PopSockets CEO says Amazon uses ‘bullying with a smile’ to press for lower prices

Popular phone accessory maker PopSockets accused Amazon of “strong-arming” it and failing to remove fake products. “One of the strangest relationships I’ve had with a retailer is with Amazon,” Barnett said. “Like any brand, however, PopSockets is free to choose which retailers it supplies and chose to stop selling directly through Amazon,” the spokesperson said. PopSockets is just one of many brands that have publicly expressed their dissatisfaction with selling products on Amazon’s marketplace.


Popular phone accessory maker PopSockets accused Amazon of “strong-arming” it and failing to remove fake products.
“One of the strangest relationships I’ve had with a retailer is with Amazon,” Barnett said.
“Like any brand, however, PopSockets is free to choose which retailers it supplies and chose to stop selling directly through Amazon,” the spokesperson said.
PopSockets is just one of many brands that have publicly expressed their dissatisfaction with selling products on Amazon’s marketplace.
PopSockets CEO says Amazon uses ‘bullying with a smile’ to press for lower prices Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tactics, relationship, ceo, bullying, barnett, prices, uses, amazon, selling, popsockets, sell, directly, company, products, lower, smile, press


PopSockets CEO says Amazon uses 'bullying with a smile' to press for lower prices

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos attends a commemoration ceremony held in front of Saudi consulate on the first anniversary of his murder, in Istanbul, Turkey on October 02, 2019.

Popular phone accessory maker PopSockets accused Amazon of “strong-arming” it and failing to remove fake products.

David Barnett, CEO of PopSockets, testified during a House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee hearing on competition in the digital economy in Colorado on Friday. Barnett claims Amazon pressured PopSockets to lower the price of its products on the platform and said if it failed to do so, the company would source product from the “grey market,” or third-party sellers. PopSockets sells grips that attach to the back of cellphones.

“One of the strangest relationships I’ve had with a retailer is with Amazon,” Barnett said. “The agreement appears to be negotiated in good faith, but what happens is there are phone calls where we get bullying with a smile.”

An Amazon spokesperson told CNBC in a statement that the company sought to continue working with PopSockets to provide “competitive prices, availability, broad selection and fast delivery” for those products to its customers.

“Like any brand, however, PopSockets is free to choose which retailers it supplies and chose to stop selling directly through Amazon,” the spokesperson said. “Even so, we’ve continued to work with PopSockets to address our shared concerns about counterfeit, and continue to have a relationship with PopSockets through Merch by Amazon, which enables other sellers to create customized PopSockets for sale.”

Barnett said Amazon uses a variety of tactics to “bully” businesses, such as threatening to send excess inventory back at a cost to the company. He also disputed Amazon’s argument that there are other online marketplaces for businesses to sell their goods.

“We sell on the Walmart platform, sales are 1/38th of the sales we had on Amazon when we had a relationship,” Barnett said. “And Target it’s even less. These are small fractions.”

PopSockets is just one of many brands that have publicly expressed their dissatisfaction with selling products on Amazon’s marketplace. In 2018, PopSockets attempted to stop selling directly with Amazon, citing the aggressive pricing atmosphere and other controlling tactics, such as not allowing PopSockets to sell its products through a distributor. Barnett said PopSockets is now “testing” a direct selling relationship with Amazon.

Amazon said it requires some popular, widely available brands to sell to it directly to guarantee it’s offering the lowest prices compared to those offered at other stores.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tactics, relationship, ceo, bullying, barnett, prices, uses, amazon, selling, popsockets, sell, directly, company, products, lower, smile, press


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3 questions to ask yourself before selling an investment

Before you sell an investment, experts recommend asking yourself thee following questions. Your reasons for wanting to sell an investment could range from practical to emotional, and it’s important to understand what’s motivating your decision. That said, you will want to have a plan for which investments in your portfolio you’ll sell — and why. Before you consider selling, you’ll want to make sure you understand the associated costs, which could include: Transaction costs. Even if you decide th


Before you sell an investment, experts recommend asking yourself thee following questions.
Your reasons for wanting to sell an investment could range from practical to emotional, and it’s important to understand what’s motivating your decision.
That said, you will want to have a plan for which investments in your portfolio you’ll sell — and why.
Before you consider selling, you’ll want to make sure you understand the associated costs, which could include: Transaction costs.
Even if you decide th
3 questions to ask yourself before selling an investment Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, understand, tax, investment, ask, market, selling, investments, questions, sell, money, youll, plan


3 questions to ask yourself before selling an investment

Much of the advice about investing focuses on getting started in the stock market. However, the day will inevitably come when you need to sell your investments. Just as you should have a long-term strategy for investing in the stock market, you’ll need to develop a plan for determining when to sell — and then stick with it. Otherwise, you risk succumbing to a common cognitive bias of withdrawing money from the market at the worst possible time. “If you’re prepared in advance, nothing should be a surprise,” says Tim McGrath, a certified financial planner and managing partner at Riverpoint Wealth Management. “A lot of people don’t have a game plan or process for determining what to sell.” It’s important to consider the long-term consequences associated with a short-term decision. If you sell investments because of a bout of turbulence, you could miss out when the market eventually rebounds, as it always has in the past. Alternatively, treating your investment account like an ATM could create an unexpected tax burden. Before you sell an investment, experts recommend asking yourself thee following questions.

1. Why do you want to sell?

Your reasons for wanting to sell an investment could range from practical to emotional, and it’s important to understand what’s motivating your decision. A good way of sussing that out is by asking yourself if selling the investment will fund a want or a need, says Mike Kojonen, a financial advisor and founder of Principal Preservation Services. “Don’t use your investments for something you just want to buy,” he recommends. That’s because you’ll pay a price for doing so, including capital gains taxes on profits. Oftentimes, Kojonen’s clients will reconsider selling investments once they understand the implications of doing so — and particularly if it was to fund a short-term “want,” like a car or a vacation, he says. To avoid surprises that might cause you to sell an investment to cover an emergency, McGrath says it’s important to plan ahead. That means anticipating major expenses you might have in the next 12 to 24 months and ensuring you have an emergency fund that can cover at least three months worth of living expenses.

