The cost of your shoes could jump thanks to the US-China trade war

The cost of your sneakers or high heels could soon jump, thanks to another round of tariffs under consideration by the Trump administration as part of an ongoing trade war with China. The list includes footwear — everything from sneakers to sandals, golf shoes, rain boots and ski shoes. Should the tariff increase ultimately take effect, analysts say consumers would feel the brunt of the impact. FDRA said a popular type of canvas “skate” sneaker, currently retailing at $49.99, with a 25% tariff,


The cost of your sneakers or high heels could soon jump, thanks to another round of tariffs under consideration by the Trump administration as part of an ongoing trade war with China. The list includes footwear — everything from sneakers to sandals, golf shoes, rain boots and ski shoes. Should the tariff increase ultimately take effect, analysts say consumers would feel the brunt of the impact. FDRA said a popular type of canvas “skate” sneaker, currently retailing at $49.99, with a 25% tariff,
The cost of your shoes could jump thanks to the US-China trade war Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, war, footwear, billion, jump, shoes, increase, trade, thanks, tariff, cost, tariffs, 25, china, working, uschina


The cost of your shoes could jump thanks to the US-China trade war

The cost of your sneakers or high heels could soon jump, thanks to another round of tariffs under consideration by the Trump administration as part of an ongoing trade war with China.

The White House on Monday released a fresh list of about $300 billion in Chinese goods that could get hit with 25% tariffs, if President Donald Trump decides to move forward with his threat. The list includes footwear — everything from sneakers to sandals, golf shoes, rain boots and ski shoes.

Should the tariff increase ultimately take effect, analysts say consumers would feel the brunt of the impact. And the American footwear industry is particularly dependent on China.

In 2017, China accounted for about 72% of all footwear imported into the U.S., according to the American Apparel and Footwear Association. The U.S. imported $11.4 billion worth of footwear from China last year, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

“While brands have moved their production into other countries in Asia because labor costs are lower there, everybody is still making shoes in China,” said Matt Powell, a sports analyst for NPD Group. “The Chinese have years of expertise. They tend to be the best at making high-value product.”

Both Nike and Adidas — the top two sneaker makers in the U.S. by sales — have steadily been easing their reliance on China, shifting production to Vietnam instead. Both companies declined to comment when reached by CNBC.

Puma has said it’s working to do more of the same. But China still dominates when it comes to footwear manufacturing.

“For a lot of working families who buy shoes at Walmart, Target and these other retailers … a ton of volume runs through [China], ” said Matt Priest, the president and CEO of the Footwear Distributors and Retailers of America, a trade organization. The proposed tariffs on footwear “are concerning to say the least,” he said. “It’s every single type of shoe.”

FDRA said a popular type of canvas “skate” sneaker, currently retailing at $49.99, with a 25% tariff, could increase to $65.57. The price of a typical hunting boot would increase from $190 to $248.56. And a popular performance running shoe could jump from $150 to $206.25, FDRA said.

Ultimately, a 25% tariff on footwear could cost shoppers more than $7 billion each year, Priest said — what he called a “conservative” estimate.

— CNBC’s Jessica Golden contributed to this reporting.

WATCH: Cramer explains which businesses have the most exposure to the trade war


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, war, footwear, billion, jump, shoes, increase, trade, thanks, tariff, cost, tariffs, 25, china, working, uschina


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Yankees star Giancarlo Stanton makes $28 million a year but still shops at TJ Maxx

Actress Debra Messing, who is worth an estimated $20 million, refuses to pay full price for clothes. “I was taught that from a very very young age,” she tells CNBC Make It. “My mother would basically say, ‘You’re stupid if you go to the mall and pay full price if you can go to T.J. Maxx and get it for less.’ “My ‘broke habit’ still is my clothing and shoes,” he told Maverick Carter on a 2018 episode of UNINTERRUPTED’s “Kneading Dough.” “If I like the clothing, if I like the shoes, I’ll wear thos


