Sen. Kamala Harris calls on Congress to take steps toward Trump impeachment

Sen. Kamala Harris late Monday said she would support Congress starting impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump. That comes on the heels of fellow Democratic presidential contender Sen. Elizabeth Warren last week calling for impeachment. Aside from Harris, Warren also was one of five 2020 Democratic presidential candidates participating in Monday evening’s New Hampshire town hall event. Warren reiterated her call for impeachment in Monday’s town hall, saying the impeachment proces


Sen. Kamala Harris late Monday said she would support Congress starting impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump. That comes on the heels of fellow Democratic presidential contender Sen. Elizabeth Warren last week calling for impeachment. Aside from Harris, Warren also was one of five 2020 Democratic presidential candidates participating in Monday evening’s New Hampshire town hall event. Warren reiterated her call for impeachment in Monday’s town hall, saying the impeachment proces
Sen. Kamala Harris calls on Congress to take steps toward Trump impeachment Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: jeff daniels, elijah nouvelage
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, presidential, kamala, investigation, sen, trump, impeachment, congress, hall, town, harris, steps, calls, president, obstruction, warren


Sen. Kamala Harris calls on Congress to take steps toward Trump impeachment

Sen. Kamala Harris late Monday said she would support Congress starting impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump.

That comes on the heels of fellow Democratic presidential contender Sen. Elizabeth Warren last week calling for impeachment.

“I think we have very good reason to believe that there is an investigation that has been conducted, which has produced evidence that tells us that this president and his administration engaged in obstruction of justice,” Harris said in response to a question at a CNN town hall in New Hampshire. “I believe Congress should take the steps toward impeachment.”

Harris, the junior senator from California and a member of the Senate’s Judiciary Committee and Select Intelligence Committee, said the report released following Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian involvement in the 2016 presidential election made it clear there was “good evidence” to make a case for obstruction of justice.

“For those of us who have been following the investigation, and have seen any part of that report, it’s very clear that there’s a lot of good evidence pointing to obstruction and obstruction of justice,” said Harris, a former prosecutor who once served as district attorney in San Francisco and later as California attorney general.

Added Harris: “I believe that we need to get rid of this president.”

Similarly, Warren last week urged Congress to begin the process of impeachment action against Trump. The Massachusetts politician thus became the first 2020 presidential candidate to call for impeachment proceedings.

“To ignore a President’s repeated efforts to obstruct an investigation into his own disloyal behavior would inflict great and lasting damage on this country, and it would suggest that both the current and future Presidents would be free to abuse their power in similar ways,” Warren tweeted Friday. She also called on elected officials in both parties to “set aside political considerations and do their constitutional duty.”

Aside from Harris, Warren also was one of five 2020 Democratic presidential candidates participating in Monday evening’s New Hampshire town hall event. Others were Sens. Bernie Sanders and Amy Klobuchar as well as Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Ind.

Warren reiterated her call for impeachment in Monday’s town hall, saying the impeachment process is a “tool” of accountability Congress is given. “This is not about politics. This is about principle.”

Despite calling for impeachment, Harris told the town hall audience that she’s “a realist” and recognizes the Democratic-controlled House probably will look at the impeachment issue differently than the Republican-led Senate.

“When I look at what has been happening over the last two years and some months that I’ve been in the United States Senate,” Harris added, “I have also witnessed folks in the United States Congress, and in particular in the GOP, who have been presented with many reasons to push back against this president — and they have not.”

Harris said an investigation by the House of Representatives “is very likely to happen” and would require a simply majority vote. Still, she noted that even if the House does vote to impeach, the next step would be up to the Senate.

