Sorrell: Chance of a no-deal Brexit to increase if Johnson becomes PM

Sorrell: Chance of a no-deal Brexit to increase if Johnson becomes PM16 Hours AgoMartin Sorrell, the former CEO of WPP, speaks with CNBC about the U.K. political situation.


Sorrell: Chance of a no-deal Brexit to increase if Johnson becomes PM16 Hours AgoMartin Sorrell, the former CEO of WPP, speaks with CNBC about the U.K. political situation.
Sorrell: Chance of a no-deal Brexit to increase if Johnson becomes PM Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, political, sorrell, wpp, chance, nodeal, speaks, uk, brexit, situation, increase, johnson, pm16


Sorrell: Chance of a no-deal Brexit to increase if Johnson becomes PM

Sorrell: Chance of a no-deal Brexit to increase if Johnson becomes PM

16 Hours Ago

Martin Sorrell, the former CEO of WPP, speaks with CNBC about the U.K. political situation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, political, sorrell, wpp, chance, nodeal, speaks, uk, brexit, situation, increase, johnson, pm16


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US chipmakers are reportedly quietly lobbying to ease Huawei ban

Huawei’s American chip suppliers, including Qualcomm and Intel, are quietly pressing the U.S. government to ease its ban on sales to the Chinese tech giant, even as Huawei itself avoids typical government lobbying, people familiar with the situation said. The ban bars U.S. suppliers from selling to Huawei, the world’s largest telecommunications equipment company, without special approval, because of what the government said were national security issues. “For technologies that do not relate to n


Huawei’s American chip suppliers, including Qualcomm and Intel, are quietly pressing the U.S. government to ease its ban on sales to the Chinese tech giant, even as Huawei itself avoids typical government lobbying, people familiar with the situation said. The ban bars U.S. suppliers from selling to Huawei, the world’s largest telecommunications equipment company, without special approval, because of what the government said were national security issues. “For technologies that do not relate to n
US chipmakers are reportedly quietly lobbying to ease Huawei ban Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, ban, chinese, suppliers, reportedly, ease, quietly, security, intel, lobbying, chipmakers, selling, huawei, situation, technology


US chipmakers are reportedly quietly lobbying to ease Huawei ban

Huawei’s American chip suppliers, including Qualcomm and Intel, are quietly pressing the U.S. government to ease its ban on sales to the Chinese tech giant, even as Huawei itself avoids typical government lobbying, people familiar with the situation said.

Executives from top U.S. chipmakers Intel and Xilinx attended a meeting in late May with the Commerce Department to discuss a response to Huawei’s placement on the black list, one person said.

The ban bars U.S. suppliers from selling to Huawei, the world’s largest telecommunications equipment company, without special approval, because of what the government said were national security issues.

Qualcomm has also pressed the Commerce Department over the issue, four people said.

Chip makers argue that Huawei units selling products such as smartphones and computer servers use commonly available parts and are unlikely to present the same security concerns as the Chinese technology firm’s 5G networking gear, according to three people.

“This isn’t about helping Huawei. It’s about preventing harm to American companies,” one of the people said.

Out of $70 billion that Huawei spent buying components in 2018, some $11 billion went to U.S. firms including Qualcomm, Intel and Micron Technology Inc.

Qualcomm, for example, wants to be able to continue shipping chips to Huawei for common devices like phones and smart watches, a person familiar with the company’s situation said.

The Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA), a trade group, acknowledged it arranged consultations with the U.S. government on behalf of the companies to help them comply and brief officials on the impact of the ban on the companies.

“For technologies that do not relate to national security, it seems they shouldn’t fall within the scope of the order. And we have conveyed this perspective to government,” said Jimmy Goodrich, vice president of global policy at SIA.

The ban came soon after the breakdown of talks to end the months-long trade spat between China and the United States, spurred by U.S. allegations of Chinese corporate espionage, intellectual property theft and forced technology transfer.

