North Korea conducts ‘important test’ at once-dismantled site

North Korea has said its resumption of nuclear and long-range missile tests depends on the United States. North Korea didn’t say what the test included. Kim Dong-yub, an analyst at Seoul’s Institute for Far Eastern Studies, said that North Korea likely tested for the first time a solid-fuel engine for an intercontinental ballistic missile. The long-range rockets that North Korea used in either ICBM launches or satellite liftoffs in recent years all used liquid propellants. The North Korean test


North Korea has said its resumption of nuclear and long-range missile tests depends on the United States.
North Korea didn’t say what the test included.
Kim Dong-yub, an analyst at Seoul’s Institute for Far Eastern Studies, said that North Korea likely tested for the first time a solid-fuel engine for an intercontinental ballistic missile.
The long-range rockets that North Korea used in either ICBM launches or satellite liftoffs in recent years all used liquid propellants.
The North Korean test
North Korea conducts ‘important test’ at once-dismantled site Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-08
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, statement, important, oncedismantled, north, conducts, korea, korean, used, longrange, site, satellite, test, sohae, united


North Korea conducts 'important test' at once-dismantled site

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un supervises a “strike drill” for multiple launchers and tactical guided weapon into the East Sea on May 4, 2019

North Korea said Sunday that it carried out a “very important test” at its long-range rocket launch site that it reportedly rebuilt after having partially dismantled it at the start of denuclearization talks with the United States last year.

The announcement comes amid dimming prospects for a resumption of negotiations, with the North threatening to seek “a new way” if it fails to get major U.S. concessions by year’s end. North Korea has said its resumption of nuclear and long-range missile tests depends on the United States.

Saturday’s test at the Sohae Satellite Launching Ground will have “an important effect on changing the strategic position of (North Korea) once again in the near future,” an unidentified spokesman from the North’s Academy of National Defense Science said in a statement, carried by the country’s official Korean Central News Agency.

North Korea didn’t say what the test included. Kim Dong-yub, an analyst at Seoul’s Institute for Far Eastern Studies, said that North Korea likely tested for the first time a solid-fuel engine for an intercontinental ballistic missile.

The use of solid fuel increases a weapon’s mobility and reduces the amount of launch preparation time. The long-range rockets that North Korea used in either ICBM launches or satellite liftoffs in recent years all used liquid propellants.

CNN reported Friday that a new satellite image indicated North Korea may be preparing to resume testing engines used to power satellite launchers and intercontinental ballistic missiles at the site.

Seoul’s Defense Ministry said in a brief statement later Sunday that South Korea and the United States are closely monitoring activities at the Sohae site and other key North Korean areas.

On Saturday, President Donald Trump and South Korean President Moon Jae-in discussed developments related to North Korea, and the two leaders committed to continuing close communication, the White House said in a statement. Moon’s office also released a similar statement, saying the two leaders had a 30-minute phone conversation at Trump’s request.

The North Korean test “is meant to improve military capabilities and to shore up domestic pride and legitimacy,” said Leif-Eric Easley, a professor at Ewha University in Seoul. “With the activity at Sohae, Pyongyang is also trying to raise international concerns that it may intensify provocations and walk away from denuclearization talks next year.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-08
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, statement, important, oncedismantled, north, conducts, korea, korean, used, longrange, site, satellite, test, sohae, united


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Music site Genius sues Google, claiming it caught the company ‘red-handed’ copying lyrics

In a new lawsuit, music site Genius Media claims it caught Google “red-handed” copying lyrics for its own benefit at the expense of Genius’ business. Genius claims Google and Canada-based lyric licensing company LyricFind misappropriated lyrics from its website. Google claims in the post that it licenses lyrics from third parties when music publishers don’t have digital copies of the text. “We do not crawl or scrape websites to source these lyrics,” Google wrote at the time. LyricFind suggested


In a new lawsuit, music site Genius Media claims it caught Google “red-handed” copying lyrics for its own benefit at the expense of Genius’ business.
Genius claims Google and Canada-based lyric licensing company LyricFind misappropriated lyrics from its website.
Google claims in the post that it licenses lyrics from third parties when music publishers don’t have digital copies of the text.
“We do not crawl or scrape websites to source these lyrics,” Google wrote at the time.
LyricFind suggested
Music site Genius sues Google, claiming it caught the company ‘red-handed’ copying lyrics Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, google, sues, music, watermark, boxes, site, lyricfind, search, company, redhanded, content, copying, claims, lyrics, genius, claiming


Music site Genius sues Google, claiming it caught the company 'red-handed' copying lyrics

In a new lawsuit, music site Genius Media claims it caught Google “red-handed” copying lyrics for its own benefit at the expense of Genius’ business.

