Biden goes after Warren and Sanders on health care in third Democratic primary debate

Former Vice President Joe Biden wasted no time in taking swings at his two biggest threats in the 2020 Democratic primary. Then he called the single-payer health care plan that Sanders and Warren support too expensive. He again highlighted that he “wrote the damn bill” and moved the discussion forward on single-payer health care. The senator argued “we need a health care system that guarantees health care for all people.” At one point, Biden questioned Sanders, a democratic socialist, over his p


Former Vice President Joe Biden wasted no time in taking swings at his two biggest threats in the 2020 Democratic primary. Then he called the single-payer health care plan that Sanders and Warren support too expensive. He again highlighted that he “wrote the damn bill” and moved the discussion forward on single-payer health care. The senator argued “we need a health care system that guarantees health care for all people.” At one point, Biden questioned Sanders, a democratic socialist, over his p
Biden goes after Warren and Sanders on health care in third Democratic primary debate Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-12  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sanders, plan, biden, warren, care, primary, president, health, sen, democratic, vice, debate, goes


Biden goes after Warren and Sanders on health care in third Democratic primary debate

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT), former Vice President Joe Biden, and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) interact on stage during the Democratic Presidential Debate at Texas Southern University’s Health and PE Center on September 12, 2019 in Houston, Texas.

Former Vice President Joe Biden wasted no time in taking swings at his two biggest threats in the 2020 Democratic primary.

Asked during Thursday’s debate whether Sens. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., had gone too far with their sweeping proposals, Biden first said “that’ll be for voters to decide.” Then he zeroed in on “Medicare for All” plans — perhaps the biggest dividing line among contenders to take on President Donald Trump next year.

Flanked by Sanders and Warren at center stage, the former vice president said he was “for Barack” — tying himself to the president under whom he served and the increasingly popular Affordable Care Act he helped to pass. Then he called the single-payer health care plan that Sanders and Warren support too expensive.

Biden said Warren “has not indicated how she pays for” the government-run plan. He argued Sanders “gets about halfway there.”

Without criticizing each other, Warren and Sanders defended the merits of their health care proposals. Warren said “we all owe a huge debt to President Obama.” She also said that, despite likely tax increases for many families, overall “costs are going to go up” for wealthy individuals and corporations and go down for middle-class families.

Sanders also called Medicare for All “the most cost-effective approach.” He again highlighted that he “wrote the damn bill” and moved the discussion forward on single-payer health care. The senator argued “we need a health care system that guarantees health care for all people.”

The issue, which voters consistently list as the most important in the 2020 election, dominated more than a half hour of discussion at the start of the debate. Biden, Sanders and Warren — the three candidates who have stood out from the field in most polling — got the most speaking time on health care as they got chances to rebut other contenders’ attacks.

At one point, Biden questioned Sanders, a democratic socialist, over his plan that would have companies return their health care savings to workers. The senator responded that he thought they will. Biden shot back: “For a socialist, you’ve got a lot more confidence in corporate America than I do.”

Both Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., and South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg criticized Medicare for All as going too far. Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., instead said Democrats’ health care discussions were giving Americans a “headache.” She argued Democrats should focus on Trump’s past efforts to repeal Obamacare.

At various points, candidates praised Obama. Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro used the former president — whose association with Biden has been a major part of his vice president’s campaign — to hit the Democratic frontrunner.

“I am fulfilling the legacy of Barack Obama, and you’re not,” Castro, who served in Obama’s Cabinet, said.

“That’ll be a surprise to him,” Biden rebutted.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-12  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sanders, plan, biden, warren, care, primary, president, health, sen, democratic, vice, debate, goes


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Cramer: Wall Street executives are saying Elizabeth Warren’s 2020 bid has ‘got to be stopped’

The financial community is really worried about the possibility of Sen. Elizabeth Warren becoming president, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said on Tuesday. “When you get off the desk and talk to executives, they’re more fearful of her winning,” Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street.” He said he’s hearing a “she’s got to be stopped” mantra bubbling up among corporate executives. “It would be a sub-optimal situation for the banks” if Warren were to win the Democratic nomination, he added. CNBC’s David Faber to


