‘We kinda hate this market,’ Wells Fargo’s Chris Harvey says as stocks trade near all-time highs

The firm’s head of equity strategy is worried market sentiment is becoming too optimistic as stocks trade near all-time highs. “We kinda hate this market,” Harvey told CNBC’s “Trading Nation” on Wednesday. The market has moved very close to our price target, and many of the catalysts that we talked about have played out.” “I would say mid single digits for your capital market returns. “As we look forward, there’s not much left for us to substantially say the market is going to move higher.”


The firm’s head of equity strategy is worried market sentiment is becoming too optimistic as stocks trade near all-time highs.
“We kinda hate this market,” Harvey told CNBC’s “Trading Nation” on Wednesday.
The market has moved very close to our price target, and many of the catalysts that we talked about have played out.”
“I would say mid single digits for your capital market returns.
“As we look forward, there’s not much left for us to substantially say the market is going to move higher.”
‘We kinda hate this market,’ Wells Fargo’s Chris Harvey says as stocks trade near all-time highs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: stephanie landsman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, near, kinda, say, target, trade, hate, think, going, returns, highs, single, market, stocks, sentiment, harvey, wells, fargos


'We kinda hate this market,' Wells Fargo's Chris Harvey says as stocks trade near all-time highs

Wells Fargo Securities’ Christopher Harvey is looking for a signal that it’s time to take risk off the table, and he expects it’ll come sooner rather than later.

The firm’s head of equity strategy is worried market sentiment is becoming too optimistic as stocks trade near all-time highs.

“We kinda hate this market,” Harvey told CNBC’s “Trading Nation” on Wednesday. “When did we stop liking this market? It’s been relatively recent. The market has moved very close to our price target, and many of the catalysts that we talked about have played out.”

Those drivers included Federal Reserve interest rate policy, better-than-expected earnings and too much bearishness among investors.

Harvey’s 2019 year-end S&P 500 price target is 3,088. As of Wednesday’s close, the index is less than 1% away from that.

“What we’re left with is near-term sentiment and near-term sentiment being the driver of prices,” he said. “That could be based on a tweet. It could be based on positioning. And so, it becomes very difficult to handicap this market at this point in time.”

Despite his cautiousness, Harvey is not forecasting a dramatic plunge.

“We don’t think the wheels are going to fall off the cart,” he said. “We don’t think we’re going to have a 10% correction.”

He expects a return to a less exciting stock market environment that supports much smaller returns starting as early as next year.

“I would say mid single digits for your capital market returns. And, if you have mid single digits, you should be happy,” added Harvey. “These double-digit returns that we’re used to? I think those are a thing of the past.”

The S&P 500 has soared 23% so far this year while the Dow is up 18%. The tech-heavy Nasdaq has performed even better over the past 52 weeks, up 27%.

Harvey is in the process of determining the level he’d start taking profits. He believes the market isn’t there yet, but it’s getting closer.

“Do we talk about a melt-up? Is that possible? Sure, that’s possible,” Harvey said. “As we look forward, there’s not much left for us to substantially say the market is going to move higher.”

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: stephanie landsman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, near, kinda, say, target, trade, hate, think, going, returns, highs, single, market, stocks, sentiment, harvey, wells, fargos


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‘We may not be perfect every single time,’ The RealReal CEO tells customers after CNBC report

The RealReal CEO Julie Wainwright conceded on Wednesday that the luxury consignment marketplace’s claim of not having any fakes on its website may not be correct. “We strive for perfection, but may not be perfect every single time,” Wainwright wrote in an email to customers and consignors. In the email, Wainwright described the coverage as “attempting to discredit the business we have so proudly built.” CNBC reviewed nearly 1,400 reviews of the company online and found fakes, damage and customer


The RealReal CEO Julie Wainwright conceded on Wednesday that the luxury consignment marketplace’s claim of not having any fakes on its website may not be correct.
“We strive for perfection, but may not be perfect every single time,” Wainwright wrote in an email to customers and consignors.
In the email, Wainwright described the coverage as “attempting to discredit the business we have so proudly built.”
CNBC reviewed nearly 1,400 reviews of the company online and found fakes, damage and customer
‘We may not be perfect every single time,’ The RealReal CEO tells customers after CNBC report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: scott zamost andrea day jennifer schlesinger, scott zamost, andrea day, jennifer schlesinger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, single, value, wainwright, customers, ceo, sent, realreal, email, fakes, company, perfect, site, report, items, tells


'We may not be perfect every single time,' The RealReal CEO tells customers after CNBC report

The RealReal CEO Julie Wainwright conceded on Wednesday that the luxury consignment marketplace’s claim of not having any fakes on its website may not be correct.

