Mythbusters’ Adam Savage spent 14 years and over $15,000 building a single Comic-Con costume

How much would you spend to build a near-perfect replica of your favorite movie costume? To design and create a copy of his favorite space suit, Adam Savage, the host of Discovery Channel’s “Savage Builds” and former co-host of “Mythbusters,” spent over $15,000. But one of these experiences stands out as not only his “favorite costume on the planet,” but also the most expensive one he’s created. Sunset Boulevard | Corbis Historical | Getty Images”My most expensive costume build — that’s going to


How much would you spend to build a near-perfect replica of your favorite movie costume? To design and create a copy of his favorite space suit, Adam Savage, the host of Discovery Channel’s “Savage Builds” and former co-host of “Mythbusters,” spent over $15,000. But one of these experiences stands out as not only his “favorite costume on the planet,” but also the most expensive one he’s created. Sunset Boulevard | Corbis Historical | Getty Images”My most expensive costume build — that’s going to
Mythbusters’ Adam Savage spent 14 years and over $15,000 building a single Comic-Con costume Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, adam, building, savage, space, costume, 14, comiccon, kanes, suit, spent, single, movie, favorite, alien, 15000, mythbusters, version


Mythbusters' Adam Savage spent 14 years and over $15,000 building a single Comic-Con costume

How much would you spend to build a near-perfect replica of your favorite movie costume? To design and create a copy of his favorite space suit, Adam Savage, the host of Discovery Channel’s “Savage Builds” and former co-host of “Mythbusters,” spent over $15,000. Savage recommends people follow their “secret thrills.” And his not-so-secret thrill is cosplay. For years, Savage has attended Comic-Cons all over the country in elaborate costumes that he designs and builds from scratch. But one of these experiences stands out as not only his “favorite costume on the planet,” but also the most expensive one he’s created.

Actor John Hurt on the set of “Alien”. Sunset Boulevard | Corbis Historical | Getty Images

“My most expensive costume build — that’s going to have to be Kane’s suit from ‘Alien,'” Savage tells CNBC Make It. Savage says he spent roughly 14 years gathering the information, parts, knowledge and research required to make his own version, investing over $15,000 dollars in the suit over time. “Alien,” the 1979 movie directed by Ridley Scott, follows a crew as they encounter an aggressive alien race. In the movie, executive officer Kane, played by actor John Hurt, encounters the first alien, which attaches itself to his face and, later, spectacularly bursts from his chest in a pivotal scene. After years of working on and off on the project since about 2005, Savage set a deadline to finish it. “Leading up to the planning for 2014, I knew that I wanted to complete Kane’s Alien space suit and wear it on the floor at San Diego Comic-Con later that summer,” Savage writes in his new book, “Every Tool’s a Hammer: Life is What You Make It.”

Adam Savage in his replica of Kane’s space suit, holding a prop version of a “facehugger” from the 1979 “Alien” movie. Norman Chan | Tested


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, adam, building, savage, space, costume, 14, comiccon, kanes, suit, spent, single, movie, favorite, alien, 15000, mythbusters, version


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How a single mom of four switched careers to land a six-figure salary

After separating from her husband in June, single mom Shannon Lance found herself suddenly needing to earn enough to support four children. Lance began her job search after completing an intensive 14-week program with Washington-based Coding Dojo. Just six days after beginning her job hunt, Lance secured a six-figure offer from travel expenses firm SAP Concur. “I was (previously) a teacher and had a bunch of professional experience that gave me soft skills which helped land the job,” she said. H


After separating from her husband in June, single mom Shannon Lance found herself suddenly needing to earn enough to support four children. Lance began her job search after completing an intensive 14-week program with Washington-based Coding Dojo. Just six days after beginning her job hunt, Lance secured a six-figure offer from travel expenses firm SAP Concur. “I was (previously) a teacher and had a bunch of professional experience that gave me soft skills which helped land the job,” she said. H
How a single mom of four switched careers to land a six-figure salary Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, learning, switched, experience, program, single, work, salary, mom, coding, land, careers, job, didnt, career, lance, sixfigure