“I’ve not seen any evidence to suggest that (Senate Republicans) will weigh on the facts instead of partisan adherence to, to being protective of this president,” said Harris. “And that’s what concerns me about what will become the eventual outcome. So we have to be realistic about what might be the end result, but that doesn’t mean that the process should not take hold.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: jeff daniels, elijah nouvelage
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, presidential, kamala, investigation, sen, trump, impeachment, congress, hall, town, harris, steps, calls, president, obstruction, warren


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Sen. Majority Leader McConnell to introduce bill to raise the minimum age to buy tobacco to 21

In 2018, the number of high school students using tobacco products increased by about 38%, the CDC found in its annual National Youth Tobacco Survey. In response, local and state governments have pushed up the age to buy tobacco products to 21. A dozen states have already raised the minimum buying age and New York and Maryland are expected to join them soon. Lawmakers in McConnell’s home state of Kentucky rejected a state bill earlier this year to raise the minimum buying age. Tobacco giants Alt


In 2018, the number of high school students using tobacco products increased by about 38%, the CDC found in its annual National Youth Tobacco Survey. In response, local and state governments have pushed up the age to buy tobacco products to 21. A dozen states have already raised the minimum buying age and New York and Maryland are expected to join them soon. Lawmakers in McConnell’s home state of Kentucky rejected a state bill earlier this year to raise the minimum buying age. Tobacco giants Alt
Sen. Majority Leader McConnell to introduce bill to raise the minimum age to buy tobacco to 21 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: angelica lavito, joshua roberts
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mcconnell, minimum, bill, altria, 21, legislation, leader, products, buy, age, tobacco, strongly, raising, buying, majority, raise, introduce, sen


Sen. Majority Leader McConnell to introduce bill to raise the minimum age to buy tobacco to 21

In 2018, the number of high school students using tobacco products increased by about 38%, the CDC found in its annual National Youth Tobacco Survey. The agency blamed the increase on e-cigarettes. Use of the products by high school students surged nearly 78%.

In response, local and state governments have pushed up the age to buy tobacco products to 21. A dozen states have already raised the minimum buying age and New York and Maryland are expected to join them soon. Even more states are considering legislation. At least 450 cities and counties have enacted T21 laws, according to the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

Yet even with McConnell behind the bill, some conservative lawmakers are sure to oppose the measure. Lawmakers in McConnell’s home state of Kentucky rejected a state bill earlier this year to raise the minimum buying age. Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C., recently blasted the Food and Drug Administration for pursuing a ban on menthol cigarettes.

Tobacco giants Altria, British American Tobacco and e-cigarette maker Juul have all thrown their weight behind raising the minimum buying age. Altria CEO Howard Willard and Juul CEO Kevin Burns have both urged legislation in recent op-eds. Altria started running “T21” ads earlier this month in The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal and other newspapers.

“Altria strongly supports raising the legal age of purchase for all tobacco products, including e-vapor, to 21. This is the most effective action to reverse rising underage e-vapor usage rates. Now is the time to move to 21 and we welcome Senator McConnell’s leadership on this important issue,” Willard said Thursday in a statement.

“We commend Senator McConnell for announcing this legislation as we strongly support raising the purchasing age for all tobacco products, including vapor products, to 21 and have been actively supporting legislation to do this at the federal level and in states across the country,” Burns said in a statement Thursday.

Burns said this type of legislation can help restrict youth access by preventing products being shared between legal-age and underage peers.

“We support Senator McConnell’s efforts to raise the national minimum purchase age to 21 as an effective means of keeping tobacco products out of middle and high schools, where many youth obtain the products, especially vapor, from friends between the ages of 18 and 21,” BAT said Thursday.

A 2015 National Academy of Medicine study concluded that increasing the minimum buying age would reduce the number of teens who get hooked on nicotine and therefore save lives.

A spokesman for the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids said while the group “strongly supports” raising the minimum tobacco buying age, it wants to “make sure it is a strong bill that is free of special interest provisions that benefit the tobacco industry.”

He warned that some proposals have included provisions that prohibit things like flavor bans, which e-cigarette makers strongly oppose.

Shares of Altria slid about 2% and British American Tobacco dipped about 1%. Juul is privately held.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: angelica lavito, joshua roberts
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mcconnell, minimum, bill, altria, 21, legislation, leader, products, buy, age, tobacco, strongly, raising, buying, majority, raise, introduce, sen


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Bernie Sanders releases 10 years of tax returns

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., released 10 years of tax returns Monday evening, showing the majority of his income came from his U.S. Senate salary until 2016, when his income jumped with the publication of a book on his first presidential run. During his 2016 campaign, Sanders initially released just a summary of his 2014 tax returns, before releasing his full return later in the primary. Sanders has been under pressure to release his returns since he launched his campaign for the Democratic presi


Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., released 10 years of tax returns Monday evening, showing the majority of his income came from his U.S. Senate salary until 2016, when his income jumped with the publication of a book on his first presidential run. During his 2016 campaign, Sanders initially released just a summary of his 2014 tax returns, before releasing his full return later in the primary. Sanders has been under pressure to release his returns since he launched his campaign for the Democratic presi
Bernie Sanders releases 10 years of tax returns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: shaquille brewster, lev radin, pacific press, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sen, sanders, releases, campaign, tax, bernie, 2016, total, released, income, release, returns


Bernie Sanders releases 10 years of tax returns

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., released 10 years of tax returns Monday evening, showing the majority of his income came from his U.S. Senate salary until 2016, when his income jumped with the publication of a book on his first presidential run.

His total income popped to over $1 million in 2016 and 2017, after he wrote “Our Revolution: A Future to Believe In” in November 2016, raising his effective tax rate for those years to over 30 percent.

“I consider paying more in taxes as my income rose to be both an obligation and an investment in our country,” Sanders said in a statement released by his campaign. “I will continue to fight to make our tax system more progressive so that our country has the resources to guarantee the American Dream to all people.”

His book debuted on the New York Times bestseller list at #3, and has sold approximately 227,000 copies, according to the industry tracker NPD BookScan. Two subsequent books, “The Bernie Sanders Guide to Political Revolution” and “Where Do We Go From Here: Two Years in the Resistance” sold over 27,000 and 26,000 copies, respectively.

During his 2016 campaign, Sanders initially released just a summary of his 2014 tax returns, before releasing his full return later in the primary.

“We had a good idea based on his 2014 returns what to expect,” Steve Rosenthal, a senior fellow in the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center at the Urban Institute, told NBC News after reviewing his returns. “He made a whole bunch of money as an author now, which is sizable. Running for president has been a lucrative business for him.”

Sanders has been under pressure to release his returns since he launched his campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination in February. In a televised CNN town hall shortly after, the senator promised to release them “sooner than later.”

However, after several weeks without producing documents, questions continued to grow. Sanders then told reporters he would release them by tax day, April 15th.

“You sort of wonder why he resisted releasing more returns in prior years,” Rosenthal said. “Now he’s released 10 years of returns but they all look the same, all of which is pretty modest in what he’s showing.”

On the trail, Sanders — who makes the fight for economic justice a fundamental theme of his candidacy — routinely rails against the millionaire and billionaire class, saying the “1 percent may have unlimited resources and power, but they are the 1 percent. We are the 99 percent.” In January, he introduced the “For the 99.8 Percent Act” that his office says would raise $2.2 trillion through a dramatic increase to the estate tax on wealthy families.

Sanders now joins several other 2020 candidates who have released their tax documents to the public. Sunday, Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., released 15 years of returns. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., added 2018 to the 10 years of returns released last August. In March, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., was the first to release her 2018 returns, publishing 12 years total, and started an online petition that calls on every candidate to disclose their taxes.

Washington Democratic Gov. Jay Inslee and Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., have released their returns for this year as well.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: shaquille brewster, lev radin, pacific press, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sen, sanders, releases, campaign, tax, bernie, 2016, total, released, income, release, returns


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Amazon is trying to soften its image as regulatory scrutiny of Big Tech grows

But rather than fiercely fighting every battle, Amazon looks like its ready to play nice. In March, Amazon dropped a policy that prevented merchants from offering lower prices on other websites following an investigation request by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.). Last month, the company scaled back some of its most aggressive promotion tactics after Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) And late last year Amazon raised its minimum wage to $15 following criticism of the company’s working conditions


But rather than fiercely fighting every battle, Amazon looks like its ready to play nice. In March, Amazon dropped a policy that prevented merchants from offering lower prices on other websites following an investigation request by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.). Last month, the company scaled back some of its most aggressive promotion tactics after Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) And late last year Amazon raised its minimum wage to $15 following criticism of the company’s working conditions
Amazon is trying to soften its image as regulatory scrutiny of Big Tech grows Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: eugene kim, brent lewis, denver post, getty images, david ryder
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, big, growing, tech, soften, sen, stores, scrutiny, amazon, trying, business, winatallcost, regulatory, image, following, working, looks, grows, company


Amazon is trying to soften its image as regulatory scrutiny of Big Tech grows

Amazon’s relentless pursuit of growth in retail, cloud computing, advertising and consumer devices has put the company squarely in the sights of Washington lawmakers who are concerned about Big Tech’s growing influence over consumers. But rather than fiercely fighting every battle, Amazon looks like its ready to play nice.