Actress Debra Messing, who is worth an estimated $20 million, refuses to pay full price for clothes. “I was taught that from a very very young age,” she tells CNBC Make It. “My mother would basically say, ‘You’re stupid if you go to the mall and pay full price if you can go to T.J. Maxx and get it for less.’ “My ‘broke habit’ still is my clothing and shoes,” he told Maverick Carter on a 2018 episode of UNINTERRUPTED’s “Kneading Dough.” “If I like the clothing, if I like the shoes, I’ll wear thos
Yankees star Giancarlo Stanton makes $28 million a year but still shops at TJ Maxx Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: kathleen elkins, tom szczerbowski, getty images sport, getty images, -giancarlo stanton, new york yankee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 28, maxx, makes, clothing, shoes, wearing, stanton, million, price, jeans, shops, yankees, gronkowski, tj, wear, giancarlo, star, ill, pay, clothes


Yankees star Giancarlo Stanton makes $28 million a year but still shops at TJ Maxx

Stanton’s not the only celebrity who appreciates a bargain.

Actress Debra Messing, who is worth an estimated $20 million, refuses to pay full price for clothes. “I was taught that from a very very young age,” she tells CNBC Make It.

“My mother would basically say, ‘You’re stupid if you go to the mall and pay full price if you can go to T.J. Maxx and get it for less.’ And nowadays, with the apps and everything, there are so many places where you can get things on sale that I just won’t walk into a place and pay full price.”

And New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski, who recently announced that he’s retiring from football at age 29, is also frugal when it comes to his wardrobe. “My ‘broke habit’ still is my clothing and shoes,” he told Maverick Carter on a 2018 episode of UNINTERRUPTED’s “Kneading Dough.” “If I like the clothing, if I like the shoes, I’ll wear those shoes and I’ll wear that clothing down to the rags.”

He’ll sometimes wear a favorite pair of jeans “seven days straight,” he said, adding: “I make sure I throw them in the washer, like, Day 3.”

Wearing the same thing and getting the most out of his clothes feels natural, said Gronkowski, who grew up using hand-me-downs: “Whatever my brothers had — hockey equipment, baseball equipment, even clothes — [my parents] used to just hand it down to us kids. That’s why I just feel like I have no problem ever just wearing the same shirt, wearing the same jeans, shorts, until I totally got to finally get rid of them.”

Don’t miss: 5 rich NFL stars who live like they’re broke

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: kathleen elkins, tom szczerbowski, getty images sport, getty images, -giancarlo stanton, new york yankee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 28, maxx, makes, clothing, shoes, wearing, stanton, million, price, jeans, shops, yankees, gronkowski, tj, wear, giancarlo, star, ill, pay, clothes


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Yankees star Giancarlo Stanton makes $28 million a year but still shops at TJ Maxx

Actress Debra Messing, who is worth an estimated $20 million, refuses to pay full price for clothes. “I was taught that from a very very young age,” she tells CNBC Make It. “My mother would basically say, ‘You’re stupid if you go to the mall and pay full price if you can go to T.J. Maxx and get it for less.’ “My ‘broke habit’ still is my clothing and shoes,” he told Maverick Carter on a 2018 episode of UNINTERRUPTED’s “Kneading Dough.” “If I like the clothing, if I like the shoes, I’ll wear thos


Actress Debra Messing, who is worth an estimated $20 million, refuses to pay full price for clothes. “I was taught that from a very very young age,” she tells CNBC Make It. “My mother would basically say, ‘You’re stupid if you go to the mall and pay full price if you can go to T.J. Maxx and get it for less.’ “My ‘broke habit’ still is my clothing and shoes,” he told Maverick Carter on a 2018 episode of UNINTERRUPTED’s “Kneading Dough.” “If I like the clothing, if I like the shoes, I’ll wear thos
Yankees star Giancarlo Stanton makes $28 million a year but still shops at TJ Maxx Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: kathleen elkins, tom szczerbowski, getty images sport, getty images, -giancarlo stanton, new york yankee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 28, maxx, makes, clothing, shoes, wearing, stanton, million, price, jeans, shops, yankees, gronkowski, tj, wear, giancarlo, star, ill, pay, clothes


Yankees star Giancarlo Stanton makes $28 million a year but still shops at TJ Maxx

Stanton’s not the only celebrity who appreciates a bargain.

