More China tariffs could push the US into a ‘Trump recession,’ CEO says

While the U.S. Commerce Department has granted a 90-day reprieve to Huawei, China has already been ramping up development of its own semiconductor industry — which could ultimately hurt the profits of U.S. companies. The blacklisting of Huawei will not only push China to become more closed off to the rest of the world, but will also hinder the United States’ ability to maintain “world leadership” in the technology market, Shapiro said. “We have these great American chip companies ready to sell t


While the U.S. Commerce Department has granted a 90-day reprieve to Huawei, China has already been ramping up development of its own semiconductor industry — which could ultimately hurt the profits of U.S. companies. The blacklisting of Huawei will not only push China to become more closed off to the rest of the world, but will also hinder the United States’ ability to maintain “world leadership” in the technology market, Shapiro said. “We have these great American chip companies ready to sell t
More China tariffs could push the US into a ‘Trump recession,’ CEO says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: shirley tay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, world, china, companies, xi, push, ceo, united, states, shapiro, recession, president, tariffs, huawei


More China tariffs could push the US into a 'Trump recession,' CEO says

Trump on Monday renewed his tariff threats on China after Myron Brilliant, the head of international affairs at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, told CNBC that Trump’s “weaponization of tariffs” hurts the U.S. economy and “creates uncertainty” with trading partners. Trump confirmed that an additional raft of levies will be slapped on Beijing if Chinese President Xi Jinping does not show up at the G-20 meeting in Japan — an event investors and economists will be watching for signs of a breakthrough in the trade impasse.

Huawei dispute could ‘escalate out of control’

The current tensions between the U.S. and China appeared to reach a new height when Washington placed Huawei on a U.S. entity list in May, limiting the Chinese telecom giant’s ability to purchase goods from American firms. While the U.S. Commerce Department has granted a 90-day reprieve to Huawei, China has already been ramping up development of its own semiconductor industry — which could ultimately hurt the profits of U.S. companies. According to Shapiro, restrictive measures in the tech space could escalate “out of control” and cause both consumers and U.S. chip companies to be “trampled.” The blacklisting of Huawei will not only push China to become more closed off to the rest of the world, but will also hinder the United States’ ability to maintain “world leadership” in the technology market, Shapiro said. “We have these great American chip companies ready to sell to all around the world,” he said. “And the fact is, I think the U.S. policy may be really pushing China to do everything by itself, and not only put up walls around China, but we’re putting up an economic fence around the United States.” If the U.S. wants to advance “and be innovative, maintain world leadership, we have to be out there in the world marketplace,” he added.

President Donald Trump speaks during a press conference with China’s President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. Nicholas Asfouri | AFP | Getty Images

Tech bifurcation possible


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: shirley tay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, world, china, companies, xi, push, ceo, united, states, shapiro, recession, president, tariffs, huawei


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Here’s how the trade war could lead to a boom in counterfeit goods

As the trade war between the U.S. and China has continued to heat up, Chinese nationals potentially could turn to a surprising way around tariffs: increasing the number of counterfeit goods, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Trade groups have warned Congress that tariffs could increase costs and drain resources available to fight illicit counterfeits. They also caution that consumers may knowingly or unknowingly seek counterfeit goods as legitimate goods become more expensive. Si


As the trade war between the U.S. and China has continued to heat up, Chinese nationals potentially could turn to a surprising way around tariffs: increasing the number of counterfeit goods, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Trade groups have warned Congress that tariffs could increase costs and drain resources available to fight illicit counterfeits. They also caution that consumers may knowingly or unknowingly seek counterfeit goods as legitimate goods become more expensive. Si
Here’s how the trade war could lead to a boom in counterfeit goods Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: jennifer schlesinger, andrea day, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, goods, according, product, trade, heres, tariffs, shapiro, products, lead, counterfeit, boom, ways, war, unit


Here's how the trade war could lead to a boom in counterfeit goods

As the trade war between the U.S. and China has continued to heat up, Chinese nationals potentially could turn to a surprising way around tariffs: increasing the number of counterfeit goods, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Trade groups have warned Congress that tariffs could increase costs and drain resources available to fight illicit counterfeits. They also caution that consumers may knowingly or unknowingly seek counterfeit goods as legitimate goods become more expensive. Six trade groups sent a letter to the House Ways and Means Committee with the warning in June, according to World Trademark Review.

