C3 2019 Disruptor 50

With so many products — everything from smart refrigerators and ovens to oil pumps — becoming connected to the internet, C3 (formerly C3 IoT) realized there was an abundance of information about how all these devices are performing. C3 began life as a software venture for the energy industry. But after the recession, when spending on software in the energy industry had all but dried up, Siebel course-corrected. Two new AI applications — antimoney laundering AML and manufacturing yield optimizati


With so many products — everything from smart refrigerators and ovens to oil pumps — becoming connected to the internet, C3 (formerly C3 IoT) realized there was an abundance of information about how all these devices are performing. C3 began life as a software venture for the energy industry. But after the recession, when spending on software in the energy industry had all but dried up, Siebel course-corrected. Two new AI applications — antimoney laundering AML and manufacturing yield optimizati
C3 2019 Disruptor 50 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: cnbccom staff, george kavallines, source, indigo agriculture, leah millis, prakash singh, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, disruptor, siebel, software, 2019, data, c3, company, aml, customers, energy, 50, industry, laundering


C3 2019 Disruptor 50

With so many products — everything from smart refrigerators and ovens to oil pumps — becoming connected to the internet, C3 (formerly C3 IoT) realized there was an abundance of information about how all these devices are performing. Its software can read all that data and tell its owners — companies in industries such as aerospace, financial services, health care, retailing and utilities, to name a few — if something is about to break down, or the most efficient ways to use sensor data in their supply chain management.

Read More: FULL LIST 2019 DISRUPTOR 50

The company was launched in 2009 by Thomas Siebel, the same man who started, and sold, Siebel Systems, the customer relationship management software firm, to Oracle in 2006 for $6 billion. C3 began life as a software venture for the energy industry. But after the recession, when spending on software in the energy industry had all but dried up, Siebel course-corrected. Two new AI applications — antimoney laundering AML and manufacturing yield optimization — are in trials with customers today. C3 says in the case of its AML offering, a large global bank has improved identification of potential money laundering by 200% while reducing false alarms by 85%.

Today the Redwood City, California-based company counts 3M, the New York Power Authority and Shell among its customers. The company has raised $228 million so far from investors, including TPG Growth and Breyer Capital.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: cnbccom staff, george kavallines, source, indigo agriculture, leah millis, prakash singh, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, disruptor, siebel, software, 2019, data, c3, company, aml, customers, energy, 50, industry, laundering


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Google cloud plagued by internal clashes in its effort to catch Amazon

When Google CEO Sundar Pichai handed Diane Greene the keys to the company’s fledgling cloud business three years ago, it was supposed to mark the internet company’s arrival into enterprise computing. For years, Google had struggled to get out of its own way in business software, hamstrung by a developer-centric culture that prioritized automation and fast, easy-to-use products over communication with business buyers and users. So while Google was dithering alongside a large group of also-rans, A


When Google CEO Sundar Pichai handed Diane Greene the keys to the company’s fledgling cloud business three years ago, it was supposed to mark the internet company’s arrival into enterprise computing. For years, Google had struggled to get out of its own way in business software, hamstrung by a developer-centric culture that prioritized automation and fast, easy-to-use products over communication with business buyers and users. So while Google was dithering alongside a large group of also-rans, A
Google cloud plagued by internal clashes in its effort to catch Amazon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-21  Authors: jordan novet, jillian donfro, tony avelar, bloomberg, getty images, drew angerer, david paul morris
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plagued, amazon, cloud, software, catch, enterprise, vmware, greene, clashes, internal, siebel, business, effort, billion, ceo, google


Google cloud plagued by internal clashes in its effort to catch Amazon

When Google CEO Sundar Pichai handed Diane Greene the keys to the company’s fledgling cloud business three years ago, it was supposed to mark the internet company’s arrival into enterprise computing.

For years, Google had struggled to get out of its own way in business software, hamstrung by a developer-centric culture that prioritized automation and fast, easy-to-use products over communication with business buyers and users. The huge profit margins in the online advertising business made it hard to justify loading up on expensive salespeople and marketing campaigns.