Genius claims Google and Canada-based lyric licensing company LyricFind misappropriated lyrics from its website. Genius alleges that Google, through LyricFind, displayed lyrics at the top of search results in its “Information Boxes” that were stripped directly from Genius without attribution. Genius is seeking at least $50 million in combined damages from the companies, according to the lawsuit, filed in state court in Brooklyn.

The lawsuit adds to a an already noisy field of Google critics who claim the company employs anti-competitive practices to keep users on its own sites instead of sending them directly to those providing the content. Yelp has been among the loudest voices alleging Google favors its own search services over competitors’ and stunts web traffic to other sites with its text boxes that serve users key information on their own search pages.

Google’s treatment of competitive services is likely to become a focus for federal and state investigators probing the company for potential antitrust violations. State attorneys general investigating Google are planning to expand their probe beyond its original focus on advertising into search, CNBC reported last month.

After suspecting Google was ripping off its transcriptions, the complaint says, Genius placed a digital watermark in its lyrics made up of different styles of apostrophes that spelled out “red-handed” in Morse Code. If Google’s lyric boxes contained the watermark, the suit claims, “there would be no explanation other than that the lyrics were copied from Genius’s website, e.g., by using the copy/paste functionality or a computer program.”

After notifying Google that it had found its watermarks in its lyric boxes, Genius alleges multiple Google executives said they were looking into the issue but would not explain how the watermark showed up in its results. Genius designed a second experiment in 2018 to determine how widespread the issue had become, applying the watermark to a random sample of songs. Of the 271 songs to which Genius applied the watermark and that appeared in Google’s info box between October and December of that year, 43% “showed clear evidence of matching” the watermark, according to the complaint.

In response to a request for comment, a Google spokesperson pointed to a June blog post explaining how the company provides lyrics in its info boxes. Google claims in the post that it licenses lyrics from third parties when music publishers don’t have digital copies of the text. The company pledged to add third party attribution for digital lyrics and have its lyrics partner ensure it was following industry standards.

“We do not crawl or scrape websites to source these lyrics,” Google wrote at the time. “The lyrics that you see in information boxes on Search come directly from lyrics content providers, and they are updated automatically as we receive new lyrics and corrections on a regular basis.”

The post followed a Wall Street Journal report where Genius first went public with its claims against Google. The complaint alleges this was the first time Google had tried to “to address their misappropriation of content from Genius’s website.”

LyricFind did not immediately respond to a request for comment, but the company wrote in a June blog post responding to the original Journal story that it does not knowingly copy content from Genius. LyricFind said its content teams often begin with a copy of lyrics from “numerous sources” and then corrects them. After Genius notified LyricFind that it believed Genius lyrics were coming up in its database, LyricFind asked its content team not to consult Genius as a source “[a]s a courtesy.” LyricFind suggested the content team may have “unknowingly sourced Genius lyrics from another location” where they were also available.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, google, sues, music, watermark, boxes, site, lyricfind, search, company, redhanded, content, copying, claims, lyrics, genius, claiming


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Target and Walmart are a threat to Amazon this Cyber Monday

Amazon has become a huge threat to big-box stores in recent years, but those retailers may be making a comeback this Cyber Monday. Walmart and Target had bigger jumps than Amazon in online customer spending during the first two weeks of November compared with the same period last year, according research firm Edison Trends, which looked at more than 1.2 million transactions. Walmart took in 51% more than last year, while Target followed close behind with a 47% increase. “Retailers have gone from


Amazon has become a huge threat to big-box stores in recent years, but those retailers may be making a comeback this Cyber Monday.
Walmart and Target had bigger jumps than Amazon in online customer spending during the first two weeks of November compared with the same period last year, according research firm Edison Trends, which looked at more than 1.2 million transactions.
Walmart took in 51% more than last year, while Target followed close behind with a 47% increase.
“Retailers have gone from
Target and Walmart are a threat to Amazon this Cyber Monday Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: mallika mitra, lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, online, stores, investing, according, site, walmart, cyber, amazon, ecommerce, spending, threat, target


Target and Walmart are a threat to Amazon this Cyber Monday

Amazon has become a huge threat to big-box stores in recent years, but those retailers may be making a comeback this Cyber Monday.