Counterfeit goods cost the U.S. economy an estimated $600 billion a year, or 3 percent of the U.S. gross domestic product, according to Steve Shapiro, the unit chief for the FBI’s intellectual property rights unit. Twenty-four federal and international law enforcement agencies work together to stop the illegal products. But booming e-commerce sales are adding to the flood of products agencies must monitor, and counterfeiters are increasingly learning how to make harder-to-spot fakes or finding new ways around the systems that were put in place to prevent fraudulent products.

“Every day I come into the office and I see new product categories that criminals are manufacturing fraudulently,” Shapiro said.

Shipments from China are including an ever-increasing number of counterfeit items, according to Frank Russo, the port director for Customs and Border Protection at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: jennifer schlesinger, andrea day, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, goods, according, product, trade, heres, tariffs, shapiro, products, lead, counterfeit, boom, ways, war, unit


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Woodbridge Group ordered to pay $1 billion for Ponzi scheme targeting retail investors

A federal court in Florida ordered a real estate investing firm and its former owner to pay $1 billion for operating a Ponzi scheme that targeted thousands of retail investors, many of them seniors. The Securities and Exchange Commission, which announced the order on Monday, filed an emergency action in December 2017 charging the company with operating the $1.2 billion Ponzi scheme that defrauded 8,400 retail investors across the country. It was supposed to pay investors a 10 percent annual retu


A federal court in Florida ordered a real estate investing firm and its former owner to pay $1 billion for operating a Ponzi scheme that targeted thousands of retail investors, many of them seniors. The Securities and Exchange Commission, which announced the order on Monday, filed an emergency action in December 2017 charging the company with operating the $1.2 billion Ponzi scheme that defrauded 8,400 retail investors across the country. It was supposed to pay investors a 10 percent annual retu
Woodbridge Group ordered to pay $1 billion for Ponzi scheme targeting retail investors Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-28  Authors: liz moyer, adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, court, investing, ponzi, group, woodbridge, ordered, investors, scheme, million, money, targeting, billion, pay, retail, shapiro


Woodbridge Group ordered to pay $1 billion for Ponzi scheme targeting retail investors

A federal court in Florida ordered a real estate investing firm and its former owner to pay $1 billion for operating a Ponzi scheme that targeted thousands of retail investors, many of them seniors.

The court ordered Woodbridge Group of Companies to pay $892 million in disgorgement and its former owner and CEO Robert H. Shapiro to pay a $100 million civil penalty and give back more than $20 million in ill-gotten gains and interest.

The Securities and Exchange Commission, which announced the order on Monday, filed an emergency action in December 2017 charging the company with operating the $1.2 billion Ponzi scheme that defrauded 8,400 retail investors across the country. The SEC accused Shapiro and Woodbridge of swindling seniors in “a business model built on lies.”

It was supposed to pay investors a 10 percent annual return by investing in developers who flipped luxury real estate. But the SEC said the money went instead to a constellation of related companies and was used to pay off other investors. Shapiro was accused of diverting $21 million for his own benefit, including charter planes, country club fees, luxury vehicles and jewelry.

A Ponzi scheme is an investment fraud that pays current investors with money brought in from new investors, often without ever investing the money in the way it was advertised it would be invested. The U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida approved the judgments against Woodbridge and its 281 affiliates. The defendants neither admitted nor denied the SEC’s accusations.

Woodbridge collapsed in December 2017 when it stopped paying investors and filed for bankruptcy.