In March, Amazon dropped a policy that prevented merchants from offering lower prices on other websites following an investigation request by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.). Last month, the company scaled back some of its most aggressive promotion tactics after Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) called out abusive business practices. And late last year Amazon raised its minimum wage to $15 following criticism of the company’s working conditions by Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-VT).

Amazon also confirmed to CNBC that it would soon start accepting cash at the Amazon Go cashierless stores as a growing number of cities and states push for laws that require all stores to serve the unbanked. It’s all part of a strategy to be more likable at a time when tech companies are drawing heat for behavior that looks increasingly anti-competitive.

“I believe Amazon has made the connection between likability and immunity from regulation,” said NYU business professor Scott Galloway, author of “The Four: The Hidden DNA of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google.”

This is a different company from the vigorously defensive, win-at-all-cost Amazon we’re used to seeing.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: eugene kim, brent lewis, denver post, getty images, david ryder
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, big, growing, tech, soften, sen, stores, scrutiny, amazon, trying, business, winatallcost, regulatory, image, following, working, looks, grows, company


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Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley doubts Obamacare will be ruled unconstitutional

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley doesn’t believe a lawsuit challenging the Affordable Care Act’s constitutionality will succeed, the Iowa Republican told the Des Moines Register on Thursday. In December, U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor ruled the health-care law unconstitutional after 20 Republican-led states filed a suit against it. The health-care law captured the ire of conservatives when it passed in 2010. However, Grassley told the Register that the bill, which was unveiled


Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley doesn’t believe a lawsuit challenging the Affordable Care Act’s constitutionality will succeed, the Iowa Republican told the Des Moines Register on Thursday. In December, U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor ruled the health-care law unconstitutional after 20 Republican-led states filed a suit against it. The health-care law captured the ire of conservatives when it passed in 2010. However, Grassley told the Register that the bill, which was unveiled
Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley doubts Obamacare will be ruled unconstitutional Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: ashley turner, chip somodevilla, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doubts, replacement, healthcare, sen, republicans, ruled, grassley, law, majority, unconstitutional, trump, obamacare, senate, chuck, republican, told


Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley doubts Obamacare will be ruled unconstitutional

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley doesn’t believe a lawsuit challenging the Affordable Care Act’s constitutionality will succeed, the Iowa Republican told the Des Moines Register on Thursday.

“I don’t believe the courts are going to strike it down,” Grassley said, adding that Republicans don’t have to work on a replacement for the 2010 health-care law because he said it is unclear what the courts will decide to do.

The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, is once again in jeopardy after President Donald Trump reignited debate over his predecessor’s health-care law in March when his administration decided to support a federal judge’s ruling that Obamacare is unconstitutional.

In December, U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor ruled the health-care law unconstitutional after 20 Republican-led states filed a suit against it. O’Connor said that without the law’s individual mandate — a tax penalty on anyone who did not purchase health insurance — Obamacare could not stand.

The Trump administration reduced the individual mandate to $0 in the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

O’Connor’s ruling awaits deliberation in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit in New Orleans.

Trump has repeatedly criticized Obamacare and pledged to repeal it, but Republicans have yet to propose a health-care policy to replace it that could pass muster in Congress. Trump said in a late-March tweet that the “Republican Party will become the Party of Great HealthCare,” but the president was forced to abandon the cause when his party expressed little desire to revisit the health-care debate before the 2020 election.

Grassley, who is one of the many Republicans who oppose President Barack Obama’s 2010 health care law, said Thursday that he expects the Supreme Court will uphold Obamacare if the case is brought before them.

He told the Register he “would be very doubtful” that Chief Justice John Roberts would “be changing his mind” on the law. Roberts was the deciding vote that upheld Obamacare’s constitutionality when the law was deliberated by the Supreme Court in 2012.