“We strive for perfection, but may not be perfect every single time,” Wainwright wrote in an email to customers and consignors.

Wainwright’s message was sent one day after CNBC reported that copywriters, who were hired to write descriptions of items, were verifying the authenticity of items without sufficient training. Former employees also said they were operating under strict quotas, in a culture that focused on volume. They said this could lead to fakes or mistakes on the site.

The stock of the company, which went public in June, has dropped more than 20% to trade around $17.50 since the report. It has lost about $380 million in market value, bringing its current capitalization to $1.5 billion.

The RealReal has long tried to differentiate itself from competitors by saying it has a process by which it authenticates ever item on its site to make sure there are no counterfeits.

In the email, Wainwright described the coverage as “attempting to discredit the business we have so proudly built.”

“Counterfeiting is a global issue and those engaged in its practice are egregious and relentless,” Wainwright’s email said. “Therefore, the entire team at The RealReal works diligently seven days a week to ensure the highest standards in our authentication practices.”

She added: “There is no other resale company doing more to remove fakes, and put counterfeiters out of business than The RealReal.”

CNBC reviewed nearly 1,400 reviews of the company online and found fakes, damage and customer service were the top complaints.

The day after the report, two unhappy customers who were interviewed received an email from the company, cancelling their memberships.

“It has come to our attention that The RealReal has been unable to satisfy your needs as a client. Please be advised that your membership with The RealReal has been canceled and you will no longer be able to shop or consign on our site,” the email sent to Cherish Garcia said.

Garcia, who lives in the Philippines, said The RealReal sold her a fake Prada dress in 2017 and has not used the site since.

Wendy Meltzer, who also complained about receiving a designer scarf with the wrong tag attached, which inflated its value, received a similar email on Tuesday from the company cancelling her membership. Meltzer has been a customer and consignor.

“The items you have on consignment with us are being returned along with a check for outstanding commissions,” the email said.

Below is a copy of the full email:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: scott zamost andrea day jennifer schlesinger, scott zamost, andrea day, jennifer schlesinger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, single, value, wainwright, customers, ceo, sent, realreal, email, fakes, company, perfect, site, report, items, tells


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‘Shark Tank’: This fighter-jet salesman quit 6-figure job to sell razors with ‘aerospace-grade engineering’

Patrick Coddou seemed to have an enviable life: A great wife, a great job with an impressive salary. I literally sold stealth-fighter jets for a living,” Patrick told the “Shark Tank” investors on Sunday’s episode. I saw my life 30 years in the future, and I saw myself still doing the same thing. “Something” was founding, with his wife Jennifer, Supply, a company that sells high end, patented single blade razors. “[We] use aerospace-grade engineering and a single, American-made blade that is sup


Patrick Coddou seemed to have an enviable life: A great wife, a great job with an impressive salary.
I literally sold stealth-fighter jets for a living,” Patrick told the “Shark Tank” investors on Sunday’s episode.
I saw my life 30 years in the future, and I saw myself still doing the same thing.
“Something” was founding, with his wife Jennifer, Supply, a company that sells high end, patented single blade razors.
“[We] use aerospace-grade engineering and a single, American-made blade that is sup
‘Shark Tank’: This fighter-jet salesman quit 6-figure job to sell razors with ‘aerospace-grade engineering’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-05  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salesman, hated, razors, wife, job, single, tank, blade, fighterjet, quit, sell, life, engineering, shark, supply, saw, patrick, great, aerospacegrade


'Shark Tank': This fighter-jet salesman quit 6-figure job to sell razors with 'aerospace-grade engineering'

Patrick Coddou seemed to have an enviable life: A great wife, a great job with an impressive salary. But that’s not how he felt.