Actress Debra Messing, who is worth an estimated $20 million, refuses to pay full price for clothes. “I was taught that from a very very young age,” she tells CNBC Make It.

“My mother would basically say, ‘You’re stupid if you go to the mall and pay full price if you can go to T.J. Maxx and get it for less.’ And nowadays, with the apps and everything, there are so many places where you can get things on sale that I just won’t walk into a place and pay full price.”

And New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski, who recently announced that he’s retiring from football at age 29, is also frugal when it comes to his wardrobe. “My ‘broke habit’ still is my clothing and shoes,” he told Maverick Carter on a 2018 episode of UNINTERRUPTED’s “Kneading Dough.” “If I like the clothing, if I like the shoes, I’ll wear those shoes and I’ll wear that clothing down to the rags.”

He’ll sometimes wear a favorite pair of jeans “seven days straight,” he said, adding: “I make sure I throw them in the washer, like, Day 3.”

Wearing the same thing and getting the most out of his clothes feels natural, said Gronkowski, who grew up using hand-me-downs: “Whatever my brothers had — hockey equipment, baseball equipment, even clothes — [my parents] used to just hand it down to us kids. That’s why I just feel like I have no problem ever just wearing the same shirt, wearing the same jeans, shorts, until I totally got to finally get rid of them.”

Don’t miss: 5 rich NFL stars who live like they’re broke

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: kathleen elkins, tom szczerbowski, getty images sport, getty images, -giancarlo stanton, new york yankee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 28, maxx, makes, clothing, shoes, wearing, stanton, million, price, jeans, shops, yankees, gronkowski, tj, wear, giancarlo, star, ill, pay, clothes


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Rob Gronkowski kept a ‘broke habit’ while making millions in the NFL

New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski announced on Sunday that he’s retiring from football at age 29. The announcement means that Gronkowski will end his $54 million contract with the Patriots a year early. “My ‘broke habit’ still is my clothing and shoes,” he told Maverick Carter on a 2018 episode of UNINTERRUPTED’s “Kneading Dough.” “If I like the clothing, if I like the shoes, I’ll wear those shoes and I’ll wear that clothing down to the rags.” It took Gronkowski a long time to decide


New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski announced on Sunday that he’s retiring from football at age 29. The announcement means that Gronkowski will end his $54 million contract with the Patriots a year early. “My ‘broke habit’ still is my clothing and shoes,” he told Maverick Carter on a 2018 episode of UNINTERRUPTED’s “Kneading Dough.” “If I like the clothing, if I like the shoes, I’ll wear those shoes and I’ll wear that clothing down to the rags.” It took Gronkowski a long time to decide
Rob Gronkowski kept a ‘broke habit’ while making millions in the NFL Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: emmie martin, kathleen elkins, michael reaves, getty images sport, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kept, money, wearing, broke, habit, making, shoes, gronkowski, jeans, ill, clothing, rob, wear, millions, nfl, patriots, football


Rob Gronkowski kept a 'broke habit' while making millions in the NFL

New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski announced on Sunday that he’s retiring from football at age 29.

The announcement means that Gronkowski will end his $54 million contract with the Patriots a year early. But even without collecting a paycheck, the football star will have plenty of money to fall back on: Gronkowski hasn’t touched a dime of this NFL salary or signing bonuses. Instead, he chose to live off of his endorsement money throughout his career.

He’s particularly frugal when it comes to his wardrobe. “My ‘broke habit’ still is my clothing and shoes,” he told Maverick Carter on a 2018 episode of UNINTERRUPTED’s “Kneading Dough.” “If I like the clothing, if I like the shoes, I’ll wear those shoes and I’ll wear that clothing down to the rags.”

