Stocks could struggle after record outflows, history shows

Investors just pulled money out of stocks at a record pace and, if history is any indication, equities could struggle before recovering. Such strong outflows are typically seen as a contrarian indicator to buy back into stocks, but it could take some time for equities to start climbing back. Using Kensho Analytics, CNBC found the median gain for the S&P 500 one week after these outflows is just 0.4 percent. Stocks start turning significantly higher after three months, the analysis shows. The S&P


Investors just pulled money out of stocks at a record pace and, if history is any indication, equities could struggle before recovering. Such strong outflows are typically seen as a contrarian indicator to buy back into stocks, but it could take some time for equities to start climbing back. Using Kensho Analytics, CNBC found the median gain for the S&P 500 one week after these outflows is just 0.4 percent. Stocks start turning significantly higher after three months, the analysis shows. The S&P
Stocks could struggle after record outflows, history shows Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: fred imbert, brendan mcdermid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sp, outflows, pulled, struggle, stocks, worst, shows, record, history, median, dec, start, trade


Stocks could struggle after record outflows, history shows

Investors just pulled money out of stocks at a record pace and, if history is any indication, equities could struggle before recovering.

Data compiled by the Lipper team at Refinitiv showed investors pulled $46.2 billion from U.S. equity mutual funds and exchange-traded funds between Dec. 5 and Dec. 12. This is the biggest one-week outflow on record, according to Lipper.

Such strong outflows are typically seen as a contrarian indicator to buy back into stocks, but it could take some time for equities to start climbing back.

CNBC looked at the 10 largest weekly outflow numbers over the past 10 years. Using Kensho Analytics, CNBC found the median gain for the S&P 500 one week after these outflows is just 0.4 percent. Returns a month after are not great either, with the median coming in at 0.3 percent.

Stocks start turning significantly higher after three months, the analysis shows. The S&P 500’s three-month median return after these outflows tops 3 percent. The index’s median gain six months after outflows hits 4 percent.

Investors are draining money from stocks as Wall Street grapples with uncertainty around the U.S.-China trade war and fears over a possible global economic slowdown.

The U.S. and China are working toward striking a permanent deal on trade after agreeing Dec. 1 to a 90-day truce on tariffs. However, experts fear the grace period will not be enough to put together a deal that addresses the issues concerning both China and the U.S.

Meanwhile, the Chinese government reported Friday November industrial output numbers that were the worst in four years alongside its worst retail sales growth data since 2003. This led to a sharp sell-off in U.S. stocks on Friday, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average falling more than 500 points at its session low.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: fred imbert, brendan mcdermid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sp, outflows, pulled, struggle, stocks, worst, shows, record, history, median, dec, start, trade


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Mueller investigation cost $25 million in first 16 months, report shows

Special counsel Robert Mueller has spent just over $25 million in his probe of any links between the Trump campaign and Russia, according to a new filing released Friday. The filing shows that Mueller spent a total of $4.5 million in the six-month period between April and October, with most of the fees going to personnel compensation and benefits. The probe incurred another $4 million in costs to Justice Department components not directly tied to the inquiry. President Donald Trump has blasted M


Special counsel Robert Mueller has spent just over $25 million in his probe of any links between the Trump campaign and Russia, according to a new filing released Friday. The filing shows that Mueller spent a total of $4.5 million in the six-month period between April and October, with most of the fees going to personnel compensation and benefits. The probe incurred another $4 million in costs to Justice Department components not directly tied to the inquiry. President Donald Trump has blasted M
Mueller investigation cost $25 million in first 16 months, report shows Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: tucker higgins, tom williams, cq roll call, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, cost, mueller, 16, shows, filing, 25, related, president, million, months, investigation, manafort, probe, russian, report, spent


Mueller investigation cost $25 million in first 16 months, report shows

Special counsel Robert Mueller has spent just over $25 million in his probe of any links between the Trump campaign and Russia, according to a new filing released Friday.

The filing shows that Mueller spent a total of $4.5 million in the six-month period between April and October, with most of the fees going to personnel compensation and benefits. The probe incurred another $4 million in costs to Justice Department components not directly tied to the inquiry.

President Donald Trump has blasted Mueller for the cost of the probe. In June, the president wrote in a post on Twitter that “the Russian Hoax Investigation has now cost our government over $17 million, and going up fast.”

