Sanctions over China’s human rights could strengthen US position in trade talks, says economist

“In bringing this up, I think there are few who can factually refute and cut the U.S. down on their position.” ‘Nail in the coffin’Ahead of this week’s talks, a number of conflicting reports appeared to suggest little progress had been made. The Xinjiang-related restrictions was “the nail in the coffin” for any breakthrough during this round of trade talks, according to Gabriel Wildau, senior vice president at Teneo Risk Advisory. Still, Wildau told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Thursday in Asia that h


“In bringing this up, I think there are few who can factually refute and cut the U.S. down on their position.” ‘Nail in the coffin’Ahead of this week’s talks, a number of conflicting reports appeared to suggest little progress had been made. The Xinjiang-related restrictions was “the nail in the coffin” for any breakthrough during this round of trade talks, according to Gabriel Wildau, senior vice president at Teneo Risk Advisory. Still, Wildau told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Thursday in Asia that h
Sanctions over China’s human rights could strengthen US position in trade talks, says economist Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, senior, president, told, issues, china, strengthen, economist, sanctions, chinas, rights, position, human, talks, round, okun


Sanctions over China's human rights could strengthen US position in trade talks, says economist

Chinese President Xi Jinping shakes hands with President Donald Trump before a bilateral meeting during the G20 Summit on June 29, 2019 in Osaka, Japan. China News Service | Getty Images

It is literally impossible to have any optimism that this round of trade talks will lead to a breakthrough in the context of demands that China undergo structural reform to address what the US finds as unfair trade practices. Steven Okun senior advisor at McLarty Associates

The face-off has so far focused on a myriad of issues including China’s large trade deficit with the U.S., currency manipulation, limited market access, intellectual property theft and security problems related to Huawei. In many of those instances, observers have challenged the U.S. position — for example, when Washington called China a currency manipulator, some observers disputed it and said it was not the case, Varathan explained. With human rights, however, the issue has become more sensitive. “You can’t fault them for it. You can’t say, ‘technically that’s wrong,’ and it becomes a sensitive issue,” Varathan said. “In bringing this up, I think there are few who can factually refute and cut the U.S. down on their position.” Predictably, this week’s moves from Washington drew criticism from China. Its commerce ministry urged the U.S. to “immediately stop making irresponsible remarks on the issue of Xinjiang” and to “stop interfering” in China’s internal affairs.

‘Nail in the coffin’

Ahead of this week’s talks, a number of conflicting reports appeared to suggest little progress had been made. Experts told CNBC the two-day meeting, starting Thursday, is not expected to yield any kind of major deal and the prospects of a narrow agreement — or at least a framework — are becoming less likely. U.S. tariffs on $250 billion worth of Chinese goods are due to rise to 30% on Oct. 15. “It is literally impossible to have any optimism that this round of trade talks will lead to a breakthrough in the context of demands that China undergo structural reform to address what the US finds as unfair trade practices,” Steven Okun, senior advisor at McLarty Associates told CNBC. “Presuming the US would not accept a mini-deal based primarily on a substantial purchase of US goods, the most one can reasonably expect in terms of progress is a delay to the tariffs due to be implemented on October 15th,” Okun said by email. He added that if the U.S. includes “non-traditional trade demands within the context of a trade agreement, then there is no end to this portion of the trade war in sight.” The Xinjiang-related restrictions was “the nail in the coffin” for any breakthrough during this round of trade talks, according to Gabriel Wildau, senior vice president at Teneo Risk Advisory. Still, Wildau told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Thursday in Asia that he is more optimistic that even with the U.S. bringing up human rights issues, China may be receptive to doing a deal if the circumstances are right. “The Chinese are very used to, at this point 30 years after Tiananmen Square, very used to receiving, to absorbing, U.S. criticism on human rights,” he said. “They’ve shown a willingness over the years to compartmentalize that anger against that criticism, and to prioritize important economic issues and important economic relationships with the U.S. and other big economies.”