Obamacare, which sought to expand access to insurance and increase consumer protections, includes provisions that expand Medicaid in most states, allow children to remain on their parents’ insurance plans until age 26 and protect those with pre-existing conditions.

The health-care law captured the ire of conservatives when it passed in 2010. Republicans have vowed to do away with Obamacare ever since, but the GOP failed to repeal the law in 2017 when they controlled Congress and the White House. Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle believe Republicans’ failed efforts to scrap the law handed Democrats a majority in the House of Representatives in last year’s midterm elections.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said in March that the Senate would wait until Republicans gained full control of Congress before considering a replacement plan. The GOP, which holds a majority in the Senate, needs 21 more seats in the House to win a majority in the next election.

Grassley, who has been working on a bipartisan basis to tackle high drug prices in the U.S., also praised a bill he co-sponsored that protects people with pre-existing conditions. However, Grassley told the Register that the bill, which was unveiled this week, would not be debated unless Obamacare was repealed.

Though Grassley doubts Obamacare will be ruled unconstitutional, he claimed replacement legislation could “easily” be created.

Grassley’s office confirmed the Register’s reporting, but did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for additional comment.

Read the Des Moines Register’s full report here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: ashley turner, chip somodevilla, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doubts, replacement, healthcare, sen, republicans, ruled, grassley, law, majority, unconstitutional, trump, obamacare, senate, chuck, republican, told


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3 big tax planning takeaways from Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s 2018 return

Say what you will about presidential hopeful Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., but it looks like she’s getting some good tax advice. Warren released her 2018 tax return Wednesday. She filed jointly with her husband Bruce H. Mann, a professor at Harvard Law School. The two reported total income of $905,742 and paid total taxes of $230,965, according to the return. Here are a few tax planning takeaways from the senator’s 2018 return.


Say what you will about presidential hopeful Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., but it looks like she’s getting some good tax advice. Warren released her 2018 tax return Wednesday. She filed jointly with her husband Bruce H. Mann, a professor at Harvard Law School. The two reported total income of $905,742 and paid total taxes of $230,965, according to the return. Here are a few tax planning takeaways from the senator’s 2018 return.
3 big tax planning takeaways from Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s 2018 return Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: darla mercado, bill clark, cq-roll call group, getty images, catherine lane, -tim steffen, cpa, director of advanced planning at robert w baird
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, werent, big, return, takeaways, taxes, total, wrong, 2018, makes, warren, warrens, elizabeth, sen, planning


3 big tax planning takeaways from Sen. Elizabeth Warren's 2018 return

Say what you will about presidential hopeful Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., but it looks like she’s getting some good tax advice.

Warren released her 2018 tax return Wednesday. She filed jointly with her husband Bruce H. Mann, a professor at Harvard Law School.

The two reported total income of $905,742 and paid total taxes of $230,965, according to the return.

The couple didn’t get a refund. Rather, they owed the IRS $24,477 in taxes. They weren’t on the hook for underpayment penalties.

“I don’t think there’s anything wrong with her owing,” said Tim Steffen, CPA and director of advanced planning at Robert W. Baird & Co. “She makes estimated tax payments throughout the year, and we tell people that this makes the most sense — there are no penalties there.”

Here are a few tax planning takeaways from the senator’s 2018 return.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: darla mercado, bill clark, cq-roll call group, getty images, catherine lane, -tim steffen, cpa, director of advanced planning at robert w baird
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, werent, big, return, takeaways, taxes, total, wrong, 2018, makes, warren, warrens, elizabeth, sen, planning


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Chuck Schumer says Stephen Moore, Herman Cain would not be good fit for Fed’s mission

Sen. Chuck Schumer told reporters Tuesday that he did not think Stephen Moore or Hermain Cain are qualified for seats on the Federal Reserve board. But Schumer, the top Democrat in the Senate, said he doesn’t see Cain and Moore “fitting in with the mission of the Fed, which is to conduct monetary policy and not be political.” Trump nominated Cain, a former presidential candidate and pizza CEO, in early April and Moore, an economic commentator, in late March to the seven-member board. A CNBC Fed


