How a single mom of four switched careers to land a six-figure salary

After separating from her husband in June, single mom Shannon Lance found herself suddenly needing to earn enough to support four children. Lance began her job search after completing an intensive 14-week program with Washington-based Coding Dojo. Just six days after beginning her job hunt, Lance secured a six-figure offer from travel expenses firm SAP Concur. “I was (previously) a teacher and had a bunch of professional experience that gave me soft skills which helped land the job,” she said. H


After separating from her husband in June, single mom Shannon Lance found herself suddenly needing to earn enough to support four children. Lance began her job search after completing an intensive 14-week program with Washington-based Coding Dojo. Just six days after beginning her job hunt, Lance secured a six-figure offer from travel expenses firm SAP Concur. “I was (previously) a teacher and had a bunch of professional experience that gave me soft skills which helped land the job,” she said. H
How a single mom of four switched careers to land a six-figure salary Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, learning, switched, experience, program, single, work, salary, mom, coding, land, careers, job, didnt, career, lance, sixfigure


How a single mom of four switched careers to land a six-figure salary

After separating from her husband in June, single mom Shannon Lance found herself suddenly needing to earn enough to support four children. “I have a teaching degree but (teaching) won’t pay the bills for a family of five – it’s just not an option,” she told CNBC. “I thought about nursing, but the biggest drawback was that it required going back to school for two years to get another degree – I didn’t have two years, I have kids and bills to pay.” Despite being a self-confessed technophobe, Lance decided to learn computer coding after a suggestion from her brother-in-law, taking the plunge into an entirely new career path. Lance began her job search after completing an intensive 14-week program with Washington-based Coding Dojo. Just six days after beginning her job hunt, Lance secured a six-figure offer from travel expenses firm SAP Concur. In an interview with CNBC, she shared her tips on achieving success in a new career.

Value your ‘soft skills’

Although a career change can set you back in terms of direct industry experience, Lance urged others not to underestimate the value of basic core capabilities that appeal to employers — like strong communication or leadership skills. “I was (previously) a teacher and had a bunch of professional experience that gave me soft skills which helped land the job,” she said. “(That was) combined with having just coming out of a great program which gave me all the right tech skills.”

Be willing to learn

As well as considering how your skillset could be transferred to a new industry, Lance told CNBC that having the right attitude was a real asset when it came to landing a job with no direct experience. She said she was upfront about what she could and couldn’t do, taking the approach: “I don’t know a lot about it, but I do know a little bit – and I’m willing to learn more.” According to Lance, embracing those knowledge gaps and showcasing a desire for self-improvement could be just as valuable as experience to some employers. “For the job I got, the company was starting a new team that would be using new technology, so we’d all be learning whether they hired somebody with experience or not,” she said. “They wanted people who were capable of learning quickly and who could work and learn under pressure. Going through Coding Dojo proved I had those capabilities and that desire to keep learning.”

Work your own way

Although Lance didn’t feel intellectually limited while learning to code, she said comparing her own pace of work to others’ sometimes led to unnecessary frustration and could impact her confidence. “One challenge was the amount of time it took to get through everything. I don’t think I had trouble with the actual program, but I didn’t have any tech background, so every assignment would take me one and a half times as long as everyone else,” she told CNBC. “Some of the people in my group had played on computers since they were 12 — so the assignments only took 20 to 30 minutes for them to complete.” She said it was important to find your own way to get work done, rather than sticking to the chronological or seemingly “correct” method. Her coding program was organized into three sections, and when she initially attempted to do each assignment in order, Lance found herself falling behind. “I’d have to skip forward and go back again – that’s not a good strategy,” she said. Instead, she got through all of the reading and learning materials for each topic before attempting to complete an assignment. “Make sure you do the reading and homework way before you start struggling with (graded assignments and technical work),” she said. “And make sure you allow yourself enough time outside of class to get stuff done.” Lance also advised those considering a career change not to overestimate their own academic ability. “I was pretty good in school and didn’t have to study a lot,” she said. “I went into Coding Dojo thinking I could get it done quicker, underestimating how much time it would consume. (You have to let it) take as long as it takes.”