Bigger issues at hand


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, senior, president, told, issues, china, strengthen, economist, sanctions, chinas, rights, position, human, talks, round, okun


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Cyber threats are a top risk for most banks and corporations worldwide, expert says

Cyber threats are a top risk for most banks and corporations worldwide, expert says3 Hours AgoAlessandro Roccati, senior vice president of the Financial Institutions Group at Moody’s, discusses the growing cybersecurity threats to global lenders.


Cyber threats are a top risk for most banks and corporations worldwide, expert says3 Hours AgoAlessandro Roccati, senior vice president of the Financial Institutions Group at Moody’s, discusses the growing cybersecurity threats to global lenders.
Cyber threats are a top risk for most banks and corporations worldwide, expert says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10
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Cyber threats are a top risk for most banks and corporations worldwide, expert says

Cyber threats are a top risk for most banks and corporations worldwide, expert says

3 Hours Ago

Alessandro Roccati, senior vice president of the Financial Institutions Group at Moody’s, discusses the growing cybersecurity threats to global lenders.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10
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Social Security benefits to get a 1.6% boost in 2020

The Social Security Administration announced on Thursday that the cost-of-living adjustment for 2020 will be 1.6%. But there are some exceptions, said Mary Johnson, Social Security and Medicare policy analyst at the Senior Citizens League. TaxesWhile Social Security checks get a 1.6% boost, the tax rates on retirees’ income will stay the same. If you earn at least $25,000 individually or $32,000 as a couple filing jointly, your Social Security benefits could be subject to taxes. “It’s the other


The Social Security Administration announced on Thursday that the cost-of-living adjustment for 2020 will be 1.6%. But there are some exceptions, said Mary Johnson, Social Security and Medicare policy analyst at the Senior Citizens League. TaxesWhile Social Security checks get a 1.6% boost, the tax rates on retirees’ income will stay the same. If you earn at least $25,000 individually or $32,000 as a couple filing jointly, your Social Security benefits could be subject to taxes. “It’s the other
Social Security benefits to get a 1.6% boost in 2020 Cached Page below :
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Social Security benefits to get a 1.6% boost in 2020

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It’s official: Your Social Security checks will get a modest increase next year. The Social Security Administration announced on Thursday that the cost-of-living adjustment for 2020 will be 1.6%. That number is less than what retirees have received in recent years. In 2019, they got a 2.8% bump, while in 2018 the increase was 2%. Still, it’s better than zero, which retirees saw in 2010, 2011 and 2016. Social Security cost-of-living adjustments have averaged 1.4% in the past decade. To calculate the change, the Social Security Administration uses the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers, CPI-W, from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The 2020 increase is in line with an estimate released last month by the Senior Citizens League, a nonpartisan senior group.

Medicare premiums

The next announcement for retirees to watch for is Medicare Part B premiums for next year. Estimates from Medicare trustees peg that at $144.30, up from $135.50 in 2019. If those estimates are correct, individuals who receive the lowest Social Security benefit amounts — $550 or less – would be protected by a rule called the hold harmless provision, according to the Senior Citizens League. Medicare Part B premiums (which cover doctor’s visits among other things) are typically automatically deducted from Social Security benefit checks. The hold harmless provision prevents Part B premium increases from being larger than any Social Security benefit increases. About 70% of beneficiaries are covered, according to the Senior Citizens League. But there are some exceptions, said Mary Johnson, Social Security and Medicare policy analyst at the Senior Citizens League. For example, a low earning spouse in a high earning couple might not be covered, she said. High wage earners who do not fall under the hold harmless provision could see a small excess Medicare premium, said Joe Elsasser, president and founder of Covisum, a provider of Social Security claiming software.

Taxes

While Social Security checks get a 1.6% boost, the tax rates on retirees’ income will stay the same. If you earn at least $25,000 individually or $32,000 as a couple filing jointly, your Social Security benefits could be subject to taxes. One way to plan for that is to increase your voluntary withholding with the Social Security Administration. But a more effective way might be to increase withholdings from other sources of income, Elsasser said. “If they only have Social Security, that’s going to be tax free,” Elsasser said. “It’s the other income that creates the tax on Social Security benefits.”