Google, which sells hardware, software and technical services to Huawei, has also advocated so it can keep selling to the company, Huawei Chairman Liang Hua told reporters in China earlier this month.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, ban, chinese, suppliers, reportedly, ease, quietly, security, intel, lobbying, chipmakers, selling, huawei, situation, technology


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Many Americans say their financial situation is worse since the Great Recession

The Great Recession has officially been over for a decade. Many people’s finances haven’t recovered from the recession’s blows, according to a new survey by personal finance website Bankrate.com. “There are still tens of millions who are struggling to even get back to where they were before the economy took a turn for the worse,” said Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst at Bankrate.com. More than half of Americans who were adults amid the Great Recession said they endured some type of negative


The Great Recession has officially been over for a decade. Many people’s finances haven’t recovered from the recession’s blows, according to a new survey by personal finance website Bankrate.com. “There are still tens of millions who are struggling to even get back to where they were before the economy took a turn for the worse,” said Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst at Bankrate.com. More than half of Americans who were adults amid the Great Recession said they endured some type of negative
Many Americans say their financial situation is worse since the Great Recession Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-14  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, recession, worse, great, say, half, type, financial, americans, took, turn, theyre, website, situation


Many Americans say their financial situation is worse since the Great Recession

The Great Recession has officially been over for a decade. For many Americans, there’s little reason to celebrate.

Many people’s finances haven’t recovered from the recession’s blows, according to a new survey by personal finance website Bankrate.com.

“There are still tens of millions who are struggling to even get back to where they were before the economy took a turn for the worse,” said Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst at Bankrate.com.

More than half of Americans who were adults amid the Great Recession said they endured some type of negative financial impact, Bankrate found. And half of those people say they’re doing worse now than before the crisis.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-14  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, recession, worse, great, say, half, type, financial, americans, took, turn, theyre, website, situation


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Russia’s Putin says Huawei is getting pushed out from global market

Russia’s Putin says Huawei is getting pushed out from global market10:10 AM ET Fri, 7 June 2019Russian President Vladimir Putin said some would call the current situation a war of the technological era.


Russia’s Putin says Huawei is getting pushed out from global market10:10 AM ET Fri, 7 June 2019Russian President Vladimir Putin said some would call the current situation a war of the technological era.
Russia’s Putin says Huawei is getting pushed out from global market Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, putin, pushed, getting, market, huawei, war, technological, situation, market1010, russias, vladimir, president, global


Russia's Putin says Huawei is getting pushed out from global market

Russia’s Putin says Huawei is getting pushed out from global market

10:10 AM ET Fri, 7 June 2019

Russian President Vladimir Putin said some would call the current situation a war of the technological era.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, putin, pushed, getting, market, huawei, war, technological, situation, market1010, russias, vladimir, president, global


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‘Hope not,’ Trump says when asked if the United States will go to war with Iran

US President Donald Trump (L) greets Switzerland’s President Ueli Maurer before a meeting at the White House on May 16, 2019, in Washington, DC. Meanwhile, members of Congress blasted the Trump administration for leaving them in the dark about details of the situation with Iran — and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Trump lacks authority to declare war on Iran. Within hours of Trump making that public comment, The New York Times reported that the president has told acting Defense Secretary Patric


US President Donald Trump (L) greets Switzerland’s President Ueli Maurer before a meeting at the White House on May 16, 2019, in Washington, DC. Meanwhile, members of Congress blasted the Trump administration for leaving them in the dark about details of the situation with Iran — and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Trump lacks authority to declare war on Iran. Within hours of Trump making that public comment, The New York Times reported that the president has told acting Defense Secretary Patric
‘Hope not,’ Trump says when asked if the United States will go to war with Iran Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, situation, authorization, house, states, hope, pelosi, asked, president, middle, united, trump, war, iran


'Hope not,' Trump says when asked if the United States will go to war with Iran

US President Donald Trump (L) greets Switzerland’s President Ueli Maurer before a meeting at the White House on May 16, 2019, in Washington, DC.

Meanwhile, members of Congress blasted the Trump administration for leaving them in the dark about details of the situation with Iran — and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Trump lacks authority to declare war on Iran.

Within hours of Trump making that public comment, The New York Times reported that the president has told acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan that he does not want to go to war with Iran.

That answer to a reporter’s question during a photo opportunity at the White House with Swiss President Ueli Maurer came amid growing concern about a conflict between the U.S. and Iran.

President Donald Trump said “hope not” when he was asked Thursday if the United States is going to war with Iran.

“The responsibility in the Congress is for Congress to declare war,” said Pelosi, D-Calif.

“So I hope the president’s advisors recognize that they have no authorization to go forward in any way. They cannot call the authorization, AUMF, the authorization for the use of military force, that was passed in 2001, as any authorization to go forward in the Middle East now,” she said.

“I like what I hear from the president that he has no appetite for this,” Pelosi added added. “One of the places that I agree with the president is that both of us in our opposition to the war in Iraq and I hope the same attitude will prevail with the president of the United States even though some of his supporters are rattling sabers.”