He’ll sometimes wear a favorite pair of jeans “seven days straight,” he said, adding: “I make sure I throw them in the washer, like, Day 3.”

Wearing the same thing and getting the most out of his clothes feels natural, said Gronkowski, who grew up using hand-me-downs: “Whatever my brothers had — hockey equipment, baseball equipment, even clothes — [my parents] used to just hand it down to us kids. That’s why I just feel like I have no problem ever just wearing the same shirt, wearing the same jeans, shorts, until I totally got to finally get rid of them.”

It took Gronkowski a long time to decide to splurge on one luxury: a diamond necklace. “I finally went out and bought myself a chain,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: emmie martin, kathleen elkins, michael reaves, getty images sport, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kept, money, wearing, broke, habit, making, shoes, gronkowski, jeans, ill, clothing, rob, wear, millions, nfl, patriots, football


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‘Shark Tank’ star Kevin O’Leary’s top advice to his younger self

O’Leary frequently preaches the importance of saving and investing, and recommends that young people harness the magic of compounding returns. “You don’t need that problem.” “So if you’re 20 — listen to what Mr. Wonderful is saying here — you don’t need 50 shirts,” he says. Don’t miss: Kevin O’Leary shares his best advice about paying off your mortgageDisclosure: CNBC owns the exclusive off-network cable rights to ABC’s “Shark Tank.”


O’Leary frequently preaches the importance of saving and investing, and recommends that young people harness the magic of compounding returns. “You don’t need that problem.” “So if you’re 20 — listen to what Mr. Wonderful is saying here — you don’t need 50 shirts,” he says. Don’t miss: Kevin O’Leary shares his best advice about paying off your mortgageDisclosure: CNBC owns the exclusive off-network cable rights to ABC’s “Shark Tank.”
‘Shark Tank’ star Kevin O’Leary’s top advice to his younger self Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: sarah berger, courtesy of kevin oleary
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youre, self, need, tank, worry, pair, advice, 20, star, kevin, shoes, oleary, shark, younger, olearys, dont, pairs


'Shark Tank' star Kevin O'Leary's top advice to his younger self

It’s the same reason O’Leary refuses to pay even $2.50 for a cup of coffee; he knows if he makes that coffee at home for pennies, he can put the savings to better use.

O’Leary frequently preaches the importance of saving and investing, and recommends that young people harness the magic of compounding returns.

“When you’re 21 years old, or 20 or 18 or 19 and you start putting aside 10 percent of what you make, [you could have] over $1,000,000 by the time you’re 65,” O’Leary previously told CNBC Make It. “If no one else is going to worry about your retirement, I want you to worry about it.”

O’Leary has added a string of zeros to the number of dollars in his bank account since he was 20, so he is now personally willing to spend on investment pieces that will last for years and on his favorite splurge, $150 underwear.

But that doesn’t mean he’s wasteful. O’Leary tells CNBC Make It he only wears four pairs of shoes — two pairs of Prada shoes, a pair of flip flops and a pair of sneakers for working out.

“I started off with probably 100 pairs of shoes. It’s like the Imelda Marcos problem,” O’Leary says, referring to the corrupt former first lady of the Philippines, who was famously known for her excessive shoe collection. “You don’t need that problem.”

“So if you’re 20 — listen to what Mr. Wonderful is saying here — you don’t need 50 shirts,” he says. You only need a handful of essentials, which he says includes six t-shirts, three pairs of jeans and three baseball caps.