Seek support to switch career


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, learning, switched, experience, program, single, work, salary, mom, coding, land, careers, job, didnt, career, lance, sixfigure


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These are the best cars we tested in 2018

In 2018, we had the opportunity to sample nearly 50 new cars, trucks and SUVs from myriad of automakers. We tested everything from $16,005 hatchbacks to six-figure coupes, doing our best to cover the gamut of fresh sheet metal on sale today. Of all of the cars we tested, though, some distinguished themselves. While many cars impressed us, these six set themselves above the rest.


In 2018, we had the opportunity to sample nearly 50 new cars, trucks and SUVs from myriad of automakers. We tested everything from $16,005 hatchbacks to six-figure coupes, doing our best to cover the gamut of fresh sheet metal on sale today. Of all of the cars we tested, though, some distinguished themselves. While many cars impressed us, these six set themselves above the rest.
These are the best cars we tested in 2018 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-22  Authors: mack hogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sample, sixfigure, sale, todayof, sheet, trucks, tested, suvs, set, best, 2018, cars


These are the best cars we tested in 2018

In 2018, we had the opportunity to sample nearly 50 new cars, trucks and SUVs from myriad of automakers. We tested everything from $16,005 hatchbacks to six-figure coupes, doing our best to cover the gamut of fresh sheet metal on sale today.

Of all of the cars we tested, though, some distinguished themselves. While many cars impressed us, these six set themselves above the rest.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-22  Authors: mack hogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sample, sixfigure, sale, todayof, sheet, trucks, tested, suvs, set, best, 2018, cars


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8 ways to negotiate a six-figure salary like a pro

Cenedella said many workers feel compelled to take the first offer, concerned they’ll be perceived as rude or ungrateful if they negotiate. A record low unemployment rate of 3.7 percent is boosting the confidence of workers and causing more people to leave jobs to pursue jobs with six-figure salaries, said Andrew J. Sherman, a partner at Seyfarth Shaw, who helps small and midsize enterprises negotiate six-figure salary contracts with prospective employees. That means there’s more job-hopping and


Cenedella said many workers feel compelled to take the first offer, concerned they’ll be perceived as rude or ungrateful if they negotiate. A record low unemployment rate of 3.7 percent is boosting the confidence of workers and causing more people to leave jobs to pursue jobs with six-figure salaries, said Andrew J. Sherman, a partner at Seyfarth Shaw, who helps small and midsize enterprises negotiate six-figure salary contracts with prospective employees. That means there’s more job-hopping and
8 ways to negotiate a six-figure salary like a pro Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-06  Authors: julie halpert, rubberball productions, brand x pictures, getty images, -marc cenedella, founder, ceo of ladders, a leading professional career site
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sixfigure, jobs, negotiation, job, ways, helps, salary, pro, negotiate, higher, dont, employer, offer


8 ways to negotiate a six-figure salary like a pro

Last month Marc Cenedella, founder and CEO of Ladders, the leading career platform for jobs paying $100,000 and more, was advising a female executive with 20 years’ experience in marketing. She wasn’t happy with the salary offered by a prospective employer, but she was sheepish about negotiating.

Cenedella advised her to tell the employer that she was hoping to earn $15,000 more because of a move from the Southwest to New York City, which had a higher cost of living and higher commuting costs. She did so, and within three days the company agreed to the increase.

Cenedella said many workers feel compelled to take the first offer, concerned they’ll be perceived as rude or ungrateful if they negotiate. “The biggest mistake people make is that any negotiation is too much negotiation for them,” he said.

Negotiations like this are taking place more often these days. A record low unemployment rate of 3.7 percent is boosting the confidence of workers and causing more people to leave jobs to pursue jobs with six-figure salaries, said Andrew J. Sherman, a partner at Seyfarth Shaw, who helps small and midsize enterprises negotiate six-figure salary contracts with prospective employees. “People are seeing there are more opportunities available to them,” he said.