But the inquiry has proceeded along relatively quickly and at less expense than similar inquiries conducted by the Justice Department, such as Kenneth Starr’s investigation into President Bill Clinton.

Some have noted that Mueller’s prosecution of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort also netted cash for the government, thanks to asset forfeitures Manafort agreed to as part of his plea agreement. In September, Manafort agreed to hand over real estate and cash estimated to be worth as much as $46 million. That money does not contribute to Mueller’s budget.

In the latest filing, Mueller reported spending nearly $3 million on compensation, $580,000 on travel and transportation, $1 million on rent and related expenses, and $300,000 on contractual services, primarily related to IT.

Since he began his probe in May 2017, Mueller has filed more than 100 criminal charges against 33 individuals and three companies. Twenty-five of those indicted in connection with the probe are Russian nationals.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: tucker higgins, tom williams, cq roll call, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, cost, mueller, 16, shows, filing, 25, related, president, million, months, investigation, manafort, probe, russian, report, spent


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Arrest of Huawei CFO shows ‘the gloves are now fully off,’ says Eurasia Group

The arrest of Huawei’s global chief financial officer in Canada, reportedly related to a violation of U.S. sanctions, will corrode trade negotiations between Washington and Beijing, risk consultancy Eurasia Group said Thursday. “Beijing is likely to react angrily to this latest arrest of a Chinese citizen in a third country for violating U.S. law,” Eurasia analysts wrote. Canada’s Department of Justice said on Wednesday the country arrested Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver, where she is facing extradit


The arrest of Huawei’s global chief financial officer in Canada, reportedly related to a violation of U.S. sanctions, will corrode trade negotiations between Washington and Beijing, risk consultancy Eurasia Group said Thursday. “Beijing is likely to react angrily to this latest arrest of a Chinese citizen in a third country for violating U.S. law,” Eurasia analysts wrote. Canada’s Department of Justice said on Wednesday the country arrested Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver, where she is facing extradit
Arrest of Huawei CFO shows ‘the gloves are now fully off,’ says Eurasia Group Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-06  Authors: huileng tan, photographer, collection, getty images, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, related, statement, cfo, fully, sanctions, chinese, violation, group, trade, telecommunications, arrest, gloves, told, huawei, shows, eurasia


Arrest of Huawei CFO shows 'the gloves are now fully off,' says Eurasia Group

The arrest of Huawei’s global chief financial officer in Canada, reportedly related to a violation of U.S. sanctions, will corrode trade negotiations between Washington and Beijing, risk consultancy Eurasia Group said Thursday.

“Beijing is likely to react angrily to this latest arrest of a Chinese citizen in a third country for violating U.S. law,” Eurasia analysts wrote.

In fact, Global Times — a hyper-nationalistic tabloid tied to the Chinese Communist Party — responded to the arrest by posting on Twitter a statement about trade war escalation it attributed to an expert “close to the Chinese Ministry of Commerce.”

“China should be fully prepared for an escalation in the #tradewar with the US, as the US will not ease its stance on China, and the recent arrest of the senior executive of #Huawei is a vivid example,” said the statement, paired with a photo of opposing fists with Chinese and American flags superimposed upon them.

Canada’s Department of Justice said on Wednesday the country arrested Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver, where she is facing extradition to the U.S. The arrest is related to violations of U.S. sanctions, a person familiar with the matter told Reuters.

U.S. authorities have been probing Huawei, one of the world’s largest makers of telecommunications network equipment, since at least 2016 for allegedly shipping U.S.-origin products to Iran and other countries in violation of U.S. export and sanctions laws, sources told Reuters in April.