Sen. Chuck Schumer told reporters Tuesday that he did not think Stephen Moore or Hermain Cain are qualified for seats on the Federal Reserve board. But Schumer, the top Democrat in the Senate, said he doesn’t see Cain and Moore “fitting in with the mission of the Fed, which is to conduct monetary policy and not be political.” Trump nominated Cain, a former presidential candidate and pizza CEO, in early April and Moore, an economic commentator, in late March to the seven-member board. A CNBC Fed
Chuck Schumer says Stephen Moore, Herman Cain would not be good fit for Fed’s mission Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: jessica bursztynsky, joshua roberts
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sen, survey, chuck, senate, moore, mission, schumer, fit, good, chair, feds, served, herman, fed, stephen, cain, vice


Chuck Schumer says Stephen Moore, Herman Cain would not be good fit for Fed's mission

Sen. Chuck Schumer told reporters Tuesday that he did not think Stephen Moore or Hermain Cain are qualified for seats on the Federal Reserve board.

The two men are Trump’s picks to join the U.S. central bank. But Schumer, the top Democrat in the Senate, said he doesn’t see Cain and Moore “fitting in with the mission of the Fed, which is to conduct monetary policy and not be political.”

Trump nominated Cain, a former presidential candidate and pizza CEO, in early April and Moore, an economic commentator, in late March to the seven-member board. A top congressional Democrat echoed Schumer’s sentiments earlier Tuesday.

“Mr. Moore is superbly underqualified for the role for which he has been nominated,” wrote Rep. Carolyn Maloney, vice chair of the Joint Economic Committee, in a letter to Republican Sen. Mike Crapo and Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown, the chair and vice chair, respectively, of the Senate banking committee.

Cain has experience in central banking, having served in several positions at the Kansas City Fed from 1989 to 1996 before moving into politics. Moore, a former campaign advisor, is a visiting fellow at the Heritage Foundation and served on the Wall Street Journal’s editorial board.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said earlier the chamber would consider whoever Trump picks for those roles.

“We’re going to look at whoever the president sends up, it’s his choice to decide, and once he makes a nomination, we’ll take a look at it,” the Republican senator said.

A CNBC Fed Survey released Monday revealed that the majority of respondents in the survey didn’t believe the Senate should confirm either of the men. Sixty percent said the Senate should not confirm Moore. Fifty-three percent of respondents also called for the Senate to reject the prospective nomination of Cain.

— Reuters contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: jessica bursztynsky, joshua roberts
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sen, survey, chuck, senate, moore, mission, schumer, fit, good, chair, feds, served, herman, fed, stephen, cain, vice


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Sen. Mark Warner warns that breaking up tech giants could open the door to Chinese firms

Sen. Mark Warner warned Tuesday against trying to break up big tech companies, like Facebook and Alphabet’s Google. The Democrat from Virginia said he thinks other methods should be used to fix the issues in the sector. On Tuesday, he rolled out the first in a series of bills aimed at regulating Facebook and other social media companies. on Tuesday, bans online platforms with more than 100 million monthly active users from using so-called dark patterns. Warner’s next piece of legislation is expe


Sen. Mark Warner warned Tuesday against trying to break up big tech companies, like Facebook and Alphabet’s Google. The Democrat from Virginia said he thinks other methods should be used to fix the issues in the sector. On Tuesday, he rolled out the first in a series of bills aimed at regulating Facebook and other social media companies. on Tuesday, bans online platforms with more than 100 million monthly active users from using so-called dark patterns. Warner’s next piece of legislation is expe
Sen. Mark Warner warns that breaking up tech giants could open the door to Chinese firms Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sen, issues, tech, companies, going, giants, using, facebook, users, warner, open, mark, firms, door, warns, tencent, chinese, baidu


Sen. Mark Warner warns that breaking up tech giants could open the door to Chinese firms

Sen. Mark Warner warned Tuesday against trying to break up big tech companies, like Facebook and Alphabet’s Google.

The Democrat from Virginia said he thinks other methods should be used to fix the issues in the sector. On Tuesday, he rolled out the first in a series of bills aimed at regulating Facebook and other social media companies.

“These companies have enormous, enormous power and we do need to introduce more competition,” said Warner, vice chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. He began studying Facebook as part of the committee’s investigation into Russia’s involvement in the 2016 presidential election.