Cenedella said the days of working in one job most of your career are long gone. Companies “don’t have a loyalty to you, so you don’t need to have loyalty to a company.” That means there’s more job-hopping and opportunities for new negotiations to get you to a higher salary.

Getting to a six-figure salary “is something job seekers should aim for if they’re not there yet,” said Vicki Salemi, a career expert for Monster, a worldwide job site. Sherman said it’s an important socioeconomic benchmark “that helps people define themselves quantitatively.”

It’s not just traditional white-collar jobs that can earn you six figures. A new analysis that Monster conducted using the Gartner TalentNeuron tool of the top 10 job listings offering six-figure salaries in the past year found heavy- and tractor-trailer truck drivers among software developers, sales managers and computer systems engineers. LinkedIn’s 2017 Salary Report found that even those early in their careers can make six figures, citing investment banking analysts and associate brand managers as having a median income of more than $100,000.

So how do you successfully get to six figures? Leading experts weigh in with their top tips.

1. Know your worth. Consult professional organizations, mentors in your industry and colleagues to find out the salary range for someone at your level so you have a solid foundation going into salary negotiations, Salemi said. She suggests practicing the conversation, role-playing with a friend, if you haven’t engaged in this type of negotiation for a while.

At the same time, Sherman cautioned against overvaluing yourself. “Even though it’s a competitive marketplace, some people have an inflated perception of their worth,” he said.

2. Don’t accept the first offer. Employers almost always have an additional $5,000 or $10,000 available, yet most job seekers, concerned about appearing ungrateful, just accept the first salary that’s put on the table, Cenedella said. Consider that as a starting point.

He suggests asking for more by using positive language and separating the negotiation from the role with phrasing like, “This would be a meaningful, wonderful step forward in my career. I’m thrilled about the position, and the only thing separating me from it is the matter of pay. I hope we can get that out of the way.”

He said you can engage in a few rounds of negotiating; don’t stop until the employer says, “This is our final offer.” Even if you’re happy with the first offer, don’t accept it, Salemi said. “It could be even higher, making you even happier.” She says there’s no harm in asking if there’s any possibility to increase the offer. If an employer can’t come through on salary, ask if there are other compensation opportunities, like a signing bonus.

3. Give a reason for asking for more. Perhaps the job requires more travel, taking up more of your time and resulting in more childcare expenses, or is in a new location with a higher cost of living. Cenedella says providing a rationale for the increase “always helps these negotiations.”

4. Clearly communicate your expectations. Let the employer know the critical factors that would encourage you to consider a role outside the one you’re in. That helps the company tailor an offer to you, said Amy Schultz, director of product recruiting at LinkedIn. Dr. Steven Lindner, an industrial organizational psychologist with The WorkPlace Group in Florham Park, New Jersey, who has handled many six-figure job offers over the past 20 years, said it’s important for candidates to think through what they really need to feel good about doing the job.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-06  Authors: julie halpert, rubberball productions, brand x pictures, getty images, -marc cenedella, founder, ceo of ladders, a leading professional career site
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sixfigure, jobs, negotiation, job, ways, helps, salary, pro, negotiate, higher, dont, employer, offer


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Heitkamp unleashes six-figure TV ad against Cramer as midterms loom

“Mr. Cramer, that trade war is costing my family a lot of money and you don’t seem to care,” Linderman says. The six-figure ad is expected to run statewide for the next several weeks on TV and digital platforms. In an interview in July with KVRR, a television station in North Dakota, Cramer said that he believed the only way to get through a trade war is to win. “Some people are saying we need to get out of this trade war. There’s only one thing to do in a trade war and that is win it,” Cramer s