Walmart and Target had bigger jumps than Amazon in online customer spending during the first two weeks of November compared with the same period last year, according research firm Edison Trends, which looked at more than 1.2 million transactions.

Walmart took in 51% more than last year, while Target followed close behind with a 47% increase. Amazon’s customer spending grew just 32%.

As retailers battle for market share, they are investing in their e-commerce options, and integrating them with brick-and-mortar stores. This includes adding more products to their online shops, offering in-store pick up for items purchased online and direct shipping from stores to customers’ houses, according to Nomura Instinet analyst Michael Baker. These companies are also investing in the infrastructure of their websites to allow them to handle big shopping days like Cyber Monday.

“Retailers have gone from being in denial about the potential threat of e-commerce to accepting that e-commerce is a real threat and investing to take advantage of the omnichannel asset,” Baker said.

They’re realizing that they can compete with Amazon to win back market share, he added.

There is a lot of competing to be done. Amazon sees more users start with its site when online shopping than on any other site, including Google, according to a recent report by Bain & Co.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: mallika mitra, lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, online, stores, investing, according, site, walmart, cyber, amazon, ecommerce, spending, threat, target


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YouTube CEO says she doesn’t let her young children watch the main site

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki doesn’t allow her children to browse videos on the app, unless they’re using a version that’s meant for kids. YouTube Kids is a version of the Google-owned platform that’s designed for children under age 13. While it was launched as a way for kids to safely browse videos, YouTube Kids has also hosted a slew of problematic content, including violent and disturbing videos, The New York Times reported. The agency alleged that YouTube earned millions by illegally collectin


YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki doesn’t allow her children to browse videos on the app, unless they’re using a version that’s meant for kids.
YouTube Kids is a version of the Google-owned platform that’s designed for children under age 13.
While it was launched as a way for kids to safely browse videos, YouTube Kids has also hosted a slew of problematic content, including violent and disturbing videos, The New York Times reported.
The agency alleged that YouTube earned millions by illegally collectin
YouTube CEO says she doesn’t let her young children watch the main site Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wojcicki, app, theyre, main, young, kids, site, let, doesnt, children, ceo, platform, watch, youtube, videos, version


YouTube CEO says she doesn't let her young children watch the main site

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks during the opening keynote address at the Google I/O 2017 Conference at Shoreline Amphitheater on May 17, 2017 in Mountain View, California.

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki doesn’t allow her children to browse videos on the app, unless they’re using a version that’s meant for kids.

Moreover, Wojcicki said she tries to limit how much time they spend watching YouTube videos.

“I allow my younger kids to use YouTube Kids, but I limit the amount of time that they’re on it,” Wojcicki said in an interview that aired Sunday on CBS’ “60 Minutes.” “I think too much of anything is not a good thing.”

YouTube Kids is a version of the Google-owned platform that’s designed for children under age 13. The app contains a curated set of videos to make sure users are viewing child-friendly content and ads.

While it was launched as a way for kids to safely browse videos, YouTube Kids has also hosted a slew of problematic content, including violent and disturbing videos, The New York Times reported. The issues forced the company to put in place greater parental controls on the kids-oriented platform.

The primary YouTube platform has also faced child safety issues. Earlier this year, YouTube disabled comments on tens of millions of videos featuring minors after it was discovered that pedophiles used the platform to direct others to videos of young children.

In September, the Federal Trade Commission hit YouTube with a $170 million fine for violating the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act. The agency alleged that YouTube earned millions by illegally collecting personal data from young children without proper consent from their parents. In YouTube’s response, it directed parents to use the YouTube Kids app.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wojcicki, app, theyre, main, young, kids, site, let, doesnt, children, ceo, platform, watch, youtube, videos, version


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The Budgetnista’s 5 tips to still have fun while in debt

3 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. Tiffany “The Budgetnista” Aliche has 5 tips to help you still have fun while in debt.


3 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser.
Download the latest Flash player and try again.
Tiffany “The Budgetnista” Aliche has 5 tips to help you still have fun while in debt.
The Budgetnista’s 5 tips to still have fun while in debt Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-27
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, flash, need, player, budgetnistas, browser, enabled, view, try, tips, fun, plugin, site, debt


The Budgetnista's 5 tips to still have fun while in debt

3 Hours Ago

To view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again.

