Brazil overtakes China in consumer sentiment, according to Credit Suisse survey

Brazil has just overtaken China in terms of consumer sentiment, as the world’s second-largest economy slows down and spending intention on big ticket items decline, according to a Credit Suisse survey released Monday. Speaking to CNBC at the Credit Suisse Asian Investment Conference in Hong Kong on Monday, Eugene Klerk, the bank’s managing director of global thematic research said China showed weaker readings in spending intentions compared to Brazil and India. The Credit Suisse Emerging Consume


Brazil has just overtaken China in terms of consumer sentiment, as the world’s second-largest economy slows down and spending intention on big ticket items decline, according to a Credit Suisse survey released Monday. Speaking to CNBC at the Credit Suisse Asian Investment Conference in Hong Kong on Monday, Eugene Klerk, the bank’s managing director of global thematic research said China showed weaker readings in spending intentions compared to Brazil and India. The Credit Suisse Emerging Consume
Brazil overtakes China in consumer sentiment, according to Credit Suisse survey Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: shirley tay, jerome favre, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, consumer, according, survey, spending, suisse, overtakes, sentiment, brazil, india, consumers, china, terms, credit


Brazil overtakes China in consumer sentiment, according to Credit Suisse survey

Brazil has just overtaken China in terms of consumer sentiment, as the world’s second-largest economy slows down and spending intention on big ticket items decline, according to a Credit Suisse survey released Monday.

Speaking to CNBC at the Credit Suisse Asian Investment Conference in Hong Kong on Monday, Eugene Klerk, the bank’s managing director of global thematic research said China showed weaker readings in spending intentions compared to Brazil and India.

The Credit Suisse Emerging Consumer survey, released Monday at the conference, found that China now sits at third place in terms of overall consumer sentiment, with India and Brazil at first and second place respectively.

“If we look at the data this year, we find consumers particularly optimistic in India and we also find consumers in Brazil becoming a lot more optimistic,” Klerk said. “We see a different picture is in China.”

The survey interviewed consumers face-to-face across eight emerging economies: namely China, India, Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico,Thailand, Russia and Turkey.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: shirley tay, jerome favre, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, consumer, according, survey, spending, suisse, overtakes, sentiment, brazil, india, consumers, china, terms, credit


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The Fed is ‘not yet done’ with rate hikes, according to S&P Global Ratings

Still expecting one more rate hike from Fed this year: Analyst 3:16 AM ET Thu, 21 March 2019 | 02:39The U.S. Federal Reserve on Wednesday kept interest rates unchanged and slashed all projections of a rate hike this year. Still, according to U.S.-based financial services giant S&P Global Ratings, the Fed is “not yet done” with rate hikes. Speaking to CNBC’s “Capital Connection” on Thursday, Shaun Roache said better-than-expected economic growth and strong labor markets leave room for a hike. The


Still expecting one more rate hike from Fed this year: Analyst 3:16 AM ET Thu, 21 March 2019 | 02:39The U.S. Federal Reserve on Wednesday kept interest rates unchanged and slashed all projections of a rate hike this year. Still, according to U.S.-based financial services giant S&P Global Ratings, the Fed is “not yet done” with rate hikes. Speaking to CNBC’s “Capital Connection” on Thursday, Shaun Roache said better-than-expected economic growth and strong labor markets leave room for a hike. The
The Fed is ‘not yet done’ with rate hikes, according to S&P Global Ratings Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-22  Authors: shirley tay, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, federal, ratings, growth, rate, roache, hike, fed, projections, global, increase, according, hikes, sp


The Fed is 'not yet done' with rate hikes, according to S&P Global Ratings

Still expecting one more rate hike from Fed this year: Analyst 3:16 AM ET Thu, 21 March 2019 | 02:39

The U.S. Federal Reserve on Wednesday kept interest rates unchanged and slashed all projections of a rate hike this year.

Still, according to U.S.-based financial services giant S&P Global Ratings, the Fed is “not yet done” with rate hikes. Its chief Asia-Pacific economist told CNBC he thinks another increase may come sometime this year or early next year.

Speaking to CNBC’s “Capital Connection” on Thursday, Shaun Roache said better-than-expected economic growth and strong labor markets leave room for a hike.