“Mr. Cramer, that trade war is costing my family a lot of money and you don’t seem to care,” Linderman says. The six-figure ad is expected to run statewide for the next several weeks on TV and digital platforms. In an interview in July with KVRR, a television station in North Dakota, Cramer said that he believed the only way to get through a trade war is to win. “Some people are saying we need to get out of this trade war. There’s only one thing to do in a trade war and that is win it,” Cramer s
Heitkamp unleashes six-figure TV ad against Cramer as midterms loom Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-13  Authors: brian schwartz, tom williams, cq-roll call group, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, loom, trade, tariffs, billion, tv, heitkamp, think, sixfigure, war, trump, ad, republican, midterms, cramer, president, unleashes


Heitkamp unleashes six-figure TV ad against Cramer as midterms loom

With just under two months to go until the congressional midterm elections, Democratic North Dakota Sen. Heidi Heitkamp is not backing down to her Republican opponent U.S. Rep. Kevin Cramer and is fighting back with a new television attack ad claiming the veteran congressman does not care about the impacts of a trade war on farmers.

In the 30-second TV spot first provided to CNBC, a farmer named Charles Linderman calls out Cramer, saying he doesn’t seem to care about the cost of the tariffs being implemented by President Donald Trump.

“Mr. Cramer, that trade war is costing my family a lot of money and you don’t seem to care,” Linderman says.

The six-figure ad is expected to run statewide for the next several weeks on TV and digital platforms.

In an exclusive interview with CNBC on Thursday, Heitkamp described Cramer as a lackey for the president and said she would not be changing her methods of, at times, opposing Trump if she were re-elected.

“I think his audience is an audience of one and I think that’s the president. I don’t give my vote 100 percent of the time to anyone, unlike this guy,” Heitkamp said in reference to her opponent. “I’m going to support him [Trump] when he’s right and I’m going to oppose when he’s hurting the state.”

Trump’s tariffs on more than $50 billion of Chinese imports have led to retaliatory measures equal to $34 billion worth of American farm products such as soybeans, corn, wheat and cotton, among others.

The tariffs have negatively impacted people in her state, she argues, and added that the worst may be yet to come.

“I think the first thing when you look at trade, you haven’t seen the full impact. Fundamentally everyone had hoped by this time there would have been an agreement that we would have returned to shipping soybeans to China,” she said. “That hasn’t happened. As time goes on and you scratch the surface, people are getting more angry.”

The president also has threatened to move ahead with another round of tariffs worth more than $200 billion on various Chinese products.

Still, throughout his campaign, Cramer has continued to back Trump’s battles with China even though many of his constituents are some of the farmers getting hurt by the trade dispute.

In an interview in July with KVRR, a television station in North Dakota, Cramer said that he believed the only way to get through a trade war is to win.

“Some people are saying we need to get out of this trade war. There’s only one thing to do in a trade war and that is win it,” Cramer said at the time, according to KVRR’s transcript of the interview. “It would be a lot easier for Donald Trump to win the trade war if the people who are supposed to be on his side would get behind him rather than fighting with him,” he added.

Voters though have not shied away from supporting Cramer, even with his apparent need to show that he will follow the lead of the president if he were to knock out Heitkamp.

The latest Real Clear Politics average has the Republican congressman edging Heitkamp by just under 2 points. The state is marked as a toss-up by the nonpartisan Larry Sabato’s Crystal Ball.

Cramer’s campaign has also been given a boost by a plethora of outside spending groups looking to help flip Heitkamp’s seat.

The Republican Jewish Coalition, a powerful nonprofit lobbying group that pushes for bettering U.S.-Israel relations, just spent more than $800,000 against Heitkamp, according to new Federal Election Commission filings. The National Republican Senatorial Committee, a group dedicating to helping Republicans get elected to the Senate has spent approximately $1 million in opposing Heitkamp, records show.

On the other hand, Cramer’s attempts to side with Trump on enacting trade blockades have cost him the support of other external groups such as the political network funded by billionaire industrialist Charles Koch.

Americans for Prosperity, the nonprofit organization linked to the Koch network, announced in July at its donor summit in Colorado Springs, Colorado, that it will not be supporting Cramer’s bid for Senate.

