CodeSignal

CodeSignal developed an automated skills-based platform that recruiters and employers use to assess the abilities of job applicants. The platform generates a “Coding Score,” which recruiters can use to predict a developer’s coding and problem-solving ability. Key customers include Uber, Robinhood and Procter & Gamble.


CodeSignal developed an automated skills-based platform that recruiters and employers use to assess the abilities of job applicants.
The platform generates a “Coding Score,” which recruiters can use to predict a developer’s coding and problem-solving ability.
Key customers include Uber, Robinhood and Procter & Gamble.
CodeSignal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: cnbccom staff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, skillsbased, codesignal, score, recruiters, coding, procter, platform, predict, uber, problemsolving, robinhood


CodeSignal

CodeSignal developed an automated skills-based platform that recruiters and employers use to assess the abilities of job applicants. The platform generates a “Coding Score,” which recruiters can use to predict a developer’s coding and problem-solving ability. Key customers include Uber, Robinhood and Procter & Gamble.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: cnbccom staff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, skillsbased, codesignal, score, recruiters, coding, procter, platform, predict, uber, problemsolving, robinhood


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Score major savings on groceries with an easy smartphone strategy

You can score major savings on grocery items you already purchase regularly using your smartphone, thanks to shopping applications like Ibotta, Paribus, and Checkout 51. Ibotta, for example, works by picking up your location and displaying current offers in your area or at the retailers you shop at the most. If you’re shopping in-store, scan a product’s bar code to see any available store-specific deals or manufacturer’s coupons. Other apps like Paribus save you money by keeping track of your pu


You can score major savings on grocery items you already purchase regularly using your smartphone, thanks to shopping applications like Ibotta, Paribus, and Checkout 51.
Ibotta, for example, works by picking up your location and displaying current offers in your area or at the retailers you shop at the most.
If you’re shopping in-store, scan a product’s bar code to see any available store-specific deals or manufacturer’s coupons.
Other apps like Paribus save you money by keeping track of your pu
Score major savings on groceries with an easy smartphone strategy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-09  Authors: ivana pino, brooke frizzell
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youre, application, strategy, score, money, ibotta, paribus, scan, store, smartphone, groceries, savings, shopping, credit, major, easy, item


Score major savings on groceries with an easy smartphone strategy

You can score major savings on grocery items you already purchase regularly using your smartphone, thanks to shopping applications like Ibotta, Paribus, and Checkout 51. Ibotta, for example, works by picking up your location and displaying current offers in your area or at the retailers you shop at the most. You can filter by store and location or search for a specific items. If you’re shopping in-store, scan a product’s bar code to see any available store-specific deals or manufacturer’s coupons. Add the item to your cart on the application, then scan and upload your receipt to the application to verify your purchase and begin earning your money back. For instance, the app offers $2 back on a 6- or 12-pack of Quilted Northern Ultra Soft & Strong toilet paper, which ranges from $6.48 to $12.24. Other apps like Paribus save you money by keeping track of your purchases via your email inbox. The app scans for receipts in your email and negotiates with online retailers to refund the difference if there is a price drop in an item you bought shortly after you make a purchase.

Once you reach $20 worth of refunds in your Ibotta account, you can withdraw your money from the application and deposit the funds into your PayPal or Venmo account, or redeem the rewards for gift cards. With Paribus, you are credited funds directly onto the original form of payment or provided the equivalent amount in store credit. “The credits add up really fast,” says Grant Sabatier of millennialmoney.com, who says he has saved about $700 on groceries in the last year, “Oftentimes you’re saving between 50 cents and $3 [on each item], so after one or two trips, you’re able to get that credit, and you get credit for inviting your friends.”