Tiffany “The Budgetnista” Aliche has 5 tips to help you still have fun while in debt.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-27
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, flash, need, player, budgetnistas, browser, enabled, view, try, tips, fun, plugin, site, debt


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The RealReal’s ‘Faux and Tell’ discloses fakes published on the site

The RealReal’s stock plunged by nearly 11%, shaving off more than $202 million in market value, on the day a CNBC investigation revealed problems in the company’s authentication process. But CNBC found many of the items on the site were being authenticated by copywriters with limited training, leading to mistakes. ‘Faux and Tell’The internal documents, called “Copywriting Faux and Tell,” are “a weekly recap of TRR published and returned counterfeits.” The “GG” is described as a “garish” gold, in


The RealReal’s stock plunged by nearly 11%, shaving off more than $202 million in market value, on the day a CNBC investigation revealed problems in the company’s authentication process.
But CNBC found many of the items on the site were being authenticated by copywriters with limited training, leading to mistakes.
‘Faux and Tell’The internal documents, called “Copywriting Faux and Tell,” are “a weekly recap of TRR published and returned counterfeits.”
The “GG” is described as a “garish” gold, in
The RealReal’s ‘Faux and Tell’ discloses fakes published on the site Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-21  Authors: scott zamost andrea day jennifer schlesinger, scott zamost, andrea day, jennifer schlesinger, waverly colville, caroline skinner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, copywriters, tell, company, published, faux, fakes, documents, realreal, reports, items, authentication, discloses, site, companys, realreals


The RealReal's 'Faux and Tell' discloses fakes published on the site

The RealReal’s stock plunged by nearly 11%, shaving off more than $202 million in market value, on the day a CNBC investigation revealed problems in the company’s authentication process. As of Tuesday’s market close, its stock is down 20.7% since the report on Nov. 5, or a loss of $384.5 million. The company responded by saying its authentication was rigorous and constantly improving.

Julie Wainwright, CEO, The RealReal Scott Mlyn | CNBC

But its own internal documents obtained by CNBC show how deep the problems have been for some time. The RealReal, the world’s largest online consumer marketplace for luxury items, has touted that all its merchandise is “100% authentic” handled by a team of experts. But CNBC found many of the items on the site were being authenticated by copywriters with limited training, leading to mistakes. Two days after the story aired, CEO Julie Wainwright emailed customers saying, “we strive for perfection but we may not be perfect every single time.” She repeated that promise in an interview with Jim Cramer on CNBC’s “Mad Money” last week. The company, in a news release, said copywriters receive a minimum of 30 hours of training and review “low risk” brands, while “high risk” merchandise such as an Hermes Birkin bag are sent to expert authenticators. But the internal documents obtained after the CNBC investigation find the company has a long way to go.

‘Faux and Tell’

The internal documents, called “Copywriting Faux and Tell,” are “a weekly recap of TRR published and returned counterfeits.” They were sent to copywriters at the company’s warehouse in Brisbane, California. The company did not respond to CNBC’s request for comment about the documents, other than to say in an email, “We do not share specific details on our proprietary training programs.” A total of 227 pages from the first and third quarters of 2019 show specific examples of what are labeled “TRR fakes.” The items include purported Louis Vuitton slides in a style that was never created. Ugg boots marked with the wrong logo and bow. Moncler track pants tagged with a label that says T-shirt. A separate pair of slides from “The Row” and a Valentino scarf were supposed to be made in Italy but the label on the TRR fakes say they were “made in China.” Here is a look at some of the reports: These fake Ugg boots have an incorrect label, bow and sole. These fake Moncler track pants contain a label that says “T-shirt.” This Valentino scarf should say “Made in Italy,” but the fake says “Made in China.” These fake Jimmy Choo shoes misspell the brand as “Jimmy Ghoo” on the sole. The reports offer a sampling of the types of counterfeit products that slipped through the company’s vetting process. These include mistakes that may appear to be obvious. For example, an employee missed Jimmy Choo flats that misspell the company’s name on the sole. It reads “Jimmy Ghoo.” And a Gucci belt without any branding on the leather. The “GG” is described as a “garish” gold, in one of the company’s documents. The “Faux and Tell” reports are divided into ready to wear, handbags, accessories and shoes. Some describe “inferior screws” and “incorrect hardware on a bag.” Others specify incorrect fonts on labels, sloppy interior stitching and a “strong chemical odor.” The CNBC investigation revealed copywriters were working under a strict quota system, which they said led to obvious errors, similar to what is specified in these sample “Faux and Tell” reports. In her recent comments, Wainwright has not addressed the quota system. In a news release issued on Nov. 13, she said, “we stand behind our business, and importantly, if our customers aren’t happy or if they ever question one of our products, we always make it right.”