If you’re prepared in advance, nothing should be a surprise. Tim McGrath a certified financial planner and managing partner at Riverpoint Wealth Management

Even so, emergencies do arise that might warrant selling. That said, you will want to have a plan for which investments in your portfolio you’ll sell — and why. Finally, check your emotions. Both Kojonen and McGrath try to determine if the real reason one of their clients wants to sell is motivated by fear. If you’re frustrated with your portfolio’s performance or worried that a market decline is coming, remember why you invested in the first place and make tweaks rather than overhauls to your strategy.

Video by Courtney Stith

2. Do you understand what selling will cost?

You may look at the value of your investment and think you’ll get to keep all of that. But Uncle Sam will want a cut, as well. Before you consider selling, you’ll want to make sure you understand the associated costs, which could include: Transaction costs. Does your broker or robo-advisor charge a fee for liquidating some or all of your account?

Does your broker or robo-advisor charge a fee for liquidating some or all of your account? Capital gains taxes. How long have you owned this investment? If it’s been less than a year, you’ll have to pay short-term capital gains taxes on the profit, which is the equivalent of ordinary income tax. If it’s been longer than a year, your tax obligations are lower.

How long have you owned this investment? If it’s been less than a year, you’ll have to pay short-term capital gains taxes on the profit, which is the equivalent of ordinary income tax. If it’s been longer than a year, your tax obligations are lower. Penalty for early withdrawals. Are you considering taking out money from a 401(k) or an IRA? You should avoid dipping into your retirement account, because that money can be taxed as income. And if the money isn’t for a qualified exception, you’ll have to pay a 10% penalty.

Are you considering taking out money from a 401(k) or an IRA? You should avoid dipping into your retirement account, because that money can be taxed as income. And if the money isn’t for a qualified exception, you’ll have to pay a 10% penalty. Opportunity cost. Every dollar you remove from the market is a dollar less that’s earning interest for retirement or other long-term goals. To see the power of compounding, consider the following example from Fidelity: If you leave a retirement account of $6,000 untouched instead of cashing out when you switch jobs, in 35 years that could grow to more than $64,000 — even without any other contributions in the interim. Once you understand all of these costs, you may have a change of heart. That said, there are good reasons to sell investments, including rebalancing your portfolio to maintain your chosen mix of various stocks and bonds and taking advantage of investing strategies that can lower your tax bill.

3. What happens next?

Even if you decide that selling an investment is your best option, you need to have a plan for what happens next. That includes a strategy for when you’ll actually sell, a budget for the costs outlined above, a decision about where that money goes after you’ve liquidated it, and a plan for reinvesting that money again later.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, understand, tax, investment, ask, market, selling, investments, questions, sell, money, youll, plan


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A day in the life of the top real estate agent in LA, who makes millions selling luxury properties to the super rich

Aaron routinely sells multimillion-dollar properties, including one estate for a whopping $65 million, and on his new CNBC show, “Listing Impossible,” he helps homeowners sell their luxury real estate. He also runs the Aaron Kirman Group (AKG), a real estate team he started in 2017 that’s grown from seven agents at its inception to nearly 70 today. “There is no typical day in real estate,” he warns me when I arrive. Aaron Kirman real estate agent, star of CNBC’s “Listing Impossible”Aaron has a p


Aaron routinely sells multimillion-dollar properties, including one estate for a whopping $65 million, and on his new CNBC show, “Listing Impossible,” he helps homeowners sell their luxury real estate.
He also runs the Aaron Kirman Group (AKG), a real estate team he started in 2017 that’s grown from seven agents at its inception to nearly 70 today.
“There is no typical day in real estate,” he warns me when I arrive.
Aaron Kirman real estate agent, star of CNBC’s “Listing Impossible”Aaron has a p
A day in the life of the top real estate agent in LA, who makes millions selling luxury properties to the super rich Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, real, tells, work, luxury, makes, day, million, super, morning, property, estate, properties, selling, life, rich, aaron, millions, team


A day in the life of the top real estate agent in LA, who makes millions selling luxury properties to the super rich

Aaron Kirman knows how to close a deal: He’s sold roughly $6 billion worth of real estate over his 25-year career, making him the No. 1 agent in Los Angeles and among the top in the country. Aaron routinely sells multimillion-dollar properties, including one estate for a whopping $65 million, and on his new CNBC show, “Listing Impossible,” he helps homeowners sell their luxury real estate. He also runs the Aaron Kirman Group (AKG), a real estate team he started in 2017 that’s grown from seven agents at its inception to nearly 70 today. As a top realtor, Aaron makes seven figures, but not all real estate agents earn a ton of money — and that’s one of the biggest misconceptions of the job. Most bring home less than $50,000 a year, Aaron estimates, while a top producer will make between $200,000 and $500,000. “Then you have the very, very, very top — a select few who make more than a million,” he says, adding: “And then there’s one level up, which is big, mega brokers. I’m pretty lucky to consider myself one of those.” To experience a sliver of what it’s like to be the top realtor in the City of Angels, I spent a day with Aaron, meeting clients and looking at listings in some of the wealthiest neighborhoods in LA.