Buying power


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, provision, security, benefits, league, retirees, medicare, tax, increase, boost, social, 2020, senior, citizens


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American Airlines shuffles top staff after key customer service executive steps down

Kerry Philipovitch, senior vice president of customer experience, handling areas from reservations, customer service, baggage and premium service, will retire at the end of the year, the airline said Thursday. A spokesman called the departure of Philipovitch, 49, who has been in the role at American since 2013, “entirely voluntary.” We haven’t been consistently hitting the mark, and that’s not fair to our team or our customers,” American’s president, Robert Isom, said in a note to employees. Hea


Kerry Philipovitch, senior vice president of customer experience, handling areas from reservations, customer service, baggage and premium service, will retire at the end of the year, the airline said Thursday. A spokesman called the departure of Philipovitch, 49, who has been in the role at American since 2013, “entirely voluntary.” We haven’t been consistently hitting the mark, and that’s not fair to our team or our customers,” American’s president, Robert Isom, said in a note to employees. Hea
American Airlines shuffles top staff after key customer service executive steps down Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, changes, key, senior, americans, operations, vice, isom, airlines, role, service, shuffles, steps, experience, staff, executive, customer, president, american


American Airlines shuffles top staff after key customer service executive steps down

American Airlines is shuffling some of its top executives after a key departure and struggles with its operations that led to hundreds of flight cancellations and long delays over the past few months.

Kerry Philipovitch, senior vice president of customer experience, handling areas from reservations, customer service, baggage and premium service, will retire at the end of the year, the airline said Thursday. A spokesman called the departure of Philipovitch, 49, who has been in the role at American since 2013, “entirely voluntary.”

The changes come amid growing pressure on American’s CEO, Doug Parker, to improve the Fort Worth, Texas-based carrier’s operations after it faced hundreds of cancellations over the summer, angering customers and employees. American’s stock is down more than 15% so far this year while Delta and United are each up 4%.

American has blamed many of the delays and cancellations on the unions representing its mechanics, which it accused of conducting an illegal work slowdown to gain leverage in contract talks, accusations the unions have denied. Negotiations resumed last month.

“The most important thing we can do to make culture a competitive advantage and deliver a world-class customer experience is run a safe and reliable operation. We haven’t been consistently hitting the mark, and that’s not fair to our team or our customers,” American’s president, Robert Isom, said in a note to employees.

The airline has made recent improvements, however. In September, nearly 83% of American’s flights arrived on time, its best month since November 2017 and more than 4 percentage points higher than the year-earlier period.

“The changes we’re announcing today will help build on that momentum and ensure we’re operating better than ever by increasing coordination across all operations functions,” Isom said.

The changes will mean Isom will have four direct reports, down from five, since American won’t replace Philipovitch.

David Seymour, for example, will expand his role as head of operations to take on Philipovitch’s tasks of managing airport operations.

Head of network planning, Vasu Raja, who was promoted to senior vice president, will add airline alliances and partnerships to his role. Joint ventures and equity stakes have become more important to airlines as they expand because foreign ownership rules prevent carriers from buying foreign airlines outright. Last month, rival Delta announced a surprise minority stake in American’s longtime Latin American partner LATAM, the region’s largest airline.

Kurt Stache, senior vice president of loyalty and marketing, will take on passenger experience management, which Philiopovich previously handled.

The changes will mean Isom will have four direct reports, down from five.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, changes, key, senior, americans, operations, vice, isom, airlines, role, service, shuffles, steps, experience, staff, executive, customer, president, american


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Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Bed Bath & Beyond, PG&E, Sprint and more

Tritton was most recently executive vice president and chief merchandising officer at Target. His immediate focus will be on “accelerating the [c]ompany’s ongoing business transformation,” the home goods retailer said in a press release. Separately, Target announced that Senior Vice President of Operations Michael Fiddelke will become executive vice president and CFO on Nov. 1. So far, more than a dozen other state attorneys general have signed onto the multi-state lawsuit opposing the merger, R