While the documents were sent to copywriters at the company’s Brisbane, California warehouse, a former employee at the Secaucus, New Jersey warehouse told CNBC that she saw similar documents during presentations to staff. The RealReal also has a warehouse in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. In a news release, The RealReal said its authentication team processed nearly 490,000 items and caught about 4,000 fakes in October alone. Another 139 products were rejected by the company’s quality control team before being posted. She did not say how many fakes have been sold on The RealReal’s site or in its three retail stores. Publicly available financial reports also do not break down the number of fakes. The company’s site said: “Online and in-store purchases may be returned online (except non-member and cash refund returns which must be made in-store). Online returns must be requested within 14 days of in-store purchase or shipment date and items must be received within 21 days of in-store purchase or shipment date. Items received after 21 days or with the security tag missing or removed cannot be returned.” The company said it has sold more than 11.5 million items since it started eight years ago. The RealReal has advertised on its Facebook page that it “is the leader in authenticated luxury consignment. With an expert behind every item, we ensure everything we sell is 100% real.” The reference to “100% real” was removed from the page on Nov. 5, the day the CNBC investigation aired. Claims of everything “100% authentic” also have been scrubbed from the company’s website. Analysts have said that if customers don’t trust the authentication process, that would likely have a negative impact on the stock. Wainwright has said 82% of its gross merchandise volume is from repeat buyers and 81% is from repeat consignors, indicating there is a high trust in the company. In a research note dated Nov. 4, Cowen Equity Research was upbeat. “Authentication has been an area of investor concern; however, we believe REAL is the only player that can currently authenticate luxury goods across various categories with scale, and REAL continues to invest behind detecting counterfeits,” the Cowen report said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-21  Authors: scott zamost andrea day jennifer schlesinger, scott zamost, andrea day, jennifer schlesinger, waverly colville, caroline skinner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, copywriters, tell, company, published, faux, fakes, documents, realreal, reports, items, authentication, discloses, site, companys, realreals


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Britain’s ruling Conservative party launches spoof opposition ‘manifesto’ site

The U.K.’s Conservative Party on Thursday created a spoof website purporting to be the Labour Party’s manifesto and attacking its pledges. The official Conservative Party Twitter account tweeted out links to the spoof site multiple times on Thursday afternoon. The site identifies itself as “a website by the Conservative Party” beneath the headline “Labour’s 2019 Manifesto.” Twitter itself weighed in on Wednesday to condemn the action, warning of punitive measures if CCHQ, the Conservative press


The U.K.’s Conservative Party on Thursday created a spoof website purporting to be the Labour Party’s manifesto and attacking its pledges.
The official Conservative Party Twitter account tweeted out links to the spoof site multiple times on Thursday afternoon.
The site identifies itself as “a website by the Conservative Party” beneath the headline “Labour’s 2019 Manifesto.”
Twitter itself weighed in on Wednesday to condemn the action, warning of punitive measures if CCHQ, the Conservative press
Britain’s ruling Conservative party launches spoof opposition ‘manifesto’ site Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-21  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spoof, launches, manifesto, labour, britains, site, ruling, corbyn, conservative, twitter, opposition, prime, party, website


Britain's ruling Conservative party launches spoof opposition 'manifesto' site

The U.K.’s Conservative Party on Thursday created a spoof website purporting to be the Labour Party’s manifesto and attacking its pledges.

Shortly before the main opposition party launched its manifesto, a website using the URL “labourmanifesto.co.uk” was registered by the Conservatives, and contains a picture of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn looking confused while mocking the party’s policies on Brexit and tax.

The official Conservative Party Twitter account tweeted out links to the spoof site multiple times on Thursday afternoon.

The Conservatives had reportedly paid for a Google advert meaning internet browsers were directed toward the website when users searched for “Labour” shortly after the manifesto launch.