The analysts said the Huawei executive’s arrest will not derail the start of trade negotiations after U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping’s meeting last weekend in Argentina saw them agree to first steps to resolve their trade dispute. Still, they acknowledged, the incident involving Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei is likely to cloud talks.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-06  Authors: huileng tan, photographer, collection, getty images, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, related, statement, cfo, fully, sanctions, chinese, violation, group, trade, telecommunications, arrest, gloves, told, huawei, shows, eurasia


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The all new season of ‘Deal or No Deal’ is coming to CNBC: Here’s what to expect

The briefcases, the models, the million dollars — and yes, Howie Mandel — are returning to household screens and this time on CNBC! The iconic game show “Deal or No Deal” is finally back after its 10-year hiatus, and viewers have a lot to look forward to. With record-breaking numbers, the original episodes of “Deal or No Deal” were an instant hit. Executive Producer Scott St. John praised Mandel’s role as host on the show’s latest documentary, “Deal or No Deal: Back in Business” saying, “The mai


The briefcases, the models, the million dollars — and yes, Howie Mandel — are returning to household screens and this time on CNBC! The iconic game show “Deal or No Deal” is finally back after its 10-year hiatus, and viewers have a lot to look forward to. With record-breaking numbers, the original episodes of “Deal or No Deal” were an instant hit. Executive Producer Scott St. John praised Mandel’s role as host on the show’s latest documentary, “Deal or No Deal: Back in Business” saying, “The mai
The all new season of ‘Deal or No Deal’ is coming to CNBC: Here’s what to expect Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-05  Authors: claire rodgers, sophia fraioli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, season, deal, iconic, models, know, mandel, shows, fans, viewers, role, heres, coming, mandels, expect


The all new season of 'Deal or No Deal' is coming to CNBC: Here's what to expect

The briefcases, the models, the million dollars — and yes, Howie Mandel — are returning to household screens and this time on CNBC! The iconic game show “Deal or No Deal” is finally back after its 10-year hiatus, and viewers have a lot to look forward to.

The fun-for-the-family show was revered by fans back in its heyday and was the first time Mandel had ever hosted a game-show. What most people don’t know about the show’s history is that Mandel initially turned down the offer to host, believing it would be a career killer. After some convincing from Mandel’s wife, Terry, and media company Endemol’s former EVP of unscripted, Rob Smith, it didn’t take long for the comedian to say, “Deal!” The rest is history.

With record-breaking numbers, the original episodes of “Deal or No Deal” were an instant hit.

Executive Producer Scott St. John praised Mandel’s role as host on the show’s latest documentary, “Deal or No Deal: Back in Business” saying, “The main thing that made ‘Deal or No Deal’ so successful, originally, was Howie.”

On the upcoming season of “Deal or No Deal,” fans can expect to see plenty of new twists. For starters, the banker — whom all mega-fans know and fear — is now a woman whose identity is kept a mystery. The briefcase models are more diverse, playing an even bigger role than ever before. Fans will get a sense of their distinct personalities and the connections they share with the contestants. Plus, the iconic stage has a modern update with new and improved technology. And most of all, the contestants have the chance to counter-offer the banker, which opens doors to riskier challenges that’ll keep viewers on the edge of their seats.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-05  Authors: claire rodgers, sophia fraioli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, season, deal, iconic, models, know, mandel, shows, fans, viewers, role, heres, coming, mandels, expect


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Women in Asia are a growing luxury force, report shows

Women — especially in China — are playing an increasingly big role in Asia’s luxury spending. That is a key finding of Wealth Report Asia 2018, Bank Julius Baer’s latest look into high-end consumption in the region released Tuesday. And while China continues to dominate overall global luxury spending — accounting for 30 percent — women are becoming an increasing force in that aspect of conspicuous consumption in the world’s second-largest economy. “In terms of how much they buy, women actually a


Women — especially in China — are playing an increasingly big role in Asia’s luxury spending. That is a key finding of Wealth Report Asia 2018, Bank Julius Baer’s latest look into high-end consumption in the region released Tuesday. And while China continues to dominate overall global luxury spending — accounting for 30 percent — women are becoming an increasing force in that aspect of conspicuous consumption in the world’s second-largest economy. “In terms of how much they buy, women actually a
Women in Asia are a growing luxury force, report shows Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-04  Authors: kelly olsen, viewstock, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spending, force, china, baers, report, women, luxury, growing, asia, wealth, julius, consumption, shows


Women in Asia are a growing luxury force, report shows

Women — especially in China — are playing an increasingly big role in Asia’s luxury spending.

That is a key finding of Wealth Report Asia 2018, Bank Julius Baer’s latest look into high-end consumption in the region released Tuesday.