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Don’t miss: Kevin O’Leary shares his best advice about paying off your mortgage

Disclosure: CNBC owns the exclusive off-network cable rights to ABC’s “Shark Tank.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: sarah berger, courtesy of kevin oleary
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youre, self, need, tank, worry, pair, advice, 20, star, kevin, shoes, oleary, shark, younger, olearys, dont, pairs


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Alphabet’s Verily has been working on health-tracking shoes to measure movement, weight and falls

Alphabet’s life sciences arm, Verily, has been looking for partners to co-develop shoes with sensors embedded to monitor the wearer’s movement and weight, as well as to measure falls, CNBC has learned. If Verily progresses with the project, the shoes could have a wide range of health-related uses. Verily was previously known as Google Life Sciences, but in 2015 it became a separate company under Google’s parent company, Alphabet, and is tracked financially within Alphabet’s “Other Bets” segment.


Alphabet’s life sciences arm, Verily, has been looking for partners to co-develop shoes with sensors embedded to monitor the wearer’s movement and weight, as well as to measure falls, CNBC has learned. If Verily progresses with the project, the shoes could have a wide range of health-related uses. Verily was previously known as Google Life Sciences, but in 2015 it became a separate company under Google’s parent company, Alphabet, and is tracked financially within Alphabet’s “Other Bets” segment.
Alphabet’s Verily has been working on health-tracking shoes to measure movement, weight and falls Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-01  Authors: christina farr, tunart, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, measure, google, healthtracking, company, movement, working, partners, sciences, verily, project, life, falls, shoes, weight, alphabets


Alphabet's Verily has been working on health-tracking shoes to measure movement, weight and falls

Alphabet’s life sciences arm, Verily, has been looking for partners to co-develop shoes with sensors embedded to monitor the wearer’s movement and weight, as well as to measure falls, CNBC has learned.

Three people familiar with the project say that the Google sister company has in recent months shown a prototype of the design in private meetings, hoping to attract partners to build the shoes and take them to market. It is not known whether the project is still active.

If Verily progresses with the project, the shoes could have a wide range of health-related uses. For instance, sudden weight gain can be a sign that the body is retaining fluid, which is a symptom of congestive heart failure. Another area of interest is fall detection, two of the people said, which could be useful for seniors in particular.

Verily did not respond to a request for comment.

Apple recently introduced fall detection into its latest Apple Watch, which also provides a way for users to reach emergency services in the event of a more serious tumble.

Verily was previously known as Google Life Sciences, but in 2015 it became a separate company under Google’s parent company, Alphabet, and is tracked financially within Alphabet’s “Other Bets” segment. In January, it raised $1 billion from Silver Lake and others to “increase flexibility and optionality,” according to the company’s CEO Andy Conrad, which could be an indicator of a potential spin-out from Alphabet.

The company has recruited dozens of engineers, scientists and health experts to its ranks. Many of its technical leads originally worked at Google.

Thus far, Verily has found success in teaming up with larger companies to develop and potentially commercialize its project ideas.

Aside from the shoes, Verily is working on several other hardware projects, including a stabilizing spoon to help people with movement disorders eat, a smartwatch for its clinical research efforts and a “smart” contact lens for age-related farsightedness or improving sight after a cataract surgery.

WATCH: Verily’s Project Baseline: ‘Google Maps for health’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-01  Authors: christina farr, tunart, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, measure, google, healthtracking, company, movement, working, partners, sciences, verily, project, life, falls, shoes, weight, alphabets


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Puma is releasing self-lacing smart shoes to take on Nike

Besides charging your phone, smart watch and wireless headphones, you could soon be charging your shoes too. Puma is about to release it’s own self-lacing training shoes that will rival Nike’s high-tech sneakers that can do the same. Puma’s smart shoes, called the Fi, are connected to its app which enables the laces to be tightened or loosened with the swipe of a finger. It currently only works with an Apple iPhone or Apple Watch, but will soon be available on Android phones too. Each smart trai


Besides charging your phone, smart watch and wireless headphones, you could soon be charging your shoes too. Puma is about to release it’s own self-lacing training shoes that will rival Nike’s high-tech sneakers that can do the same. Puma’s smart shoes, called the Fi, are connected to its app which enables the laces to be tightened or loosened with the swipe of a finger. It currently only works with an Apple iPhone or Apple Watch, but will soon be available on Android phones too. Each smart trai
Puma is releasing self-lacing smart shoes to take on Nike Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-31  Authors: uptin saiidi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, puma, watch, wireless, selflacing, smart, nike, releasing, training, battery, soon, apple, works, shoes, charging


Puma is releasing self-lacing smart shoes to take on Nike

Besides charging your phone, smart watch and wireless headphones, you could soon be charging your shoes too.