The Trump administration has sent an aircraft carrier strike group and bombers to the Middle East in response to what it has characterized as “troubling and escalatory indications and warnings” from Iran.

Those indications include a purported threat from Iran against U.S. diplomatic posts in Iraq, as well as worry that Iran is setting the stage to place rocket launchers on ships in the Persian Gulf.

On Wednesday, the U.S. State Department ordered nonemergency government employees to leave the American embassy in Baghdad and the consulate in Erbil.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., a member of the Armed Services Committee, told reporters Thursday: “The American people have been kept in the dark. It is disgraceful and despicable that we’re on the verge of war, and the American people are given this kind of confused and chaotic picture of what the situation is on the ground.”

Blumenthal said that he and other senators have heard that “we are supposedly going to have a briefing on Tuesday” from the Trump administration about the Iran situation.

But, Blumenthal added, “we’re hearing it may be too late because hostilities may have begun or there may be an escalation on the military situation.”

That would be “petrifying,” he said.

Later Thursday, three sources told NBC News that all senators will be receiving a classified briefing next Tuesday to update them on the situation involving Iran and the Middle East.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, situation, authorization, house, states, hope, pelosi, asked, president, middle, united, trump, war, iran


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Royal baby Archie faces a complicated tax situation

It’s official: Baby Sussex has greeted the world and the royal family. The first child of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex — Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor — made his world debut on Monday and his first public appearance on Wednesday. Because the baby was born to an American mother, that also makes him an American citizen. And being an American — regardless of where you live in the world — also comes with a tax bill because the U.S. is one of the few countries that tax people on citizenship,


It’s official: Baby Sussex has greeted the world and the royal family. The first child of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex — Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor — made his world debut on Monday and his first public appearance on Wednesday. Because the baby was born to an American mother, that also makes him an American citizen. And being an American — regardless of where you live in the world — also comes with a tax bill because the U.S. is one of the few countries that tax people on citizenship,
Royal baby Archie faces a complicated tax situation Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09  Authors: lorie konish, dominic lipinski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, situation, archie, sussex, faces, royal, unique, world, wednesdaybecause, citizenship, baby, young, complicated, tax, american


Royal baby Archie faces a complicated tax situation

It’s official: Baby Sussex has greeted the world and the royal family. And he will eventually have to say hello to Uncle Sam.

The first child of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex — Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor — made his world debut on Monday and his first public appearance on Wednesday.

Because the baby was born to an American mother, that also makes him an American citizen.

And being an American — regardless of where you live in the world — also comes with a tax bill because the U.S. is one of the few countries that tax people on citizenship, not residency.

For young Archie, that will mean a unique situation — and possibly a key decision when he’s old enough as to whether or not to keep his American citizenship.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09  Authors: lorie konish, dominic lipinski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, situation, archie, sussex, faces, royal, unique, world, wednesdaybecause, citizenship, baby, young, complicated, tax, american


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No settlement expected in $27 million SEC ‘market manipulation’ case, court filing says

A settlement in principle for Florida businessman Barry Honig now appears to be off the table, according to a filing on Tuesday in the case that was signed by all parties. The Securities and Exchange Commission brought charges for what it called “classic pump-and-dump schemes” in September. The SEC filed for an extension of time on April 26 for a planned settlement. “Defendant Honig and the Commission staff reached an agreement in principle to settle the Commission’s claims for liability,” the A


A settlement in principle for Florida businessman Barry Honig now appears to be off the table, according to a filing on Tuesday in the case that was signed by all parties. The Securities and Exchange Commission brought charges for what it called “classic pump-and-dump schemes” in September. The SEC filed for an extension of time on April 26 for a planned settlement. “Defendant Honig and the Commission staff reached an agreement in principle to settle the Commission’s claims for liability,” the A
No settlement expected in $27 million SEC ‘market manipulation’ case, court filing says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07  Authors: jennifer schlesinger scott zamost, ritika shah, jennifer schlesinger, scott zamost
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, honig, signed, filing, 27, principle, situation, court, table, market, settlement, sec, staff, settlementdefendant, manipulation, million, case, commission, expected, appears


No settlement expected in $27 million SEC 'market manipulation' case, court filing says

A settlement in principle for Florida businessman Barry Honig now appears to be off the table, according to a filing on Tuesday in the case that was signed by all parties.

The Securities and Exchange Commission brought charges for what it called “classic pump-and-dump schemes” in September.

The SEC filed for an extension of time on April 26 for a planned settlement.

“Defendant Honig and the Commission staff reached an agreement in principle to settle the Commission’s claims for liability,” the April motion said.