It tracks the spending habits of so-called high-net-worth individuals, which the Swiss private banking group said have “net investable wealth” of more than $1 million, excluding property in which they mainly reside.

It said that the growing buying power of wealthy Asian women is driven by factors including more of them in senior management positions and more self-made female millionaires.

And while China continues to dominate overall global luxury spending — accounting for 30 percent — women are becoming an increasing force in that aspect of conspicuous consumption in the world’s second-largest economy.

“In terms of how much they buy, women actually account for half of Chinese luxury spending,” Julius Baer’s Pearlyn Wong, executive director for markets and advisory solutions in the Asia Pacific, told reporters while introducing the findings.

The report described that as a trend that’s been developing for the past five years.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-04  Authors: kelly olsen, viewstock, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spending, force, china, baers, report, women, luxury, growing, asia, wealth, julius, consumption, shows


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This timeline shows how the US-China trade war led to Trump and Xi’s high-stakes meeting

1 Hour Ago | 05:12The U.S. has already put tariffs on $250 billion in Chinese goods, and could slap duties on an additional $267 billion in imports. Beijing has responded with tariffs on $110 billion in U.S. goods targeting politically important industries such as agriculture. Trump, who campaigned in 2016 on cracking down on what he called Chinese trade abuses, comes into the meeting with a specific set of demands. The White House has shown optimism about making progress, but Trump has threaten


1 Hour Ago | 05:12The U.S. has already put tariffs on $250 billion in Chinese goods, and could slap duties on an additional $267 billion in imports. Beijing has responded with tariffs on $110 billion in U.S. goods targeting politically important industries such as agriculture. Trump, who campaigned in 2016 on cracking down on what he called Chinese trade abuses, comes into the meeting with a specific set of demands. The White House has shown optimism about making progress, but Trump has threaten
This timeline shows how the US-China trade war led to Trump and Xi’s high-stakes meeting Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-30  Authors: john w schoen, jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, uschina, meeting, tariffs, trade, shows, billion, highstakes, beijing, led, official, timeline, chinese, win, trump, goods, deal, xis, war


This timeline shows how the US-China trade war led to Trump and Xi's high-stakes meeting

The G-20 summit is underway, but what does it mean for investors? 1 Hour Ago | 05:12

The U.S. has already put tariffs on $250 billion in Chinese goods, and could slap duties on an additional $267 billion in imports. Beijing has responded with tariffs on $110 billion in U.S. goods targeting politically important industries such as agriculture.

Trump, who campaigned in 2016 on cracking down on what he called Chinese trade abuses, comes into the meeting with a specific set of demands. He wants to address alleged Chinese theft of intellectual property, forced technology transfers, ownership of American companies in China, and tariffs and nontariff barriers, among other issues.

The White House has shown optimism about making progress, but Trump has threatened even more tariffs if the sides cannot reach a deal. Washington and Beijing appeared to have a difficult task in striking a concrete trade agreement even as Trump seeks a political win on one of his signature issues.

On Friday, a senior administration official said Trump “doesn’t feel pressure to make a deal for the sake of a deal” and feels “he has more time.” The president has gotten information from advisors that the economy “continues to show resilience and strength” despite a recent slide in U.S. stock prices, the official said.

Here is a timeline of the U.S.-China trade conflict during the Trump era that led up to the dinner, and the products the tariffs have affected so far:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-30  Authors: john w schoen, jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, uschina, meeting, tariffs, trade, shows, billion, highstakes, beijing, led, official, timeline, chinese, win, trump, goods, deal, xis, war


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Amazon has a new way to record HD TV shows even if you don’t pay for cable — here’s how it works

Amazon began selling a new product called the Fire TV Recast earlier this month. It’s meant for folks who no longer want to pay a cable bill but still want to record and watch TV shows from broadcast networks including ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, PBS and The CW. Recast lets you record local TV shows that you can get for free over the air with an HD antenna, and then watch them on any TV with a Fire TV stick connected to it, or on your phone or tablet. It works well, but it’s pretty expensive for what yo


Amazon began selling a new product called the Fire TV Recast earlier this month. It’s meant for folks who no longer want to pay a cable bill but still want to record and watch TV shows from broadcast networks including ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, PBS and The CW. Recast lets you record local TV shows that you can get for free over the air with an HD antenna, and then watch them on any TV with a Fire TV stick connected to it, or on your phone or tablet. It works well, but it’s pretty expensive for what yo
Amazon has a new way to record HD TV shows even if you don’t pay for cable — here’s how it works Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-29  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, heres, way, watch, recast, pay, cable, hd, local, shows, record, works, know, dont, tv, tablet


Amazon has a new way to record HD TV shows even if you don't pay for cable — here's how it works

Amazon began selling a new product called the Fire TV Recast earlier this month. It’s meant for folks who no longer want to pay a cable bill but still want to record and watch TV shows from broadcast networks including ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, PBS and The CW.