The financial community is really worried about the possibility of Sen. Elizabeth Warren becoming president, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said on Tuesday. “When you get off the desk and talk to executives, they’re more fearful of her winning,” Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street.” He said he’s hearing a “she’s got to be stopped” mantra bubbling up among corporate executives. “It would be a sub-optimal situation for the banks” if Warren were to win the Democratic nomination, he added. CNBC’s David Faber to
Cramer: Wall Street executives are saying Elizabeth Warren’s 2020 bid has ‘got to be stopped’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cramer, stopped, warren, shes, sen, squawk, street, president, executives, warrens, saying, 2020, win, hes, elizabeth, presidential, wall, bid


Cramer: Wall Street executives are saying Elizabeth Warren's 2020 bid has 'got to be stopped'

The financial community is really worried about the possibility of Sen. Elizabeth Warren becoming president, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said on Tuesday.

“When you get off the desk and talk to executives, they’re more fearful of her winning,” Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street.” He said he’s hearing a “she’s got to be stopped” mantra bubbling up among corporate executives.

Warren, a champion of the left wing for her bank-bashing and wealth-taxing proposals, has been doing better at the polls in the crowded field of candidates vying for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination.

The Massachusetts senator is No. 2 in the Real Clear Politics polling average with 18% support. Former Vice President Joe Biden is first with nearly 30%, and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is third with almost 18%. No other candidate is even close breaking into the top three.

Warren is a “very compelling figure on the stump,” Cramer said, predicting that she’s going to win the first-in-the nation nominating contest in Iowa, set be held on Feb. 3, 2020. “It would be a sub-optimal situation for the banks” if Warren were to win the Democratic nomination, he added. President Donald Trump, while facing a few primary challengers, is expected to easily win the GOP presidential nomination.

CNBC’s David Faber told Cramer on Tuesday’s “Squawk on the Street” that he’s hearing the same rumblings about Wall Street being fearful of a Warren presidency.

“It’s another reason why companies are being implored to do things now … because come early to mid-2020 if Elizabeth Warren is rolling along, everybody is going to be like, ‘That’s it,'” Faber said.

In her latest interview with Cramer on his “Mad Money” show on CNBC, Warren said in January, “I want these billionaires to stop being freeloaders.” At the time, she was officially exploring a run for president.

Warren’s campaign did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cramer, stopped, warren, shes, sen, squawk, street, president, executives, warrens, saying, 2020, win, hes, elizabeth, presidential, wall, bid


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Sen. Joe Manchin will not run for West Virginia governor, ensuring Democrats keep a key seat

Senator Joe Manchin (D-WV) speaks to supporters at a campaign stop ahead of the 2018 midterm elections in Bridgeport, West Virginia, U.S., November 5, 2018. Sen. Joe Manchin will not run for governor of West Virginia, ensuring Democrats will keep a key Senate seat for a few more years. But he said he decided to stay in the Senate after considering “where [he] could be the most effective” for West Virginia. If Manchin left the Senate, his party could have a tough time winning his seat in West Vir


Senator Joe Manchin (D-WV) speaks to supporters at a campaign stop ahead of the 2018 midterm elections in Bridgeport, West Virginia, U.S., November 5, 2018. Sen. Joe Manchin will not run for governor of West Virginia, ensuring Democrats will keep a key Senate seat for a few more years. But he said he decided to stay in the Senate after considering “where [he] could be the most effective” for West Virginia. If Manchin left the Senate, his party could have a tough time winning his seat in West Vir
Sen. Joe Manchin will not run for West Virginia governor, ensuring Democrats keep a key seat Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-03  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, state, senator, priorities, west, governor, run, manchin, gop, key, democrats, virginia, joe, seats, sen, ensuring, seat, senate


Sen. Joe Manchin will not run for West Virginia governor, ensuring Democrats keep a key seat

Senator Joe Manchin (D-WV) speaks to supporters at a campaign stop ahead of the 2018 midterm elections in Bridgeport, West Virginia, U.S., November 5, 2018.

Sen. Joe Manchin will not run for governor of West Virginia, ensuring Democrats will keep a key Senate seat for a few more years.

The senator declined to challenge Republican Gov. Jim Justice next year, his spokesman said Tuesday. Manchin, considered one of the more centrist members of the Senate, won reelection to another six-year term last year.