The author and Aaron, in front of a $65 million home CNBC Make It

It’s a brisk Monday in October. I leave my apartment around 6 a.m. to give myself plenty of time to navigate LA traffic and make it to Aaron’s home in Beverly Hills on time. His two dogs, Jack and Lucy, greet me at the front door. Aaron just moved in three weeks ago, but you can’t tell. The three-bedroom home is immaculate. It has a mid-century vibe, tons of natural light and the walls are covered in funky art pieces. “There is no typical day in real estate,” he warns me when I arrive. “When we think we have a schedule, it changes. At the level that we do, people need you when they need you and they want you when they want you.” True to his word, our schedule changes multiple times over the next 12 hours. Here’s how the day unfolds.

7 a.m. The morning starts with Starbucks

Aaron can’t function without his Starbucks. “It’s my addiction,” he tells me. “No matter where I am, in any given city, I can’t get up without it.” By the time I show up, he already has a triple soy cappuccino — his typical order — in hand. His personal assistant picked it up on her way to his house.

Aaron and his go-to order: a triple soy cappuccino

Most days, like this one, start between 7 and 7:30 a.m. “A lot of people start at like 5 or 6 — it’s just not in my nature to do that,” he says. A later start does typically means a longer day: “We sometimes work until 10 p.m. When I don’t have dinners or events, it’s more like 8:30 to 9.”

7:30 a.m. He meditates, swims and gets ready for the day

Aaron has a detailed and time-consuming morning routine that, even on the busiest days, he refuses to cut short. “I’m very careful with self-care,” he says. “I notice if I don’t take care of myself in the morning, I’m in a bad mood. I’m crotchety.” After his coffee, he meditates for five to six minutes by his outdoor pool. For him, that’s a long time: “In the past, meditation was almost impossible for me. I move really fast, so I’ve had to work on that part of me. But I’ve noticed that I’m now much more creative, innovative, calm and centered.”

Not a bad place to meditate CNBC Make It

He then swims a few laps and reads the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal to catch up on the news before getting ready for the day. He throws on some exercise clothes and packs his work outfit, as he won’t come back home after going to the gym. He used to get dressed up, but now that he’s established himself, he can get away with a more casual look. Plus, he’s learned that “the more comfortable you are in life, the better you’ll do. My competition gets dressed to the nines. They wear suits, they wear ties, they wear $5,000 clothes every day. I’m a T-shirt and jeans guy.”

The more comfortable you are in life, the better you’ll do. Aaron Kirman real estate agent, star of CNBC’s “Listing Impossible”

He hasn’t yet eaten — “breakfast is not my meal,” he tells me — but grabs a protein shake for the road.

9:45 a.m. He hits the gym

Just before 10 a.m., we head to the gym. Today, we’re taking Aaron’s Bentley instead of his Porsche. Since we’re already behind schedule, he does an efficient, 20-minute circuit with one of his personal trainers (he has two). He aims to exercise at least 40 minutes a day — on a jam-packed day like today, he’ll do the second half of his workout at night. His morning routine pushes back the start of his work day quite a bit, something he’s fully aware of: “Our schedule is insane, and it doesn’t help that I have this morning routine that probably drives everyone crazy. “My staff is like, Would you mind skipping the gym? Would you mind not swimming? Would you mind not meditating? And my answer is, no. I have to protect my time. My performance is much better when I’m happy, healthy and living the way I choose to, which means being semi-selfish in the morning.”

Aaron works out every day with one of his two trainers CNBC Make It

11 a.m. Appointment 1, Beverly Hills

While our work day doesn’t officially start until 11 a.m., Aaron has been taking phone calls all morning, from home and the car. Most of the calls concern a listing party he’s hosting tonight at a $65 million mansion. His team has put a lot of time and money into the event and 200 people are expected to come, but there’s a fire in the area that’s already closed down major roads. Aaron’s trying to decide whether it’s appropriate to host the party and is having his team monitor the situation throughout the morning so he can make a final call by 1 p.m. He puts the decision on hold during his appointments. The first is with a property developer who’s interested in hiring Aaron to sell a multimillion-dollar home he and his brother built. It’s their first time meeting and they’ll have a few more walk-throughs before deciding whether to move forward.

The first property we visit is a $15.5 million home in the heart of the Beverly Hills flats Juwan Li / Marc Angeles

Aaron has a lot of meetings like this, in which sellers are “interviewing” him to sell their property. It’s a two-way street, though: Aaron is also interviewing the seller to make sure they’ll be a good match.

12:30 p.m. Appointments 2 and 3, Beverly Hills

We’re already running late for several appointments, but it doesn’t phase Aaron. He simply makes a few phone calls to his assistants, who will push back his schedule. Our next two meetings are with clients whose homes are nearly ready to put on the market — one will be listed for about $20 million and the other for about $33 million. Aaron does a walk-through of both to assess the staging.

The second property we visit, a 6-bed, 9.5 bath listed for $19.995 million Matthew Momberger

He’s very pleased with some design aspects and highly unimpressed with others — and he doesn’t hold back when offering feedback. His commentary ranges from “Love, love, love, love.” to “Hate the chandelier. We gotta get this down.” to “Everything is disgusting,” which was his gut reaction to one particular home theater.

The third home we visit is an 8-bed, 12-bath listed for $33.4 million Juwan Li

Besides helping stage the home, another important part of his job is advising the seller on how to pick a fair price for the property. “In today’s market, we really want to price houses exactly where they should be because that’s how we get the highest number,” he tells me. “If a seller prices too high, it sits on the market and we have to go to them and ask for a reduction. We don’t want that. We want to sell the house for what it’s worth and get them on their way.” While Aaron can make price suggestions, at the end of the day, it’s the seller who makes the final call.

2:15 p.m. Appointments 3 and 4, Bel Air

Between meetings, we’re in the car, which acts as Aaron’s second office. “My car time is my work time,” he tells me. “It’s the only time we can really catch up on phone calls because we’re usually so back-to-back on appointments.” Our final two appointments are in Bel Air — specifically, at the Bel Air Golf Club. “This is where the big money LA is,” Aaron tells me. “Houses are huge. The biggest sales we have in LA are here.” We spend just 20 minutes at the first property. It’s still under construction and the seller has a lot of work to do, but just seeing the view from the infinity pool is enough to tell that this home will eventually come with a fat sticker price.