How a single mom of four switched careers to land a six-figure salary

After separating from her husband in June, single mom Shannon Lance found herself suddenly needing to earn enough to support four children. “I have a teaching degree but (teaching) won’t pay the bills for a family of five – it’s just not an option,” she told CNBC. “I thought about nursing, but the biggest drawback was that it required going back to school for two years to get another degree – I didn’t have two years, I have kids and bills to pay.” Despite being a self-confessed technophobe, Lance decided to learn computer coding after a suggestion from her brother-in-law, taking the plunge into an entirely new career path. Lance began her job search after completing an intensive 14-week program with Washington-based Coding Dojo. Just six days after beginning her job hunt, Lance secured a six-figure offer from travel expenses firm SAP Concur. In an interview with CNBC, she shared her tips on achieving success in a new career.

Value your ‘soft skills’

Although a career change can set you back in terms of direct industry experience, Lance urged others not to underestimate the value of basic core capabilities that appeal to employers — like strong communication or leadership skills. “I was (previously) a teacher and had a bunch of professional experience that gave me soft skills which helped land the job,” she said. “(That was) combined with having just coming out of a great program which gave me all the right tech skills.”

Be willing to learn

As well as considering how your skillset could be transferred to a new industry, Lance told CNBC that having the right attitude was a real asset when it came to landing a job with no direct experience. She said she was upfront about what she could and couldn’t do, taking the approach: “I don’t know a lot about it, but I do know a little bit – and I’m willing to learn more.” According to Lance, embracing those knowledge gaps and showcasing a desire for self-improvement could be just as valuable as experience to some employers. “For the job I got, the company was starting a new team that would be using new technology, so we’d all be learning whether they hired somebody with experience or not,” she said. “They wanted people who were capable of learning quickly and who could work and learn under pressure. Going through Coding Dojo proved I had those capabilities and that desire to keep learning.”

Work your own way

Although Lance didn’t feel intellectually limited while learning to code, she said comparing her own pace of work to others’ sometimes led to unnecessary frustration and could impact her confidence. “One challenge was the amount of time it took to get through everything. I don’t think I had trouble with the actual program, but I didn’t have any tech background, so every assignment would take me one and a half times as long as everyone else,” she told CNBC. “Some of the people in my group had played on computers since they were 12 — so the assignments only took 20 to 30 minutes for them to complete.” She said it was important to find your own way to get work done, rather than sticking to the chronological or seemingly “correct” method. Her coding program was organized into three sections, and when she initially attempted to do each assignment in order, Lance found herself falling behind. “I’d have to skip forward and go back again – that’s not a good strategy,” she said. Instead, she got through all of the reading and learning materials for each topic before attempting to complete an assignment. “Make sure you do the reading and homework way before you start struggling with (graded assignments and technical work),” she said. “And make sure you allow yourself enough time outside of class to get stuff done.” Lance also advised those considering a career change not to overestimate their own academic ability. “I was pretty good in school and didn’t have to study a lot,” she said. “I went into Coding Dojo thinking I could get it done quicker, underestimating how much time it would consume. (You have to let it) take as long as it takes.”

Seek support to switch career


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, learning, switched, experience, program, single, work, salary, mom, coding, land, careers, job, didnt, career, lance, sixfigure


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The multi-billion dollar search deal between Google and Apple took four months working ‘every single day’

Tim Cook participates in a panel discussion during the TIME 100 Summit 2019 on April 23, 2019 in New York City. Google pays Apple billions of dollars to be the default search engine in the Safari browser on iPhones and Mac computers. A deal like that doesn’t come together overnight, and a new interview with Apple’s former general counsel Bruce Sewell reveals just how involved the most senior levels of both companies were hammering out the details. “The Google negotiation for example, between App