In a statement Tuesday, the Democrat said he “loved” his stint as the state’s governor from 2004 to 2010. But he said he decided to stay in the Senate after considering “where [he] could be the most effective” for West Virginia.

“Ultimately, I believe my role as a U.S. Senator allows me to position our state for success for the rest of this century,” Manchin said, highlighting health care, energy and infrastructure as some of his top priorities in the Senate.

His presence is critical for Democrats as they push to take control of the chamber. If Manchin left the Senate, his party could have a tough time winning his seat in West Virginia. President Donald Trump carried the state by about 40 percentage points in 2016.

Republicans currently have a 53-47 edge in the Senate. The GOP has to defend 23 seats next year, while 12 Democratic seats are up for grabs.

Manchin stands among the Democrats most likely to vote with Trump’s priorities and confirm his Cabinet and judicial nominees. He has angered liberals by siding with the GOP on some abortion-related bills and by voting to confirm Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh last year. The senator has also done more to boost the flagging coal industry — which has a major presence in his state — than many Democrats would like.

Still, he has served as a buffer for his party against Republican legislative priorities. Manchin voted against a GOP plan to repeal parts of the Affordable Care Act in 2017 as the measure failed by only one vote.

The senator has touted his ability to work with Republicans, most recently in an effort to revive gun background check legislation authored with Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-03  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, state, senator, priorities, west, governor, run, manchin, gop, key, democrats, virginia, joe, seats, sen, ensuring, seat, senate


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Georgia GOP Sen. Johnny Isakson will resign at the end of the year due to health issues

Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., will resign at the end of the year as he faces various health problems. “It goes against every fiber of my being to leave in the middle of my Senate term, but I know it’s the right thing to do on behalf of my state.” Isakson has represented Georgia in the Senate since 2005. Democrats have flooded into the race for Perdue’s seat following a closer than expected gubernatorial race last year. “While she will not be a candidate herself, she is committed to helping Democra


Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., will resign at the end of the year as he faces various health problems. “It goes against every fiber of my being to leave in the middle of my Senate term, but I know it’s the right thing to do on behalf of my state.” Isakson has represented Georgia in the Senate since 2005. Democrats have flooded into the race for Perdue’s seat following a closer than expected gubernatorial race last year. “While she will not be a candidate herself, she is committed to helping Democra
Georgia GOP Sen. Johnny Isakson will resign at the end of the year due to health issues Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-28  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, resign, democrats, race, states, abrams, state, end, term, health, johnny, sen, senate, georgia, gop, seat, isakson, issues


Georgia GOP Sen. Johnny Isakson will resign at the end of the year due to health issues

Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., will resign at the end of the year as he faces various health problems.

In a statement Wednesday, the 74-year-old lawmaker said his Parkinson’s disease has advanced. In addition, he has undergone physical therapy following a fall in July and had a procedure to remove a growth on his kidney this week.

“With the mounting health challenges I am facing, I have concluded that I will not be able to do the job over the long term in the manner the citizens of Georgia deserve,” Isakson said. “It goes against every fiber of my being to leave in the middle of my Senate term, but I know it’s the right thing to do on behalf of my state.”

Isakson has represented Georgia in the Senate since 2005. His term ends in January 2023.

The senator’s departure creates another potentially competitive race as Republicans and Democrats fight for control of the chamber — and the next president’s legislative agenda — next year. Democrats have already targeted incumbent Republican Sen. David Perdue, who faces reelection in 2020.

Georgia’s Republican Gov. Brian Kemp will appoint a successor, then the state will hold an election for the Senate seat in 2020, said Tess Hammock, a spokeswoman for the Georgia secretary of state’s office.

A special election for his seat would draw intense national interest as Republicans try to defend their 53-47 majority in the Senate.

Democrats have flooded into the race for Perdue’s seat following a closer than expected gubernatorial race last year. Kemp beat former state House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams by about 1.5 percentage points, giving Democrats hopes of making Georgia into a Senate or even presidential battleground in 2020.

Democrats who hope to challenge Perdue include former lieutenant governor candidate Sarah Riggs Amico and former Columbus Mayor Teresa Tomlinson.

Abrams declined to jump into the Democratic primary despite prodding from national party leaders. She now could face pressure to run for Isakson’s seat, as well. 