This story is developing. Please check back for updates.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-28  Authors: liz moyer, adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, court, investing, ponzi, group, woodbridge, ordered, investors, scheme, million, money, targeting, billion, pay, retail, shapiro


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Hackers using identity theft tactics to scam businesses out of data

Most people are familiar with identity theft, which happens when someone pretends to be someone else to make purchases, apply for credit or even get their tax refund. However, an increasing number of criminals are doing the same thing, but stealing business data. Business identity theft was up 46 percent year-over-year in 2017, the latest numbers available, according to data and analytics company Dun & Bradstreet. “Criminals have a perception that it’s easier to find a business’s data than it is


Most people are familiar with identity theft, which happens when someone pretends to be someone else to make purchases, apply for credit or even get their tax refund. However, an increasing number of criminals are doing the same thing, but stealing business data. Business identity theft was up 46 percent year-over-year in 2017, the latest numbers available, according to data and analytics company Dun & Bradstreet. “Criminals have a perception that it’s easier to find a business’s data than it is
Hackers using identity theft tactics to scam businesses out of data Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-21  Authors: jennifer schlesinger, andrea day, thomas samson, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, identity, data, perception, shapiro, company, hackers, using, theft, scam, tactics, businesses, business, recent, according


Hackers using identity theft tactics to scam businesses out of data

Most people are familiar with identity theft, which happens when someone pretends to be someone else to make purchases, apply for credit or even get their tax refund.

However, an increasing number of criminals are doing the same thing, but stealing business data.

Business identity theft was up 46 percent year-over-year in 2017, the latest numbers available, according to data and analytics company Dun & Bradstreet.

Cyber-criminals “actually take on their client lists or the special sauce that makes that company operate and compete with them directly. In other instances, they’re pretending to be that business,” Steven Shapiro, a unit chief at the FBI, told CNBC in a recent interview.

At stake are businesses’ brand, reputation and trade secrets. One recent case cost the company $1 billion in market share and hundreds of jobs, according to the FBI.

“Criminals have a perception that it’s easier to find a business’s data than it is for individuals. There’s also a perception that businesses have deeper pockets than an individual would in an identity theft situation,” said Shapiro.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-21  Authors: jennifer schlesinger, andrea day, thomas samson, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, identity, data, perception, shapiro, company, hackers, using, theft, scam, tactics, businesses, business, recent, according


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Forced tech transfer in China is ‘almost historic’ now: CEO

Forced tech transfer in China is ‘almost historic’ now: CEO5:50 PM ET Mon, 3 Dec 2018Gary Shapiro, CEO of the Consumer Technology Association, says there has been a “reversal in policies” by China on intellectual property, in part due to pressure from the Obama administration and the Trump administration.


Forced tech transfer in China is ‘almost historic’ now: CEO5:50 PM ET Mon, 3 Dec 2018Gary Shapiro, CEO of the Consumer Technology Association, says there has been a “reversal in policies” by China on intellectual property, in part due to pressure from the Obama administration and the Trump administration.
Forced tech transfer in China is ‘almost historic’ now: CEO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, historic, china, ceo, technology, trump, tech, property, transfer, forced, reversal, pressure, administration, shapiro


Forced tech transfer in China is 'almost historic' now: CEO

Forced tech transfer in China is ‘almost historic’ now: CEO

5:50 PM ET Mon, 3 Dec 2018

Gary Shapiro, CEO of the Consumer Technology Association, says there has been a “reversal in policies” by China on intellectual property, in part due to pressure from the Obama administration and the Trump administration.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, historic, china, ceo, technology, trump, tech, property, transfer, forced, reversal, pressure, administration, shapiro


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How to get a raise, even when the boss won’t negotiate

I was promoted early (it usually takes two years), and got a raise, but lost my eligibility for overtime pay. It seems to me like the company really does not expect us to negotiate or even discuss our salary. Next, do some research outside your company, Mr. Shapiro said. The idea, Mr. Shapiro said, is to “make the employer an ally.” At the same time, you should probably start thinking about what you’ll do if the company really won’t budge.