Perks and drawbacks of shopping apps


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-09  Authors: ivana pino, brooke frizzell
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youre, application, strategy, score, money, ibotta, paribus, scan, store, smartphone, groceries, savings, shopping, credit, major, easy, item


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4 money moves you can make in your 20s to build strong credit by your 30s

Your credit score can fluctuate, though, and is more of a snapshot than summary of your credit report. Video by Ian Wolsten The length of your credit history makes up 15% of your overall credit score, so making good choices early on factors into your score. The average FICO credit score for people ages 20 to 29 is 662, which is considered “fair.” Here are four money moves you can make in your 20s to establish strong credit in your 30s. He recommends a secured credit card, which often has a credi


Your credit score can fluctuate, though, and is more of a snapshot than summary of your credit report.
Video by Ian Wolsten The length of your credit history makes up 15% of your overall credit score, so making good choices early on factors into your score.
The average FICO credit score for people ages 20 to 29 is 662, which is considered “fair.”
Here are four money moves you can make in your 20s to establish strong credit in your 30s.
He recommends a secured credit card, which often has a credi
4 money moves you can make in your 20s to build strong credit by your 30s Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, payment, 20s, student, history, rewards, 30s, score, build, debt, bills, moves, money, credit, card, strong, youre


4 money moves you can make in your 20s to build strong credit by your 30s

The earlier you start building credit, the better, according to experts. Your credit score is one of the most important numbers in your financial life. If you start building and improving your credit in your 20s, you’ll be in a better position to be approved for a mortgage, an auto loan, or a rewards credit card in the future, says Ted Rossman, a credit analyst at Bankrate. Having strong credit can help you in less expected ways, too: It can mean you pay less on a cellphone plan, for example, or less money in fees to set up utilities. As you make financial decisions, like big purchases and timely payments on your bills, you establish your credit history, which informs the three-digit number known as your credit score. Your credit score can fluctuate, though, and is more of a snapshot than summary of your credit report.

Video by Ian Wolsten The length of your credit history makes up 15% of your overall credit score, so making good choices early on factors into your score. “There’s really no substitute for time in this process [because] you can’t get that time back,” says Rossman. The average FICO credit score for people ages 20 to 29 is 662, which is considered “fair.” The average rises to 673 for people ages 30 to 39, and the average credit score for Americans overall is now 703, which is considered “good.”

Here are four money moves you can make in your 20s to establish strong credit in your 30s.

1. Find a good starter card

If you’re building your credit history from scratch, find a starter card with a low credit limit so you’re less at risk of going into debt, says Matt Schulz, a credit card industry analyst at CompareCards.com. He recommends a secured credit card, which often has a credit limit of $200 to $250 and requires a deposit equal to the credit limit to open the account. “It can be really hard to get credit if you don’t have credit,” says Schulz. “The good news is that credit cards are generally the easiest way to get started, in part because they’re the easiest to get. The trouble is that what is available for credit newbies often comes with sky-high APRs, lots of fees, and few rewards.” It’s important to choose a safe card early on and to get into the habit of paying your bills before looking for credit card rewards. For instance, if you have trouble paying off your bills on time, you won’t be able to reap credit card benefits because your interest rates will outweigh your rewards and you could end up in debt. Once you’ve established good habits, you can trade up to a rewards card that complements your spending habits.

2. Pay your bills on time and in full

Your credit score is generated using an algorithm that includes several factors, including your spending history and your ability to pay off debt. The largest portion, 35%, is your payment history. That’s why paying your bills on time and in full is “the whole ballgame” when it comes to building credit, says Schulz. Schulz says a negative item, like a late payment, can stay on your report for seven years. That means if you make a late payment at 25 years old, it will remain on your credit report until you’re 32. A single late payment can also drag down your credit score by as much as 100 points, adds Rossman. He says the best ways to prevent yourself from missing a payment is to check your statement every few days, set up autopay, and create calendar reminders for when your bills are due.

FICO breakdown Factors that impact your credit score Social chart title kiersten schmidt/grow FICO

3. Work on paying off student loan debt

Paying off any debt, like student loans, consistently over time will help you establish your credit history and boost your credit score, says Rossman. Student loans are a type of installment debt, or debt borrowed as a lump sum and paid down in regular installments. Installment debt can actually be good for your credit: When you make student loan payments on time each month, you’re establishing credit history while chipping away at your debt. “If you have student loan debt or any sort of loan obligation, make sure that you’re paying those on time,” says Rossman.