Recast lets you record local TV shows that you can get for free over the air with an HD antenna, and then watch them on any TV with a Fire TV stick connected to it, or on your phone or tablet. So you can record the local football game on a Sunday and then watch it whenever you want to, sort of like you would if you paid for cable and a DVR box.

It works well, but it’s pretty expensive for what you get, and has some shortcomings that you should know about.

Here’s what you need to know about the Fire TV Recast.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-29  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, heres, way, watch, recast, pay, cable, hd, local, shows, record, works, know, dont, tv, tablet


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Facebook’s YouTube competitor is pivoting to older audiences as teens tune out and publishers balk

In August, the company said about 50 million U.S. users each month view Watch content. With these trends in mind, Facebook is now soliciting video content for older users in hopes of making Watch more relevant. One media company said Facebook was asking them for shows hosted by traditional celebrities rather than social media stars. Any teen shows need to have adult themes that could attract older viewers. On the list of Watch shows available for advertising, only 25 percent are for people in th


In August, the company said about 50 million U.S. users each month view Watch content. With these trends in mind, Facebook is now soliciting video content for older users in hopes of making Watch more relevant. One media company said Facebook was asking them for shows hosted by traditional celebrities rather than social media stars. Any teen shows need to have adult themes that could attract older viewers. On the list of Watch shows available for advertising, only 25 percent are for people in th
Facebook’s YouTube competitor is pivoting to older audiences as teens tune out and publishers balk Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-26  Authors: michelle castillo, justin sullivan, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, competitor, pivoting, youtube, shows, company, facebook, viewers, older, video, content, balk, users, watch, teens, facebooks, audiences, media, publishers, tune


Facebook's YouTube competitor is pivoting to older audiences as teens tune out and publishers balk

Facebook launched Watch in August 2017 as a hub for video content. Users can follow series, and the platform recommends videos based on user behavior. The initiative is a way for the company to tap into digital video advertising, an industry worth $28 billion in 2018 according to eMarketer. Facebook has invested more than $1 billion buying original shows and content for Watch, per Variety.

But the service is not thriving, and many media buyers are ignoring it.

In August, the company said about 50 million U.S. users each month view Watch content. It’s a tiny audience compared with YouTube, which said in May it had 1.8 billion logged-in viewers each month. Facebook acknowledged in a meeting with publishers in October that a lot of users are not familiar the Watch brand, according to one company in attendance.

In addition, Sarah Madigan, who was on the deal team for Facebook original series, left the company recently for MGM, according to her LinkedIn account. She previously was a director of content acquisition for Netflix.

At the same time, teens are losing interest in Facebook overall. A recent Piper Jaffray report showed only 36 percent of teens used Facebook at least once a month during fall 2018, down from 52 percent just two years ago.

With these trends in mind, Facebook is now soliciting video content for older users in hopes of making Watch more relevant.

In talks with at least three media companies, Facebook has hinted it wants Watch shows aimed at post-college millennials around parenting age and older. One media company said Facebook was asking them for shows hosted by traditional celebrities rather than social media stars. Facebook responded most positively to talent in their 30s through 50s.

Another company said Facebook said it wanted shows for a broad audience, but not focused on anyone who was under the age of 20. Any teen shows need to have adult themes that could attract older viewers. Facebook was also asking for more formats that may be familiar to traditional TV viewers and middle America, like reality and talk shows.

Facebook has pared down the number of shows it is purchasing. The few it supports has more household appeal for post-college viewers. “Queen America” stars Catherine Zeta-Jones, while talk show “Red Table Talk” stars Jada Pinkett Smith. “The Real World,” while still on air, has more of a nostalgia factor for Gen Xers.