So while Google was dithering alongside a large group of also-rans, Amazon Web Services was running away with cloud computing. Microsoft deftly moved into second place by pivoting its traditional software licensing business to a subscription-based cloud-first model.

Greene was meant to change all that. She brought with her serious enterprise credentials as the co-founder and first CEO of VMware. In some sense, VMware helped kick off the cloud revolution by pioneering a technology called “virtualization,” which allowed the operators of data centers to squeeze more functionality out of the server hardware they bought and maintained. Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff has said “there’s no more successful female executive in Silicon Valley” than Greene.

Pichai wrote in his introductory blog post in November 2015 that “Diane needs no introduction.” She would get her own dedicated sales team, pulling cloud software sales out from under the control of the core advertising business.

On Friday, that plan came to an abrupt halt when Greene announced that she will leave her post in January. Greene will be replaced by Thomas Kurian, who recently left a top executive role at Oracle, where he spent 22 years.

During Greene’s tenure, Google increased its annual capital expenditures from $10 billion to over $13 billion, and went on a hiring spree — the cloud group has added more people than any other at Alphabet over the last two years. It got some key customer wins and built out several important functions for selling to enterprises, including professional services, training and marketing.

Despite all that, Google continues to struggle. People who follow the industry say it’s a two-horse race between Amazon and Microsoft, with Google failing to keep pace in a cloud infrastructure market that Gartner expects to grow to $39.5 billion next year from $31 billion in 2018. In terms of market share, Google has yet to crack double digits.

“They figured out and monetized search like nobody probably ever will, but I don’t think they care about the enterprise,” said Tom Siebel, the co-founder of software company Siebel Systems, which Oracle acquired for almost $6 billion in 2006. Siebel, who has known Greene for about 15 years and is now CEO of cloud software company C3, said that when it comes to helping big businesses solve their infrastructure problems, “Google is just not a factor.”

Greene put a positive spin on last week’s announcement, saying that she was among the Google employees to interview Kurian for the job, along with Pichai and Urs Hoelzle, Google’s eighth employee, who serves as senior vice president of technical infrastructure.

Greene also said that when she took the position in 2015, she told family and friends that it would be for only two years.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-21  Authors: jordan novet, jillian donfro, tony avelar, bloomberg, getty images, drew angerer, david paul morris
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plagued, amazon, cloud, software, catch, enterprise, vmware, greene, clashes, internal, siebel, business, effort, billion, ceo, google


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How Uber and other star start-ups scale up for success

Tom Siebel, the billionaire founder of software company Siebel Systems, which merged with Oracle in 2006, is now CEO of Internet of Things start-up C3 IoT. “C3 IoT is composed of baby boomers, Gen Xers and millennials, creating a richer, more complex tapestry of values and goals. It also will be costly not just in terms of the bottom line but also on the culture as well.” Like Noto at SoFi, Selby stepped into her role in the wake of a CEO ouster. So far, Selby has met the challenge of steering T


Tom Siebel, the billionaire founder of software company Siebel Systems, which merged with Oracle in 2006, is now CEO of Internet of Things start-up C3 IoT. “C3 IoT is composed of baby boomers, Gen Xers and millennials, creating a richer, more complex tapestry of values and goals. It also will be costly not just in terms of the bottom line but also on the culture as well.” Like Noto at SoFi, Selby stepped into her role in the wake of a CEO ouster. So far, Selby has met the challenge of steering T
How Uber and other star start-ups scale up for success Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-22  Authors: julia boorstin, john van hasselt, corbis, getty images, george kavallines, source, richard drew, susana gonzalez, bloomberg, ponywang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, selby, star, founder, ceo, startups, need, scale, work, hire, von, success, culture, siebel, uber, company


How Uber and other star start-ups scale up for success

Duolingo’s CEO Luis von Ahn said his company has struggled with how to reconcile its mission of making education free and accessible to everyone, while also making money to build a sustainable business. “This has been a source of tension at Duolingo,” he said. “How can we make it so that providing free education isn’t at odds with us earning the revenue we need to keep the company running and provide returns to investors?” After five years of trying different revenue models, von Ahn said they’ve found a combination of ads and in-app purchases that work and support the larger vision of the company.

For others, people are the biggest challenge.