I was promoted early (it usually takes two years), and got a raise, but lost my eligibility for overtime pay. It seems to me like the company really does not expect us to negotiate or even discuss our salary. Next, do some research outside your company, Mr. Shapiro said. The idea, Mr. Shapiro said, is to “make the employer an ally.” At the same time, you should probably start thinking about what you’ll do if the company really won’t budge.
How to get a raise, even when the boss won’t negotiate Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-13  Authors: rob walker, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, raise, negotiate, shapiro, boss, mr, salary, company, started, wont, really, pay, youre


How to get a raise, even when the boss won't negotiate

Send your workplace conundrums to workologist@nytimes.com, including your name and contact information (even if you want it withheld). The Workologist is a guy with well-intentioned opinions, not a professional career adviser. Letters may be edited.

I graduated from college two years ago and have been at the same company ever since. When I started, I was told that the salary was nonnegotiable; all entry-level employees start at the same hourly rate. I had a strong first year at work. Also, I regularly worked overtime, so I was making about 15 percent extra over my base pay. I was promoted early (it usually takes two years), and got a raise, but lost my eligibility for overtime pay. So I make less now than when I started. When I tried to discuss this with my boss, management, and human resources, they all told me nothing could be done and that my salary would get back to where it started next year if I got a raise after my next performance review. I’ve now had my review, and received the highest rating. But my boss said that she has no information about salary and isn’t the right person to discuss it with. It seems to me like the company really does not expect us to negotiate or even discuss our salary. Is that the strangest thing you’ve ever heard, or am I missing something here? H.M.

That’s really frustrating. And certainly your boss claiming to be unsure about whom you should talk to is rather strange. It’s not as if you’re asking about some esoteric issue; salary is kind of a big deal.

For some help, I talked to Daniel Shapiro, founder and director of the Harvard International Negotiation Program.

Your first move is to get more information. Set up a meeting with H.R., Mr. Shapiro suggested. Treat it as purely informational: Don’t complain about your boss or demand a raise. Just focus on getting someone to explain the compensation system, how employees are valued, and what opportunitiesfor advancement or increased pay are available now or will be in the future.

More from The New York Times:

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How to retire in your 30s With $1 million in the bank

Your job is more intense. Your pay and title haven’t kept up.

“You could learn a lot,” he said. Maybe your boss isn’t giving you the whole story. Or perhaps there are more innocent factors: Your company’s entry-level salary may be high for your field.

You might also talk to trusted colleagues to see if others have had the same experience. Next, do some research outside your company, Mr. Shapiro said. Find out what your firm’s competitors would pay a person like you.

When you’ve got a handle on all this, arrange a separate conversation with whomever turns out to make decisions on salary issues — and get creative. Is a bonus a possibility? What about more time off? Improved benefits? A raise tied to specific goals in a definite time period?

“People typically see negotiation as an adversarial game,” Mr. Shapiro said. “Shift the nature of that conversation, so that it’s collaborative.” You can frame your effort as seeking input in finding a fair resolution. Point out that you’re paid $X, but for these reasons you believe you are worth $Y. Then, he said, ask something like, “What advice do you have for me about how to think through this salary dilemma?”

The idea, Mr. Shapiro said, is to “make the employer an ally.”

At the same time, you should probably start thinking about what you’ll do if the company really won’t budge. Unless you’re willing to accept being paid less than believe you deserve, that means exploring alternatives elsewhere.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-13  Authors: rob walker, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, raise, negotiate, shapiro, boss, mr, salary, company, started, wont, really, pay, youre


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Facebook gave Cambridge Analytica ‘keys’ to break in, says Penn. attorney general

Facebook gave Cambridge Analytica ‘keys’ to break in, says Penn. attorney general4 Hours AgoJosh Shapiro, Pennsylvania attorney general, talks about ways to protect consumers from data breaches.