On the list of Watch shows available for advertising, only 25 percent are for people in their young 20s, one media buyer said. The rest are for an older audience, especially newer shows. Another media company who did an independent analysis of their competitors found just 15 percent of the top 25 shows on Facebook Watch are aimed towards teens and young adults.

In a statement, Facebook played down the significance of Watch as a stand-alone service separate from the News Feed, but said that video consumption rates are higher within Watch.

“We see Watch and News Feed serving complementary purposes, so it makes sense that video consumption and discovery are happening in both places,” Matthew Henick, Facebook head of content strategy and planning, said in a statement. “People are increasingly coming back to Watch for an intentional, people-centric viewing experience, and we’ve seen that people view videos for five times longer in Watch compared to in News Feed. Most importantly, people are connecting with friends and other fans around those videos on Watch in a way they don’t on other platforms.”

Facebook also noted that some shows have successfully captured younger viewers — for instance, it says, 75 percent of “Ball in the Family” viewers are under 35.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-26  Authors: michelle castillo, justin sullivan, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, competitor, pivoting, youtube, shows, company, facebook, viewers, older, video, content, balk, users, watch, teens, facebooks, audiences, media, publishers, tune


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Trump shows he will turn blind eye to Khashoggi killing, Turkey says

Donald Trump’s comments about Jamal Khashoggi’s killing show the U.S. president will turn a blind eye to the issue no matter what investigators uncover, Turkey’s foreign minister said on Friday. On Tuesday, Trump vowed to remain a “steadfast partner” of Saudi Arabia despite saying that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman may have known about the plan to murder Khashoggi last month. Criticising Trump’s stance for putting commercial deals with Riyadh ahead of justice, Foreign Minister Mevlut Ca


Donald Trump’s comments about Jamal Khashoggi’s killing show the U.S. president will turn a blind eye to the issue no matter what investigators uncover, Turkey’s foreign minister said on Friday. On Tuesday, Trump vowed to remain a “steadfast partner” of Saudi Arabia despite saying that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman may have known about the plan to murder Khashoggi last month. Criticising Trump’s stance for putting commercial deals with Riyadh ahead of justice, Foreign Minister Mevlut Ca
Trump shows he will turn blind eye to Khashoggi killing, Turkey says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-23  Authors: middle east monitor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, turn, president, khashoggis, turkish, khashoggi, turkey, cavusoglu, crown, eye, killing, prince, trump, blind, saudi, shows


Trump shows he will turn blind eye to Khashoggi killing, Turkey says

Donald Trump’s comments about Jamal Khashoggi’s killing show the U.S. president will turn a blind eye to the issue no matter what investigators uncover, Turkey’s foreign minister said on Friday.

On Tuesday, Trump vowed to remain a “steadfast partner” of Saudi Arabia despite saying that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman may have known about the plan to murder Khashoggi last month.

Criticising Trump’s stance for putting commercial deals with Riyadh ahead of justice, Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said human life should take precedence.

“This statement that Trump made also means: ‘No matter what happens, I will turn a blind eye.’ This is not a correct approach. Not everything is money,” Cavusoglu told broadcaster CNN Turk.

He also said the United States had not informed Turkey of an audio recording regarding Khashoggi’s killing, a day after a Turkish newspaper said that the CIA had signaled to Turkey it had a recording in which the crown prince ordered to “silence Khashoggi”.

Turkey’s President Tayyip Erdogan has said the order for Khashoggi’s killing came from the highest level of the Saudi government but probably not King Salman, putting the spotlight instead on Salman’s heir and de facto ruler Prince Mohammed.

A day after conflicting Turkish media reports over whether Erdogan would meet Prince Mohammed at a G20 summit in Argentina next week, Cavusoglu said there was no reason why a meeting could not take place, but the final decision was Erdogan’s.

The president has not directly accused the crown prince of organising the killing, and the Saudi government has denied that he had prior knowledge of the 15-man hit team – including a senior intelligence officer in the prince’s security team – which was sent to Turkey and killed Khashoggi in the Saudi consulate.