Abrams quickly shot down speculation about a Senate run.

“Leader Abrams’ focus will not change: she will lead voter protection efforts in key states across the country, and make sure Democrats are successful in Georgia in 2020,” a spokesman for the former Georgia lawmaker said. “While she will not be a candidate herself, she is committed to helping Democratic candidates win both Senate races next year.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-28  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, resign, democrats, race, states, abrams, state, end, term, health, johnny, sen, senate, georgia, gop, seat, isakson, issues


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2020 candidates face a critical debate deadline. Here’s what happens if they miss it

Days before Wednesday’s deadline to qualify for the fall presidential primary debates, Democratic candidates teetering below the threshold are scrambling to make the grade. Missing the debate could cripple campaigns struggling to survive in the crowded field — 23 are still vying to become the 2020 nominee. Candidates need at least 2% support in at least four polls approved by the Democratic National Committee and 130,000 unique donors to secure a spot. “There’s no better opportunity, no bigger o


Days before Wednesday’s deadline to qualify for the fall presidential primary debates, Democratic candidates teetering below the threshold are scrambling to make the grade. Missing the debate could cripple campaigns struggling to survive in the crowded field — 23 are still vying to become the 2020 nominee. Candidates need at least 2% support in at least four polls approved by the Democratic National Committee and 130,000 unique donors to secure a spot. “There’s no better opportunity, no bigger o
2020 candidates face a critical debate deadline. Here’s what happens if they miss it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-22  Authors: jordan mcdonald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 2020, running, deadline, critical, campaign, happens, candidates, miss, debate, sen, democratic, heres, presidential, youre, national, face, debates


2020 candidates face a critical debate deadline. Here's what happens if they miss it

Democratic presidential hopeful Mayor of New York City Bill de Blasio participates in the first Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign season hosted by NBC News at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, Florida, June 26, 2019.

Days before Wednesday’s deadline to qualify for the fall presidential primary debates, Democratic candidates teetering below the threshold are scrambling to make the grade.

Missing the debate could cripple campaigns struggling to survive in the crowded field — 23 are still vying to become the 2020 nominee.

Candidates need at least 2% support in at least four polls approved by the Democratic National Committee and 130,000 unique donors to secure a spot.

So far 10 candidates have qualified:

Former Vice President Joe Biden

Sen. Cory Booker

Sen. Kamala Harris

Sen. Amy Klobuchar

Sen. Bernie Sanders

Sen. Elizabeth Warren

South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg

Former HUD Secretary Julian Castro

Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke

Businessman Andrew Yang

The debates provide a national platform on which presidential hopefuls can make their case to the public ahead of the early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada.

So far, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, former Sen. Mike Gravel and Rep. Eric Swalwell have suspended their campaigns.

The third and fourth rounds of debates are scheduled for Sept. 12-13 and October.

The good news for the low-polling hopefuls: They still have a chance to make the October debate. That’s because the requirements are the same for both debates, so candidates who fail to qualify for September’s see no reason to drop out just yet.

“While we continue to see positive momentum, we always knew the third debate would be a challenge and we will work toward the October debate goal,” said Jaclyn Rothenberg, national press secretary for New York Mayor Bill De Blasio’s campaign.

It also means there will likely be more Democrats on the stage in October than in September.

Some campaigns aim to soldier on through the presidential primary, even if they miss the fall debates entirely.

John Delaney’s campaign announced he would remain in the race until at least the Iowa caucuses in February, despite currently polling at 0.4% in national Democratic polling. Seth Moulton, another long shot, is also dismissive of the notion of dropping out this fall.

“Our campaign isn’t focused on the horse race,” said Matt Corridoni, Moulton’s national press secretary. “Early fall is not the time to be picking winners and losers.”

But according to operatives of past elections, missing the debates means the campaign won’t ever get off the ground.

“The reality is that if you’re not in the debates, you’re not in the campaign,” said Christian Ferry, campaign manager for Sen. Lindsey Graham when he ran in a crowded GOP presidential primary field in 2016.

The debates overall might not be changing voter preference much, but in today’s political climate candidates who are able to capture media attention are the ones who survive the longest.

“There’s no better opportunity, no bigger opportunity than the debates,” said Mike DuHaime, who served as senior strategist for Chris Christie’s 2016 GOP presidential campaign.