Tom Siebel, the billionaire founder of software company Siebel Systems, which merged with Oracle in 2006, is now CEO of Internet of Things start-up C3 IoT. He said success always hinges on human capital.

“The way people work today differs drastically from my Siebel Systems and Oracle days, when the employee base consisted primarily of baby boomers who shared similar perspectives and sources of motivation,” said Siebel. “C3 IoT is composed of baby boomers, Gen Xers and millennials, creating a richer, more complex tapestry of values and goals. … Given the rate of technological change we are facing, you need to find and attract people who are agile, who like to learn, who have a book in their hand, who want to solve the previously unsolvable.”

More from CNBC Disruptor 50:

23andMe founder Anne Wojcicki is leading a DNA revolution by going directly to consumers

SpaceX leading the space race to launch humans to Mars by 2019

Oscar Health has a vision of fairer pay for doctors and clearer pricing for patients

Thinx CEO Maria Molland Selby stressed the value of smart hiring, saying without the right people even the best ideas will fail. “Specifically, hire only for what you need right now. If you hire someone too senior or if you hire for a role that isn’t absolutely essential, it will likely cause issues in terms of being able to get things done quickly and efficiently. It also will be costly not just in terms of the bottom line but also on the culture as well.”

Like Noto at SoFi, Selby stepped into her role in the wake of a CEO ouster. Thinx’s founder and former CEO, Miki Agrawal, was pushed out last year following accusations of sexual harassment and a culture of bullying and inappropriate conduct under her leadership. So far, Selby has met the challenge of steering Thinx into its next stage as a company, codifying employee policies and focusing on rebuilding the culture. “Always take skill set and culture fit into account,” Selby said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-22  Authors: julia boorstin, john van hasselt, corbis, getty images, george kavallines, source, richard drew, susana gonzalez, bloomberg, ponywang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, selby, star, founder, ceo, startups, need, scale, work, hire, von, success, culture, siebel, uber, company


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Billionaire Thomas Siebel on immigration: US should be stapling green cards to college diplomas

Billionaire tech CEO on immigration: US should be stapling green cards to college diplomas 5 Hours Ago | 00:46As a fix for Silicon Valley’s talent gap, billionaire tech CEO Thomas Siebel said the U.S. should work harder to keep international students, and be “stapling green cards to their diplomas.” “We’re spending enormous federal dollars, tax dollars training and educating these people and then we don’t allow them to work for us,” he said. Siebel echoed the sentiments out of Silicon Valley tha


Billionaire tech CEO on immigration: US should be stapling green cards to college diplomas 5 Hours Ago | 00:46As a fix for Silicon Valley’s talent gap, billionaire tech CEO Thomas Siebel said the U.S. should work harder to keep international students, and be “stapling green cards to their diplomas.” “We’re spending enormous federal dollars, tax dollars training and educating these people and then we don’t allow them to work for us,” he said. Siebel echoed the sentiments out of Silicon Valley tha
Billionaire Thomas Siebel on immigration: US should be stapling green cards to college diplomas Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-01-31  Authors: sara salinas, david a grogan
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, cards, billionaire, diplomas, tech, science, siebel, ceo, stapling, thomas, students, green, immigration, talent, work, silicon, college


Billionaire Thomas Siebel on immigration: US should be stapling green cards to college diplomas

Billionaire tech CEO on immigration: US should be stapling green cards to college diplomas 5 Hours Ago | 00:46

As a fix for Silicon Valley’s talent gap, billionaire tech CEO Thomas Siebel said the U.S. should work harder to keep international students, and be “stapling green cards to their diplomas.”

The CEO of C3 IoT, a software company centered on the so-called internet of things, told CNBC’s “Squawk Alley” it makes “no sense at all” to bar qualified foreign students from staying in the country after graduation.

“We’re spending enormous federal dollars, tax dollars training and educating these people and then we don’t allow them to work for us,” he said.

Siebel echoed the sentiments out of Silicon Valley that the tech hub is facing a talent shortage, forcing some companies to look outside the field for hires.