“We cannot accuse one person without definite evidence, this is not correct,” Cavusoglu said. “However, the ‘it may be, it may not be’ statement seemed interesting to us.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-23  Authors: middle east monitor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, turn, president, khashoggis, turkish, khashoggi, turkey, cavusoglu, crown, eye, killing, prince, trump, blind, saudi, shows


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Saudi war game scenario shows peril of post-Khashoggi period for the US

The toxic aftermath of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi’s murder has allies feuding, adversaries scheming, and competitors jockeying for influence among Muslims worldwide. One possible outcome in the below scenario is the worst regional war the Middle East has seen. He considers two options: a secure call to President Donald Trump to request he join his Saudi allies against their common foe. Or, alternatively, the Saudi Air Force strikes Iran, provoking a counterstrike that it hopes will bring A


The toxic aftermath of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi’s murder has allies feuding, adversaries scheming, and competitors jockeying for influence among Muslims worldwide. One possible outcome in the below scenario is the worst regional war the Middle East has seen. He considers two options: a secure call to President Donald Trump to request he join his Saudi allies against their common foe. Or, alternatively, the Saudi Air Force strikes Iran, provoking a counterstrike that it hopes will bring A
Saudi war game scenario shows peril of post-Khashoggi period for the US Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-23  Authors: fred kempe, mark wilson, pool via bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, scenario, middle, war, iran, american, yemen, values, period, saudi, shows, game, peril, risk, postkhashoggi, allies, worry


Saudi war game scenario shows peril of post-Khashoggi period for the US

DUBAI – Even in a region that specializes in nightmare scenarios, the “war game” below got my attention because it falls within the realm of the possible and the horrible.

What makes it even more explosive is the context. The toxic aftermath of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi’s murder has allies feuding, adversaries scheming, and competitors jockeying for influence among Muslims worldwide.

One possible outcome in the below scenario is the worst regional war the Middle East has seen. Another could be a historic rupture in U.S. relations with Saudi Arabia.

A Middle Eastern government analyst, when asked what risk keeps him awake at night, frames the scenario this way:

Iranian-backed Houthi militia in Yemen break a fragile cease-fire with a missile launched at Riyadh, the Saudi capital. Unlike so many before it, this missile slips through Saudi air defenses and lands on a shopping mall in early evening, the busiest time of the day. The strike takes mass casualties and sets off panic. Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, already rattled by U.S. and European backlash from the Khashoggi killing, blames Tehran for the attack, knows he must respond, but is unsure what allies he can count on. Advisors argue he must strike Iran itself, given the scale of the carnage, the pointlessness of striking targets in Yemen, and questions swirling about his leadership. However, he lacks the offensive and defensive wherewithal for a sustained war with Iran. He considers two options: a secure call to President Donald Trump to request he join his Saudi allies against their common foe. Or, alternatively, the Saudi Air Force strikes Iran, provoking a counterstrike that it hopes will bring American allies into the fighting. In either case, the U.S. president is left to decide: double-down on a tainted ally or stand aside and risk those consequences.

This is just one of many perilous scenarios that experts in the region are discussing as potential “aftershocks” from the Khashoggi killing.

What U.S. allies worry about most are the consequences of understandable U.S. and European reaction to the murder –brutal, foolish and irresponsible as it was – that disregards the risk of weakening U.S. alliances, strengthening the already growing role of China and Russia, and fueling pan-Islamist momentum.

Most of all, they worry about a slowing or even a reversal of moves over the last two years by the Saudi crown prince to turn his kingdom against the support and financing of Islamist extremism that was in no small part a result of previous Saudi leadership.

The ongoing Saudi affair highlights a historic tension in U.S. foreign policy between American values and interests. Without its values as a guide, the United States loses its unique attraction as a global power. Yet values alone would have failed to win the Cold War against the Soviet Union – and will likely fail now in the Middle East as well.

The Wall Street Journal editorial board this week joined a chorus of criticism of Trump’s statement this week that leaned toward all interests and no values. “Ronald Reagan,” said the Wall Street Journal, “pursued a hard-line, often controversial foreign policy against Soviet Communism, but he did so with a balance of unblinkered realism and American idealism. Mr. Trump seems incapable of such balance.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-23  Authors: fred kempe, mark wilson, pool via bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, scenario, middle, war, iran, american, yemen, values, period, saudi, shows, game, peril, risk, postkhashoggi, allies, worry


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