Facebook gave Cambridge Analytica ‘keys’ to break in, says Penn. attorney general4 Hours AgoJosh Shapiro, Pennsylvania attorney general, talks about ways to protect consumers from data breaches.
Facebook gave Cambridge Analytica ‘keys’ to break in, says Penn. attorney general Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-23
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talks, ways, protect, hours, shapiro, general4, general, pennsylvania, penn, keys, attorney, cambridge, break, facebook, analytica, gave


Facebook gave Cambridge Analytica 'keys' to break in, says Penn. attorney general

Facebook gave Cambridge Analytica ‘keys’ to break in, says Penn. attorney general

4 Hours Ago

Josh Shapiro, Pennsylvania attorney general, talks about ways to protect consumers from data breaches.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-23
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talks, ways, protect, hours, shapiro, general4, general, pennsylvania, penn, keys, attorney, cambridge, break, facebook, analytica, gave


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Caltech breakthrough: Bacteria engineered with ‘sonar’ fight disease

The study of the role that inflammation plays in disease has also become a key goal of medical science. The Caltech researchers engineered the gene for that gas-filled nanostructure into benign versions of E. coli and Salmonella. Now the Caltech team has moved on to a larger goal with this gene — engineering it into the T-cells that are vital to immunotherapy. But Shapiro said it will be years before Caltech researchers know if the approach works with T-cells similarly to in bacteria, but the ul


The study of the role that inflammation plays in disease has also become a key goal of medical science. The Caltech researchers engineered the gene for that gas-filled nanostructure into benign versions of E. coli and Salmonella. Now the Caltech team has moved on to a larger goal with this gene — engineering it into the T-cells that are vital to immunotherapy. But Shapiro said it will be years before Caltech researchers know if the approach works with T-cells similarly to in bacteria, but the ul
Caltech breakthrough: Bacteria engineered with ‘sonar’ fight disease Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-01-05  Authors: eric rosenbaum, pasieka, getty images, courtesy of the millius family, qilai shen, bloomberg, jonathan ernst, michael phillips, pedro castellano
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, ultrasound, sonar, technique, disease, researchers, shapiro, questions, cells, answer, caltech, bacteria, engineered, body, breakthrough, fight


Caltech breakthrough: Bacteria engineered with 'sonar' fight disease

“Sophisticated cellular agents are fulfilling a sci-fi vision of having shrunken micro-robots running around in bodies and fixing things, but currently there is no way to see where these agents are inside the body, what they are doing or how they are doing it. It’s a black box.”

To date, the most effective medical imaging tools have relied on fluorescent proteins — a technique based on jellyfish genes that resulted in a Nobel Prize in 2008 — but that does not work well for cells in the middle of the body because light gets absorbed on its way out of tissues.

While there is no guarantee this technique will ever be applied to human patients — the Caltech experiments were conducted with mice — it already can prove valuable in lab testing of drugs. A former official at biotech firm, Vion Pharmaceuticals, that experienced a failed trial in the first-ever attempt to use Salmonella as a cancer-fighting agent decades ago, said this week it might have continued with more trials if this technique had been available because the ultrasound would have allowed it to better track the bacteria to see if they were successfully colonizing patient tumors — Vion had to use tissue biopsies.

The immunotherapy market is projected to be worth as much as hundreds of billions of dollars in the next few decades, and both venture capital and stock market investors have been investing in biotech firms developing these therapies. The study of the role that inflammation plays in disease has also become a key goal of medical science. And research related to the microbiome — the millions of types of microorganisms including bacteria that live in and on our bodies, especially in the gut — has also been booming.

“Some patients respond and some patients don’t, and the question is did cells not get to the right place, or not in enough numbers, or got there but the therapy was not effective,” Shapiro explained. “Depending on the answer to those questions, what you do next could be very different.” He added that in drug development and patient treatment, “ideally you answer these questions sooner rather than later, you don’t wait for the cancer to progress.”

Researchers not directly involved in the Caltech study wrote in an accompanying piece for Nature this week that outlined the implications of the acoustically engineered bacteria, “Some medical approaches currently in use or being developed introduce bacterial cells as a therapy for gut disease or cancer, so this ultrasound technique might be adapted for clinical use to determine whether such cells have reached the desired location.”

More from Modern Medicine:

Drug breakthroughs coming in neglected hearing loss market

An AI has been designed to walk people through the end of life

Nobel Prize-winning research warns about using phone in bed

As in the case of the jellyfish gene, Caltech researchers went looking in the natural world for an organism with the right properties to bounce off soundwaves. They found one in a photosynthetic microbe in bodies of water that evolved a gas-filled vesicle inside their cells that could modulate density. As a result, these gas-filled proteins could produce signals under ultrasound. In ultrasound, sound waves move through tissue and when encountering something with another density or stiffness, some of sound waves gets reflected back, Shapiro said, equating it to sonar in the ocean. The Caltech researchers engineered the gene for that gas-filled nanostructure into benign versions of E. coli and Salmonella.