Tim Cook participates in a panel discussion during the TIME 100 Summit 2019 on April 23, 2019 in New York City. Google pays Apple billions of dollars to be the default search engine in the Safari browser on iPhones and Mac computers. A deal like that doesn’t come together overnight, and a new interview with Apple’s former general counsel Bruce Sewell reveals just how involved the most senior levels of both companies were hammering out the details. “The Google negotiation for example, between App
The multi-billion dollar search deal between Google and Apple took four months working ‘every single day’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-10  Authors: kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, interview, 2019, deal, york, apple, single, search, google, dollar, youtube, university, working, took, months, sewell, day, multibillion


The multi-billion dollar search deal between Google and Apple took four months working 'every single day'

Tim Cook participates in a panel discussion during the TIME 100 Summit 2019 on April 23, 2019 in New York City.

Google pays Apple billions of dollars to be the default search engine in the Safari browser on iPhones and Mac computers.

A deal like that doesn’t come together overnight, and a new interview with Apple’s former general counsel Bruce Sewell reveals just how involved the most senior levels of both companies were hammering out the details.

“The Google negotiation for example, between Apple and Google over search, probably took us four months,” Sewell said in an interview with Columbia University law students posted to YouTube.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-10  Authors: kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, interview, 2019, deal, york, apple, single, search, google, dollar, youtube, university, working, took, months, sewell, day, multibillion


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My wife and I have been married 50 years, and we’ve never had a single fight about money—here’s our secret

My wife and I got married in 1968, and in the 50-plus years we’ve been together, we’ve never had a single fight about money. But the way I see it, differences over money should never come as a surprise when you’re married. As anyone who’s been married for several decades can tell you, financial compatibility is an essential element to any successful marriage. I’m 75 and my wife is 79, and we’ve maintained a peaceful marriage — thanks in large part to our shared views on saving and spending. If t


My wife and I got married in 1968, and in the 50-plus years we’ve been together, we’ve never had a single fight about money. But the way I see it, differences over money should never come as a surprise when you’re married. As anyone who’s been married for several decades can tell you, financial compatibility is an essential element to any successful marriage. I’m 75 and my wife is 79, and we’ve maintained a peaceful marriage — thanks in large part to our shared views on saving and spending. If t
My wife and I have been married 50 years, and we’ve never had a single fight about money—here’s our secret Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-25  Authors: dick quinn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, secret, wife, benefits, married, fight, money, financial, 50, marriage, weve, way, relationship, pay, moneyheres, single


My wife and I have been married 50 years, and we've never had a single fight about money—here's our secret

My wife and I got married in 1968, and in the 50-plus years we’ve been together, we’ve never had a single fight about money. There were deliberations, but never any fights. I get asked all the time: “How do you do it?” The secret, I tell them, can be summed up in three words: It’s our money.

I realize this isn’t the case for most couples. But having spent my entire career in employee benefits, finance and retirement counseling, I’ve witnessed a handful of misguided ideas about marriage and money.

In the early 60s, less than 25% of married women were employed, which led men to believe that any overtime pay they earned belonged solely to them. It was rare for couples to discuss their conflicting attitudes toward money — and if they did, they often found themselves caught in an antagonistic gridlock.

That sort of attitude led to a lot of tension in marriages — and it’s still prevalent today. In fact, arguments about money are still one of the top predictors for divorce. But the way I see it, differences over money should never come as a surprise when you’re married.

As anyone who’s been married for several decades can tell you, financial compatibility is an essential element to any successful marriage. One miser and one spendthrift will have a tough time agreeing. That doesn’t necessarily mean the relationship is doomed, it just means a serious conversation about financial goals and values must take place immediately. Having financial peace in a relationship is a matter of mutual respect and responsibility. The objective is to work on having a similar money mindset moving forward.

I’m 75 and my wife is 79, and we’ve maintained a peaceful marriage — thanks in large part to our shared views on saving and spending. She knows as well as I do where we stand financially. Any money that comes in is considered as our money, regardless of who brought it in, and we manage it together.