“You need media attention and/or money,” DuHaime said. “If you’re not on the debate stage, you’re not getting either of those two.”

Many candidates have been pressured to drop out and run in key Senate races instead. With the GOP defending more than 20 seats next year, Democrats hope running strong candidates can give them control of the chamber for the first time since 2014.

Gov. John Hickenlooper’s departure last week was accompanied by an announcement that he would consider challenging Republican Sen. Cory Gardner for his seat in Colorado in 2020. Indeed, Thursday morning Hickenlooper said he would do just that.

Gov. Steve Bullock has been goaded to run for a Republican-held seat in Montana, and O’Rourke has faced calls for him to recapture the magic of his failed but close 2018 bid to oust Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas by running against Sen. John Cornyn in 2020.

So far, that call is falling on deaf ears.

“I will not in any scenario run for the United States Senate,” O’Rourke said on MSNBC. “I’m running for president. I’m running for this country. I’m taking this fight directly to Donald Trump, and that is what I am exclusively focused on doing right now.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-22  Authors: jordan mcdonald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 2020, running, deadline, critical, campaign, happens, candidates, miss, debate, sen, democratic, heres, presidential, youre, national, face, debates


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A voter who could be key to Elizabeth Warren’s 2020 hopes? Justice Brett Kavanaugh

Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s political origin story is inextricably tied to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a regulatory agency the presidential contender envisioned while an influential professor at Harvard Law School. But Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who until October was a federal appeals court judge in Washington, made his views clear before his confirmation. Read more: Supreme Court could cripple consumer finance watchdog if agency critic Brett Kavanaugh is confirmedIn his first term on th


Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s political origin story is inextricably tied to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a regulatory agency the presidential contender envisioned while an influential professor at Harvard Law School. But Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who until October was a federal appeals court judge in Washington, made his views clear before his confirmation. Read more: Supreme Court could cripple consumer finance watchdog if agency critic Brett Kavanaugh is confirmedIn his first term on th
A voter who could be key to Elizabeth Warren’s 2020 hopes? Justice Brett Kavanaugh Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-18  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kavanaugh, key, warren, voter, 2020, agency, warrens, court, sen, brett, presidential, wealth, tax, justice, elizabeth, supreme, hopes


A voter who could be key to Elizabeth Warren's 2020 hopes? Justice Brett Kavanaugh

Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s political origin story is inextricably tied to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a regulatory agency the presidential contender envisioned while an influential professor at Harvard Law School.

In the brief biography included on her campaign’s Twitter account, Warren boasts that she is the “mom” of the agency. In Iowa, a staffer recently got the CFPB’s initials tattooed on her bottom lip.

But the fate of the Obama-era regulatory agency is now in the hands of a skeptical Supreme Court, which is weighing whether to take up a case that would allow it to rule on the constitutionality of the agency’s structure. The court is being asked to declare the CFPB — and all of its actions to date — unlawful.

The top court has not yet considered the matter. But Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who until October was a federal appeals court judge in Washington, made his views clear before his confirmation.

“The CFPB’s departure from historical practice, threat to individual liberty, and diminution of Presidential authority combine to make this an overwhelming case of unconstitutionality,” Kavanaugh wrote in a dissent in 2018. A little more than a year before, Kavanaugh authored an opinion, later overruled, striking down the agency.

Read more: Supreme Court could cripple consumer finance watchdog if agency critic Brett Kavanaugh is confirmed

In his first term on the bench, Kavanaugh has proven to be near the court’s ideological center.

If he and the court’s four other Republican-appointed justices put Warren’s signature accomplishment in the dust bin, the decision could dent the Massachusetts Democrat’s argument that she is the best presidential candidate to accomplish “big, structural change” while in office.

And it could focus attention on questions about the constitutionality of another Warren pledge, a federal wealth tax on the ultra-rich, which Warren says will raise the funds to pay for other key parts of her agenda. Those who advised Warren on the wealth tax plan have said they are uncertain about whether the top court will approve it.

The case is another instance in which the Supreme Court, with a newly reliable conservative majority, could hamper Democratic political goals. In the wake of Kavanaugh’s confirmation last year, liberal activists have pressured Democrats to reform the court, which they have argued has grown politicized.

