am I comfortable here socially? 2: Am I comfortable here academically?” he asked. “3: Do the social side and the academic side meet my expectations?” Alternatively, they might be making the leap from a community college to a four-year university, which can bring in additional complexity. Here are three questions to consider before making a change.

1. Do your credits stay or go?

Hill Street Studios | DigitalVision | Getty Images

Before making a switch, your child should find out whether her new school will readily accept the credits she’s already gathered. “A misconception is that all of the credits will transfer, but usually they don’t,” said Mark Kantrowitz, publisher and vice president of research at SavingforCollege.com. Schools may have agreements detailing the transferability of credits from one college to the next. This is especially the case for partnership programs where community colleges have paired up with four-year schools to smooth the transfer process. More from Personal Finance:

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Democrats push to roll back “anti-consumer” measures Keep an eye out for catches within those agreements. “Even if you have an agreement that says the credit transfers, you might not satisfy the prerequisites,” said Kantrowitz. “This means you might have to retake the class.” In cases where there is no agreement, the colleges themselves need to review your child’s transcripts to see if the coursework maps over. This is an important consideration because in a worst-case scenario, it could mean students are spending more time and money making up classes.

2. What happens to your financial aid?

Maybe your student plans on completing the fall semester at one school and transferring to another school in the spring. If that’s the case, be aware of how this move could affect grants and other financial aid. Your child won’t be able to take his current aid to his new school. “With state and federal aid, if you’re transferring mid-year, you get whatever is left over at the new college,” said Kantrowitz. When your child withdraws from a school to transfer elsewhere, federal loans go into repayment status unless he gets an in-school deferment, according to the U.S. Department of Education. Coordinate with the financial aid office at both schools to ensure a smooth transition.

3. Which grades matter the most?

PeopleImages | Getty Images

Just because your child has a plan to swap schools in the future, that doesn’t mean he should slacken up on his studies at the current school Those stellar SAT scores and high-school transcripts matter less as time goes on. “The general rule is that, once you start college, the significant majority of the decision-making process is based on what’s done at that college,” said Greenberg.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: darla mercado
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Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak plans to donate his salary to public education—here’s why

Sisolak is Nevada’s first Democratic governor in decades and ran on a platform that included reforming education spending, drawing on his experience serving for 10 years as a Nevada System of Higher Education regent. The gift is relatively small compared to the size of Nevada’s education budget — The Guinn Center reports that Nevada’s budget allocates nearly $6.6 billion to education — but draws attention to the need for increased education funding. In the years following the great recession, ed


Sisolak is Nevada’s first Democratic governor in decades and ran on a platform that included reforming education spending, drawing on his experience serving for 10 years as a Nevada System of Higher Education regent. The gift is relatively small compared to the size of Nevada’s education budget — The Guinn Center reports that Nevada’s budget allocates nearly $6.6 billion to education — but draws attention to the need for increased education funding. In the years following the great recession, ed
Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak plans to donate his salary to public education—here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: abigail hess, ethan miller getty image, ethan miller getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salary, plans, steve, schools, state, spending, budget, education, states, public, donate, funding, nevadas, governor, nevada, educationheres, sisolak


Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak plans to donate his salary to public education—here's why

Sisolak is Nevada’s first Democratic governor in decades and ran on a platform that included reforming education spending, drawing on his experience serving for 10 years as a Nevada System of Higher Education regent. Before entering politics, Sisolak founded and ran a telemarketing business.

According to Sisolak’s statement, the Governor will donate the net of his $163,474 salary, and has instructed Department of Education officials to evenly divide his gift among the state’s 416 Title I schools — schools with high percentages of low-income students — so that each school receives at least $1,000 over his four years in office.

The gift is relatively small compared to the size of Nevada’s education budget — The Guinn Center reports that Nevada’s budget allocates nearly $6.6 billion to education — but draws attention to the need for increased education funding. “This unprecedented gesture serves to highlight the need for more funding in our schools now,” Keenan Korth, communications specialist for a Nevada teachers union, tells CNN.

In the years following the great recession, education funding was slashed in states across the country and Nevada experienced some of the greatest cuts. According to most-recent data from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CPBB), American elementary and high schools cut capital spending by $23 billion, or 31%, between 2008 and 2015. Nevada’s budget made the deepest cuts to capital spending, which was reduced by 82%.

The CPBB reports that during those years, Nevada reduced per-pupil state funding for pre-K students by 39.5% (about $1,448 after adjusting for inflation) and the student-to-teacher ratio in Nevada rose from 18.3 to 21.2.

Sisolak has called for restoring education funding to at least pre-recession levels and proposes shifting money from the state’s hotel and marijuana taxes towards schools.

During his first State of the State Address in January, the Governor emphasized his focus on education. “So far we’ve talked about a number of important issues,” he said. “But there is no issue more important to me than making sure every child in every classroom gets a great education.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: abigail hess, ethan miller getty image, ethan miller getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salary, plans, steve, schools, state, spending, budget, education, states, public, donate, funding, nevadas, governor, nevada, educationheres, sisolak


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These colleges have the cheapest out-of-state tuition

Why college is so expensive in America 5:16 PM ET Tue, 2 April 2019 | 18:06With college costs soaring and student loan debt at a record high, more students and families are considering public schools simply because of the generally lower tuition. At public, four-year institutions, average costs for the current school year, including room and board, were $21,370, according to the College Board, while tuition plus room and board at four-year private universities was more than double that: $48,510


Why college is so expensive in America 5:16 PM ET Tue, 2 April 2019 | 18:06With college costs soaring and student loan debt at a record high, more students and families are considering public schools simply because of the generally lower tuition. At public, four-year institutions, average costs for the current school year, including room and board, were $21,370, according to the College Board, while tuition plus room and board at four-year private universities was more than double that: $48,510
These colleges have the cheapest out-of-state tuition Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: jessica dickler, phelan m ebenhack, bloomberg, getty images, photo, pacificboyksu, melanie stetson, christian science monitor, source, dasonnenfeld
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, costs, colleges, tuition, universities, cheapest, public, school, room, college, board, schools, private, outofstate


These colleges have the cheapest out-of-state tuition

Why college is so expensive in America 5:16 PM ET Tue, 2 April 2019 | 18:06

With college costs soaring and student loan debt at a record high, more students and families are considering public schools simply because of the generally lower tuition.

At public, four-year institutions, average costs for the current school year, including room and board, were $21,370, according to the College Board, while tuition plus room and board at four-year private universities was more than double that: $48,510 on average.

Some public schools are far more affordable than others, particularly for those applying out of state. Personal finance site GOBankingRates ranked 100 public universities by out-of-state tuition costs, based on data from schools and U.S. News & World Report.

People assume a private school is better, but “these public schools are equally good and they have huge resources,” said Andrew DePietro, the lead researcher and data analyst at GoBankingRates.

In addition, not only are the schools near the top of the list relatively less expensive, but most also have a high acceptance rate, making them particularly attainable for college-bound seniors.

Here are the public colleges that made the top 10:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: jessica dickler, phelan m ebenhack, bloomberg, getty images, photo, pacificboyksu, melanie stetson, christian science monitor, source, dasonnenfeld
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, costs, colleges, tuition, universities, cheapest, public, school, room, college, board, schools, private, outofstate


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