4. Use credit sparingly to maintain a low utilization rate


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, payment, 20s, student, history, rewards, 30s, score, build, debt, bills, moves, money, credit, card, strong, youre


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Military members should boost their credit score for a smoother transition into civilian life. Here’s how

It’s not necessarily an easy transition from military life to a civilian one. “In a lot of ways, you are taken care of in the military. “When you come out into civilian world, there are a lot of things you may be doing for the first time on your own.” He was a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy aboard nuclear attack submarines, before retiring in 1997. During his seven-year commission, he was awarded two Navy Commendation Medals and four Navy Achievement Medals.


It’s not necessarily an easy transition from military life to a civilian one.
“In a lot of ways, you are taken care of in the military.
“When you come out into civilian world, there are a lot of things you may be doing for the first time on your own.”
He was a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy aboard nuclear attack submarines, before retiring in 1997.
During his seven-year commission, he was awarded two Navy Commendation Medals and four Navy Achievement Medals.
Military members should boost their credit score for a smoother transition into civilian life. Here’s how Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, transition, medals, world, ways, members, navy, things, score, boost, life, military, taken, heres, smoother, credit, lot, civilian


Military members should boost their credit score for a smoother transition into civilian life. Here's how

It’s not necessarily an easy transition from military life to a civilian one.

You’ll have to find a job and a place to live, to start.

“In a lot of ways, you are taken care of in the military. You get free medical and dental, and you just go to the local naval hospital for that service,” said Jim Lebenthal, a CNBC contributor who is also a longtime investment expert and current partner at Cerity Partners.

“When you come out into civilian world, there are a lot of things you may be doing for the first time on your own.”

Lebenthal would know. He was a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy aboard nuclear attack submarines, before retiring in 1997. During his seven-year commission, he was awarded two Navy Commendation Medals and four Navy Achievement Medals.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, transition, medals, world, ways, members, navy, things, score, boost, life, military, taken, heres, smoother, credit, lot, civilian


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The best credit cards for fair and average credit of November 2019

If you have fair or average credit (generally 580 to 669, according to Experian), you don’t have to settle for a no-frills credit card with high fees. There’s an assortment of credit cards designed for people with fair or average credit that still offer rewards programs, helpful perks, no annual fees and no foreign transaction fees. Below, CNBC Select reviewed the best credit cards that give people with fair or average credit better qualification chances. Keep in mind that card issuers don’t dis


If you have fair or average credit (generally 580 to 669, according to Experian), you don’t have to settle for a no-frills credit card with high fees.
There’s an assortment of credit cards designed for people with fair or average credit that still offer rewards programs, helpful perks, no annual fees and no foreign transaction fees.
Below, CNBC Select reviewed the best credit cards that give people with fair or average credit better qualification chances.
Keep in mind that card issuers don’t dis
The best credit cards for fair and average credit of November 2019 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-01  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, credit, qualify, score, average, cards, 2019, dont, card, high, fair, best


The best credit cards for fair and average credit of November 2019

If you have fair or average credit (generally 580 to 669, according to Experian), you don’t have to settle for a no-frills credit card with high fees.

There’s an assortment of credit cards designed for people with fair or average credit that still offer rewards programs, helpful perks, no annual fees and no foreign transaction fees.

While these cards might be easier to qualify for, they often come with high interest rates — but this shouldn’t be an issue if you pay your bill on time and in full. After all, your primary goal when signing up for a credit card should be to improve your score with responsible financial behavior, so it bumps up to a good score range (670 to 799).

Below, CNBC Select reviewed the best credit cards that give people with fair or average credit better qualification chances. (See our methodology for more information on how we choose the best cards.)

Keep in mind that card issuers don’t disclose exact credit score requirements and the ranges provided above should only be used as a guideline. If you’re unsure if you’ll qualify, you can fill out a pre-qualification form to check your odds.