This particular property still has a lot of work to be done, but the infinity pool is in nice shape CNBC Make It

The last appointment of the day is with a potential buyer: He’s a billionaire interested in a $65 million mansion. It’s the home where Aaron’s listing party was supposed to take place. He made the decision to cancel it because he felt it would be insensitive to host a fun event while neighboring communities were dealing with a destructive fire. Additionally, the theme of the event was fire and water and there were supposed to be fire dancers performing. “That would have been a PR nightmare,” he says. “In real estate, when you’re at the top of the game like we are, people like to talk and read and write and so we have to be very cautious with our approach. Anything we do can make the news.” Working with the super rich is part of Aaron’s day-to-day. Surprisingly, they’re also some of his more frugal clients, he tells me: “Ironically, I’ve noticed that sometimes the more money people have, the less they want to spend it, so getting these deals through can be a challenge.” I can’t tag along to meet the billionaire buyer because NDAs have been signed, but Aaron shows me the property after they chat. It’s a 28,000-square-foot masterpiece with nine beds, 17 baths, a moat and 160-foot swimming pool.

The last property we see is a resort-like oasis Juwan Li / Marc Angeles

It even has a full-service hair and nail salon in the master suite.

Features in this $65 million mansion include a hair and nail salon Juwan Li / Marc Angeles

4:30 p.m. Lunch break and team meetings

Our last stop of the day is Aaron’s office, where his entire AKG team is based. It’s in Beverly Hills, not too far from his home where we began the day. “The secret of Los Angeles is working close to where you live,” he tells me. “That way you’re not stuck in traffic for hours and hours.” He has a brief moment to eat his first real meal of the day (pasta and chicken) before stepping into a tech meeting. Finally, around 5:30 p.m., he can check in face-to-face with his assistants and office manager, who help run his business and life. “People don’t realize that behind every person who’s very successful there’s a team of people who drive that support system,” he tells me. “I wouldn’t survive day in and day out if I didn’t have somebody doing my emails, my calendar, my marketing, my advertising, my technology.”

People don’t realize that behind every person who’s very successful there’s a team of people who drive that support system. Aaron Kirman real estate agent, star of CNBC’s “Listing Impossible”

Aaron has a personal assistant, whose day starts when his does. After delivering his morning coffee to his home, she’ll do everything from feeding and walking his dogs to restocking his fridge to filling up his gas tank. Other assistants handle the phone calls that come into his office, the hundreds of emails he gets a day and all of his schedule changes. It’s already been a full day, but he hasn’t done any “actual work,” he says. “This is where the business is actually going to get done,” Aaron tells me from his corner office. Before diving into the financials of the company and other business tasks with his office manager, he grabs a bag of Pirate’s Booty for a snack. An assistant brings him an English tea, which is a new part of his evening routine. “At the end of the day my voice sounds like my Grandma and it sounds like I have nodules even though I don’t,” says Aaron. He’s hoping the tea helps with that.

7 p.m. The day wraps


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, real, tells, work, luxury, makes, day, million, super, morning, property, estate, properties, selling, life, rich, aaron, millions, team


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Gwyneth Paltrow: Selling Goop products on Amazon wouldn’t ‘be good for us’

Gwyneth Paltrow may be a fan of Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos as a business person, but you won’t see Goop products on his site anytime soon, Paltrow tells Julia Boorstin in an interview with CNBC Make It. “One of the special things about Goop is it’s mostly direct-to-consumer, [and] that we choose the channels carefully,” the Goop founder and CEO said when asked if she would sell Goop products on Amazon. “We’ve been wrestling with the idea of if we should have a wholesale partner or if we should keep i


Gwyneth Paltrow may be a fan of Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos as a business person, but you won’t see Goop products on his site anytime soon, Paltrow tells Julia Boorstin in an interview with CNBC Make It.
“One of the special things about Goop is it’s mostly direct-to-consumer, [and] that we choose the channels carefully,” the Goop founder and CEO said when asked if she would sell Goop products on Amazon.
“We’ve been wrestling with the idea of if we should have a wholesale partner or if we should keep i
Gwyneth Paltrow: Selling Goop products on Amazon wouldn’t ‘be good for us’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gwyneth, amazon, business, think, goop, wouldnt, told, products, ceo, paltrow, selling, good, wellness, bezos


Gwyneth Paltrow: Selling Goop products on Amazon wouldn't 'be good for us'

Gwyneth Paltrow may be a fan of Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos as a business person, but you won’t see Goop products on his site anytime soon, Paltrow tells Julia Boorstin in an interview with CNBC Make It.

“One of the special things about Goop is it’s mostly direct-to-consumer, [and] that we choose the channels carefully,” the Goop founder and CEO said when asked if she would sell Goop products on Amazon.

“I don’t think a marketplace would be good for us, but I admire the business so much,” she tells CNBC Make It.

Goop, which began in 2008 as a travel and lifestyle newsletter sells high-end beauty, fashion, wellness and home products, including Goop’s in-house line of dietary supplements, skincare and clothing, which is company’s fastest-growing revenue stream, Forbes reported in 2018.

And while Paltrow doesn’t think Amazon is the right place for Goop’s luxury goods (and other luxury retailers agree), she recently announced that brand would begin selling its Goop-branded $60 detoxifying tonics, $90 vitamin blends and other wellness and beauty products at Sephora stores.

“We’ve been wrestling with the idea of if we should have a wholesale partner or if we should keep it all direct to consumer,” Paltrow told CNBC Make It. “And I think that when the Sephora opportunity presented itself it was just too good of an opportunity to reach a new customer.”