Now the Caltech team has moved on to a larger goal with this gene — engineering it into the T-cells that are vital to immunotherapy. “The first step was to put it into bacteria to see if we can image those bacteria, and image in the body, but the bigger picture goal is to do it in any kind of cell. We want to put the same genetic set into immunotherapy to track it.”

He said that is very active research in the Caltech lab now, and “it’s doable. With improvements in this technique and if it is well tolerated by cells, ultimately we would like to see it in humans.”

But Shapiro said it will be years before Caltech researchers know if the approach works with T-cells similarly to in bacteria, but the ultimate goals of this technique span from basic science to targeted therapies.

“We want to see things like cells and cellular functions happening inside the body. We want to know how cancers form and how microbes live, because in the body is different than in the lab,” Shapiro said. “Even just to answer basic questions on what microbes do in mammals, there are still lots of open questions on diseases that this technique can help answer.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-01-05  Authors: eric rosenbaum, pasieka, getty images, courtesy of the millius family, qilai shen, bloomberg, jonathan ernst, michael phillips, pedro castellano
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, ultrasound, sonar, technique, disease, researchers, shapiro, questions, cells, answer, caltech, bacteria, engineered, body, breakthrough, fight


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STATE Optical takes aim at Warby Parker with Chicago-branded glasses made in the USA

Each frame includes a set of 21 precision drilled holes set in the temples, a homage to Illinois being the 21st state of America. Still, Shapiro insisted domestic manufacturing gives STATE an advantage in the quality of its eyewear. By producing the frames in the U.S., Shapiro said they can spot quality or production issues and correct them early. The stakes are high in the fiercely competitive eyewear market, which is expected to grow to nearly $130 billion worldwide as demand increases for pre


Each frame includes a set of 21 precision drilled holes set in the temples, a homage to Illinois being the 21st state of America. Still, Shapiro insisted domestic manufacturing gives STATE an advantage in the quality of its eyewear. By producing the frames in the U.S., Shapiro said they can spot quality or production issues and correct them early. The stakes are high in the fiercely competitive eyewear market, which is expected to grow to nearly $130 billion worldwide as demand increases for pre
STATE Optical takes aim at Warby Parker with Chicago-branded glasses made in the USA Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-11-17  Authors: mike juang, getty images, source, wikimedia commons
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, state, homma, parker, market, eyewear, chicagobranded, takes, shapiro, manufacturing, glasses, usa, optical, warby, frame, set, quality, try, aim


STATE Optical takes aim at Warby Parker with Chicago-branded glasses made in the USA

Indeed, frame designs are all named after streets in Chicago, from Armitage to Ravenswood. Each frame includes a set of 21 precision drilled holes set in the temples, a homage to Illinois being the 21st state of America.

Each frame, which retails for between $320 and $4200, bears a small stamp on the inside: “Made in the USA”—a nod to the politics of manufacturing goods domestically.

While some of the materials are still sourced from overseas (Italian acetate and hinges from Germany), all steps of manufacturing are done in the U.S.

According to Shapiro, that created some difficulties for manufacturing: While many craftsmen were knowledgeable about eyewear in the U.S., none of them had seen a frame being made before. “Fundamentally it’s going to be more difficult and expensive to manufacture in the U.S.,” said Shapiro. “The cost of labor is higher even now between the U.S. and China.”

Still, Shapiro insisted domestic manufacturing gives STATE an advantage in the quality of its eyewear. By producing the frames in the U.S., Shapiro said they can spot quality or production issues and correct them early.

The stakes are high in the fiercely competitive eyewear market, which is expected to grow to nearly $130 billion worldwide as demand increases for prescription eyeglasses. The U.S. market is dominated by Essilor and Luxottica with 19 percent and 13 percent, respectively, according to data from Euromonitor. Earlier this year, the companies announced a merger to consolidate every part of their eyewear manufacturing businesses.