“I spent about a decade climbing the corporate ladder. I had a six-figure job. I literally sold stealth-fighter jets for a living,” Patrick told the “Shark Tank” investors on Sunday’s episode.

“On the outside, it looked like I had everything, but I hated waking up in the morning. I hated going to work. I went in and out of depression. It affected our marriage, and I became a person that I didn’t recognize anymore. I saw my life 30 years in the future, and I saw myself still doing the same thing. So I finally decided to do something about it.”

“Something” was founding, with his wife Jennifer, Supply, a company that sells high end, patented single blade razors.

“[We] use aerospace-grade engineering and a single, American-made blade that is supremely close [when shaving] and comfortable,” Patrick said during the episode.

The Coddous said they put their life-savings into Supply and quit their jobs to focus on the business.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-05  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salesman, hated, razors, wife, job, single, tank, blade, fighterjet, quit, sell, life, engineering, shark, supply, saw, patrick, great, aerospacegrade


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The euro is a ‘trap’ and countries should be allowed to ditch it, Hungary’s central banker says

The euro, currently used in 19 European countries, was introduced in 1999 and under EU rules every member of the wider political bloc should ultimately adopt the single currency. EU states, both in and outside the euro zone, should admit that the euro has been a strategic error,” he wrote. European countries, mainly those that share the euro, were severely hit by the sovereign debt crisis of 2011. In 2014, the European Central Bank told politicians in Budapest that a draft law that would apply s


The euro, currently used in 19 European countries, was introduced in 1999 and under EU rules every member of the wider political bloc should ultimately adopt the single currency.
EU states, both in and outside the euro zone, should admit that the euro has been a strategic error,” he wrote.
European countries, mainly those that share the euro, were severely hit by the sovereign debt crisis of 2011.
In 2014, the European Central Bank told politicians in Budapest that a draft law that would apply s
The euro is a ‘trap’ and countries should be allowed to ditch it, Hungary’s central banker says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-04  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, countries, bank, banker, allowed, currency, central, single, members, hungarys, ditch, european, euro, zone, trap


The euro is a 'trap' and countries should be allowed to ditch it, Hungary's central banker says

A sculpture depicting the Euro logo is pictured in front of the former headquarter of the European Central Bank in Frankfurt, Germany, on Feb. 7, 2018

Euro zone countries should be allowed to stop using the single currency over the coming decades, the Hungarian central bank governor has argued in an article for the Financial Times.

The euro, currently used in 19 European countries, was introduced in 1999 and under EU rules every member of the wider political bloc should ultimately adopt the single currency. Hungary is still yet to sign up despite repeated moves to ditch the forint.

Gyorgy Matolcsy, in charge of Hungary’s National Bank since March 2013, described the euro as a “French snare” that has not served its members well.

“The common currency was not needed for European success stories before 1999 and the majority of euro zone member states did not benefit from it later,” Matolcsy said in the opinion piece.

“The time has come to wake up from this harmful and fruitless dream. A good starting point would be to recognise that the single currency is a trap for practically all its members — for different reasons — not a gold mine. EU states, both in and outside the euro zone, should admit that the euro has been a strategic error,” he wrote.

European countries, mainly those that share the euro, were severely hit by the sovereign debt crisis of 2011. This crisis spread across different countries, impacting Greece in particular. A solution for the southern European economy divided governments for some time as they questioned how to handle its massive debts and dwindling growth. At the time, different politicians, including Germany’s Former Finance Minister Wolfgang Schäuble, argued that Greece should temporarily stop using the euro.

“Europeans must give up their risky fantasies of creating a power that rivals the U.S. Members of the euro zone should be allowed to leave the currency zone in the coming decades, and those remaining should build a more sustainable global currency,” Matolcsy added.

Hungary has had a complicated relationship with the EU over the years and Prime Minister Viktor Orban is seen as a thorn in the side of Brussels. In 2014, the European Central Bank told politicians in Budapest that a draft law that would apply sanctions to members of its central bank that failed to submit a wealth declaration was not compliant with EU law. The central bank itself has also been questioned by European lawmakers about its political independence.