Still, Paltrow would “really love” something from Bezos: a half hour of his time “to pick his brain about e-commerce” and ask him “dorky” questions about the business, Paltrow told CNBC Make It.

Paltrow has previously said she is “fascinated” by the way that the richest man in the world runs his business.

Paltrow once cold-called the Amazon CEO in hopes that she could ask how he has tenaciously entered markets from grocery to healthcare.

“[H]e sort of gives himself license at every turn to go into every business and I would want to psychologically understand the why and the engine behind that,” Paltrow said at South by Southwest in March.

Though the two did eventually connect over email, Paltrow says Bezos didn’t respond after she asked for a sit down.

Of course, Goop seems to be doing just fine without Bezos’ help — the company was valued at $250 million in 2018, according to The New York Times.

However Goop has received some backlash over the years for promoting controversial and potentially harmful products or treatments under the guise of “wellness. In October 2018, Goop settled a $145,000 lawsuit for selling $66 vaginal jade eggs “whose advertised medical claims were not supported by competent and reliable science.”

“[T]o generalize and say there’s been controversy around us I don’t think is quite fair, especially when you look at other businesses and some of the hot water they’ve gotten into along the way,” Paltrow told CNBC Make It.

“We’re really just trying to move culture forward, especially as it comes to women,” she says, adding the company has since hired an in-house regulatory team to vet scientific claims.

-Reporting by Julia Boorstin

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gwyneth, amazon, business, think, goop, wouldnt, told, products, ceo, paltrow, selling, good, wellness, bezos


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Your old VCRs, VHS tapes, and video games could help you make easy money

Several VHS tapes sold on eBay for more than $10,000, according to a study based on all transactions on eBay.com between 2017-2019. Many of the most valuable tapes were unopened copies of Disney movies like “Toy Story,” “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,” and “Beauty and the Beast.” In the days of on-demand streaming services, it may come as a surprise that people are paying top dollar for old VHS tapes. “People are kind of hoping for a simpler time, and that’s where things like VHS tapes come in


Several VHS tapes sold on eBay for more than $10,000, according to a study based on all transactions on eBay.com between 2017-2019.
Many of the most valuable tapes were unopened copies of Disney movies like “Toy Story,” “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,” and “Beauty and the Beast.”
In the days of on-demand streaming services, it may come as a surprise that people are paying top dollar for old VHS tapes.
“People are kind of hoping for a simpler time, and that’s where things like VHS tapes come in
Your old VCRs, VHS tapes, and video games could help you make easy money Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07  Authors: ivana pino
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, games, item, easy, items, money, old, vhs, thats, good, vcrs, video, valuable, selling, tapes, help, sherwood


Your old VCRs, VHS tapes, and video games could help you make easy money

The new year is a great time to do away with any clutter that you may have lying around. But don’t be so quick to toss old and unused items in the donation bin. Several VHS tapes sold on eBay for more than $10,000, according to a study based on all transactions on eBay.com between 2017-2019. Many of the most valuable tapes were unopened copies of Disney movies like “Toy Story,” “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,” and “Beauty and the Beast.” In the days of on-demand streaming services, it may come as a surprise that people are paying top dollar for old VHS tapes. But Lisa Sherwood, senior marketing consultant at Perficient Digital, suggests that the nostalgia factor that comes with these items is a key part of their earning potential. “People are kind of flocking back to stuff from the ’80s and ’90s,” says Sherwood. “People are kind of hoping for a simpler time, and that’s where things like VHS tapes come in and do well.” If you’ve saved favorite items from your childhood, here’s how they can help you make some extra cash.

Take stock of what you have

Do an inventory of what’s stashed away in your home or storage unit — or, if your parents kept some of your childhood favorites at their house, explore their attic or basement, where you may have piles of old records, toys, baseball cards, flip phones, movies, and other items. If you stumble across something you think may be valuable, Sherwood says, do a little research online to determine if it has any resale value. “Be as specific as possible, and look at how much other people are selling that item for. That’s a good guideline for what you might be able to get.”

Look at how much other people are selling that item for. That’s a good guideline for what you might be able to get. Lisa Sherwood senior marketing consultant at Perficient Digital

While most of the items you unearth probably aren’t very valuable, being in possession of the “right, rare thing” could be great, says Sherwood. Items like the Atari E.T. video game are selling for over $1 million while a 1990 Jose Uribe baseball card is going for over $8 million. On the lower end of the spectrum, some Barbie dolls from the start of the millennium can sell for $200 or more. As you’re rummaging through your belongings, keep an eye out for popular items that were unique to their time but are no longer on the market. “It’s not like every item is going to be worth a ton, but if the item is in good condition and they might bring back a bit of nostalgia for people, those might have value,” says Sherwood.

Market your items wisely


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07  Authors: ivana pino
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, games, item, easy, items, money, old, vhs, thats, good, vcrs, video, valuable, selling, tapes, help, sherwood


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GOP Sen. Grassley turns to House Speaker Pelosi for help selling his bipartisan drug pricing bill

Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley is turning to Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for help selling his bipartisan bill to lower drug prices in the Senate. Grassley told CNBC on Tuesday that he wants to convince Pelosi to abandon her drug pricing bill, passed by the House in December, and support his legislation. We have bipartisan support in the Senate.” Grassley, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, worked with ranking Democrat Ron Wyden of Oregon to pass a broad drug pricing bill through


Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley is turning to Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for help selling his bipartisan bill to lower drug prices in the Senate.
Grassley told CNBC on Tuesday that he wants to convince Pelosi to abandon her drug pricing bill, passed by the House in December, and support his legislation.
We have bipartisan support in the Senate.”
Grassley, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, worked with ranking Democrat Ron Wyden of Oregon to pass a broad drug pricing bill through
GOP Sen. Grassley turns to House Speaker Pelosi for help selling his bipartisan drug pricing bill Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, drug, wants, turns, sen, pricing, gop, pelosi, support, republicans, house, grassley, selling, senate, bipartisan, prices, help, bill, speaker


GOP Sen. Grassley turns to House Speaker Pelosi for help selling his bipartisan drug pricing bill

Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley is turning to Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for help selling his bipartisan bill to lower drug prices in the Senate.