Tritton was most recently executive vice president and chief merchandising officer at Target. His immediate focus will be on “accelerating the [c]ompany’s ongoing business transformation,” the home goods retailer said in a press release. Separately, Target announced that Senior Vice President of Operations Michael Fiddelke will become executive vice president and CFO on Nov. 1. So far, more than a dozen other state attorneys general have signed onto the multi-state lawsuit opposing the merger, R
Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Bed Bath & Beyond, PG&E, Sprint and more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: ganesh setty
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bed, target, stocks, trade, following, tritton, making, general, shares, president, senior, tmobile, vice, biggest, bath, hours, pge, moves, sprint


Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Bed Bath & Beyond, PG&E, Sprint and more

Check out the companies making headlines after the bell:

Bed Bath & Beyond shares surged as much as 22% during extended trade after the company announced that Mark Tritton will take the helm as president and CEO of the company on Nov. 4, succeeding interim CEO Mary A. Winston. Tritton was most recently executive vice president and chief merchandising officer at Target. His immediate focus will be on “accelerating the [c]ompany’s ongoing business transformation,” the home goods retailer said in a press release.

Separately, Target announced that Senior Vice President of Operations Michael Fiddelke will become executive vice president and CFO on Nov. 1. The retailer’s shares dropped 1%, after the company’s stock hit a YTD high earlier Wednesday.

PG&E shares plunged more than 25% after a California judge granted a motion from a group of claimants and senior note-holders led by Elliott Management, which would open the way to a rival restructuring plan. The claimants and creditors must file their plan by Oct. 17, the judge ordered.

Shares of Sprint popped nearly 3% after the bell following Mississippi’s Attorney General Jim Hood’s settlement with T-Mobile to drop his state’s legal challenge against the merger between the two carriers in exchange for new T-Mobile 5G networks, among other commitments. Within six years, New T-Mobile must cover at least 92% of Mississippi’s general population and 88% of its rural population with 5G service, according to the terms of the agreement. So far, more than a dozen other state attorneys general have signed onto the multi-state lawsuit opposing the merger, Reuters reported.

Micron shares sunk 2% following a report from the South China Morning Post that the U.S. and China made no progress in deputy-level trade negotiations this week. Higher-level talks are expected to last for only Thursday, the report added, instead of the Thursday-Friday timeframe that was originally planned.

Shares of NVIDIA and Broadcom also fell following the news. NVIDIA fell 2% while Broadcom dropped 1%.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: ganesh setty
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bed, target, stocks, trade, following, tritton, making, general, shares, president, senior, tmobile, vice, biggest, bath, hours, pge, moves, sprint


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Risk of no-deal Brexit remains meaningful, analyst says

Risk of no-deal Brexit remains meaningful, analyst says4 Hours AgoPaul Watters, senior director and head of corporate research at S&P Global Ratings, discusses Brexit.


Risk of no-deal Brexit remains meaningful, analyst says4 Hours AgoPaul Watters, senior director and head of corporate research at S&P Global Ratings, discusses Brexit.
Risk of no-deal Brexit remains meaningful, analyst says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07
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Risk of no-deal Brexit remains meaningful, analyst says

Risk of no-deal Brexit remains meaningful, analyst says

4 Hours Ago

Paul Watters, senior director and head of corporate research at S&P Global Ratings, discusses Brexit.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07
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These costs are taking the biggest bite out of retirees’ wallets. Social Security isn’t helping

Recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show just which expenses could be taking the biggest bite out of your wallet. The data come from the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers, or CPI-U. The Senior Citizens League, a non-partisan advocacy group, selected the top costs affecting retirees from the data. But the numbers exclude one big health-care cost for retirees: Medicare premiums. Surveys show that retirees’ total health-care costs are closer to 25%


Recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show just which expenses could be taking the biggest bite out of your wallet. The data come from the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers, or CPI-U. The Senior Citizens League, a non-partisan advocacy group, selected the top costs affecting retirees from the data. But the numbers exclude one big health-care cost for retirees: Medicare premiums. Surveys show that retirees’ total health-care costs are closer to 25%
These costs are taking the biggest bite out of retirees’ wallets. Social Security isn’t helping Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, isnt, costs, league, wallets, social, healthcare, retirees, helping, data, biggest, past, statistics, security, bite, medicare, taking, labor, senior


These costs are taking the biggest bite out of retirees' wallets. Social Security isn't helping

If you’re retired, you’ve probably noticed that costs keep going up.

Recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show just which expenses could be taking the biggest bite out of your wallet.

One of the main culprits: health insurance, which surged 18.6% from August 2018 to August 2019. That’s second only to intercity bus fare, which went up 21.8% in the past year.

Other things that have gotten costlier in the past 12 months: repairing household items, which rose by 8.7%; men’s outerwear, 8.3%; and potatoes, 6.2%.

The data come from the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers, or CPI-U. The Senior Citizens League, a non-partisan advocacy group, selected the top costs affecting retirees from the data.

But the numbers exclude one big health-care cost for retirees: Medicare premiums. Surveys show that retirees’ total health-care costs are closer to 25% of their overall income, said Mary Johnson, Social Security and Medicare policy analyst at The Senior Citizens League.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: lorie konish
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Treasury yields rise amid cautious trade optimism

China is not the only one that has to change its practices:… The U.S. also has to re-look the way it’s engaging with China to address its complaints, said Stephen Roach, a senior fellow at Yale University. Politicsread more


China is not the only one that has to change its practices:… The U.S. also has to re-look the way it’s engaging with China to address its complaints, said Stephen Roach, a senior fellow at Yale University. Politicsread more
Treasury yields rise amid cautious trade optimism Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: elliot smith
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Treasury yields rise amid cautious trade optimism

China is not the only one that has to change its practices:…

The U.S. also has to re-look the way it’s engaging with China to address its complaints, said Stephen Roach, a senior fellow at Yale University.

Politics

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: elliot smith
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Here’s what advisors can do if they suspect a senior is being financially abused or exploited

After making calls to the bar, the financial advisor made a discovery: A close friend of the client was secretly writing and cashing the checks. As boomers continue to age, financial advisors are confronting a new threat to their hard-earned savings: elder financial abuse. Eight out of 10 participants said they would feel comfortable telling friends, family or a financial advisor if they had been subject to financial elder abuse. What’s more, about 33% don’t know how to report an elder financial


After making calls to the bar, the financial advisor made a discovery: A close friend of the client was secretly writing and cashing the checks. As boomers continue to age, financial advisors are confronting a new threat to their hard-earned savings: elder financial abuse. Eight out of 10 participants said they would feel comfortable telling friends, family or a financial advisor if they had been subject to financial elder abuse. What’s more, about 33% don’t know how to report an elder financial
Here’s what advisors can do if they suspect a senior is being financially abused or exploited Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financially, senior, suspect, exploited, advisors, youre, heres, seniors, abused, elder, abuse, financial, checks, clients, advisor, lost


Here's what advisors can do if they suspect a senior is being financially abused or exploited

Westend61 | Westend61 | Getty Images

Ed Gjertsen II, a financial advisor in Northfield, Illinois, knew something was fishy when an elderly and infirm client started cashing checks at a local bar. It was out of character for the investor, a single man in his 70s. “These were small checks: $500 here, $1,000 there,” said Gjertsen, a certified financial planner and vice president of Mack Investment Securities. “He was in declining health, which is why we knew he wasn’t up and out of the house cashing checks — he just couldn’t do it,” he said. After making calls to the bar, the financial advisor made a discovery: A close friend of the client was secretly writing and cashing the checks. “If you’re a smart enough scammer, you’re not trying to cash $30,000 at once; you’re slowly moving money out,” said Gjertsen.

As boomers continue to age, financial advisors are confronting a new threat to their hard-earned savings: elder financial abuse. Close to half of seniors aged 65 or over oversee their own finances, which makes them vulnerable to thieves, according to a new survey from AIG Life & Retirement. Eight out of 10 participants said they would feel comfortable telling friends, family or a financial advisor if they had been subject to financial elder abuse. What’s more, about 33% don’t know how to report an elder financial abuse incident. The company performed an online poll of 2,200 adults in June. “People are living longer lives than before,” said Michele Kryger, head of elder and vulnerable client care at AIG. “We are focused on helping people save for retirement, and we don’t want to see that savings go out the door to a fraudster.”