Puma is about to release it’s own self-lacing training shoes that will rival Nike’s high-tech sneakers that can do the same.

Puma’s smart shoes, called the Fi, are connected to its app which enables the laces to be tightened or loosened with the swipe of a finger. It currently only works with an Apple iPhone or Apple Watch, but will soon be available on Android phones too.

Each smart training shoe will have a battery based under its sole that can be charged through a wireless charging dock or by swapping out the batteries.

Puma’s designers said the battery would last about a week with normal use.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-31  Authors: uptin saiidi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, puma, watch, wireless, selflacing, smart, nike, releasing, training, battery, soon, apple, works, shoes, charging


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5 rich NFL stars who live like they’re broke

The New England Patriots paid Rob Gronkowski a base salary of $8 million for the 2018 season. Instead, since his professional career started in 2010, he’s been living off of his endorsement money. Gronkowski is particularly frugal when it comes to his wardrobe. “My ‘broke habit’ still is my clothing and shoes,” he told Maverick Carter on a 2018 episode of “Kneading Dough,” adding, “If I like the clothing, if I like the shoes, I’ll wear those shoes and I’ll wear that clothing down to the rags.” H


The New England Patriots paid Rob Gronkowski a base salary of $8 million for the 2018 season. Instead, since his professional career started in 2010, he’s been living off of his endorsement money. Gronkowski is particularly frugal when it comes to his wardrobe. “My ‘broke habit’ still is my clothing and shoes,” he told Maverick Carter on a 2018 episode of “Kneading Dough,” adding, “If I like the clothing, if I like the shoes, I’ll wear those shoes and I’ll wear that clothing down to the rags.” H
5 rich NFL stars who live like they’re broke Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-24  Authors: kathleen elkins, randy holmes, disney abc television group, getty images, dustin bradford, patrick mcdermott, jeff gross, scott w grau, icon sportswire, corbis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, clothing, million, wear, live, ill, theyre, hes, wardrobe, 2018, touched, nfl, stars, rich, broke, washer, shoes


5 rich NFL stars who live like they're broke

The New England Patriots paid Rob Gronkowski a base salary of $8 million for the 2018 season. For 2019, it increases to $9 million. But though he’s one of the highest-paid tight ends in the league, the 29-year-old hasn’t touched “one dime of my signing bonus or NFL contract money,” he revealed in his 2015 book, “It’s Good to Be Gronk.”

Instead, since his professional career started in 2010, he’s been living off of his endorsement money.

Gronkowski is particularly frugal when it comes to his wardrobe. “My ‘broke habit’ still is my clothing and shoes,” he told Maverick Carter on a 2018 episode of “Kneading Dough,” adding, “If I like the clothing, if I like the shoes, I’ll wear those shoes and I’ll wear that clothing down to the rags.”

He’ll sometimes wear a favorite pair of jeans “seven days straight,” he said, though “I make sure I throw them in the washer, like, day three.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-24  Authors: kathleen elkins, randy holmes, disney abc television group, getty images, dustin bradford, patrick mcdermott, jeff gross, scott w grau, icon sportswire, corbis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, clothing, million, wear, live, ill, theyre, hes, wardrobe, 2018, touched, nfl, stars, rich, broke, washer, shoes


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You can lace Nike’s Adapt BB shoes with a smartphone app

The Adapt BB, priced at $350, does more than just lace itself. Using a power lacing system called Fit Adapt, users can adjust to find the perfect fit whether it’s manually or digitally, using the Nike Adapt mobile app. Nike researchers said the Nike Adapt BB is the most tested shoe in its history. Tatum will wear the Adapt BB in the shoe’s professional debut Wednesday night when the Celtics play the Toronto Raptors. With a smart shoe comes new responsibilities — like having to charge the shoes e