The site identifies itself as “a website by the Conservative Party” beneath the headline “Labour’s 2019 Manifesto.” It then contains a series of news excerpts criticizing the opposition’s flagship policies.

The spoof website states: “All you need to know about Labour’s manifesto is that Jeremy Corbyn as Prime Minister means higher taxes for you and your family, the chaos of two more referendums and more indecision and delay on Brexit.”

This stunt comes just days after the Conservative Party faced a backlash for rebranding its press office Twitter account to masquerade as a fact checking service and tweet out Conservative talking points during a televised debate between Corbyn and Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

The move had been branded “dystopian” by the BBC and faced widespread criticism for its apparent attempt to mislead voters ahead of the December 12 general election.

Twitter itself weighed in on Wednesday to condemn the action, warning of punitive measures if CCHQ, the Conservative press wing, repeated such behavior.

CNBC has contacted the Labour Party for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-21  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spoof, launches, manifesto, labour, britains, site, ruling, corbyn, conservative, twitter, opposition, prime, party, website


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The RealReal’s ‘Faux and Tell’ discloses fakes published on the site

The RealReal’s stock plunged by nearly 11%, shaving off more than $202 million in market value, on the day a CNBC investigation revealed problems in the company’s authentication process. But CNBC found many of the items on the site were being authenticated by copywriters with limited training, leading to mistakes. ‘Faux and Tell’The internal documents, called “Copywriting Faux and Tell,” are “a weekly recap of TRR published and returned counterfeits.” The “GG” is described as a “garish” gold, in


The RealReal’s stock plunged by nearly 11%, shaving off more than $202 million in market value, on the day a CNBC investigation revealed problems in the company’s authentication process.
But CNBC found many of the items on the site were being authenticated by copywriters with limited training, leading to mistakes.
‘Faux and Tell’The internal documents, called “Copywriting Faux and Tell,” are “a weekly recap of TRR published and returned counterfeits.”
The “GG” is described as a “garish” gold, in
The RealReal’s ‘Faux and Tell’ discloses fakes published on the site Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: scott zamost andrea day jennifer schlesinger, scott zamost, andrea day, jennifer schlesinger, waverly colville, caroline skinner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, published, documents, copywriters, discloses, site, fakes, tell, companys, items, company, reports, realreal, authentication, faux, realreals


The RealReal's 'Faux and Tell' discloses fakes published on the site

The RealReal’s stock plunged by nearly 11%, shaving off more than $202 million in market value, on the day a CNBC investigation revealed problems in the company’s authentication process. As of Tuesday’s market close, its stock is down 20.7% since the report on Nov. 5, or a loss of $384.5 million. The company responded by saying its authentication was rigorous and constantly improving.

Julie Wainwright, CEO, The RealReal Scott Mlyn | CNBC

But its own internal documents obtained by CNBC show how deep the problems have been for some time. The RealReal, the world’s largest online consumer marketplace for luxury items, has touted that all its merchandise is “100% authentic” handled by a team of experts. But CNBC found many of the items on the site were being authenticated by copywriters with limited training, leading to mistakes. Two days after the story aired, CEO Julie Wainwright emailed customers saying, “we strive for perfection but we may not be perfect every single time.” She repeated that promise in an interview with Jim Cramer on CNBC’s “Mad Money” last week. The company, in a news release, said copywriters receive a minimum of 30 hours of training and review “low risk” brands, while “high risk” merchandise such as an Hermes Birkin bag are sent to expert authenticators. But the internal documents obtained after the CNBC investigation find the company has a long way to go.

‘Faux and Tell’