Read the full article on the Financial Times’ website here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-04  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, countries, bank, banker, allowed, currency, central, single, members, hungarys, ditch, european, euro, zone, trap


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A single anonymous market manipulator caused bitcoin to top $20,000 two years ago, study shows

A forensic study on bitcoin’s 2017 boom has found that nearly the entire rise of the digital currency at the time is attributable to “one large player,” although the market manipulator remains unidentified. The professors’ study found that tethers being traded for bitcoins revealed a pattern. The digital currency exchange Bitfinex is one of the largest in the world. The study found that, through Bitfinex, the single player was able to manipulate demand for bitcoin via “extreme” flows of tethers.


A forensic study on bitcoin’s 2017 boom has found that nearly the entire rise of the digital currency at the time is attributable to “one large player,” although the market manipulator remains unidentified.
The professors’ study found that tethers being traded for bitcoins revealed a pattern.
The digital currency exchange Bitfinex is one of the largest in the world.
The study found that, through Bitfinex, the single player was able to manipulate demand for bitcoin via “extreme” flows of tethers.
A single anonymous market manipulator caused bitcoin to top $20,000 two years ago, study shows Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-04  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bitfinex, player, manipulator, shows, bitcoin, 20000, digital, professors, market, single, ago, tether, shams, large, currency, study, anonymous, caused


A single anonymous market manipulator caused bitcoin to top $20,000 two years ago, study shows

A forensic study on bitcoin’s 2017 boom has found that nearly the entire rise of the digital currency at the time is attributable to “one large player,” although the market manipulator remains unidentified.

Finance professors John Griffin and Amin Shams – instructors at University of Texas and the Ohio State University, respectively – analyzed over 200 gigabytes of data for the transaction history between bitcoin and tether, another digital currency. Tether is an asset known as a “stablecoin,” which has its trading value connected to the dollar.

The professors’ study found that tethers being traded for bitcoins revealed a pattern.

“We find that the identified patterns are not present on other flows, and almost the entire price impact can be attributed to this one large player,” Griffin and Shams wrote. “We map this data across both blockchains and find that the one player or entity (labeled as 1LSg throughout the paper) is behind the majority of the patterns we document.”

Griffin and Shams were able to follow the clusters of data to a source: “One large account at Bitfinex.” The digital currency exchange Bitfinex is one of the largest in the world. The study found that, through Bitfinex, the single player was able to manipulate demand for bitcoin via “extreme” flows of tethers. The Wall Street Journal first reported on the updated study’s results on Monday.

The manipulation occurred as bitcoin rose to an all-time high of nearly $20,000 in late 2017, the study found. Bitcoin traded at about $9,300 on Monday.

“One of the SEC’s top worries is that crypto is subject to manipulation. This study appears to lend credibility to that argument,” Cowen analyst Jaret Seiberg said in a note on Monday.

The study comes after an analysis published in March found that 95% bitcoin spot trading is faked. The survey, created by cryptocurrency asset manager Bitwise for the SEC, found that only $273 million of about $6 billion in average daily bitcoin volume was legitimate.

Cowen said Griffin and Shams’ study will likely add even more scrutiny of bitcoin and cryptocurrency at large, especially from regulators and lawmakers.

“We see this as further souring Washington on crypto and believe it is negative for efforts to launch crypto ETFs and for Facebook to launch Libra,” Seiberg added.

Libra is Facebook’s cryptocurrency project, which has seen several major backers drop out in the past month.

While the latest study doesn’t identify the manipulator, the professors suggest those running Bitfinex either knew of the operation or were even possibly assisting the scheme. Bitfinex’s general counsel Stuart Hoegner told the WSJ that the study “lacks academic rigor,” saying that “it is the global rise of digital currency that has driven the market’s demand for tether.”

Both Bitfinex and Tether Ltd., the company that controls tether, are owned and operated by the same people. The WSJ noted that both companies are under investigations for alleged fraud by the Department of Justice and the New York Attorney General.