“The students that we’re graduating out of Stanford, Harvard, Illinois, Berkeley, who are getting their master’s degrees, Ph.D.s in, say, data science, AI and computer science,” Siebel said. “We’re making them go home. I mean this is crazy.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-01-31  Authors: sara salinas, david a grogan
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, cards, billionaire, diplomas, tech, science, siebel, ceo, stapling, thomas, students, green, immigration, talent, work, silicon, college


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Billionaire tech CEO Siebel predicts higher permanent unemployment from technology

Billionaire technology CEO Tom Siebel foresees even more ethical problems—including widespread job losses—if companies continue to evolve with big data. CNBC’s Mike Santoli spoke with Siebel in an exclusive interview for CNBC PRO on the sidelines of the Delivering Alpha conference in New York in September. Santoli asked the big data CEO about his outlook for the industry and its impact on the current labor force. Siebel is the Chairman and CEO of C3 IoT, a fast-growing computer software company


Billionaire technology CEO Tom Siebel foresees even more ethical problems—including widespread job losses—if companies continue to evolve with big data. CNBC’s Mike Santoli spoke with Siebel in an exclusive interview for CNBC PRO on the sidelines of the Delivering Alpha conference in New York in September. Santoli asked the big data CEO about his outlook for the industry and its impact on the current labor force. Siebel is the Chairman and CEO of C3 IoT, a fast-growing computer software company
Billionaire tech CEO Siebel predicts higher permanent unemployment from technology Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-10-02  Authors: thomas franck, david a grogan
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, data, predicts, technology, tech, permanent, unemployment, siebel, billionaire, santoli, york, going, companies, big, ceo, higher, pro


Billionaire tech CEO Siebel predicts higher permanent unemployment from technology

Billionaire technology CEO Tom Siebel foresees even more ethical problems—including widespread job losses—if companies continue to evolve with big data.

CNBC’s Mike Santoli spoke with Siebel in an exclusive interview for CNBC PRO on the sidelines of the Delivering Alpha conference in New York in September. Santoli asked the big data CEO about his outlook for the industry and its impact on the current labor force.

“Ethical issues that are very problematic are the implications for the job market…ever since the invention of the mechanical loom at the beginning of the nineteenth century, we’ve been using technology to replace jobs,” he said. “The net effect though—there will be unemployment, jobs will be eliminated. The idea that we’re going to train taxi drivers in New York City to be data scientists: I’m not buying it.”

Siebel is the Chairman and CEO of C3 IoT, a fast-growing computer software company that provides a platform for corporations to develop big data operations, predictive analytics, artificial intelligence, and internet-of-things applications.

“Let’s think about health care where we can do predictive analytics. We’re going to be able to predict disease with very, very high levels of precision: The onset of diabetes, heart disease, different forms of cancer, whatever it may be,” said Siebel. “Soon we will have in these datasets the genome sequence for the population of the United States and insurance companies and the people dealing with these data will know things about these patients that, candidly, patients don’t want to know.”

To be sure, Siebel noted that companies must advance with the help of big data, an area he has been working in for years. As founder of Siebel Systems, he built the foundation of the customer relationship management market.

“You know, many of these companies that do not make this transition to this new kind of generation of what’s going on – candidly, they’re going to be out of business,” said Siebel.

See here for the full CNBC PRO report and interview video .


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-10-02  Authors: thomas franck, david a grogan
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, data, predicts, technology, tech, permanent, unemployment, siebel, billionaire, santoli, york, going, companies, big, ceo, higher, pro


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Exclusive PRO Talks: Tech billionaire Tom Siebel explains why firms need big data to survive

Software billionaire Tom Siebel shared his views on why it’s so important for technology and business to integrate in an exclusive interview with CNBC PRO’s Mike Santoli. “Let’s look at the facts: In the last 50 years, if we look at the Fortune 500 50 years ago, 90 percent of those companies are gone. If we look at the companies that are in existence today in the Fortune 100, in 30 years 15 percent of them are gone,” he said. “These new business models, I mean – think about Tesla, think about Am