Before the gathering, the group published a digital ad thanking Heitkamp for co-sponsoring the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief and Consumer Protection Act, a bill that rolls back Dodd-Frank regulations mainly on community banks, or those with less than $100 billion in assets.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-13  Authors: brian schwartz, tom williams, cq-roll call group, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, loom, trade, tariffs, billion, tv, heitkamp, think, sixfigure, war, trump, ad, republican, midterms, cramer, president, unleashes


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The 15 companies with the most $100,000 job opportunities in New York

If you want to live comfortably in the Big City, you’re going to need a big paycheck. Job site Ladders analyzed thousands of opportunities across the United States and found that New York had the second highest number of six-figure jobs. Ladders further analyzed its database in order to compile a list of companies with the most openings New York and surrounding areas that pay over $100,000 and found that 15 companies stand out. Several international companies seem to be offering high salaries fo


If you want to live comfortably in the Big City, you’re going to need a big paycheck. Job site Ladders analyzed thousands of opportunities across the United States and found that New York had the second highest number of six-figure jobs. Ladders further analyzed its database in order to compile a list of companies with the most openings New York and surrounding areas that pay over $100,000 and found that 15 companies stand out. Several international companies seem to be offering high salaries fo
The 15 companies with the most $100,000 job opportunities in New York Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-30  Authors: abigail hess, getty images, chris ratcliffe, bloomberg, scott mlyn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 15, need, million, big, city, order, 100000, companies, opportunities, analyzed, york, job, sixfigure


The 15 companies with the most $100,000 job opportunities in New York

If you want to live comfortably in the Big City, you’re going to need a big paycheck.

According to a report from SmartAsset, workers need to make $164,614 a year in order to afford a two-bedroom apartment in New York. Real-estate website Zillow estimates that it costs between $1.7 million and $1 million to buy a home in Manhattan and that the median rental price is $3,450.

Fortunately, New York offers some of the highest-paying jobs in the country. Job site Ladders analyzed thousands of opportunities across the United States and found that New York had the second highest number of six-figure jobs.

Ladders further analyzed its database in order to compile a list of companies with the most openings New York and surrounding areas that pay over $100,000 and found that 15 companies stand out. But just because these companies are hiring in New York doesn’t mean they are headquartered there. Several international companies seem to be offering high salaries for people who can work from new New York.

Here are the employers with the most six-figure opportunities in the City That Never Sleeps.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-30  Authors: abigail hess, getty images, chris ratcliffe, bloomberg, scott mlyn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 15, need, million, big, city, order, 100000, companies, opportunities, analyzed, york, job, sixfigure


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Billionaire Peter Thiel gives first six-figure donation of the midterm campaign cycle to the RNC

Venture capitalist and Republican megadonor Peter Thiel has made his first six-figure splash in the 2018 midterm election cycle, according to newly posted Federal Election Commission records. The RNC saw Thiel, a billionaire philanthropist who has been conspicuously silent throughout the runup to the congressional midterm elections, give $101,700 to its cause in July. It is the biggest amount he has donated to a political cause since the 2016 presidential election, according to records. The RNC


Venture capitalist and Republican megadonor Peter Thiel has made his first six-figure splash in the 2018 midterm election cycle, according to newly posted Federal Election Commission records. The RNC saw Thiel, a billionaire philanthropist who has been conspicuously silent throughout the runup to the congressional midterm elections, give $101,700 to its cause in July. It is the biggest amount he has donated to a political cause since the 2016 presidential election, according to records. The RNC
Billionaire Peter Thiel gives first six-figure donation of the midterm campaign cycle to the RNC Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-29  Authors: brian schwartz, adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cycle, thiel, donation, billionaire, republican, president, trump, gop, sixfigure, election, midterm, gives, campaign, rnc, peter, political, super


Billionaire Peter Thiel gives first six-figure donation of the midterm campaign cycle to the RNC

Venture capitalist and Republican megadonor Peter Thiel has made his first six-figure splash in the 2018 midterm election cycle, according to newly posted Federal Election Commission records.