I retired in 2010 as vice president of compensation and benefits for a Fortune 500 company. My wife (also retired) and I live off my pension and our Social Security benefits, but our money philosophy has remained the same. We have several joint checking and savings accounts. Once money goes into an account, it’s apportioned among many others. For example, we have an account designated for travel, and another for fixed monthly bills, which includes utilities, taxes and HOA fees. Our checking accounts are mainly used to pay credit card bills.

This compartmentalized approach is our way of budgeting. But here’s the thing, we also know that neither of us is going to spend more we can afford. If there’s something significant that we need or want, we’ll wait until we’ve saved enough to pay in cash.

Many financial experts will advise against joint accounts. Call me old-fashioned, but I wholeheartedly disagree. In my opinion, insisting on a strict division between the money that each party earns is a sign of not being fully committed to the union.

If both parties are constantly questioning each other’s financial decisions, it’s unlikely that the relationship will last. I can understand a working person wanting a sense of ownership to some degree, but a marriage should be built on complete trust. Insisting on “your money” and “my money” violates that commitment. (Besides, there will be plenty of time for divisions in the divorce process.)

My wife and I don’t consider ourselves wealthy. We’re financially secure because we made sure our goals and values aligned before entering the dominion of marital bliss. That said, it does take a lot of hard work. We have four children who all went to private colleges. They worked campus and summer jobs to pay off their loans. My wife and I remortgaged our house (twice) and even started a part-time business to cover the remaining costs. That meant working 16 hours a day between two jobs.

My point is, if you sort out your differences early on and agree to say “it’s our money,” you’ll live happily ever after or hold hands in bankruptcy court. Either way, you’ll be in it together. But if your money differences are extreme, proceed at your own peril. Based on what I’ve seen, major changes by either party are unlikely.

Keep in mind that this advice is coming from someone who’s been married for more than 50 years, so unless your relationship is intended to be permanent, the “mine is mine” approach may be better.

Dick Quinn is a financial blogger and MarketWatch contributor. Before retiring in 2010, Dick was a compensation and benefits executive at an S&P 500 Company. His previous blogs include Healthy Change, Saving Ourselves and Required Irritation. Follow him on Twitter .

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-25  Authors: dick quinn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, secret, wife, benefits, married, fight, money, financial, 50, marriage, weve, way, relationship, pay, moneyheres, single


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Dollar at two-year high, safe havens up on stormy global economy

“Safe havens were the currencies of choice as confidence in global growth faltered,” said Joseph Manimbo, senior market analyst at Western Union Business Solutions. The dollar hit a high of 98.371 against a basket of six major currencies, its highest since May 2017. If it maintains its path, the dollar will be on track for a fourth consecutive month of gains. Compounding these worries, European parliamentary elections began on Thursday with euroskeptic parties expected to do well, raising concer


“Safe havens were the currencies of choice as confidence in global growth faltered,” said Joseph Manimbo, senior market analyst at Western Union Business Solutions. The dollar hit a high of 98.371 against a basket of six major currencies, its highest since May 2017. If it maintains its path, the dollar will be on track for a fourth consecutive month of gains. Compounding these worries, European parliamentary elections began on Thursday with euroskeptic parties expected to do well, raising concer
Dollar at two-year high, safe havens up on stormy global economy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-23
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stormy, twoyear, single, concerns, high, highest, safe, yen, worries, havens, trade, dollar, economy, having, global, united, euro


Dollar at two-year high, safe havens up on stormy global economy

The dollar hit its highest level in two years and the yen rose half a percent on Thursday as economic and political uncertainties swept through Europe and Asia, pinning down the euro and the yuan.

Worries over German manufacturing, the impact of a trade war on Asian economies and deepening concerns over Brexit and European parliamentary elections have broadly curbed risk appetite and sent investors to perceived safe-haven assets.

“Safe havens were the currencies of choice as confidence in global growth faltered,” said Joseph Manimbo, senior market analyst at Western Union Business Solutions. “The greenback and safer rivals from Japan and Switzerland were in the driver’s seat.”

While the United States is not without its own worries – namely trade conflict with China – investors see the greenback as a relative safe haven because of its preeminence in the global economy and the extra cushion of having some of the highest interest rates in the developed world.