Warren herself has indicated that she is open to expanding the size of the nine-member panel, drawing a contrast between herself and fellow progressive Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who has ruled out the idea.

Read more: The Supreme Court could stop Elizabeth Warren’s wealth tax dead in its tracks

In a sign of the rising political profile of the top court, a number of Democratic senators, including presidential contender Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, filed an unusual brief with the justices this week telling them to “heal” or face the prospect of getting “restructured.”

The Warren campaign did not respond to multiple requests for comment. Warren has previously defended the constitutionality of the CFPB, and said that other government agencies, such as the Comptroller of the Currency, have similar structures.

The CFPB said in 2017 it had returned $12 billion in financial relief to consumers since it was created seven years earlier in the wake of the financial crisis. The Trump administration has severely curtailed its enforcement actions.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-18  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kavanaugh, key, warren, voter, 2020, agency, warrens, court, sen, brett, presidential, wealth, tax, justice, elizabeth, supreme, hopes


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GOP Sen. Rick Scott: Americans should get tax cuts in return for tariffs paid on Chinese goods

Republican Sen. Rick Scott told CNBC on Monday the U.S. government should return money collected from China tariffs to Americans as tax relief. President Donald Trump, earlier this month announced an impeding 10% tariff on the remaining $300 billion of Chinese goods that had not been previously taxed. Back In May, Trump hiked tariffs to 25% from 10% on $200 billion in Chinese goods. “We have to help American companies … and get more American jobs and stop helping China,” Scott said. “I’m not s


Republican Sen. Rick Scott told CNBC on Monday the U.S. government should return money collected from China tariffs to Americans as tax relief. President Donald Trump, earlier this month announced an impeding 10% tariff on the remaining $300 billion of Chinese goods that had not been previously taxed. Back In May, Trump hiked tariffs to 25% from 10% on $200 billion in Chinese goods. “We have to help American companies … and get more American jobs and stop helping China,” Scott said. “I’m not s
GOP Sen. Rick Scott: Americans should get tax cuts in return for tariffs paid on Chinese goods Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, tariffs, american, sen, gop, scott, paid, trump, sure, tariff, stop, billion, return, trade, goods, rick, cuts


GOP Sen. Rick Scott: Americans should get tax cuts in return for tariffs paid on Chinese goods

Republican Sen. Rick Scott told CNBC on Monday the U.S. government should return money collected from China tariffs to Americans as tax relief.

“Anything we raise in tariffs, we should give back to the rank and public in tax reductions,” the Florida senator said in a “Squawk Box ” interview, acknowledging there’s been some “short-term pain.”

“We have to help American farmers open up more markets around the world,” said Scott, who did not elaborate on what such relief might look like.

Data from U.S. Customs and Border Protection, which collects taxes on imports, showed the U.S. had assessed $23.7 billion in tariffs from early 2018 through May 1. According to a Reuters report, total tariff revenue rose 73% in the first half of 2019 from a year earlier.

The trade dispute between the world’s two largest economies has been escalating in recent months, with investors fearing that it could slow global and U.S. economic growth. In fact, Goldman Sachs lowered its fourth-quarter U.S. growth forecast by 0.2% to 1.8%, with the cumulative drag on gross domestic product of 0.6%.

President Donald Trump, earlier this month announced an impeding 10% tariff on the remaining $300 billion of Chinese goods that had not been previously taxed. Back In May, Trump hiked tariffs to 25% from 10% on $200 billion in Chinese goods.

“We have to help American companies … and get more American jobs and stop helping China,” Scott said. “Stop acting like they are a partner,” adding he doesn’t see how a trade deal can be reached.