Wednesday’s statement was a dovish turn from previous Federal Open Market Committee projections. The committee had previously predicted two rate hikes in 2019, following four increases in 2018.

The FOMC said it would be “patient” before any further increase in rates.

Given the “soft patch” the global economy is going through, Roache acknowledged that “it makes sense for the Fed to pause to watch the data to see how things evolve.” Still, he said he felt that concerns about global growth were “a little bit overdone.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-22  Authors: shirley tay, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, federal, ratings, growth, rate, roache, hike, fed, projections, global, increase, according, hikes, sp


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What Indonesia’s e-commerce unicorn says it’s going to do with $1.1 billion in cash investment

Indonesian e-commerce firm Tokopedia plans to use the billion-dollar investment it secured last year to grow its core businesses and make the company “stronger” and more “robust,” according to its associate vice president of financial technology, Samuel Sentana. Tokopedia secured $1.1 billion from SoftBank’s Vision Fund and Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba in December last year, raising the Indonesian unicorn’s valuation to $7 billion as of January. A unicorn is a start-up valued at more than $1


Indonesian e-commerce firm Tokopedia plans to use the billion-dollar investment it secured last year to grow its core businesses and make the company “stronger” and more “robust,” according to its associate vice president of financial technology, Samuel Sentana. Tokopedia secured $1.1 billion from SoftBank’s Vision Fund and Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba in December last year, raising the Indonesian unicorn’s valuation to $7 billion as of January. A unicorn is a start-up valued at more than $1
What Indonesia’s e-commerce unicorn says it’s going to do with $1.1 billion in cash investment Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19  Authors: shirley tay, dimas ardian, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, investment, grow, stronger, indonesias, financial, cash, technology, 11, robust, ecommerce, billion, sentana, secured, going, unicorn, indonesian


What Indonesia's e-commerce unicorn says it's going to do with $1.1 billion in cash investment

Indonesian e-commerce firm Tokopedia plans to use the billion-dollar investment it secured last year to grow its core businesses and make the company “stronger” and more “robust,” according to its associate vice president of financial technology, Samuel Sentana.

Tokopedia secured $1.1 billion from SoftBank’s Vision Fund and Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba in December last year, raising the Indonesian unicorn’s valuation to $7 billion as of January. A unicorn is a start-up valued at more than $1 billion.

Speaking to CNBC’s “Street Signs Asia” at the Money 20/20 conference in Singapore on Tuesday, Sentana said the money will be used to grow its four key businesses: financial technology and payment; logistics; online-to-offline commerce; and the marketplace and digital business.

“That $1.1 billion is going to be funded into these four core business to make the ecosystem even more stronger and robust, so that everybody can start to buy and sell everything, and can discover everything,” Sentana said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19  Authors: shirley tay, dimas ardian, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, investment, grow, stronger, indonesias, financial, cash, technology, 11, robust, ecommerce, billion, sentana, secured, going, unicorn, indonesian


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Cathay Pacific says it’s ‘very happy’ with its Boeing fleet, despite recent 737 Max crash

U.S. plane manufacturer Boeing has been mired in controversy since its 737 Max 8 operated by Ethiopian Airlines crashed minutes after takeoff on Sunday, killing all 157 people on board. Despite recent safety concerns surrounding the 737 Max 8, Cathay Pacific’s CEO said Thursday he was “very happy” with the Hong Kong-based carrier’s Boeing fleet. Speaking to CNBC’s “Squawk Box Asia,” Rupert Hogg said “about 50-50” of the airline’s fleet is made up of Boeing and Airbus planes — namely, the Boeing


U.S. plane manufacturer Boeing has been mired in controversy since its 737 Max 8 operated by Ethiopian Airlines crashed minutes after takeoff on Sunday, killing all 157 people on board. Despite recent safety concerns surrounding the 737 Max 8, Cathay Pacific’s CEO said Thursday he was “very happy” with the Hong Kong-based carrier’s Boeing fleet. Speaking to CNBC’s “Squawk Box Asia,” Rupert Hogg said “about 50-50” of the airline’s fleet is made up of Boeing and Airbus planes — namely, the Boeing
Cathay Pacific says it’s ‘very happy’ with its Boeing fleet, despite recent 737 Max crash Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: shirley tay, marcio rodrigo machado, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cathay, crash, pacific, despite, 737, airlines, plane, recent, fleet, hogg, boeing, happy, operated, max, killing, ethiopian


Cathay Pacific says it's 'very happy' with its Boeing fleet, despite recent 737 Max crash

U.S. plane manufacturer Boeing has been mired in controversy since its 737 Max 8 operated by Ethiopian Airlines crashed minutes after takeoff on Sunday, killing all 157 people on board.