The internal documents, called “Copywriting Faux and Tell,” are “a weekly recap of TRR published and returned counterfeits.” They were sent to copywriters at the company’s warehouse in Brisbane, California. The company did not respond to CNBC’s request for comment about the documents, other than to say in an email, “We do not share specific details on our proprietary training programs.” A total of 227 pages from the first and third quarters of 2019 show specific examples of what are labeled “TRR fakes.” The items include purported Louis Vuitton slides in a style that was never created. Ugg boots marked with the wrong logo and bow. Moncler track pants tagged with a label that says T-shirt. A separate pair of slides from “The Row” and a Valentino scarf were supposed to be made in Italy but the label on the TRR fakes say they were “Made in China.” Here is a look at some of the reports: These fake Ugg boots have an incorrect label, bow and sole. These fake Moncler track pants contain a label that says “T-shirt.” This Valentino scarf should say “Made in Italy,” but the fake says “Made in China.” These fake Jimmy Choo shoes misspell the brand as “Jimmy Ghoo” on the sole. The reports offer a sampling of the types of counterfeit products that slipped through the company’s vetting process. These include mistakes that may appear to be obvious. For example, an employee missed Jimmy Choo flats that misspell the company’s name on the sole. It reads “Jimmy Ghoo.” And a Gucci belt without any branding on the leather. The “GG” is described as a “garish” gold, in one of the company’s documents. The “Faux and Tell” reports are divided into ready to wear, handbags, accessories and shoes. Some describe “inferior screws” and “incorrect hardware on a bag.” Others specify incorrect fonts on labels, sloppy interior stitching and a “strong chemical odor.” The CNBC investigation revealed copywriters were working under a strict quota system, which they said led to obvious errors, similar to what is specified in these sample “Faux and Tell” reports. In her recent comments, Wainwright has not addressed the quota system. In a news release issued on Nov. 13, she said, “we stand behind our business, and importantly, if our customers aren’t happy or if they ever question one of our products, we always make it right.”

While the documents were sent to copywriters at the company’s Brisbane, California warehouse, a former employee at the Secaucus, New Jersey, warehouse told CNBC that she saw similar documents during presentations to staff. The RealReal also has a warehouse in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. In a news release, The RealReal said its authentication team processed nearly 490,000 items and caught about 4,000 fakes in October alone. Another 139 products were rejected by the company’s quality control team before being posted. She did not say how many fakes have been sold on The RealReal’s site or in its three retail stores. Publicly available financial reports also do not break down the number of fakes. The company’s site said: “Online and in-store purchases may be returned online (except non-member and cash refund returns which must be made in-store). Online returns must be requested within 14 days of in-store purchase or shipment date and items must be received within 21 days of in-store purchase or shipment date. Items received after 21 days or with the security tag missing or removed cannot be returned.” The company said it has sold more than 11.5 million items since it started eight years ago. The RealReal has advertised on its Facebook page that it “is the leader in authenticated luxury consignment. With an expert behind every item, we ensure everything we sell is 100% real.” The reference to “100% real” was removed from the page on Nov. 5, the day the CNBC investigation aired. Claims of everything “100% authentic” also have been scrubbed from the company’s website. Analysts have said that if customers don’t trust the authentication process, that would likely have a negative impact on the stock. Wainwright has said 82% of its gross merchandise volume is from repeat buyers and 81% is from repeat consignors, indicating there is a high trust in the company. In a research note dated Nov. 4, Cowen Equity Research was upbeat. “Authentication has been an area of investor concern; however, we believe REAL is the only player that can currently authenticate luxury goods across various categories with scale, and REAL continues to invest behind detecting counterfeits,” the Cowen report said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: scott zamost andrea day jennifer schlesinger, scott zamost, andrea day, jennifer schlesinger, waverly colville, caroline skinner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, published, documents, copywriters, discloses, site, fakes, tell, companys, items, company, reports, realreal, authentication, faux, realreals


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Amazon is home to thriving businesses that turn TikTok memes into merchandise

Other memes like “Yeet,” “I’m baby” and, of course, “OK boomer” are plastered across T-shirts, sweatshirts, hats and socks, forever immortalized despite the internet’s increasingly short attention span. AmazonWhile the company dabbles in meme merchandise, it doesn’t represent the majority of Gotham City’s sales because “it’s tough to have a business that just chases those trends,” Garriss said. Taking a “fast fashion approach” to meme merchandise is often a gamble, he said. In some cases, meme m


Other memes like “Yeet,” “I’m baby” and, of course, “OK boomer” are plastered across T-shirts, sweatshirts, hats and socks, forever immortalized despite the internet’s increasingly short attention span.
AmazonWhile the company dabbles in meme merchandise, it doesn’t represent the majority of Gotham City’s sales because “it’s tough to have a business that just chases those trends,” Garriss said.
Taking a “fast fashion approach” to meme merchandise is often a gamble, he said.
In some cases, meme m
Amazon is home to thriving businesses that turn TikTok memes into merchandise Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-17  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, merchandise, businesses, meme, pop, boomer, amazon, site, memes, shirtwascash, tiktok, thriving, popular, turn