Here are CNBC Select’s picks for the top credit cards for people with fair or average credit:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-01  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, credit, qualify, score, average, cards, 2019, dont, card, high, fair, best


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Don’t fall for these 2 myths about what hurts your credit score

Even a slight dip in your credit score can cost you thousands over the life of a loan, so establishing and maintaining strong credit is important. That said, don’t believe everything you hear about what will and won’t hurt your credit score. Here are two credit myths you shouldn’t believe:Myth 1: Checking your credit report hurts your scoreAbout 1 in 5 credit card users mistakenly believes checking their credit report could cause their score to drop, according to a 2018 survey from Discover. The


Even a slight dip in your credit score can cost you thousands over the life of a loan, so establishing and maintaining strong credit is important.
That said, don’t believe everything you hear about what will and won’t hurt your credit score.
Here are two credit myths you shouldn’t believe:Myth 1: Checking your credit report hurts your scoreAbout 1 in 5 credit card users mistakenly believes checking their credit report could cause their score to drop, according to a 2018 survey from Discover.
The
Don’t fall for these 2 myths about what hurts your credit score Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, check, credit, dont, best, report, score, shopping, mortgage, rate, hurts, youre, myths, fall


Don't fall for these 2 myths about what hurts your credit score

Even a slight dip in your credit score can cost you thousands over the life of a loan, so establishing and maintaining strong credit is important. That said, don’t believe everything you hear about what will and won’t hurt your credit score. You might be avoiding smart moves that could actually help you save money. Here are two credit myths you shouldn’t believe:

Myth 1: Checking your credit report hurts your score

About 1 in 5 credit card users mistakenly believes checking their credit report could cause their score to drop, according to a 2018 survey from Discover. Not true. You can safely review your own credit reports as often as you’d like. “When you check your own credit report, it will not hurt your credit scores, as long as you’re not having a friend at a car dealership or mortgage broker pull it for you,” credit expert John Ulzheimer told Grow earlier this year. The only kind of credit check that hurts your score is when a lender reviews your credit as you apply for a new loan. That so-called “hard pull” can have a small and usually temporary negative affect. Read more: 2 ways to check your credit score for free

Video by David Fang

Myth 2: Shopping around for a mortgage hurts your score

When you apply for a mortgage, lenders will look at your credit to assess what kind of interest rate you’re offered — and the best way to get a competitive rate is by shopping around. Even so, experts say, there is a misconception that shopping around for mortgages will be seen as multiple requests for new credit, hurting your credit score at a time when you need it to be at its best. The reality is that applying for several loans will be treated as a single inquiry on your credit report. “There are no downsides to shopping around because [scoring models like] FICO and VantageScore will presume you’re shopping around for the best rate rather than applying for multiple loans,” Ulzheimer told Grow earlier this year. Read more: How you can save up to $500 per month on your mortgage payments


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, check, credit, dont, best, report, score, shopping, mortgage, rate, hurts, youre, myths, fall


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Don’t fall for these 3 myths about how to boost your credit score

Boosting your credit score can save you thousands of dollars on mortgage, auto loan, or private student loan payments. If you want a higher credit score and are taking steps to improve it, make sure you have good information. For instance, 12% of people said they canceled a credit card in order to help their credit score, according to a 2019 Bankrate survey of 2,582 adults, including 2,301 credit cardholders. We’ve busted three common credit score myths about what does, and doesn’t, boost your s


Boosting your credit score can save you thousands of dollars on mortgage, auto loan, or private student loan payments.
If you want a higher credit score and are taking steps to improve it, make sure you have good information.
For instance, 12% of people said they canceled a credit card in order to help their credit score, according to a 2019 Bankrate survey of 2,582 adults, including 2,301 credit cardholders.
We’ve busted three common credit score myths about what does, and doesn’t, boost your s
Don’t fall for these 3 myths about how to boost your credit score Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, myths, card, fall, dont, youre, rate, good, canceling, old, boost, credit, score, thats, utilization


Don't fall for these 3 myths about how to boost your credit score

Boosting your credit score can save you thousands of dollars on mortgage, auto loan, or private student loan payments. If you want a higher credit score and are taking steps to improve it, make sure you have good information. Some common ideas about how to boost your score don’t work — and some can even end up hurting you. For instance, 12% of people said they canceled a credit card in order to help their credit score, according to a 2019 Bankrate survey of 2,582 adults, including 2,301 credit cardholders. In fact, canceling a card with a longstanding credit history can actually drag down your score. If you’re not sure what helps or hurts, don’t worry. We’ve busted three common credit score myths about what does, and doesn’t, boost your score.