“I’m not sure what else we can do, other than stand up for American interests and American values,” he wondered. “I’m not sure what the president can do otherwise than the tariffs he is doing.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, tariffs, american, sen, gop, scott, paid, trump, sure, tariff, stop, billion, return, trade, goods, rick, cuts


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How Pete Buttigieg made his money before he was a presidential hopeful

In a wealthy 2020 Democratic presidential field, Pete Buttigieg lags behind the pack. Even so, Buttigieg made the least in 2018 out of the 13 Democratic presidential candidates who have released their tax returns. [CNBC is looking at how top 2020 presidential candidates accumulated their wealth. Read more about how Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Kamala Harris made their money.] Aside from the money Buttigieg earns as mayor and what his husband makes as a middle school teacher, t


In a wealthy 2020 Democratic presidential field, Pete Buttigieg lags behind the pack. Even so, Buttigieg made the least in 2018 out of the 13 Democratic presidential candidates who have released their tax returns. [CNBC is looking at how top 2020 presidential candidates accumulated their wealth. Read more about how Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Kamala Harris made their money.] Aside from the money Buttigieg earns as mayor and what his husband makes as a middle school teacher, t
How Pete Buttigieg made his money before he was a presidential hopeful Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, husband, presidential, tax, wealth, hopeful, took, sen, wife, sanders, pete, money, buttigieg, warren


How Pete Buttigieg made his money before he was a presidential hopeful

In a wealthy 2020 Democratic presidential field, Pete Buttigieg lags behind the pack.

The South Bend, Indiana, mayor makes a comfortable living. He and his husband, Chasten, earned $152,643 last year, according to tax returns.

Even so, Buttigieg made the least in 2018 out of the 13 Democratic presidential candidates who have released their tax returns. Former Vice President Joe Biden and his wife, Jill, led the field by raking in $4.5 million, according to tax returns. Sen. Kamala Harris of California and her husband, Douglas Emhoff, followed with $1.9 million.

[CNBC is looking at how top 2020 presidential candidates accumulated their wealth. Read more about how Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Kamala Harris made their money.]

Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and her husband, Bruce Mann, took in $846,394. Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, and his wife, Jane, made $561,293.

Aside from the money Buttigieg earns as mayor and what his husband makes as a middle school teacher, the presidential hopeful has taken in extra cash from his book, “Shortest Way Home.” From the start of 2018 to May 2019, he took in $45,000 in advance and royalties payments for the book, which came out in February.

In a primary race focused on middle class issues, Buttigieg’s lack of wealth relative to his rivals could insulate him from some of the criticism they have faced for their millionaire status.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, husband, presidential, tax, wealth, hopeful, took, sen, wife, sanders, pete, money, buttigieg, warren


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Sen. Doug Jones says Congress ‘may end up acting’ if Trump’s trade war with China drags on

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — Alabama’s Democratic Sen. Doug Jones criticized President Donald Trump’s escalating trade war with China on Tuesday, hinting at bipartisan congressional action to check the president as his state becomes more exposed to the crossfire between Washington and Beijing. “If this doesn’t change soon, I think Congress may end up acting. The ongoing trade war between the world’s two largest economies took more anxious turns this week, resulting in market volatility. Trade talks collap


HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — Alabama’s Democratic Sen. Doug Jones criticized President Donald Trump’s escalating trade war with China on Tuesday, hinting at bipartisan congressional action to check the president as his state becomes more exposed to the crossfire between Washington and Beijing. “If this doesn’t change soon, I think Congress may end up acting. The ongoing trade war between the world’s two largest economies took more anxious turns this week, resulting in market volatility. Trade talks collap
Sen. Doug Jones says Congress ‘may end up acting’ if Trump’s trade war with China drags on Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: amanda macias jacob pramuk, amanda macias, jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, state, trumps, president, sen, drags, soon, trade, doug, war, jones, end, think, congress, china, tariffs, theres


Sen. Doug Jones says Congress 'may end up acting' if Trump's trade war with China drags on

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — Alabama’s Democratic Sen. Doug Jones criticized President Donald Trump’s escalating trade war with China on Tuesday, hinting at bipartisan congressional action to check the president as his state becomes more exposed to the crossfire between Washington and Beijing.

“I think Alabama is not just in a unique position, but we are in a very vulnerable position with both manufacturing and farming, we cannot overlook the impact that this is having on farmers up and down the state from one end to another,” Jones told CNBC on the sidelines of the Space and Missile Defense Symposium in Huntsville.

“If this doesn’t change soon, I think Congress may end up acting. There’s bills that I’ve got pending with Senator Alexander and Senator Portman and I think if this doesn’t end soon, Congress is going to start stepping in more than they have in the past,” he added.