The dollar hit a high of 98.371 against a basket of six major currencies, its highest since May 2017. If it maintains its path, the dollar will be on track for a fourth consecutive month of gains.

“Certainly the dollar has been acting like something of a safe haven even though the Fed has been more dovish than has been expected,” said Neil Mellor, FX strategist at BNY Mellon.

Activity in Germany’s services and manufacturing sectors fell in May, a survey showed on Thursday, reflecting the toll that unresolved trade disputes are having on Europe’s largest economy.

While a similar figure for the euro zone as a whole was healthier, it still undershot expectations across the board, hurting the single currency.

The euro dipped to its lowest in a month at $1.111 before recovering slightly to $1.114.

Compounding these worries, European parliamentary elections began on Thursday with euroskeptic parties expected to do well, raising concerns about the single currency’s stability.

The yen also advanced broadly as persistent U.S.-China trade fears and Brexit concerns fanned risk aversion. The yen was 0.57% firmer at 109.71 to the dollar, having pulled back from a two-week low of 110.675 plumbed on Tuesday.

Reports that the United States could impose restrictions on Chinese technology company Hikvision renewed market jitters about trade on Wednesday, reversing a relief rally that followed Washington’s move to temporarily ease curbs against Huawei Technology Co Ltd.

Brexit uncertainty has set sterling up for its 14th straight day of losses against the euro – its longest losing streak in the 20-year history of the single currency.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-23
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stormy, twoyear, single, concerns, high, highest, safe, yen, worries, havens, trade, dollar, economy, having, global, united, euro


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Blue-state House members try to reclaim higher SALT deductions that were cut in Trump’s tax overhaul

Those Democrats have a clear political incentive to target the deduction cap. But efforts to hike the deduction limit may not play as well politically nationwide. Still, Congress appears to have limited appetite for addressing the state and local tax deduction limit, for now. She and other Democrats who flipped Republican-held House seats in New Jersey in last year’s midterms campaigned in part on reversing the deduction limit. As of 2016, about 30% of tax returns claimed state and local deducti


Those Democrats have a clear political incentive to target the deduction cap. But efforts to hike the deduction limit may not play as well politically nationwide. Still, Congress appears to have limited appetite for addressing the state and local tax deduction limit, for now. She and other Democrats who flipped Republican-held House seats in New Jersey in last year’s midterms campaigned in part on reversing the deduction limit. As of 2016, about 30% of tax returns claimed state and local deducti
Blue-state House members try to reclaim higher SALT deductions that were cut in Trump’s tax overhaul Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-23  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, local, jersey, single, cap, deduction, trumps, higher, tax, salt, house, overhaul, deductions, reclaim, limit, taxpayers, members, state, try


Blue-state House members try to reclaim higher SALT deductions that were cut in Trump's tax overhaul

BLOOMFIELD, N.J. — Congress fights with the White House over financial records. President Donald Trump rages against the first Republican to call for impeachment proceedings against him.

But for many voters in areas like the northeast New Jersey town of Bloomfield, those issues shrink behind concerns about property taxes and a high cost of living. And the state’s largely Democratic congressional delegation has fixed much of its ire on one target: the 2017 Republican tax overhaul.

Near the start of a town hall meeting earlier this month in Bloomfield, Rep. Mikie Sherrill tried to assure constituents that she is working to lift the new $10,000 limit on state and local tax deductions. The change disproportionately hit residents of high-tax blue states. She got some of her strongest applause of the day when she noted that “every single member of your New Jersey delegation is on a bill to get rid of the state and local tax deduction cap.”

“The New Jersey delegation has been adamant that this is our number one issue,” Sherrill told CNBC after the May 19 event.

Earlier this month, Sherrill and three other House members — Democrat Gil Cisneros of California and Republicans Elise Stefanik and Peter King of New York — introduced a bill to hike the state and local deduction to $12,000 for single taxpayers and $24,000 for married filers. Those levels match the standard deduction. A bill that Democratic Reps. Lauren Underwood and Sean Casten of Illinois introduced in March would more dramatically lift the cap to $15,000 and $30,000 for single and married filers, respectively.