Grassley told CNBC on Tuesday that he wants to convince Pelosi to abandon her drug pricing bill, passed by the House in December, and support his legislation. He argued that there’s “no other bill that can get the 60 votes required” to pass the Senate. The Iowa senator said Pelosi’s bill, which would allow the government to negotiate lower prices for certain drugs, does not stand a chance in the GOP-controlled upper chamber.

Pelosi’s support would put “pressure on the leadership of the United States Senate to get our bill up,” Grassley said on “Squawk Box.” “The president supports it. We have bipartisan support in the Senate.”

A spokesman for Pelosi’s office did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Grassley, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, worked with ranking Democrat Ron Wyden of Oregon to pass a broad drug pricing bill through their committee in July. High prescription drug costs have become a rare bipartisan issue, drawing support from both Republicans and Democrats in Congress and the Trump administration. Health care remains a top issue for voters ahead of the 2020 election.

Grassley’s bill would make changes to Medicare by adding an out-of-pocket maximum for beneficiaries and capping drug price increases at the rate of inflation, among other measures. The bill has been stalled due to lack of support from Senate Republicans.

Last month, Grassley accused Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, who has not scheduled the bill for a vote, of sabotaging it. During a briefing with reporters on Dec. 18, Grassley said that “the president wants it” but more Republicans don’t support it because McConnell “asked them not to.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, drug, wants, turns, sen, pricing, gop, pelosi, support, republicans, house, grassley, selling, senate, bipartisan, prices, help, bill, speaker


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5 tips to help you earn more cash while cleaning out your closet

If you choose to resell your unwanted items, cleaning out your home may help you add some extra dollars to your 2020 budget. Here are five strategies shopping and resale experts recommend you employ to help you get the most money for any items you’re looking to part with. Even if you’re selling used devices, it never hurts to give that old phone or tablet a quick clean to show off its prime condition. “Poshmark is more time intensive because in order to sell items fast you need to share them to


If you choose to resell your unwanted items, cleaning out your home may help you add some extra dollars to your 2020 budget.
Here are five strategies shopping and resale experts recommend you employ to help you get the most money for any items you’re looking to part with.
Even if you’re selling used devices, it never hurts to give that old phone or tablet a quick clean to show off its prime condition.
“Poshmark is more time intensive because in order to sell items fast you need to share them to
5 tips to help you earn more cash while cleaning out your closet Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, resale, selling, cash, need, youre, closet, items, cleaning, earn, thredup, brands, help, sell, best, poshmark, tips


5 tips to help you earn more cash while cleaning out your closet

If you’re like many Americans, kicking off the new year right means spending time decluttering your home and cleaning out the closets and junk drawers that inevitably fill up throughout the year. That may even include a few unwanted holiday gifts that you haven’t yet found a place for. If you choose to resell your unwanted items, cleaning out your home may help you add some extra dollars to your 2020 budget. Here are five strategies shopping and resale experts recommend you employ to help you get the most money for any items you’re looking to part with.

1. Clean and repair before you sell

Clothes you plan to resell should be undamaged and in-season. “You’ll likely have less luck sending bathing suits and summer sandals in January,” Sam Blumenthal, spokesperson for resale site thredUP, tells CNBC Make It.

Make sure the clothes are clean and in the best possible condition. “We recommend laundering or steaming your items, removing any stains and mending things such as loose buttons,” Blumenthal says. “Being unclean is one of the top reasons items get rejected.” Even if you’re selling used devices, it never hurts to give that old phone or tablet a quick clean to show off its prime condition.

2. Understand how it works

If you’re new to the resale game, take some time to browse your options. There are dozens of popular resale sites and apps, which include everything from general interest places like eBay, Facebook Marketplace and Mercari, to clothing-specific ones such as Poshmark and thredUP, to tech and device hubs like Decluttr. That’s in addition to the more traditional outlets like resale and consignment shops. No matter where you go to sell your things, you need to understand how the selling process works and how you’re getting paid. Poshmark gives you the power to set your prices, whereas thredUP determines what clothing it will accept and the price its team expects it will sell best at. There is also a cost to using these services, typically through lower payouts, commissions or upfront fees. When items are sold on Poshmark for $15 or less, the app charges sellers $2.95. Anything selling for more than $15 gives the app a 20% commission. In comparison, eBay typically charges 35 cents to list most items (the first 50 items you list are free) and while commissions vary, most sellers pay eBay about 10% of the final cost of the item. It may also help to research how much time, on average, the process will take with different services, as well as how much time you’ll need to devote to make sure things sell. Currently, thredUP estimates it will take about two weeks to process orders or you can pay an extra $16 to guarantee you’ll get it processed within one week. On Poshmark, the timing can vary widely because it is a social sharing app, Lauren Greutman, a frugal living expert and founder of LaurenGreutman.com, tells CNBC Make It. In order for you to sell an item quickly, you need to share it during the day to followers of your account, she says. Poshmark also has multiple “Posh Parties” per day that curate sales for specific types of items or brands. If your listing is pulled into one of these, you have a greater chance at selling. “EBay is easier in the sense that you can just list and forget about it,” Greutman says. “Poshmark is more time intensive because in order to sell items fast you need to share them to your followers during the day.”