Despite recent safety concerns surrounding the 737 Max 8, Cathay Pacific’s CEO said Thursday he was “very happy” with the Hong Kong-based carrier’s Boeing fleet.

Speaking to CNBC’s “Squawk Box Asia,” Rupert Hogg said “about 50-50” of the airline’s fleet is made up of Boeing and Airbus planes — namely, the Boeing 777, Airbus A350 and A330. The airline does not fly the Boeing 737 Max.

“It is a tragedy, but we’re very happy with both sets of aircraft that we have,” Hogg said, in reference to Sunday’s deadly crash.

The fatal accident involving Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 — which killed all 149 passengers and eight crew members — comes less than five months after the same model plane operated by Indonesia’s Lion Air crashed shortly after taking off from Jakarta, killing all 189 on board.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: shirley tay, marcio rodrigo machado, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cathay, crash, pacific, despite, 737, airlines, plane, recent, fleet, hogg, boeing, happy, operated, max, killing, ethiopian


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Asia’s billionaire population will top 1,000 within five years, report projects

A report released on Wednesday found that the number of billionaires in Asia is set to rise above 1,000 in the next five years. By 2023, the world’s billionaire population is expected to reach 2,696 — with Asia accounting for a third of that figure. Last year, according to the 2019 Wealth Report by London-based real estate agency and consultancy Knight Frank, Asia had 787 billionaires. The report outlined how wealth growth will play out globally over the next five years amid such headwinds as th


A report released on Wednesday found that the number of billionaires in Asia is set to rise above 1,000 in the next five years. By 2023, the world’s billionaire population is expected to reach 2,696 — with Asia accounting for a third of that figure. Last year, according to the 2019 Wealth Report by London-based real estate agency and consultancy Knight Frank, Asia had 787 billionaires. The report outlined how wealth growth will play out globally over the next five years amid such headwinds as th
Asia’s billionaire population will top 1,000 within five years, report projects Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-07  Authors: shirley tay, tim graham, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, research, asia, knight, holt, real, projects, population, growth, wealth, report, estate, asias, head, billionaire, 1000


Asia's billionaire population will top 1,000 within five years, report projects

Asia is already the world’s top region for billionaires. It’s set to extend that lead even more in coming years.

A report released on Wednesday found that the number of billionaires in Asia is set to rise above 1,000 in the next five years. By 2023, the world’s billionaire population is expected to reach 2,696 — with Asia accounting for a third of that figure.

Last year, according to the 2019 Wealth Report by London-based real estate agency and consultancy Knight Frank, Asia had 787 billionaires. That easily exceeded the 452 in Europe and 631 in North America, according to the data.

The report outlined how wealth growth will play out globally over the next five years amid such headwinds as the U.S.-China trade war and Brexit.

“Despite a darkening economic outlook, wealth creation will remain a constant in 2019,” Liam Bailey, Knight Frank’s global head of research, said in the report.

Asia, in particular, was highlighted to outperform — even as wealth growth slows globally. Of the 59 countries analyzed by Knight Frank, eight of the top 10 fastest-growing wealthy populations reside in Asian nations.

Countries in the region will see the biggest growth in “ultra-high-net-worth individuals” (UHNWI) — those valued at more than $30 million. India takes the lead with a projected 39 percent growth, followed by the Philippines and China. Romania and Ukraine were the only two non-Asian countries to rank in Knight Frank’s top 10 for the growth of their wealthy populations.

“India and the Philippines, both coming from a lower base — developing markets — (have) huge possibilities for entrepreneurial growth,” Nicholas Holt, Knight Frank’s Asia-Pacific head of research, said in an interview with CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Wednesday.

“Huge drivers of urbanization, industrialization, et cetera, in some of these markets are going to drive the prospects for wealth creation,” he added.