Those Democrats have a clear political incentive to target the deduction cap. It allows them to criticize Trump’s signature legislative achievement while offering financial relief to their districts, where a significant share of voters benefited from state and local deductions before they went away in the 2018 filing year.

But efforts to hike the deduction limit may not play as well politically nationwide. Democrats have spent a year and a half eviscerating the Republican tax law as a giveaway to the wealthy and corporations that blows a hole in the federal budget deficit. Not only do analyses show high earners would see the most benefits from raising the deduction cap, but doing so is expected to further reduce federal revenues.

“Anything that you do to raise the cap is generally going to benefit higher income taxpayers,” said Frank Sammartino, a senior fellow at the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center, an organization usually considered left of center.

Democrats are still using the tax law to score political points against Trump: Top Democratic presidential contenders such as former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders have bashed the plan on the campaign trail. Still, Congress appears to have limited appetite for addressing the state and local tax deduction limit, for now.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has not publicly mentioned plans to try to lift the deduction cap even though she criticized it as Republicans pushed to pass the tax law in 2017. A spokesman for the California Democrat did not respond to a request to comment on whether the speaker planned to bring any deduction-related bills up for a vote in the House.

The lawmakers who introduced the legislation have numerous constituents who would benefit from it. In Sherrill’s New Jersey 11th District, for example, more than 40% of taxpayers previously used state and local deductions, with an average of more than $20,000, according to the Government Finance Officers Association. She and other Democrats who flipped Republican-held House seats in New Jersey in last year’s midterms campaigned in part on reversing the deduction limit.

But easing the limit may not be as politically palatable for many of her colleagues. As of 2016, about 30% of tax returns claimed state and local deductions, at an average of about $12,500, according to the Tax Policy Center.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-23  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, local, jersey, single, cap, deduction, trumps, higher, tax, salt, house, overhaul, deductions, reclaim, limit, taxpayers, members, state, try


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Only one bottle of this $85,000 whisky exists on Earth

But for this whisky, only one bottle exists on Earth. High-end scotch whisky maker The Dalmore and Massimo Bottura, the executive chef of Modena, Italy’s three-Michelin starred Osteria Francescana (ranked No. The single malt whisky is being auctioned at Sotheby’s with bids being accepted through May 9. The whisky is expected to sell for at least $85,000 based on previous The Dalmore auctions, according to the company. There is no reserve on the auction for the whisky, but Dalmore believes it may


But for this whisky, only one bottle exists on Earth. High-end scotch whisky maker The Dalmore and Massimo Bottura, the executive chef of Modena, Italy’s three-Michelin starred Osteria Francescana (ranked No. The single malt whisky is being auctioned at Sotheby’s with bids being accepted through May 9. The whisky is expected to sell for at least $85,000 based on previous The Dalmore auctions, according to the company. There is no reserve on the auction for the whisky, but Dalmore believes it may
Only one bottle of this $85,000 whisky exists on Earth Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-26  Authors: jimmy im
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, exists, expensive, whiskys, bottle, bottura, 85000, earth, malt, paterson, single, dalmore, sell, whisky, according


Only one bottle of this $85,000 whisky exists on Earth

Rare whiskys can fetch more than $1 million at auction. But for this whisky, only one bottle exists on Earth. High-end scotch whisky maker The Dalmore and Massimo Bottura, the executive chef of Modena, Italy’s three-Michelin starred Osteria Francescana (ranked No. 1 restaurant in the world by The World’s 50 Best Restaurants) partnered to produce The Dalmore L’Anima Aged 49 Years. The single malt whisky is being auctioned at Sotheby’s with bids being accepted through May 9. The whisky is expected to sell for at least $85,000 based on previous The Dalmore auctions, according to the company.