3. Find out what sells best

If you’re really looking to maximize your potential profits, you need to find out which items and brands sell best. You may love that quirky skirt from a popular Instagram brand, but that doesn’t mean it will sell. For those considering thredUp, the service offers a handy seller’s guide that outlines what types of clothing are hot items right now, such as fashionable activewear and designer shoes and handbags. Blumenthal says the most popular brands on thredUP include The North Face, Lululemon and Kate Spade, along with luxury brands such as Gucci, Prada and Burberry. In general, Greutman says brands that have a “cult following,” like Lululemon and Anthropologie, almost always sell easily. Current styles are also a good bet. To find out what sells the best, Greutman uses the website shopbop.com and checks out what they have listed. YouTube also has a lot of great tutorials on brands to look for, she adds.

During the latest holiday season, Decluttr reports the hottest selling tech items included phones such as the iPhone 8 Plus, iPhone X and Samsung S9, as well as the Apple Watch Series 4 GPS + Cellular 44 and the PS4 (500GB) gaming system. “It seems gamers are cashing in whilst trade in-prices are at a high,” Liam Howley, CMO at Decluttr, says, adding that there’s a “jam-packed gaming release schedule” around the corner in 2020 that will likely cause the cost of these systems to drop once newer versions are on sale. If you’re looking to unload an old phone, check out SellCell.com, which compares prices from all the leading cell phone buyers in the U.S. The site offers an easy way to compare prices, but only on phones.

4. Determine how important convenience is to you

When it comes to selling your unwanted items, you may have to put in quite a lot of work to really get the most money for your stuff. If you’re looking to unload things quickly and conveniently, you may not get the best price. Many resale sites and apps are designed to focus on convenience. “It’s important for sellers to keep in mind that thredUP is the most convenient place for women to clean out everything in their closet — from GAP to Gucci — not necessarily the place they will make the most money (since thredUP does all the work for you!),” Blumenthal says. Many tech-centric resale sites also focus on convenience, rather than getting you the best possible price. With TargetTrade-In.com, you can trade in your unwanted electronics — from phones and tablets to game consoles and voice speakers — for a Target gift card. But an unlocked iPhone 6 with 64GB of storage in working condition nets you just $13.76 on the site, compared to $59 on Decluttr.

5. Create a specific and appealing listing


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, resale, selling, cash, need, youre, closet, items, cleaning, earn, thredup, brands, help, sell, best, poshmark, tips


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How Richard Branson started Virgin Atlantic with a blackboard selling $39 flights

And for billionaire Richard Branson, it’s no different. Only when the British entrepreneur was met with a cancelled flight in the early 80s, it inspired another response, too: A new business idea. Branson — already a successful businessman, having formed Virgin Records some years earlier — was due to fly to the British Virgin Islands to be reunited with a “lovely lady” on his private Necker Island, when his American Airlines flight was suddenly cancelled. “I was livid because I hadn’t seen her f


And for billionaire Richard Branson, it’s no different.
Only when the British entrepreneur was met with a cancelled flight in the early 80s, it inspired another response, too: A new business idea.
Branson — already a successful businessman, having formed Virgin Records some years earlier — was due to fly to the British Virgin Islands to be reunited with a “lovely lady” on his private Necker Island, when his American Airlines flight was suddenly cancelled.
“I was livid because I hadn’t seen her f
How Richard Branson started Virgin Atlantic with a blackboard selling $39 flights Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-30  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, flights, started, suddenly, seen, successful, solution, british, selling, richard, branson, blackboard, flight, virgin, atlantic, weeks


How Richard Branson started Virgin Atlantic with a blackboard selling $39 flights

A canceled flight, in many of us, inspires frustration and anger. And for billionaire Richard Branson, it’s no different.

Only when the British entrepreneur was met with a cancelled flight in the early 80s, it inspired another response, too: A new business idea.

Branson — already a successful businessman, having formed Virgin Records some years earlier — was due to fly to the British Virgin Islands to be reunited with a “lovely lady” on his private Necker Island, when his American Airlines flight was suddenly cancelled.

“I was livid because I hadn’t seen her for three weeks,” Branson recalled in an interview with CNBC for “The Brave Ones” podcast.

So, he did as all good entrepreneurs do, and looked for a solution.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-30  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, flights, started, suddenly, seen, successful, solution, british, selling, richard, branson, blackboard, flight, virgin, atlantic, weeks


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How it’s become cheaper and easier for everyday people to invest over the last 10 years

People have been buying and selling shares of companies in the U.S. for hundreds of years, but changes over the past 10 years especially have made it cheaper and easier than ever for ordinary people to invest in the stock market. Since the late 1700s, traders working at the New York Stock Exchange have executed trades on behalf of all types of customers. Peter Tuchman has had a front row seat to the more recent changes: He’s been buying and selling stocks at the New York Stock Exchange since the


People have been buying and selling shares of companies in the U.S. for hundreds of years, but changes over the past 10 years especially have made it cheaper and easier than ever for ordinary people to invest in the stock market.
Since the late 1700s, traders working at the New York Stock Exchange have executed trades on behalf of all types of customers.
Peter Tuchman has had a front row seat to the more recent changes: He’s been buying and selling stocks at the New York Stock Exchange since the
How it’s become cheaper and easier for everyday people to invest over the last 10 years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-27  Authors: anna-louise jackson, elizabeth grace saunders
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, everyday, buying, funds, invest, easier, money, stock, exchange, investing, past, market, cheaper, selling


How it's become cheaper and easier for everyday people to invest over the last 10 years

People have been buying and selling shares of companies in the U.S. for hundreds of years, but changes over the past 10 years especially have made it cheaper and easier than ever for ordinary people to invest in the stock market. Since the late 1700s, traders working at the New York Stock Exchange have executed trades on behalf of all types of customers. By the 1970s, computers helped to revolutionize how stocks were bought and sold, and the Nasdaq exchange was founded as the world’s first electronic stock market. Peter Tuchman has had a front row seat to the more recent changes: He’s been buying and selling stocks at the New York Stock Exchange since the 1980s. He misses the old days when buying and selling was conducted by the individuals who worked at the exchanges. “I would much prefer to scream and yell,” Tuchman says. “I prefer the open outcry approach.” Nowadays, a vast majority of trading is executed electronically. And that’s been a huge shift for ordinary investors.