The RNC saw Thiel, a billionaire philanthropist who has been conspicuously silent throughout the runup to the congressional midterm elections, give $101,700 to its cause in July. It is the biggest amount he has donated to a political cause since the 2016 presidential election, according to records.

He had previously made a donation of more than $66,000 in September 2017 to the National Republican Congressional Committee, which works to elect GOP members of Congress.

In the lead-up to Thiel’s latest donation, allies of PresidentDonald Trump were concerned that the PayPal co-founder and early Facebook investor would be absent in this year’s midterms after he was given a cold shoulder by some members of the administration.

However, Trump-aligned super PACs such as America First Action have been preparing to court Thiel in an effort to bring him into the fray.

The RNC raised $14.2 million throughout the month of July, bringing its total haul for the 2018 election cycle to $227 million.

Representatives for Thiel and the RNC did not return a request for comment.

Thiel’s donation is an indication that his loyalty to Trump could be a saving grace for the GOP as it tries to maintain majorities in the House and Senate.

The PayPal co-founder was one of Trump’s earliest supporters when he first ran for the White House two years ago.

At the time, he gave $1 million to Make America Number 1, a pro-Trump super PAC chaired by GOP conservative megadonor Rebekah Mercer. He also shelled out $250,000 to Trump Victory, a joint fundraising committee, and just over $230,000 to the RNC. He also was a featured speaker at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

Thiel again voiced his respect for Trump on Monday during an event in Sao Paulo, Brazil. He told the crowd that he admires the president because he doesn’t follow the typical political playbook.

“I got to meet a lot of people running for president on the U.S. Republican side in 2016 and they all felt like zombies,” he said. “They couldn’t say anything different other than programmed ideological soundbites.”

Trump, on the other hand, is “a very healthy corrective to that,” Thiel added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-29  Authors: brian schwartz, adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cycle, thiel, donation, billionaire, republican, president, trump, gop, sixfigure, election, midterm, gives, campaign, rnc, peter, political, super


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6 ways to get rich without earning a six-figure salary

Time is on your side when you’re young. If you start at age 23, for instance, you only have to save about $14 a day to be a millionaire by age 67. If you start at age 35, on the other hand, you’d have to set aside $30 a day to reach seven figure status by age 67. You can even build a multi-million dollar portfolio on a modest salary if you start young. Check out how much you have to save per paycheck to have $2 million stashed away by the time you’re 67.


Time is on your side when you’re young. If you start at age 23, for instance, you only have to save about $14 a day to be a millionaire by age 67. If you start at age 35, on the other hand, you’d have to set aside $30 a day to reach seven figure status by age 67. You can even build a multi-million dollar portfolio on a modest salary if you start young. Check out how much you have to save per paycheck to have $2 million stashed away by the time you’re 67.
6 ways to get rich without earning a six-figure salary Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-21  Authors: kathleen elkins, gonzalo marroquin, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, start, 67, youd, salary, young, youll, age, reach, ways, day, youre, sixfigure, earning, rich, save


6 ways to get rich without earning a six-figure salary

Time is on your side when you’re young. The sooner you start putting your money to work, the less you’ll have to save each month to reach your goals, thanks to the power of compound interest.

If you start at age 23, for instance, you only have to save about $14 a day to be a millionaire by age 67. That’s assuming a six percent average annual investment return.

If you start at age 35, on the other hand, you’d have to set aside $30 a day to reach seven figure status by age 67.