While a host of factors is spurring the growth of high-net-worth populations around the world, real estate is playing a large factor in Asia, according to Oliver Williams, head of GlobalData WealthInsight, a wealth research firm that provided data for the Knight Frank report.

“Growth in non-financial assets — that is, real estate — is one of the leading factors driving UHNWI growth,” Williams is quoted as saying in the report.

However, the growing cost of real estate has spurred concerns globally about inequality and deepening wealth divides. So, Holt said, finding solutions to the housing affordability gap will remain a key priority for policymakers.

“(The gap is) certainly being addressed by cooling measures, home purchase restrictions in places like China, additional taxes — whether buying, holding or selling — or even stopping foreign buyers in New Zealand,” Holt explained. “This challenge will be a very important one for policymakers in the coming year.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-07  Authors: shirley tay, tim graham, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, research, asia, knight, holt, real, projects, population, growth, wealth, report, estate, asias, head, billionaire, 1000


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A serious shortage of cybersecurity experts could cost companies hundreds of millions of dollars

In the first half of 2018 alone, more than four billion records were compromised to data breaches. That comes at a heavy price, according to a 2018 study by IBM and the Ponemon Institute. The average data breach cost companies $3.86 million, the study found, and large-scale breaches can hit $350 million. Against that backdrop, companies are eager to hire cybersecurity experts to guard against those risks. “I always say that cybersecurity professionals are like physicians, in that they have to sp


In the first half of 2018 alone, more than four billion records were compromised to data breaches. That comes at a heavy price, according to a 2018 study by IBM and the Ponemon Institute. The average data breach cost companies $3.86 million, the study found, and large-scale breaches can hit $350 million. Against that backdrop, companies are eager to hire cybersecurity experts to guard against those risks. “I always say that cybersecurity professionals are like physicians, in that they have to sp
A serious shortage of cybersecurity experts could cost companies hundreds of millions of dollars Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: shirley tay, jack guez, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, security, companies, research, dollars, millions, cost, study, million, cybersecurity, professionals, data, serious, according, hundreds, shortage, experts, oltsik


A serious shortage of cybersecurity experts could cost companies hundreds of millions of dollars

Attempted cyberattacks are no longer an “if,” but a “when.” And, for many companies, hackers will win.

In the first half of 2018 alone, more than four billion records were compromised to data breaches.

That comes at a heavy price, according to a 2018 study by IBM and the Ponemon Institute. The average data breach cost companies $3.86 million, the study found, and large-scale breaches can hit $350 million.

Against that backdrop, companies are eager to hire cybersecurity experts to guard against those risks. The problem: There aren’t nearly enough people who can fill those roles.

The demand for skilled security professionals is one of the biggest challenges facing the cybersecurity industry today, with 2.93 million positions open and unfilled around the world, according to non-profit IT security organization (ISC)².

Without trained security staff, organizations don’t have the capability to deploy the right controls or develop specific security processes to detect and prevent cyberattacks, according to Jon Oltsik, senior principal analyst at IT research firm Enterprise Strategy Group. On top of that, current employees face the challenge of an ever-shifting industry.

“I always say that cybersecurity professionals are like physicians, in that they have to spend ample time studying the latest research and threat intelligence,” said Oltsik


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: shirley tay, jack guez, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, security, companies, research, dollars, millions, cost, study, million, cybersecurity, professionals, data, serious, according, hundreds, shortage, experts, oltsik


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A serious shortage of cybersecurity experts could cost companies hundreds of millions of dollars

In the first half of 2018 alone, more than four billion records were compromised to data breaches. That comes at a heavy price, according to a 2018 study by IBM and the Ponemon Institute. The average data breach cost companies $3.86 million, the study found, and large-scale breaches can hit $350 million. Against that backdrop, companies are eager to hire cybersecurity experts to guard against those risks. “I always say that cybersecurity professionals are like physicians, in that they have to sp


In the first half of 2018 alone, more than four billion records were compromised to data breaches. That comes at a heavy price, according to a 2018 study by IBM and the Ponemon Institute. The average data breach cost companies $3.86 million, the study found, and large-scale breaches can hit $350 million. Against that backdrop, companies are eager to hire cybersecurity experts to guard against those risks. “I always say that cybersecurity professionals are like physicians, in that they have to sp
A serious shortage of cybersecurity experts could cost companies hundreds of millions of dollars Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: shirley tay, jack guez, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, security, companies, research, dollars, millions, cost, study, million, cybersecurity, professionals, data, serious, according, hundreds, shortage, experts, oltsik


A serious shortage of cybersecurity experts could cost companies hundreds of millions of dollars

Attempted cyberattacks are no longer an “if,” but a “when.” And, for many companies, hackers will win.