Software billionaire Tom Siebel shared his views on why it’s so important for technology and business to integrate in an exclusive interview with CNBC PRO’s Mike Santoli. “Let’s look at the facts: In the last 50 years, if we look at the Fortune 500 50 years ago, 90 percent of those companies are gone. If we look at the companies that are in existence today in the Fortune 100, in 30 years 15 percent of them are gone,” he said. “These new business models, I mean – think about Tesla, think about Am
Exclusive PRO Talks: Tech billionaire Tom Siebel explains why firms need big data to survive Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-10-02  Authors: thomas franck, getty images, david paul morris, bloomberg, diego j robles, the denver post, elizabeth simpson, andrew harrer, tony avelar, caitlin ochs
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, exclusive, tom, business, tech, siebel, think, survive, fortune, gone, explains, look, going, talks, companies, ceo, need, pro, software, firms


Exclusive PRO Talks: Tech billionaire Tom Siebel explains why firms need big data to survive

Software billionaire Tom Siebel shared his views on why it’s so important for technology and business to integrate in an exclusive interview with CNBC PRO’s Mike Santoli.

“Let’s look at the facts: In the last 50 years, if we look at the Fortune 500 50 years ago, 90 percent of those companies are gone. If we look at the companies that are in existence today in the Fortune 100, in 30 years 15 percent of them are gone,” he said.

“These new business models, I mean – think about Tesla, think about Amazon, think about Facebook, think about Snapchat. You know, many of these companies that do not make this transition to this new kind of generation of what’s going on – candidly, they’re going to be out of business.”

Siebel is the Chairman and CEO of C3 IoT, a fast-growing computer software company that provides a platform for corporations to develop big data operations, predictive analytics, artificial intelligence, and internet-of-things applications. As founder of Siebel Systems, he built the foundation of the customer relationship management market.

The CEO also discusses:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-10-02  Authors: thomas franck, getty images, david paul morris, bloomberg, diego j robles, the denver post, elizabeth simpson, andrew harrer, tony avelar, caitlin ochs
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, exclusive, tom, business, tech, siebel, think, survive, fortune, gone, explains, look, going, talks, companies, ceo, need, pro, software, firms


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Tom vs. the elephant: How one billionaire entrepreneur keeps going

To say Tom Siebel has had an interesting life would be putting it mildly. He’s a billionaire, a technology visionary, and the survivor of an elephant goring eight years ago that — given the odds — should have killed him. So what do you learn about life when you’ve stared down death in the form of a five-ton elephant that crushes you, and lived to tell the tale? After you’ve made all that, and survived it all, why are you still inventing at the age of 64? Tom Siebel, now the CEO of C3 IoT, sat do


To say Tom Siebel has had an interesting life would be putting it mildly. He’s a billionaire, a technology visionary, and the survivor of an elephant goring eight years ago that — given the odds — should have killed him. So what do you learn about life when you’ve stared down death in the form of a five-ton elephant that crushes you, and lived to tell the tale? After you’ve made all that, and survived it all, why are you still inventing at the age of 64? Tom Siebel, now the CEO of C3 IoT, sat do
Tom vs. the elephant: How one billionaire entrepreneur keeps going Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-06-04  Authors: jon fortt
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, workplace, siebel, life, vs, youve, going, visionary, walk, billionaire, entrepreneur, keeps, whats, elephant, learn, tom


Tom vs. the elephant: How one billionaire entrepreneur keeps going

To say Tom Siebel has had an interesting life would be putting it mildly. He’s a billionaire, a technology visionary, and the survivor of an elephant goring eight years ago that — given the odds — should have killed him. Several doctors told Siebel he would never walk again, much less sail competitively.

But he does.

So what do you learn about life when you’ve stared down death in the form of a five-ton elephant that crushes you, and lived to tell the tale? What do you learn when you’ve invented one of the first killer workplace apps of the PC era, then sold it for about $6 billion dollars?

After you’ve made all that, and survived it all, why are you still inventing at the age of 64?

Tom Siebel, now the CEO of C3 IoT, sat down with Fortt Knox at the Nasdaq’s MarketSite in Times Square to share some insight into what’s made him tick – and what’s helped him succeed. Here are some bits to chew on:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-06-04  Authors: jon fortt
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, workplace, siebel, life, vs, youve, going, visionary, walk, billionaire, entrepreneur, keeps, whats, elephant, learn, tom


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