Being an upstart also means needing to develop brand awareness very quickly, experts say, especially if the company hopes to become relevant overseas.

“There are local companies that have large market shares already,” said Ayako Homma, Senior Analyst at Euromonitor International.

Warby Parker jump-started awareness of its own U.S.-made brand through convenience, said Homma, by letting customers choose several frames online and shipping them to their homes to try before buying.

Shapiro, however, remained optimistic about STATE.

“We know that most people don’t associate made in the USA with luxury,” said Shapiro. “When [the customer] put that frame on, that almost likely will be the first time they will try on a frame made in the United States.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-11-17  Authors: mike juang, getty images, source, wikimedia commons
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, state, homma, parker, market, eyewear, chicagobranded, takes, shapiro, manufacturing, glasses, usa, optical, warby, frame, set, quality, try, aim


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Nvidia unveils computer to drive ‘fully autonomous robotaxis’

Nvidia on Tuesday unveiled what it says is the world’s first artificial intelligence computer system designed to drive fully autonomous robotaxis, and said it plans to make a fleet of autonomous trucks. The system’s capabilities represent more than a tenfold increase over the current system, Nvidia said in a news release. Nvidia said it is working with several companies on developing robotaxis, but Shapiro declined to name them. Pegasus will be available to Nvidia automotive partners in the seco


Nvidia on Tuesday unveiled what it says is the world’s first artificial intelligence computer system designed to drive fully autonomous robotaxis, and said it plans to make a fleet of autonomous trucks. The system’s capabilities represent more than a tenfold increase over the current system, Nvidia said in a news release. Nvidia said it is working with several companies on developing robotaxis, but Shapiro declined to name them. Pegasus will be available to Nvidia automotive partners in the seco
Nvidia unveils computer to drive ‘fully autonomous robotaxis’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-10-09  Authors: robert ferris, jacob kepler, bloomberg, getty images, source
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, computer, robotaxis, nvidia, fully, zf, system, fleet, drive, automotive, autonomous, shapiro, worlds, unveils, package, company


Nvidia unveils computer to drive 'fully autonomous robotaxis'

Nvidia on Tuesday unveiled what it says is the world’s first artificial intelligence computer system designed to drive fully autonomous robotaxis, and said it plans to make a fleet of autonomous trucks.

The company claims the new system, code named Pegasus, will handle Level 5 driverless vehicles — vehicles that can be operated entirely by sensors and computers, with no human interaction.

Nvidia shares jumped more than 3 percent on the news after the market opened Tuesday.

The system will include several chips, including Nvidia’s next-generation GPU, which is due out next year, plus artificial intelligence software, in a package that the company boasts is the “size of a license plate” — a huge reduction from the massive racks of computers required today. The system’s capabilities represent more than a tenfold increase over the current system, Nvidia said in a news release.

“It is designed for truly level 5 driving,” meaning no steering wheel, no gas or brake pedal, Nvidia automotive senior director said Danny Shapiro on a call with reporters on Monday. Nvidia said it is working with several companies on developing robotaxis, but Shapiro declined to name them.

Pegasus will be available to Nvidia automotive partners in the second half of 2018. Pricing was not disclosed.

The company also announced it will partner with automotive supplier ZF to make a test fleet of autonomous delivery trucks for Deutsche Post DHL Group by 2018. DPDHL is the world’s largest mail and package delivery service, Shapiro said.

The fleet will combine sensors, cameras, radar and lidar, and the ZF ProAI self-driving system, which is based on Drive PX.

The technology is expected to improve DPDHL’s efficiency considerably by enabling 24/7 hour package delivery.

The company is also allowing some designers and developers access to its Holodeck virtual reality development platform, which lets designers test ideas in a realistic 3-D world.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-10-09  Authors: robert ferris, jacob kepler, bloomberg, getty images, source
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, computer, robotaxis, nvidia, fully, zf, system, fleet, drive, automotive, autonomous, shapiro, worlds, unveils, package, company


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