Video by David Fang

Myth 1: It’s helpful to carry a balance

You may have heard that it’s a good idea to carry a balance from month to month because it can help you build a strong credit history and in turn boost your score. But carrying a balance can actually hurt your score. That’s because your credit score depends in part on your utilization rate, which is the relationship between how much credit you’ve used to how much credit is available to you. A good rule of thumb is to keep your utilization rate below 30% on each card individually and on the total amount of credit available to you. When you go above that percentage, “that’s when [your utilization rate] starts impacting your score,” Matt Schulz, a chief industry analyst at CompareCards.com, told Grow earlier this year. Experts suggest paying off your balance each month if you can. Read more: 3 simple ways to maintain good credit

FICO breakdown Factors that impact your credit score Social chart title kiersten schmidt/grow FICO

Myth 2: Canceling an old credit card can help your score

Even if you’re no longer using an old credit card, canceling it can lower your score. That’s because canceling the card lowers the amount of overall credit you have available to you, which in turn affects your utilization rate. “I would say it’s very rare that I would advise canceling a card because of the credit score benefit,” Bankrate analyst Ted Rossman told Grow earlier this year. “It usually makes sense to leave it open, even if you’re not using it.” Read more: Don’t make this mistake with your old credit cards

Myth 3: Just pay bills on time and you’ll be fine


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, myths, card, fall, dont, youre, rate, good, canceling, old, boost, credit, score, thats, utilization


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Here are three simple ways to raise your credit score, according to a financial expert

Nearly six in 10 Americans have what’s considered a “good” credit score or better, according to credit bureau Experian. That’s good news, since your credit score is essential when you’re considering taking out a mortgage, opening a credit card, renting an apartment and even some job opportunities. Automate your bill payThe number-one thing you can do to raise your credit score is to improve and maintain your payment history. Piggyback on good credit habitsAnother easy win when improving your cre


Nearly six in 10 Americans have what’s considered a “good” credit score or better, according to credit bureau Experian.
That’s good news, since your credit score is essential when you’re considering taking out a mortgage, opening a credit card, renting an apartment and even some job opportunities.
Automate your bill payThe number-one thing you can do to raise your credit score is to improve and maintain your payment history.
Piggyback on good credit habitsAnother easy win when improving your cre
Here are three simple ways to raise your credit score, according to a financial expert Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-30  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expert, youre, credit, simple, aliche, user, according, authorized, payment, score, thats, financial, good, ways, raise, card


Here are three simple ways to raise your credit score, according to a financial expert

Americans, on a whole, actually have pretty good credit scores. Nearly six in 10 Americans have what’s considered a “good” credit score or better, according to credit bureau Experian. That’s a 703 FICO score, in case you’re wondering. FICO’s credit scores range from 300 and 850. That’s good news, since your credit score is essential when you’re considering taking out a mortgage, opening a credit card, renting an apartment and even some job opportunities. But there’s still about 12% of Americans who have a score of less than 550, which is considered fair to poor. If you’re one of those that do have a lower score, there are ways you can improve your credit, says Tiffany Aliche, personal finance expert and founder of The Budgetnista. Keep in mind that raising your score typically doesn’t happen overnight. Experts say it is possible to raise your score in one to two months, but it may take longer depending on why your score is low in the first place. Here’s a look at three easy things Aliche says you can do to get started.

1. Automate your bill pay

The number-one thing you can do to raise your credit score is to improve and maintain your payment history. “That means paying what you owe and paying when you owe,” Aliche says. An easy way to do that is by automating your payment. Set up bill pay with your bank so you never miss a payment. “When you automate it, you don’t have to think about it— set it and semi-forget it,” she recommends. Your payment history makes up the biggest portion of how your score is calculated, about 35%, Aliche says. So keeping on top of paying off your bills is crucial. But it’s worth noting that not all bills count toward your credit score. Typically, the accounts that can help or hurt your score include credit cards, store retail cards, car loans and mortgages, according to credit scoring services company FICO. (That’s not to say you shouldn’t pay all your bills on time.)