In the first half of 2018 alone, more than four billion records were compromised to data breaches.

That comes at a heavy price, according to a 2018 study by IBM and the Ponemon Institute. The average data breach cost companies $3.86 million, the study found, and large-scale breaches can hit $350 million.

Against that backdrop, companies are eager to hire cybersecurity experts to guard against those risks. The problem: There aren’t nearly enough people who can fill those roles.

The demand for skilled security professionals is one of the biggest challenges facing the cybersecurity industry today, with 2.93 million positions open and unfilled around the world, according to non-profit IT security organization (ISC)².

Without trained security staff, organizations don’t have the capability to deploy the right controls or develop specific security processes to detect and prevent cyberattacks, according to Jon Oltsik, senior principal analyst at IT research firm Enterprise Strategy Group. On top of that, current employees face the challenge of an ever-shifting industry.

“I always say that cybersecurity professionals are like physicians, in that they have to spend ample time studying the latest research and threat intelligence,” said Oltsik


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: shirley tay, jack guez, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, security, companies, research, dollars, millions, cost, study, million, cybersecurity, professionals, data, serious, according, hundreds, shortage, experts, oltsik


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New Zealand’s former leader denies authoring pro-China op-ed for Communist Party newspaper

Former New Zealand Prime Minister Jenny Shipley has denied writing a pro-China opinion piece attributed to her, according to a report published by The Guardian on Wednesday. The op-ed, titled “We need to listen to China,” was published earlier this week by the People’s Daily — the official newspaper of the Chinese Communist Party. A note at the bottom of the piece said unambiguously that it was authored by the former prime minister. The piece bearing Shipley’s byline was the most-read article on


Former New Zealand Prime Minister Jenny Shipley has denied writing a pro-China opinion piece attributed to her, according to a report published by The Guardian on Wednesday. The op-ed, titled “We need to listen to China,” was published earlier this week by the People’s Daily — the official newspaper of the Chinese Communist Party. A note at the bottom of the piece said unambiguously that it was authored by the former prime minister. The piece bearing Shipley’s byline was the most-read article on
New Zealand’s former leader denies authoring pro-China op-ed for Communist Party newspaper Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: shirley tay, vcg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, minister, guardian, according, newspaper, published, prime, oped, leader, authoring, china, zealands, article, chinese, denies, party, communist, piece, prochina


New Zealand's former leader denies authoring pro-China op-ed for Communist Party newspaper

Former New Zealand Prime Minister Jenny Shipley has denied writing a pro-China opinion piece attributed to her, according to a report published by The Guardian on Wednesday.

The op-ed, titled “We need to listen to China,” was published earlier this week by the People’s Daily — the official newspaper of the Chinese Communist Party. A note at the bottom of the piece said unambiguously that it was authored by the former prime minister.

The article itself sang the praises of Chinese efforts on poverty reduction and gender equality, and it applauded the Belt and Road Initiative — an investment campaign introduced by China as a way to create a vast global infrastructure network inextricably tied to the country.

The piece bearing Shipley’s byline was the most-read article on the paper’s website on Wednesday, according to The Guardian. However, the former prime minister said the story was artificially constructed from an interview she did with a different Chinese state-run newspaper last year, according to comments reported by CNN.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: shirley tay, vcg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, minister, guardian, according, newspaper, published, prime, oped, leader, authoring, china, zealands, article, chinese, denies, party, communist, piece, prochina


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New Zealand’s former leader denies authoring pro-China op-ed for Communist Party newspaper

Former New Zealand Prime Minister Jenny Shipley has denied writing a pro-China opinion piece attributed to her, according to a report published by The Guardian on Wednesday. The op-ed, titled “We need to listen to China,” was published earlier this week by the People’s Daily — the official newspaper of the Chinese Communist Party. A note at the bottom of the piece said unambiguously that it was authored by the former prime minister. The piece bearing Shipley’s byline was the most-read article on