– CNBC’s Tom Franck contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-04  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bitfinex, player, manipulator, shows, bitcoin, 20000, digital, professors, market, single, ago, tether, shams, large, currency, study, anonymous, caused


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Boeing engineers raised concerns about 737 Max before crashes, documents show

In 2015, more than a year before the planes were certified by federal regulators, a Boeing engineer asked whether a flight-control system that was involved in both deadly crashes was safe because it relied on a single sensor. Regulators around the world banned airlines from flying the planes after the crashes. Boeing has changed the planes’ system so that they rely on two sensors instead of one. The sensors, which measure the angle of attack, or angle of the plane relative to oncoming air, feed


In 2015, more than a year before the planes were certified by federal regulators, a Boeing engineer asked whether a flight-control system that was involved in both deadly crashes was safe because it relied on a single sensor.
Regulators around the world banned airlines from flying the planes after the crashes.
Boeing has changed the planes’ system so that they rely on two sensors instead of one.
The sensors, which measure the angle of attack, or angle of the plane relative to oncoming air, feed
Boeing engineers raised concerns about 737 Max before crashes, documents show Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-30  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sensor, concerns, mcas, regulators, boeing, engineers, planes, raised, sensors, documents, 737, max, system, engineer, single, crashes


Boeing engineers raised concerns about 737 Max before crashes, documents show

A Boeing engineer was concerned that the troubled 737 Max, years before it came to market, had a flight-control system that lacked sufficient safeguards, according to a document released Wednesday during a hearing in the House where lawmakers questioned the manufacturer’s CEO after two fatal crashes of the jetliners.

In 2015, more than a year before the planes were certified by federal regulators, a Boeing engineer asked whether a flight-control system that was involved in both deadly crashes was safe because it relied on a single sensor.

Regulators around the world banned airlines from flying the planes after the crashes. Boeing has changed the planes’ system so that they rely on two sensors instead of one. But regulators have not yet signed off on that and other changes the company has made to the planes, leaving them grounded for nearly eight months, which has crimped airline profits.

The sensors, which measure the angle of attack, or angle of the plane relative to oncoming air, feed an anti-stall system on the 737 Max. Erroneous data from a sensor triggered the system, known as MCAS, during the two crashes — one in Indonesia in October 2018 followed by another in Ethiopia in March. The crashes killed all 346 people on the flights.

“Are we vulnerable to single AOA sensor sensor failures with the MCAS implementation or is there some checking that occurs?” asked the engineer in a December 2015 email. The Federal Aviation Administration approved the planes in 2017 and they are Boeing’s bestseller.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-30  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sensor, concerns, mcas, regulators, boeing, engineers, planes, raised, sensors, documents, 737, max, system, engineer, single, crashes


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Today is historically the single best day for the stock market all year

Oct. 28 has been the single best day of the year for stocks going back to 1950 with an average return of 0.54% on the S&P 500, according to Ryan Detrick, senior market strategist for LPL Financial. The S&P 500 hit a fresh all-time high at the open on Monday, lifted by solid earnings and progress on U.S.-China trade. Of the 202 S&P 500 companies that have reported, 78% have topped analyst expectations, according to FactSet. The second best day of the year has been Dec. 26 with the S&P 500 posting


Oct. 28 has been the single best day of the year for stocks going back to 1950 with an average return of 0.54% on the S&P 500, according to Ryan Detrick, senior market strategist for LPL Financial.
The S&P 500 hit a fresh all-time high at the open on Monday, lifted by solid earnings and progress on U.S.-China trade.
Of the 202 S&P 500 companies that have reported, 78% have topped analyst expectations, according to FactSet.
The second best day of the year has been Dec. 26 with the S&P 500 posting
Today is historically the single best day for the stock market all year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worst, trade, single, today, stock, market, day, best, historically, rally, 500, according


Today is historically the single best day for the stock market all year

Seize the day, investors.

Oct. 28 has been the single best day of the year for stocks going back to 1950 with an average return of 0.54% on the S&P 500, according to Ryan Detrick, senior market strategist for LPL Financial.

The S&P 500 hit a fresh all-time high at the open on Monday, lifted by solid earnings and progress on U.S.-China trade. Perhaps the seasonal pattern will get it some extra oomph on Monday.

This time of the year is also the period when investors following the sell-in-May-and-go-away strategy come back to the market, usually in November.

“It kicks off the best six months of the year (November-April) and says goodbye to the worst six months,” Detrick said in a note on Monday. “The last few days of October to the first few days of November is one of the strongest times of the year.