Now, the situation appears to have changed.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07  Authors: jennifer schlesinger scott zamost, ritika shah, jennifer schlesinger, scott zamost
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, honig, signed, filing, 27, principle, situation, court, table, market, settlement, sec, staff, settlementdefendant, manipulation, million, case, commission, expected, appears


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Brexit creating ‘very unusual’ economic situation, BOE’s Carney says

Brexit creating ‘very unusual’ economic situation, BOE’s Carney says3 Hours AgoBank of England Governor Mark Carney outlines the impact Brexit is having on the U.K. economy and the central bank’s monetary policy.


Brexit creating ‘very unusual’ economic situation, BOE’s Carney says3 Hours AgoBank of England Governor Mark Carney outlines the impact Brexit is having on the U.K. economy and the central bank’s monetary policy.
Brexit creating ‘very unusual’ economic situation, BOE’s Carney says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, carney, outlines, monetary, uk, creating, economic, says3, situation, unusual, mark, policy, boes, brexit


Brexit creating 'very unusual' economic situation, BOE's Carney says

Brexit creating ‘very unusual’ economic situation, BOE’s Carney says

3 Hours Ago

Bank of England Governor Mark Carney outlines the impact Brexit is having on the U.K. economy and the central bank’s monetary policy.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, carney, outlines, monetary, uk, creating, economic, says3, situation, unusual, mark, policy, boes, brexit


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Retired Navy SEAL: Here’s what to do if you screw up at work

If you miss a deadline, upset a client or make any sort of error at work, chances are you can recover. The first step to take, says retired Navy SEAL Jocko Willink, is to “own the mistake.” Your instinct may be to avoid the situation, he adds, but doing so will only put you in a tougher position in the long run: “If you try and hide that mistake from your boss, believe me: When they find out about it, they’re going to be infinitely more angry that you didn’t just come clean and get that situatio


If you miss a deadline, upset a client or make any sort of error at work, chances are you can recover. The first step to take, says retired Navy SEAL Jocko Willink, is to “own the mistake.” Your instinct may be to avoid the situation, he adds, but doing so will only put you in a tougher position in the long run: “If you try and hide that mistake from your boss, believe me: When they find out about it, they’re going to be infinitely more angry that you didn’t just come clean and get that situatio
Retired Navy SEAL: Here’s what to do if you screw up at work Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: kathleen elkins, jocko willink, -jocko willink, leadership coach, retired navy seal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, willink, youre, try, boss, work, situation, retired, upset, seal, navy, theyre, heres, tougher, screw, tells


Retired Navy SEAL: Here's what to do if you screw up at work

If you miss a deadline, upset a client or make any sort of error at work, chances are you can recover.

The first step to take, says retired Navy SEAL Jocko Willink, is to “own the mistake.”

Your instinct may be to avoid the situation, he adds, but doing so will only put you in a tougher position in the long run: “If you try and hide that mistake from your boss, believe me: When they find out about it, they’re going to be infinitely more angry that you didn’t just come clean and get that situation resolved.”

The sooner you apologize and take responsibility, the better. You also want to be prepared to tell your boss how you’re solving the problem and what you plan to do in the future to prevent it from happening again, Willink, who is now an author and leadership coach, tells CNBC Make It.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: kathleen elkins, jocko willink, -jocko willink, leadership coach, retired navy seal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, willink, youre, try, boss, work, situation, retired, upset, seal, navy, theyre, heres, tougher, screw, tells


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Killer hog disease now a ‘dire situation’ in China that could lead to higher global prices

As African swine fever continues to ravage China’s hog herd, the impact may be far worse than Beijing is conceding. The government official also was quoted by state media as insisting the production of live pigs and pork supplies is generally stable. According to Shanghai-based consultant JCI, China’s pork production is forecast to fall nearly 16%, or 8.5 million metric tons in 2019. China is believed to have a large reserve of pork supplies and significant supplies in cold storage. “The consens


As African swine fever continues to ravage China’s hog herd, the impact may be far worse than Beijing is conceding. The government official also was quoted by state media as insisting the production of live pigs and pork supplies is generally stable. According to Shanghai-based consultant JCI, China’s pork production is forecast to fall nearly 16%, or 8.5 million metric tons in 2019. China is believed to have a large reserve of pork supplies and significant supplies in cold storage. “The consens
Killer hog disease now a ‘dire situation’ in China that could lead to higher global prices Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: jeff daniels, christilaliberte, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, global, million, pork, higher, supplies, situation, swine, disease, china, meat, dire, fever, killer, lead, chinas, hog, prices, production


Killer hog disease now a 'dire situation' in China that could lead to higher global prices

As African swine fever continues to ravage China’s hog herd, the impact may be far worse than Beijing is conceding. The crisis could lead to significant shortages of the country’s staple meat and drive up global prices of protein, experts said. The situation also increasing fear among U.S. pork producers of spreading contagion.