Video by David Fang Here are two key ways buying and selling stocks has changed in the last 10 years.

Investing is cheaper than ever

The price of just about everything, from coffee and airfare to big-ticket costs like education, child care, and health care, has gone up over the past decade. It’s rare that anything becomes cheaper over a 10-year span. Investing in the market is a major exception. Back in 2009, brokerages were charging anywhere from $9.99 to $19.95 per transaction to buy and sell stocks online. As of earlier this year, the cost of investing had effectively been eliminated. In the span of a few weeks, a handful of brokers announced that they would make it free to trade most U.S. stocks and exchange-traded funds (ETFs) online, matching some companies that were already at $0. The past decade has also seen robo-advisors flourish. These automated investment services are typically low-cost by nature, and they make it easy to get started investing with very little money. They’re also gaining in popularity. Between 2017 and 2019, the amount of money under management by robo-advisors worldwide has more than tripled, from about $240 billion to $980 billion, according to figures compiled by Statista. And the industry is projected to grow to more than $2 trillion by 2022. As a result, experts don’t see stock-trading costs going up again any time soon.

Index funds now rule the market

This year, for the first time ever, the amount of money invested in funds that track the market surpassed the amount managed by people who pick stocks, according to data from research firm Morningstar. Index funds have become so popular because they simplify investing by making it easy to invest in the broader market rather than in individual stocks. These funds track the performance of a particular market index, like the S&P 500, allowing investors to buy a lot of stocks at once and hold them for the long term — and for far less associated costs than buying each one individually. They’re also an easy way to add diversification to your portfolio.

Index funds, a form of passive investing, often include exchange-traded funds (ETFs). Accounting firm PwC estimates that, in 2018, 36% of money in the market was invested in such passive funds. And the number of ETFs has nearly tripled since 2009, according to figures from Statista.

What hasn’t changed about investing in stocks


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-27  Authors: anna-louise jackson, elizabeth grace saunders
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, everyday, buying, funds, invest, easier, money, stock, exchange, investing, past, market, cheaper, selling


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Travis Kalanick severs all ties with Uber, departing board and selling all his shares

In a statement Tuesday, Uber said Kalanick, 43, is leaving to “focus on his new business and philanthropic endeavors.” An Uber spokesperson said the ride-hailing company has “strong director candidates to put forward at the appropriate time.” By exiting the board and dumping his stake, Kalanick has severed his last ties from the company he co-founded. Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said in the release that he was “enormously grateful for Travis’ vision and tenacity while building Uber.” Kalanick had


In a statement Tuesday, Uber said Kalanick, 43, is leaving to “focus on his new business and philanthropic endeavors.”
An Uber spokesperson said the ride-hailing company has “strong director candidates to put forward at the appropriate time.”
By exiting the board and dumping his stake, Kalanick has severed his last ties from the company he co-founded.
Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said in the release that he was “enormously grateful for Travis’ vision and tenacity while building Uber.”
Kalanick had
Travis Kalanick severs all ties with Uber, departing board and selling all his shares Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-24  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, shares, selling, stake, departing, sold, ceo, board, stock, severs, ties, travis, kalanick, uber, company, spokesperson


Travis Kalanick severs all ties with Uber, departing board and selling all his shares

Former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick will step down from the board, effective Dec. 31, and a spokesperson said Tuesday he has sold all of his stock in the ride-hailing company he co-founded 10 years ago.

It’s unclear how much Kalanick’s total stake is worth, but the latest public filings show it’s about $2.5 billion.

In a statement Tuesday, Uber said Kalanick, 43, is leaving to “focus on his new business and philanthropic endeavors.” Kalanick is launching latest venture, CloudKitchens, which rents out space to restaurateurs for delivery-based businesses.

Uber did not say who will fill Kalanick’s board seat. An Uber spokesperson said the ride-hailing company has “strong director candidates to put forward at the appropriate time.”

Later, a spokesperson for Kalanick confirmed to CNBC that he has sold his entire stake in Uber.

By exiting the board and dumping his stake, Kalanick has severed his last ties from the company he co-founded. Kalanick was ousted as CEO in 2017 over concerns he had fostered an unhealthy workplace environment but remained on the board. He was at the New York Stock Exchange during the company’s IPO in May, though he was not on the dais with company executives.

Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said in the release that he was “enormously grateful for Travis’ vision and tenacity while building Uber.” On stage at The New York Times Dealbook conference in November, Khosrowshahi told interviewer Andrew Ross Sorkin that Kalanick has been “supportive” of Khosrowshahi’s leadership. He added that Kalanick has opinions about Uber’s different businesses, but generally the two of them are “aligned with the direction of the company.”

“Uber has been a part of my life for the past 10 years,” Kalanick said in the release. “At the close of the decade, and with the company now public, it seems like the right moment for me to focus on my current business and philanthropic pursuits. I’m proud of all that Uber has achieved, and I will continue to cheer for its future from the sidelines. I want to thank the board, Dara and the entire Uber team for everything they have done to further the Uber mission.”

Kalanick had been systematically selling his stake in Uber since the company’s stock lockup period expired last month. Other former executives, including co-founder Garrett Camp, have sold shares as well, but not at the scale that Kalanick has.

Shares of Uber were up 1.3% in morning trading Tuesday.

–CNBC’s Ellen Egeth and Hugh son contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-24  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, shares, selling, stake, departing, sold, ceo, board, stock, severs, ties, travis, kalanick, uber, company, spokesperson


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