Former New Zealand Prime Minister Jenny Shipley has denied writing a pro-China opinion piece attributed to her, according to a report published by The Guardian on Wednesday. The op-ed, titled “We need to listen to China,” was published earlier this week by the People’s Daily — the official newspaper of the Chinese Communist Party. A note at the bottom of the piece said unambiguously that it was authored by the former prime minister. The piece bearing Shipley’s byline was the most-read article on
New Zealand’s former leader denies authoring pro-China op-ed for Communist Party newspaper Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: shirley tay, vcg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, minister, guardian, according, newspaper, published, prime, oped, leader, authoring, china, zealands, article, chinese, denies, party, communist, piece, prochina


New Zealand's former leader denies authoring pro-China op-ed for Communist Party newspaper

Former New Zealand Prime Minister Jenny Shipley has denied writing a pro-China opinion piece attributed to her, according to a report published by The Guardian on Wednesday.

The op-ed, titled “We need to listen to China,” was published earlier this week by the People’s Daily — the official newspaper of the Chinese Communist Party. A note at the bottom of the piece said unambiguously that it was authored by the former prime minister.

The article itself sang the praises of Chinese efforts on poverty reduction and gender equality, and it applauded the Belt and Road Initiative — an investment campaign introduced by China as a way to create a vast global infrastructure network inextricably tied to the country.

The piece bearing Shipley’s byline was the most-read article on the paper’s website on Wednesday, according to The Guardian. However, the former prime minister said the story was artificially constructed from an interview she did with a different Chinese state-run newspaper last year, according to comments reported by CNN.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: shirley tay, vcg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, minister, guardian, according, newspaper, published, prime, oped, leader, authoring, china, zealands, article, chinese, denies, party, communist, piece, prochina


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Barney Swan skied Antarctica with clean energy to fight climate change

When Barney Swan walked out of a meeting with NASA in 2016, he felt frustrated. The then-23-year-old and a handful of colleagues had just partaken in a presentation highlighting the destructive impact Antarctica’s collapsing ice shelves are having on the planet. “It was terrifying, actually terrifying,” Swan said, recalling that meeting during a UN-partnered sustainability conference in in Singapore in January. “(Antarctica has) 90 percent of the world’s ice, 70 percent of the world’s freshwater


When Barney Swan walked out of a meeting with NASA in 2016, he felt frustrated. The then-23-year-old and a handful of colleagues had just partaken in a presentation highlighting the destructive impact Antarctica’s collapsing ice shelves are having on the planet. “It was terrifying, actually terrifying,” Swan said, recalling that meeting during a UN-partnered sustainability conference in in Singapore in January. “(Antarctica has) 90 percent of the world’s ice, 70 percent of the world’s freshwater
Barney Swan skied Antarctica with clean energy to fight climate change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-14  Authors: shirley tay, barney swan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worlds, sustainability, climate, swan, clean, change, barney, antarctica, meeting, terrifying, pole, ice, skied, energy, unpartnered, fight, nasa, walked


Barney Swan skied Antarctica with clean energy to fight climate change

When Barney Swan walked out of a meeting with NASA in 2016, he felt frustrated.

The then-23-year-old and a handful of colleagues had just partaken in a presentation highlighting the destructive impact Antarctica’s collapsing ice shelves are having on the planet.

“It was terrifying, actually terrifying,” Swan said, recalling that meeting during a UN-partnered sustainability conference in in Singapore in January.

“(Antarctica has) 90 percent of the world’s ice, 70 percent of the world’s freshwater is locked within that ice,” he said. “That place has the capacity alone to raise our sea level 20 feet, globally.”

“I walked out of that meeting with NASA feeling almost disabled,” said Swan.

But he didn’t let the experience deter him. Instead, Swan decided to do something about it: He teamed up with his father, Robert Swan — the first man to ski to both the South Pole and the North Pole in the late 1980s — and set out on an epic journey to prove that sustainability can be achieved on a large scale.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-14  Authors: shirley tay, barney swan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worlds, sustainability, climate, swan, clean, change, barney, antarctica, meeting, terrifying, pole, ice, skied, energy, unpartnered, fight, nasa, walked


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