However, when it comes to addressing antitrust issues, he has concerns about trying to dismantle the largest companies.

“These are now companies that don’t exist in an American-only vacuum. These are all global companies,” the senator said on “Power Lunch.”

“I have some concern, as somebody who is very concerned about the rise of China, that if we were to kind of chop off the legs of Facebook and Google, that they might be replaced by Alibaba, Baidu, Tencent — companies that are totally enmeshed with the Chinese government in their global economic plan,” he added.

Alibaba is China’s largest e-commerce platform and Tencent is the country’s internet giant, while the search engine Baidu is known as China’s answer to Google.

Alibaba, Baidu and Tencent did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Warner said there are ways to introduce more competition and transparency to the U.S. tech sector — which he thinks should be done before there is talk of breaking up the big companies. He also wants to tackle the manipulative behavior, address privacy issues and content around hate speech

His first bill, introduced with co-sponsor Sen. Deb Fischer, R-Neb. on Tuesday, bans online platforms with more than 100 million monthly active users from using so-called dark patterns. The term refers to interfaces designed to coax users into taking actions that often result in giving up more information than the user realizes — such as prompts to access phone and email contacts in order to keep using the platform.

Warner’s next piece of legislation is expected to address data transparency, requiring tech companies to disclose the value of user data and how companies profit from it, as Axios first reported.

“This is going to be an issue that is not going to go away. It’s going to only potentially get worse. And we’ve got to roll up our sleeves … and solve it,” said Warner.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sen, issues, tech, companies, going, giants, using, facebook, users, warner, open, mark, firms, door, warns, tencent, chinese, baidu


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Sen. Mark Warner warns that breaking up tech giants could open the door to Chinese firms

Sen. Mark Warner warned Tuesday against trying to break up big tech companies, like Facebook and Alphabet’s Google. The Democrat from Virginia said he thinks other methods should be used to fix the issues in the sector. On Tuesday, he rolled out the first in a series of bills aimed at regulating Facebook and other social media companies. on Tuesday, bans online platforms with more than 100 million monthly active users from using so-called dark patterns. Warner’s next piece of legislation is expe


Sen. Mark Warner warned Tuesday against trying to break up big tech companies, like Facebook and Alphabet’s Google. The Democrat from Virginia said he thinks other methods should be used to fix the issues in the sector. On Tuesday, he rolled out the first in a series of bills aimed at regulating Facebook and other social media companies. on Tuesday, bans online platforms with more than 100 million monthly active users from using so-called dark patterns. Warner’s next piece of legislation is expe
Sen. Mark Warner warns that breaking up tech giants could open the door to Chinese firms Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, going, chinese, sen, mark, firms, warns, tencent, using, door, users, companies, giants, tech, warner, facebook, open, issues, baidu


Sen. Mark Warner warns that breaking up tech giants could open the door to Chinese firms

Sen. Mark Warner warned Tuesday against trying to break up big tech companies, like Facebook and Alphabet’s Google.

The Democrat from Virginia said he thinks other methods should be used to fix the issues in the sector. On Tuesday, he rolled out the first in a series of bills aimed at regulating Facebook and other social media companies.

“These companies have enormous, enormous power and we do need to introduce more competition,” said Warner, vice chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. He began studying Facebook as part of the committee’s investigation into Russia’s involvement in the 2016 presidential election.

However, when it comes to addressing antitrust issues, he has concerns about trying to dismantle the largest companies.

“These are now companies that don’t exist in an American-only vacuum. These are all global companies,” the senator said on “Power Lunch.”

“I have some concern, as somebody who is very concerned about the rise of China, that if we were to kind of chop off the legs of Facebook and Google, that they might be replaced by Alibaba, Baidu, Tencent — companies that are totally enmeshed with the Chinese government in their global economic plan,” he added.

Alibaba is China’s largest e-commerce platform and Tencent is the country’s internet giant, while the search engine Baidu is known as China’s answer to Google.