2. Piggyback on good credit habits

Another easy win when improving your credit: become an authorized user. This is an especially good tip if you’re just starting out and may not have a strong score yet. If you have a parent or family member with good credit, you can ask them to add you as an authorized user to their credit card. “I’ve got great credit,” Aliche says. “Baby sister Lisa, not so much.” To help her out, Aliche added her sister as an authorized user. But Aliche did not allow her sister to get a card, so there was no risk that she might overspend. “What it meant was that when I use my card properly, it looked like we used the card properly,” Aliche says. “So she got to inherit good financial behavior.” Although it can be a helpful strategy, fewer than 1 out of 5 people have been added as authorized users, according to Credit Sesame. The financial site found that getting added as an authorized user helped those with bad credit score of under 550 improve their score by 10% in just a month.

3. Use your credit card to “pay off pennies”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-30  Authors: megan leonhardt
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Money expert: 3 hacks to improve your credit score

Money expert: 3 hacks to improve your credit score1 Hour AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. Tiffany “The Budgetnista” Aliche has 3 simple tips to help you improve your credit score.


Money expert: 3 hacks to improve your credit score1 Hour AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser.
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Tiffany “The Budgetnista” Aliche has 3 simple tips to help you improve your credit score.
Money expert: 3 hacks to improve your credit score Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-30  Authors: source, cnbc make it
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Money expert: 3 hacks to improve your credit score

Money expert: 3 hacks to improve your credit score

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Tiffany “The Budgetnista” Aliche has 3 simple tips to help you improve your credit score.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-30  Authors: source, cnbc make it
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93% of millennials are aware of their credit score, according to Discover’s Credit Health survey

Millennials have a reputation for not being the most savvy with their finances, but Discover’s annual Credit Health survey found they’re the generation most aware of their credit score. About nine in 10 (93%) millennials (ages 18 to 34, according to this survey) know their credit score, which is a huge jump from 55% in 2017. It’s a good idea to check your credit score on a regular basis for several reasons. You can raise your credit score by implementing simple actions into your daily life, such


Millennials have a reputation for not being the most savvy with their finances, but Discover’s annual Credit Health survey found they’re the generation most aware of their credit score.
About nine in 10 (93%) millennials (ages 18 to 34, according to this survey) know their credit score, which is a huge jump from 55% in 2017.
It’s a good idea to check your credit score on a regular basis for several reasons.
You can raise your credit score by implementing simple actions into your daily life, such
93% of millennials are aware of their credit score, according to Discover’s Credit Health survey Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, life, checking, score, millennials, health, credit, aware, respondents, survey, according, discovers, likely


93% of millennials are aware of their credit score, according to Discover's Credit Health survey

Millennials have a reputation for not being the most savvy with their finances, but Discover’s annual Credit Health survey found they’re the generation most aware of their credit score. About nine in 10 (93%) millennials (ages 18 to 34, according to this survey) know their credit score, which is a huge jump from 55% in 2017.

This increased awareness can be attributed to the numerous tools available that make checking your credit score so accessible, Stefanie O’Connell, personal finance expert, tells CNBC Select.

Additionally, she says that many millennials are coming of age and need to check their credit for major milestones, such as renting an apartment or taking out a lease.

In comparison, 79% of Gen X (ages 35 to 54) and 73% of boomers (55 and older) are aware of their credit score. Millennials are also the most likely to believe their credit standing has an impact on their day-to-day life (78%), compared to just 52% of Gen X and 35% of boomers.

When it comes to actually checking their credit score, 82% of respondents said they checked it at least once in the last year, up from 72% in 2017.

It’s a good idea to check your credit score on a regular basis for several reasons. For starters, checking your score can make you aware of any possible fraud on your account. If you see a drastic dip in your score, it may indicate that someone opened an account in your name or stole your card number.

Monitoring your score can also help you track progress when building credit. More than half (56%) of respondents said they are actively trying to improve their credit. You can raise your credit score by implementing simple actions into your daily life, such as limiting spending and making on-time payments. Plus the higher your credit score, the more likely you’ll qualify for the best credit cards and financing options.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, life, checking, score, millennials, health, credit, aware, respondents, survey, according, discovers, likely


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