The market staged a relief rally last week after the U.S. and China said they were “close to finalizing” some parts of a trade agreement, paving way for a bigger deal. A strong earnings season also supported the rally. Of the 202 S&P 500 companies that have reported, 78% have topped analyst expectations, according to FactSet.

The second best day of the year has been Dec. 26 with the S&P 500 posting a 0.5% gain, according to LPL Financial.

With a 0.51% loss on average for the S&P 500, Oct. 19 has been the single worst day of the year, the firm noted.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worst, trade, single, today, stock, market, day, best, historically, rally, 500, according


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Short sellers betting against Tesla lose more than $1 billion in single day as stock surges

Tesla popped 16.5% Thursday to around $300 per share, meaning short sellers betting against the stock are on track for $1.4 billion in mark-to-market losses on the day — wiping out almost 70% of short sellers’ year-to-date profits, estimates S3 Analytics. “Short sellers are, as Elon Musk stated earlier in the year, ‘feeling the burn,'” wrote Ihor Dusaniwsky, managing director at S3. “Prior to today’s price move TSLA short sellers were up +$2.00 billion in mark-to-market profits, this is down fro


Tesla popped 16.5% Thursday to around $300 per share, meaning short sellers betting against the stock are on track for $1.4 billion in mark-to-market losses on the day — wiping out almost 70% of short sellers’ year-to-date profits, estimates S3 Analytics.
“Short sellers are, as Elon Musk stated earlier in the year, ‘feeling the burn,'” wrote Ihor Dusaniwsky, managing director at S3.
“Prior to today’s price move TSLA short sellers were up +$2.00 billion in mark-to-market profits, this is down fro
Short sellers betting against Tesla lose more than $1 billion in single day as stock surges Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, short, billion, betting, marktomarket, stock, surges, profits, day, tesla, yeartodate, single, musk, lose, sellers


Short sellers betting against Tesla lose more than $1 billion in single day as stock surges

Investors betting against Elon Musk’s electric-auto maker Tesla collectively lost an estimated $1 billion-plus on Thursday as the company’s stock headed for its best day on Wall Street since 2013.

Tesla popped 16.5% Thursday to around $300 per share, meaning short sellers betting against the stock are on track for $1.4 billion in mark-to-market losses on the day — wiping out almost 70% of short sellers’ year-to-date profits, estimates S3 Analytics.

“Short sellers are, as Elon Musk stated earlier in the year, ‘feeling the burn,'” wrote Ihor Dusaniwsky, managing director at S3. “Prior to today’s price move TSLA short sellers were up +$2.00 billion in mark-to-market profits, this is down from its year-to-date P/L high of +$5.16 billion of mark-to-market profits before TSLA began its sustained rally in June.”

To be sure, those who bet against Tesla at the start of 2019 are still in the black to date with the equity down more than 11% this year after Thursday’s price moves. Tesla stock closed at $254.68 on Wednesday, which at the time represented a 23.4% slide for 2019.

Tesla is the most heavily shorted stock in the U.S., as well as the most heavily shorted automaker in the world. Short interest, or the number of shares borrowed in hopes of buying them back at a profit after the stock drops, totals $9.03 billion for Tesla, according to S3.

Some high-profile short sellers such as Greenlight founder David Einhorn and Jim Chanos have clashed with Tesla and Musk in the last few years.

Musk himself has over the years taken to Twitter to do battle against such doubters, fighting back against investors betting against his stock and other detractors, often with controversial comments.

In May 2018, Musk tweeted that shorts were about to feel the “burn of the century.” Over a year late, but maybe it’s just starting to play out for the Tesla chief.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, short, billion, betting, marktomarket, stock, surges, profits, day, tesla, yeartodate, single, musk, lose, sellers


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Co-founder of a multi-billion dollar company says a lesson from her dad was ‘the single biggest influence’ on her career

Self-made millionaire Neha Narkhede left India in 2006 to get her master’s in computer science at Georgia Tech. After graduating in 2007, she landed a job at Oracle and then at LinkedIn, where she worked as a software engineer. Today, it’s valued at $2.5 billion and Narkhede, the chief technology officer, is one of America’s richest self-made women, according to Forbes. Narkhede didn’t realize it at the time, but discussing their stories “cultivated a sense of empowerment in me,” she says. To th