Dalmore

So why is the whisky so expensive? The Dalmore L’Anima is a single malt created from three unique assemblages (blended by The Dalmore master distiller Richard Paterson) using some of the distillery’s rarest casks that previously held 40 year old Pedro Ximenez sherry and Graham’s Vintage Port Pipes. Paterson selected whiskys that embody the chocolate orange profile The Dalmore is known for, and Bottura layered flavors he loves working with in his kitchen. The two visited local markets to choose the right flavors. The single malt has aromas of sun-kissed raisins, bitter chocolate and old English marmalade; hints of Java coffee, Demerara sugar, pecan pie and crème brûlée in taste; and Sanguinello blood oranges, figs and treacle linger on the after taste, according to Bottura. There is no reserve on the auction for the whisky, but Dalmore believes it may sell for higher than $85,000. The rare Dalmore 62 was expected to sell for $65,000 but went for $149,000 in December 2017.

Dalmore

“Our creative processes fused together with our deep understanding of flavor complexity and connection,” Bottura said in a press release. The whisky is “bold, different and full of warmth,” according to Paterson. All proceeds will benefit Food For Soul, according to The Dalmore, which is a non-profit organization that empowers communities to fight food waste through social inclusion. Don’t miss: The most expensive steak sandwich in America is served on Wall Street — here’s what you get This $1,500 ice cream is the most expensive in America — here’s what you get

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-26  Authors: jimmy im
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More student loan borrowers are getting their tax refunds seized

As she scanned the letter’s black type, Alexis Patterson felt herself go numb. “The U.S. Department of Treasury … applied all or part of your payment to delinquent debt that you owe,” it read. Patterson stopped reading. The single mother would not receive her $3,063 tax refund, including her child tax credit. The government would instead apply the money to her past-due student loan account.


As she scanned the letter’s black type, Alexis Patterson felt herself go numb. “The U.S. Department of Treasury … applied all or part of your payment to delinquent debt that you owe,” it read. Patterson stopped reading. The single mother would not receive her $3,063 tax refund, including her child tax credit. The government would instead apply the money to her past-due student loan account.
More student loan borrowers are getting their tax refunds seized Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: annie nova, source, alexis patterson, akilah mccadney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, student, single, stopped, tax, loan, refund, getting, type, refunds, borrowers, stayeverything, treasury, patterson, thing, seized


More student loan borrowers are getting their tax refunds seized

As she scanned the letter’s black type, Alexis Patterson felt herself go numb. “The U.S. Department of Treasury … applied all or part of your payment to delinquent debt that you owe,” it read.

Patterson stopped reading. One thing mattered now. The single mother would not receive her $3,063 tax refund, including her child tax credit. The government would instead apply the money to her past-due student loan account.

She and her 11-year-old daughter, Ophelia, have been homeless over the last few months in Portland, Oregon. Her refund, she hoped, would help them secure a place to stay.

“Everything just fell out from beneath me,” Patterson, 47, said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: annie nova, source, alexis patterson, akilah mccadney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, student, single, stopped, tax, loan, refund, getting, type, refunds, borrowers, stayeverything, treasury, patterson, thing, seized


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Lost these tax breaks on your federal return? Your state might let you have them

Late filers: Don’t shred those receipts just yet. You might be able to nab a break on your state tax return. It’s the first time taxpayers are submitting returns under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. This overhaul of the federal tax code roughly doubled the standard deduction to $12,000 for single filers ($24,000 for married-filing-jointly), did away with personal exemptions and limited itemized deductions. As a result of these changes, about 30 million fewer households will itemize in 2018, compared


Late filers: Don’t shred those receipts just yet. You might be able to nab a break on your state tax return. It’s the first time taxpayers are submitting returns under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. This overhaul of the federal tax code roughly doubled the standard deduction to $12,000 for single filers ($24,000 for married-filing-jointly), did away with personal exemptions and limited itemized deductions. As a result of these changes, about 30 million fewer households will itemize in 2018, compared
Lost these tax breaks on your federal return? Your state might let you have them Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: darla mercado, guido mieth, digitalvision, getty images, martinprescott, peopleimages
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taxpayers, submitting, state, filers, shred, standard, tax, single, 2018, let, return, lost, taxation, federal, breaks


Lost these tax breaks on your federal return? Your state might let you have them

Late filers: Don’t shred those receipts just yet. You might be able to nab a break on your state tax return.