The ongoing trade war between the world’s two largest economies took more anxious turns this week, resulting in market volatility. China, which has already put retaliatory tariffs on a range of U.S. crops, dealt another blow to the American farm industry Monday when it said it would stop purchasing U.S. agricultural products. U.S. stock indexes stabilized Wednesday, as the S&P 500 and Nasdaq inched higher while the Dow Jones industrial average fell slightly.

On Tuesday, White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow offered reassurance, telling CNBC that there’s still an opportunity for negotiation.

“The reality is we would like to negotiate,” Kudlow said, adding that the president has said “if you make a good deal, maybe he’ll be flexible on the tariffs.”

In June, Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping agreed on the sidelines of the G-20 summit in Japan to restart negotiations and not impose new tariffs on each other’s goods. Trade talks collapsed in May, with intellectual property theft proving to be a major sticking point between the two parties.

Jones said the trade conflict has created uncertainty for key industries. Mercedes, Honda and Hyundai operate assembly plants in the state, while Mazda and Toyota are building a joint assembly plant in Alabama, according to the state’s Department of Commerce.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: amanda macias jacob pramuk, amanda macias, jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, state, trumps, president, sen, drags, soon, trade, doug, war, jones, end, think, congress, china, tariffs, theres


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Will your 529 college savings plan be needed if Democrats take the White House?

For example, Sanders’ plan would make two- and four-year public colleges and universities tuition- and debt-free. Warren has proposed eliminating the cost of tuition and fees at every public two-year and four-year college in the country and Harris has said she would make community college free and four-year public college debt-free. A college education is now the second-largest expense an individual is likely to make in a lifetime — right after purchasing a home. “Look at your financial situatio


For example, Sanders’ plan would make two- and four-year public colleges and universities tuition- and debt-free. Warren has proposed eliminating the cost of tuition and fees at every public two-year and four-year college in the country and Harris has said she would make community college free and four-year public college debt-free. A college education is now the second-largest expense an individual is likely to make in a lifetime — right after purchasing a home. “Look at your financial situatio
Will your 529 college savings plan be needed if Democrats take the White House? Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-02  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, needed, savings, democrats, college, retirement, free, sen, plan, house, education, public, tuition, dabit, 529, white, fouryear


Will your 529 college savings plan be needed if Democrats take the White House?

Student debt likely will be a key issue in the 2020 presidential race.

A good portion of the major contenders for a presidential nomination, including Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.; Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif.; former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., have supported free college and student debt relief plans.

For example, Sanders’ plan would make two- and four-year public colleges and universities tuition- and debt-free. Warren has proposed eliminating the cost of tuition and fees at every public two-year and four-year college in the country and Harris has said she would make community college free and four-year public college debt-free.

A college education is now the second-largest expense an individual is likely to make in a lifetime — right after purchasing a home. Today the average college graduate leaves school $30,000 in the red, up from $10,000 in the 1990s.

Many states, including Arkansas, Indiana, Minnesota, Montana, Oregon and Rhode Island, have already rolled out statewide free community college programs and more are expected to follow.

As the cost of higher education takes center stage in the political debate, families are also rethinking how best to save for this daunting expense.

“We have this conversation with our clients daily,” said Amin Dabit, a certified financial planner and vice president of advisory services for Personal Capital in Denver. “Since we don’t know what D.C. will come up with, focus on what you can control.”

“Look at your financial situation and come up with a plan to achieve a balance between college savings and retirement savings,” he said. “That’s the best thing we can do.”

More from Personal Finance:

These nine colleges are tuition-free

How families are paying for college

Here’s how parents can cut their kids’ college costs

When it comes to saving for college, “529 plans are the best vehicle out there,” Dabit said.

These state-sponsored savings accounts allow post-tax contributions to grow and be withdrawn tax-free as long as the money is used to pay for qualified education expenses, such as tuition and room and board.

However, there are other options, as well, Dabit said.

With an Roth individual retirement account, for example, savers under the age of 50 can make after-tax contributions up to $6,000 a year, and then take tax-free withdrawals in retirement. Account holders can also withdraw their contributions at any time — say, to cover college expenses — without taxes or penalties.

It gives you the flexibility to save for retirement and also use it for education, it just “blurs the line” between the two, he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-02  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, needed, savings, democrats, college, retirement, free, sen, plan, house, education, public, tuition, dabit, 529, white, fouryear


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