Self-made millionaire Neha Narkhede left India in 2006 to get her master’s in computer science at Georgia Tech.
After graduating in 2007, she landed a job at Oracle and then at LinkedIn, where she worked as a software engineer.
Today, it’s valued at $2.5 billion and Narkhede, the chief technology officer, is one of America’s richest self-made women, according to Forbes.
Narkhede didn’t realize it at the time, but discussing their stories “cultivated a sense of empowerment in me,” she says.
To th
Co-founder of a multi-billion dollar company says a lesson from her dad was ‘the single biggest influence’ on her career Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-23  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, selfmade, dollar, biggest, india, books, multibillion, single, influence, career, linkedin, lesson, dad, worked, women, narkhede, told, indian, female, cofounder, company


Co-founder of a multi-billion dollar company says a lesson from her dad was 'the single biggest influence' on her career

Self-made millionaire Neha Narkhede left India in 2006 to get her master’s in computer science at Georgia Tech. After graduating in 2007, she landed a job at Oracle and then at LinkedIn, where she worked as a software engineer.

In 2014, she and two of her LinkedIn colleagues launched streaming company Confluent. Today, it’s valued at $2.5 billion and Narkhede, the chief technology officer, is one of America’s richest self-made women, according to Forbes.

The 35-year-old owes some of her success to her dad, she tells CNBC Make It: “When I was growing up, he selected books and told me stories of women who were trailblazers in very male-dominated fields.

“He picked examples from many different walks of life: I read books about Indira Gandhi, who was the first female prime minister of India. He told about Indra Nooyi, who is a woman of Indian origin who went on to become CEO of PepsiCo, and about Dr. Bedi, who was the first female head of the Indian police offices.”

Narkhede didn’t realize it at the time, but discussing their stories “cultivated a sense of empowerment in me,” she says. It gave her the belief that, “if people like me can do this impossible thing, then I can too.”

To this day, learning about women who broke barriers remains “the single biggest influence on my career path,” she adds.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-23  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, selfmade, dollar, biggest, india, books, multibillion, single, influence, career, linkedin, lesson, dad, worked, women, narkhede, told, indian, female, cofounder, company


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This small stock may have just won earnings season already surging 31% in a single day

A company responsible for keeping pets healthy may have just won earnings season. PetMed Express soared more than 30% on Monday after the online pet pharmacy said its quarterly profit topped Wall Street’s estimates. The company reported earnings of 33 cents per share, while analysts were expecting earnings per share of 26 cents, according to Refinitiv. Despite beating expectations, PetMed’s net income fell about 36% since the same period last year as PetMed was forced to lower prices in a compet


A company responsible for keeping pets healthy may have just won earnings season.
PetMed Express soared more than 30% on Monday after the online pet pharmacy said its quarterly profit topped Wall Street’s estimates.
The company reported earnings of 33 cents per share, while analysts were expecting earnings per share of 26 cents, according to Refinitiv.
Despite beating expectations, PetMed’s net income fell about 36% since the same period last year as PetMed was forced to lower prices in a compet
This small stock may have just won earnings season already surging 31% in a single day Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-21  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, estimates, company, surging, earnings, online, prices, cents, share, day, season, stock, won, petmed, forced, single, small


This small stock may have just won earnings season already surging 31% in a single day

A company responsible for keeping pets healthy may have just won earnings season.

PetMed Express soared more than 30% on Monday after the online pet pharmacy said its quarterly profit topped Wall Street’s estimates. The company reported earnings of 33 cents per share, while analysts were expecting earnings per share of 26 cents, according to Refinitiv. PetMed has missed estimates the last three quarters.

Despite beating expectations, PetMed’s net income fell about 36% since the same period last year as PetMed was forced to lower prices in a competitive pet-loving environment.

“Sales were negatively impacted by increased online competition and aggressive pricing in the market that forced us to reduce prices,” said Menderes Akdag, PetMed chief executive officer, on the earnings call.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-21  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, estimates, company, surging, earnings, online, prices, cents, share, day, season, stock, won, petmed, forced, single, small


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