The Adapt BB, priced at $350, does more than just lace itself. Using a power lacing system called Fit Adapt, users can adjust to find the perfect fit whether it’s manually or digitally, using the Nike Adapt mobile app. Nike researchers said the Nike Adapt BB is the most tested shoe in its history. Tatum will wear the Adapt BB in the shoe’s professional debut Wednesday night when the Celtics play the Toronto Raptors. With a smart shoe comes new responsibilities — like having to charge the shoes e
You can lace Nike’s Adapt BB shoes with a smartphone app Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-15  Authors: jessica golden, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nikes, bb, using, nike, tatum, smart, fit, adapt, basketball, smartphone, app, shoes, shoe, lace


You can lace Nike's Adapt BB shoes with a smartphone app

Nike provided a glimpse of what the future of footwear could look like by introducing the first self-lacing smart basketball shoe on Tuesday.

The Adapt BB, priced at $350, does more than just lace itself. Using a power lacing system called Fit Adapt, users can adjust to find the perfect fit whether it’s manually or digitally, using the Nike Adapt mobile app. A custom motor and gear train tighten or loosen to customize to your foot.

For Nike, this opens a new world of smart data insights into athletes’ workouts. For athletes, it represents a new era and way they interact with sneakers.

“Athletes will be able to update and evolve their shoes with upgrades, new features and services all through smartphone technology inside their footwear,” said Michael Donaghu, Nike’s vice president of innovation.

While Nike touts this shoe as a “mobile sports research lab on feet everywhere,” the shoe currently doesn’t provide any data, but the company said that will be coming.

“We are moving from fit to firmware,” said Donaghu.

Nike researchers said the Nike Adapt BB is the most tested shoe in its history. The company chose basketball as the first sport because of the demands basketball players put on their shoes with fast cuts and constant sprints.

Boston Celtics star Jayson Tatum has been the guinea pig secretly testing the Adapt behind the scenes. Tatum will wear the Adapt BB in the shoe’s professional debut Wednesday night when the Celtics play the Toronto Raptors. The shoe is available to customers beginning Feb. 17.

Tatum said he’s most impressed by how the shoe fits. “I try to tell people that it fits l like a glove. It’s better than laces. There’s no movement in there and it’s very secure,” Tatum told CNBC.

Customization is another key feature of the Adapt BB. The two buttons at the bottom of the shoe light up in the color of your choice while programming them, a feature that Tatum finds particularly interesting.

“I love the fact that it’s one of a kind … my favorite part is just changing the colors. You can customize it to be your own shoe in a way and I think that’s the coolest part for me,” he added.

With a smart shoe comes new responsibilities — like having to charge the shoes every 10-14 days via a charging pad that comes with the shoes. While the shoes work without a phone (you can adjust using the buttons), a smartphone is required to get that perfect fit and customization.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-15  Authors: jessica golden, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nikes, bb, using, nike, tatum, smart, fit, adapt, basketball, smartphone, app, shoes, shoe, lace


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How Allbirds went from Silicon Valley fashion staple to a $1.4 billion sneaker start-up

According to Sullivan, a “big part of Allbirds’ success” was happening even before celebrities started wearing them. The “style that they’ve adopted is very comfortable, but meaningful and sustainable, [and] is spreading beyond its borders,” Esquire magazine fashion director Nick Sullivan tells CNBC Make It. “I think people are naturally intrigued by the whole Silicon Valley thing and start-ups and app designers, and everything. “More and more, people are able to wear sneakers to work, or a snea