Alibaba, Baidu and Tencent did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Warner said there are ways to introduce more competition and transparency to the U.S. tech sector — which he thinks should be done before there is talk of breaking up the big companies. He also wants to tackle the manipulative behavior, address privacy issues and content around hate speech

His first bill, introduced with co-sponsor Sen. Deb Fischer, R-Neb. on Tuesday, bans online platforms with more than 100 million monthly active users from using so-called dark patterns. The term refers to interfaces designed to coax users into taking actions that often result in giving up more information than the user realizes — such as prompts to access phone and email contacts in order to keep using the platform.

Warner’s next piece of legislation is expected to address data transparency, requiring tech companies to disclose the value of user data and how companies profit from it, as Axios first reported.

“This is going to be an issue that is not going to go away. It’s going to only potentially get worse. And we’ve got to roll up our sleeves … and solve it,” said Warner.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, going, chinese, sen, mark, firms, warns, tencent, using, door, users, companies, giants, tech, warner, facebook, open, issues, baidu


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Lindsey Graham: Trump should release his tax returns

Sen. Lindsey Graham said Thursday that “everybody” running for president in 2020 should publicly release their tax returns — including President Donald Trump. “I think you should release your tax returns if you’re running for president in 2020,” Graham told reporters. A spokesman for the senator confirmed to CNBC that Graham believes Trump should release his tax returns. As a presidential candidate, Trump broke with the tradition widely followed since Richard Nixon by refusing to release his tax


Sen. Lindsey Graham said Thursday that “everybody” running for president in 2020 should publicly release their tax returns — including President Donald Trump. “I think you should release your tax returns if you’re running for president in 2020,” Graham told reporters. A spokesman for the senator confirmed to CNBC that Graham believes Trump should release his tax returns. As a presidential candidate, Trump broke with the tradition widely followed since Richard Nixon by refusing to release his tax
Lindsey Graham: Trump should release his tax returns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-04  Authors: kevin breuninger, chip somodevilla, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, house, release, tax, graham, trump, request, president, lindsey, sen, returns, audit


Lindsey Graham: Trump should release his tax returns

Sen. Lindsey Graham said Thursday that “everybody” running for president in 2020 should publicly release their tax returns — including President Donald Trump.

The senior GOP senator from South Carolina weighed in just hours after House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Neal, D-Mass., said he had formally submitted a request to the Treasury Department for six years of Trump’s personal and business tax returns.

“I think you should release your tax returns if you’re running for president in 2020,” Graham told reporters.

“I think everybody should,” Graham added. “That’s just my view, it’d be good for the country.”

A spokesman for the senator confirmed to CNBC that Graham believes Trump should release his tax returns.

Graham has established himself as one of Trump’s closest allies on Capitol Hill. But his stance that presidential candidates ought to disclose their tax information puts some distance between him and the president, who has refused to release his returns before or after the 2016 election.

Neal’s request to IRS Commissioner Charles Rettig is expected to trigger a protracted battle with the Trump administration, whose officials have also signaled their unwillingness to hand over the president’s financial documents.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said at a Ways and Means hearing last month that he would protect Trump “as we would protect any individual taxpayer under their rights” if the request for his returns was made.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a Fox News interview Thursday that Trump “doesn’t have any intention to release those returns,” saying that the president’s taxes “continue to be under audit.”

Asked about Graham’s remarks, Sanders told CNBC that the White House has “nothing else to add at this time.”

As a presidential candidate, Trump broke with the tradition widely followed since Richard Nixon by refusing to release his tax returns. Trump had promised to release the documents following the completion of an audit, although fact-checkers say that he could still release the returns whether or not he is being audited.

Two days after his inauguration, senior advisor Kellyanne Conway said Trump is “not going to release his tax returns” because “people didn’t care.” More recently, Trump insisted that his returns are too complex for people to understand.

When asked at the White House about the request for six years of his tax returns, Trump said, “Is that all? Usually it’s 10, so I guess they’re giving up,” Trump said

He also referred to an ongoing audit as a reason not to release his returns.

“I’m always under audit, it seems,” he said. “Until such time as I’m not under audit, I would not be inclined to do that.”

A handful of Democrats running for president in 2020 have already released years of their returns. They include New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-04  Authors: kevin breuninger, chip somodevilla, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, house, release, tax, graham, trump, request, president, lindsey, sen, returns, audit


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