We are closing in on the final days of the 2018 filing season. It’s the first time taxpayers are submitting returns under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

This overhaul of the federal tax code roughly doubled the standard deduction to $12,000 for single filers ($24,000 for married-filing-jointly), did away with personal exemptions and limited itemized deductions.

As a result of these changes, about 30 million fewer households will itemize in 2018, compared to 2017, according to the Joint Committee on Taxation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: darla mercado, guido mieth, digitalvision, getty images, martinprescott, peopleimages
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taxpayers, submitting, state, filers, shred, standard, tax, single, 2018, let, return, lost, taxation, federal, breaks


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The earnings picture is about to change, likely for the better, and Jamie Dimon may be a big help

As for JPMorgan, which is reporting tomorrow, the key issue will not be the dry facts, it will be the tone Dimon strikes about the global economy. But Dimon could help change attitudes about the global economy in the second half of the year. The reason: bulls are hopeful Dimon will say the economy is still growing and paint a positive macroeconomic picture for the economy and for banks. Traders are anticipating we are near a bottom, and the markets are anticipating stronger 2020 numbers,” he tol


As for JPMorgan, which is reporting tomorrow, the key issue will not be the dry facts, it will be the tone Dimon strikes about the global economy. But Dimon could help change attitudes about the global economy in the second half of the year. The reason: bulls are hopeful Dimon will say the economy is still growing and paint a positive macroeconomic picture for the economy and for banks. Traders are anticipating we are near a bottom, and the markets are anticipating stronger 2020 numbers,” he tol
The earnings picture is about to change, likely for the better, and Jamie Dimon may be a big help Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: bob pisani, drew angerer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, way, sp, jamie, dimon, big, likely, global, change, 2020, picture, better, told, help, earnings, numbers, economy, single


The earnings picture is about to change, likely for the better, and Jamie Dimon may be a big help

Why is that happening? “Analysts over-reacted in December on concerns over a global slowdown led by China and Europe and cut numbers too much,” Nick Raich from Earnings Scout told me.

If companies beat estimates by anything close to 7 percentage points, then earnings for the first quarter are likely to be up in the low single digits, not negative.

No earnings recession!

As for JPMorgan, which is reporting tomorrow, the key issue will not be the dry facts, it will be the tone Dimon strikes about the global economy. Banks in general are continuing to see loan growth in the low single digits, flat interest income because rates are not moving up, and good credit quality.

Bottom line: no one is expecting amazing numbers.

But Dimon could help change attitudes about the global economy in the second half of the year.

The reason: bulls are hopeful Dimon will say the economy is still growing and paint a positive macroeconomic picture for the economy and for banks.

“If they put up a decent number, and Jamie says, ‘Hey, the economy is still chugging along,’ it will go a long way toward quieting down the recession worries,” Jeff Harte, bank analyst with Sandler O’Neill, told me.

Of course, the markets could still turn down if economic data from China and Europe continues to decline, but the biggest obstacle the market faces may not be earnings, it is valuation. The forward earnings multiple for the S&P 500 (Q2 2019 to Q1 2020) is currently 16.8, at the high end of the historic norm of about 15.

That’s no surprise to David Aurelio, who tracks earnings at Refinitiv: The market tends to get ahead of itself. Traders are anticipating we are near a bottom, and the markets are anticipating stronger 2020 numbers,” he told me.

Looked at that way, he’s certainly right: based on 2020 numbers, the S&P is trading at a 15.5 multiple, about inline with historic averages.

WATCH: Big bank CEOs survive Capitol Hill grilling


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: bob pisani, drew angerer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, way, sp, jamie, dimon, big, likely, global, change, 2020, picture, better, told, help, earnings, numbers, economy, single


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