The June lean hog futures contract on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange is up more than 50% in the past month as speculators wager that China’s outbreak and apparent progress in U.S.-China trade talks will increase U.S. pork demand. China consumes about 28% of the world’s meat, including 49% of pork, so it’s a significant factor in the world market.

“Assuming China’s tariffs on U.S. pork are reduced in the not-so-distant future, U.S. pork exports could pick up considerably,” according to David Maloni, executive vice president of analytics at ArrowStream, a Chicago commodity researcher for the restaurant industry. He also wrote in a newsletter Tuesday, “Longer term we are concerned that U.S. chicken and beef exports could rise as well.”

On Tuesday, China’s agricultural minister said African swine fever is now “under effective control” and the number of cases is slowing down. The government official also was quoted by state media as insisting the production of live pigs and pork supplies is generally stable.

But not everyone agrees with that assessment and some suggest Beijing maybe under reporting the severity of the killer disease’s impact on pork supplies, to save face or perhaps maintain a position of strength during negotiations to resolve the U.S.-China trade war.

“What our people there in China find is a far different story where the disease is continuing to spread,” said Arlan Suderman, chief commodities economist with INTL FCStone in Kansas City, Mo. “China just doesn’t want the rest of the world to know what the situation is.”

The economist termed it “a very dire situation” and estimates hog feeding in China has fallen at least 40% and in some larger swine producing regions plummeted more than 50% in response to the disease. He said the decline is directly attributable to infected pigs dying and producers afraid of the disease and liquidating herds to salvage some value.

“If we’re down 40%, that would mean on an annualized basis that they’ve lost more pork production capacity than what we produce in all of North and South America together on an annual basis,” said Suderman.

At least 122 cases of African swine fever have been reported in China in both its domestic pigs and wild boars since the first case was confirmed last August and the incurable disease has spread to other parts of Asia, including Vietnam where it accounts for about three-quarters of the total meat diet.

There is fear the highly contagious and deadly virus could spread beyond Asia and reach the U.S.

On Wednesday, the National Pork Producers Council announced it would cancel its 2019 World Pork Expo in Des Moines “out of an abundance of caution” given the current situation. The annual event in Iowa usually draws about 30,000 people and includes hundreds of pigs for judging contests.

The U.S. government recently announced increased measures to prevent the disease from entering the domestic livestock supply, including a renewed focus on “strict on-farm biosecurity” measures and other steps.

In Beijing, meantime, the government has indicated the number of hogs culled to help prevent the spread of African swine fever is about one million, or a fraction of the China’s roughly 700 million pigs.

Regardless, Suderman estimates China will ramp up poultry production about 8% to try to offset some of the lost pork supplies but still be left with a net deficit of about 16.2 million metric tons of meat that they will need to get from suppliers on the world market to maintain their current food supply. To put it in perspective, that is about six times the amount of pork the U.S. exported in 2018 to all markets.

Another estimate from a report recently published by a Chinese agriculture consulting firm shows the deficit in pork supplies will be less than half of the amount projected by INTL FCStone.

According to Shanghai-based consultant JCI, China’s pork production is forecast to fall nearly 16%, or 8.5 million metric tons in 2019. The Chinese firm sees a “pork supply-demand gap” of as much as 7 million metric tons this year, even compensating for other proteins such as chicken, beef and fish.

China is believed to have a large reserve of pork supplies and significant supplies in cold storage. Still, Suderman said the Chinese could start seeing product shortages in final quarter of 2019 and “a more significant problem in 2020.”

Last year, China slapped retaliatory tariffs on American pork that resulted in the import taxes of about 70%, or about five times higher than other major global suppliers such as the European Union, Brazil and Canada.

“Right now it’s hard to say how much China’s need for imports will increase due to African swine fever,” said Joe Schuele, a spokesperson with the U.S. Meat Export Federation, a trade group. “The consensus is that it will, but we’re not sure to what degree it will affect China’s production.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: jeff daniels, christilaliberte, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, global, million, pork, higher, supplies, situation, swine, disease, china, meat, dire, fever, killer, lead, chinas, hog, prices, production


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