According to Sullivan, a “big part of Allbirds’ success” was happening even before celebrities started wearing them. The “style that they’ve adopted is very comfortable, but meaningful and sustainable, [and] is spreading beyond its borders,” Esquire magazine fashion director Nick Sullivan tells CNBC Make It. “I think people are naturally intrigued by the whole Silicon Valley thing and start-ups and app designers, and everything. “More and more, people are able to wear sneakers to work, or a snea
How Allbirds went from Silicon Valley fashion staple to a $1.4 billion sneaker start-up Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: tom huddleston jr, mark dadswell, getty images, source, max shelton, filmmagic
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, allbirds, think, shoes, sullivan, billion, really, staple, fashion, wear, went, startup, valley, silicon, sneaker, tells, athletic, 14, customers, work


How Allbirds went from Silicon Valley fashion staple to a $1.4 billion sneaker start-up

In August, Leonardo DiCaprio announced that he’d personally invested in Allbirds, noting the company’s use of environmentally friendly materials.

Allbirds does, on occasion, send free products to high-profile customers, including celebrities, but an Allbirds spokesperson noted that this typically happens after those big-name customers have already started wearing the brand on their own.

According to Sullivan, a “big part of Allbirds’ success” was happening even before celebrities started wearing them. The company had already sold more than a million pairs months earlier.

The trend that started in Silicon Valley, seamlessly expanded into mainstream fashion. The “style that they’ve adopted is very comfortable, but meaningful and sustainable, [and] is spreading beyond its borders,” Esquire magazine fashion director Nick Sullivan tells CNBC Make It. “I think people are naturally intrigued by the whole Silicon Valley thing and start-ups and app designers, and everything. It sort of feels like a modern thing to do.

“So it’s natural that [Allbirds], at those very reasonable prices, anybody can get in on that.”

“I think we could never have imagined how fast and how far the idea would have traveled,” Brown says. Indeed, in addition to a strong presence on social media, including an exclusive shoe sale on Instagram in March, and a rare retail collaboration with Nordstrom earlier this year, much of the buzz around Allbirds, especially early on, spread via word of mouth.

While Allbirds tends to inspire die-hard devotion from many of its wearers, some customers have voiced complaints that the shoes wear out too quickly, despite the company’s assertions about the resilience of its natural and sustainable materials. The company has also said it is constantly improving upon its shoes and that newer iterations are more durable than the earlier versions.

Also, one reason for Allbirds’ growing ubiquity has been the fact that the shoes have strayed, somewhat, from Brown’s original vision of a purely athletic sneaker made from wool. While Allbirds sneakers can be worn for light athletic activity (the company says they work best for “short runs and casual [<5 mile] hikes"), most customers wear them for more casual purposes — anything from lounging around to running errands — or even in more traditionally dressed-up situations. One reason for that shift is the years-old "athleisure" trend — think yoga pants and running shoes as an outfit for brunch, or even a casual Friday work meeting — pioneered by the likes of Lululemon and embraced by athletic brands like Nike and Adidas. Allbirds showed up just in time to ride that athleisure wave, according to NPD Group Vice President Matt Powell, a sports industry analyst. "I think they read the market correctly," Powell tells CNBC Make It. "One of the things we've seen over the past few years is really the blurring of what's athletic and what's not," Powell says. "More and more, people are able to wear sneakers to work, or a sneaker-like product, and I think [Allbirds] really meets that niche in between the two categories. It looks dressy, but it feels like a sneaker." Still, it might be easy to look at Allbirds and wonder what all the fuss is about. Wool has been used in all types of clothing for thousands of years, Sullivan points out, and Allbirds' designs are so minimal that they almost seem boring or over-simplified. But, that might also be the point. "Sometimes, simplicity really appeals to people," Sullivan tells CNBC Make It. "You just slip it on and go. You put it in a washing machine. Those kinds of advances really do revolutionize fashion, if they're done by the right people, in the right moment, and with the right distribution. Yeah, that's how they get huge."


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: tom huddleston jr, mark dadswell, getty images, source, max shelton, filmmagic
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, allbirds, think, shoes, sullivan, billion, really, staple, fashion, wear, went, startup, valley, silicon, sneaker, tells, athletic, 14, customers, work


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