Amazon is home to thriving businesses that turn TikTok memes into merchandise

Can I get a vibe check? More like, can I get a paycheck? On Amazon, you can. The sprawling e-commerce site that sells everything from furniture to pet supplies has also become home to a busy community of meme merchandisers looking to make a quick buck off of popular internet slang phrases like “Vibe check.” Vibe check, which essentially equates to a wellness check-in from a friend, is just one of many memes made popular on social media platforms like TikTok, Facebook’s Instagram, Reddit or Twitter and is now being monetized via merchandise on Amazon. Other memes like “Yeet,” “I’m baby” and, of course, “OK boomer” are plastered across T-shirts, sweatshirts, hats and socks, forever immortalized despite the internet’s increasingly short attention span. Elsewhere, shoppers can buy a T-shirt that says “Respect the drip, Karen,” a meme popularized on TikTok. In the video, a teen instructs Karen (a moniker that makes fun of a particular type of Generation X woman) to respect his outfit. Slang terms used both on and off TikTok, like “and I oop,” which is used when someone catches you by surprise, and “bet,” a replacement for “OK sure,” are also inscribed on T-shirts.

An example of a “Respect the Drip, Karen” sweatshirt sold on Amazon. Amazon

Finding the next best meme to monetize requires sellers to remain tapped into the places where users, often members of Generation Z (age 22 and under), are sharing them. For Jonathan Garriss, CEO of novelty merchandise maker Gotham City Online, that means paying less attention to Facebook, which he said has become saturated with outdated memes. Instead, he relies on staff who frequent more youth-oriented spaces, like Reddit, while monitoring search trends to see what’s gaining popularity. “We try to find memes that have a little more staying power,” Garriss said. “There are things that are popular this week and not popular the next. We try to avoid those.” Gotham City Online sells novelty T-shirts via its subsidiary, Pop Threads, on Amazon. Aside from retro and pop culture inspired gear, Pop Threads sells clothing that references popular memes, including Crying Michael Jordan, “Here Comes Dat Boi” and Kermit the Frog sipping tea.

An example of a “Yeet” shirt sold by Pop Threads. Amazon

While the company dabbles in meme merchandise, it doesn’t represent the majority of Gotham City’s sales because “it’s tough to have a business that just chases those trends,” Garriss said. Online clothing retailer Shirtwascash has witnessed meme merchandising evolve over the years since the site launched in 2014. The site started by crowdsourcing memes from 4chan, then Reddit and later expanded to include original designs. Shirtwascash Founder Ardon Lukasiewicz, who goes by the pseudonym Based anon, said he doesn’t sell his merchandise on Amazon because he likes to remain “under the radar” to avoid copycats. The site offers T-shirts with classic memes like poorly drawn Sonic and the Shiba Inu doge, but also offers merchandise with newer memes including the conspiracy theory meme “Jeffery Epstein didn’t kill himself” and “OK boomer.” Like other retailers, Lukasiewicz tries to choose memes that he feels will last more than a couple days or weeks. Taking a “fast fashion approach” to meme merchandise is often a gamble, he said. In some cases, meme merchandise can extend the shelf-life of a certain topic, as is the case with the Epstein merchandise, or it can shed light on an important issue. “The OK boomer meme is a rare meme that’s actually kind of important,” Lukasiewicz said. “The general use is annoying, but I personally think it shows that boomers, which aren’t necessarily an age group as much as an ideology, should join us in the digital age so that it’s not just young people trying to create change.”

An example of an “OK Boomer” Christmas sweater sold by Shirtwascash. Shirtwascash


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-17  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, merchandise, businesses, meme, pop, boomer, amazon, site, memes, shirtwascash, tiktok, thriving, popular, turn


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The Budgetnista’s 3 tips to build the perfect budget for your lifestyle

1 Hour AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. Tiffany “The Budgetnista” Aliche has 3 tips to help you build the perfect budget.


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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-13
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, budget, player, try, tips, view, flash, plugin, lifestyle, browser, site, perfect, budgetnistas, build, enabled


The Budgetnista's 3 tips to build the perfect budget for your lifestyle

1 Hour Ago

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Tiffany “The Budgetnista” Aliche has 3 tips to help you build the perfect budget.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-13
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, budget, player, try, tips, view, flash, plugin, lifestyle, browser, site, perfect, budgetnistas, build, enabled


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