Threats close to home

SolStock | Getty Images

Between 2013 and 2017, seniors (over age 70) lost an average of $41,800 to elder financial exploitation, according to an analysis by the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Losses are even higher when the scammer is a friend or relative. Seniors scammed by strangers lost an average of $17,000, while those who were ripped off by someone they know lost an average of $50,200, the bureau found.

In one case, an adult child reached out to one of AIG’s call centers in Amarillo, Texas, to make a large transaction request, Kryger said. The client’s child was able to get around the security questions. Thinking the call had ended, the child made a chilling admission to someone nearby — and the AIG rep on the line overheard it. “We heard them say offline, ‘See how easy it is to impersonate my mother?'” Kryger said. The company followed its fraud protocol and contacted the authorities.

Establish procedures

Pascal Broze | ONOKY | Getty Images

Financial advisors have tools at their disposal to protect older investors. For instance, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority allows broker-dealers to put a hold of up to 15 days on the disbursement of funds from accounts belonging to seniors if they believe that individual is being financially exploited. Firms are also required to ask their retail clients to provide the name and contact information for a “trusted contact person” who can be contacted in the event of suspected financial exploitation. The Senior Safe Act, a federal law, protects advisors and their firms from liability when reporting possible exploitation to the authorities. To help advisors detect elder financial abuse, the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association released a guide detailing signs of undue influence, power of attorney abuse and other fraud. “There’s an aspect to this where it’s not just feel-good social services, but also a business purpose to look directly at the issue of aging clients and how to address this,” said Judith Kozlowski, an elder justice consultant in Washington, D.C.

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In practice, advisors should work with clients to identify those trusted contacts early in the engagement. “The most important thing an advisor can do is to have processes in place and be prepared for cognitive issues well in advance,” said CFP Carolyn McClanahan, a physician and director of financial planning at Life Planning Partners in Jacksonville, Florida. “Once those cognitive issues happen, if you haven’t already prepared and set the tone for the discussion, it’s going to be a nightmare,” she said.

Identifying who you trust

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financially, senior, suspect, exploited, advisors, youre, heres, seniors, abused, elder, abuse, financial, checks, clients, advisor, lost


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Your Social Security checks could get bigger next year. Here’s how much

When it comes to the forecast for your Social Security benefits in 2020, there’s good news and bad news. Your Social Security checks are poised to grow next year; however, the annual increase likely won’t be as much as you got in 2019. That’s according to The Senior Citizens League, which on Thursday released its latest estimate for the Social Security cost-of-living adjustment for 2020. The nonpartisan group estimates that beneficiaries will get a 1.6% boost in 2020, down from a 2.8% increase i


When it comes to the forecast for your Social Security benefits in 2020, there’s good news and bad news. Your Social Security checks are poised to grow next year; however, the annual increase likely won’t be as much as you got in 2019. That’s according to The Senior Citizens League, which on Thursday released its latest estimate for the Social Security cost-of-living adjustment for 2020. The nonpartisan group estimates that beneficiaries will get a 1.6% boost in 2020, down from a 2.8% increase i
Your Social Security checks could get bigger next year. Here’s how much Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-12  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, senior, increase, wont, nonpartisan, bigger, 2020, social, theres, poised, heres, checks, released, security


Your Social Security checks could get bigger next year. Here's how much

When it comes to the forecast for your Social Security benefits in 2020, there’s good news and bad news.

Your Social Security checks are poised to grow next year; however, the annual increase likely won’t be as much as you got in 2019.

That’s according to The Senior Citizens League, which on Thursday released its latest estimate for the Social Security cost-of-living adjustment for 2020.

The nonpartisan group estimates that beneficiaries will get a 1.6% boost in 2020, down from a 2.8% increase in 2019.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-12  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, senior, increase, wont, nonpartisan, bigger, 2020, social, theres, poised, heres, checks, released, security


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