You can even build a multi-million dollar portfolio on a modest salary if you start young. Check out how much you have to save per paycheck to have $2 million stashed away by the time you’re 67.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-21  Authors: kathleen elkins, gonzalo marroquin, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, start, 67, youd, salary, young, youll, age, reach, ways, day, youre, sixfigure, earning, rich, save


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Koch network takes on Trump’s tariffs with six-figure ad buy

The political network funded by billionaire industrialist Charles Koch is unveiling the latest phase in a multi million dollar campaign against import tariffs implemented by President Donald Trump, CNBC has learned. The news was announced on the second day of the Koch network donor summit in Colorado Springs. “American farmers work hard to put food on our tables but because of new tariffs our farmers livelihoods are at risks,” the ad states. Trump recently announced import tariffs on a variety o


The political network funded by billionaire industrialist Charles Koch is unveiling the latest phase in a multi million dollar campaign against import tariffs implemented by President Donald Trump, CNBC has learned. The news was announced on the second day of the Koch network donor summit in Colorado Springs. “American farmers work hard to put food on our tables but because of new tariffs our farmers livelihoods are at risks,” the ad states. Trump recently announced import tariffs on a variety o
Koch network takes on Trump’s tariffs with six-figure ad buy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-07-29  Authors: brian schwartz, joshua roberts
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, announced, farmers, sixfigure, network, koch, ad, takes, trade, partners, groups, tariffs, letter, trumps, buy


Koch network takes on Trump’s tariffs with six-figure ad buy

The political network funded by billionaire industrialist Charles Koch is unveiling the latest phase in a multi million dollar campaign against import tariffs implemented by President Donald Trump, CNBC has learned.

Freedom Partners, one of the groups that is part of the larger network, is announcing a six-figure television ad campaign entitled “Trade not aid,” which describes that importance of trade and the harm tariffs have on the farming community. The news was announced on the second day of the Koch network donor summit in Colorado Springs.

Beyond the ad’s attempt to highlight the vital role of the agricultural sector, it also questions Trump’s recently announced $12 billion aid package to help farmers.

“American farmers work hard to put food on our tables but because of new tariffs our farmers livelihoods are at risks,” the ad states. It later concludes by saying: “Farmers want trade, not aid.”

Trump recently announced import tariffs on a variety of goods coming from China, the European Union, Canada and Mexico. Many of those critical trading partners have retaliated with billions of dollars’ worth of trade barriers of their own against exports coming out of the United States.

In addition, Freedom Partners, along with two other network organizations in Americans for Prosperity and The LIBRE Initiative, sent a letter to Trump. The groups called on him to rejoin the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), while congratulating the administration’s economic policy achievements of tax reform, reducing financial regulations and inching toward an agreement with EU President Jean-Claude Juncker about removing the tariffs.

The groups argued, however, that if the U.S. doesn’t agree to go back into the TPP, the 11 other original countries who are still part of it will forge ahead with their rebranded Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP). Such a move could put American businesses at a disadvantage, it added.

“As a practical matter, once the CPTPP is in full effect American businesses will be at a distinct competitive disadvantage when trying to sell in these markets and our consumers will miss out on lower-priced goods,” the letter stated.

The new ad buy and letter to the president comes the same day as Koch admitted in a rare press briefing that a full blown trade war could be on the horizon.

“If it’s severe enough it could,” Koch said when asked about whether Trump’s protectionist policies could result in a trade war.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-07-29  Authors: brian schwartz, joshua roberts
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, announced, farmers, sixfigure, network, koch, ad, takes, trade, partners, groups, tariffs, letter, trumps, buy


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Rodney Williams: From six-figure Procter & Gamble gig to CEO of LISNR

In August 2012, Williams left P&G to work full-time on Lisnr and the first version of the product launched in March 2013. At the end of 2013, facing a cash shortfall, Williams started paying the salaries of his 12-member team with savings he had collected from his time working at P&G. And at the end of 2013, getting into 2014, we had a monetary delay,” Williams tells CNBC Make It. Both Williams and Glick did not take a salary during that time (Ostoich was not yet full time) and Williams’ co-foun


In August 2012, Williams left P&G to work full-time on Lisnr and the first version of the product launched in March 2013. At the end of 2013, facing a cash shortfall, Williams started paying the salaries of his 12-member team with savings he had collected from his time working at P&G. And at the end of 2013, getting into 2014, we had a monetary delay,” Williams tells CNBC Make It. Both Williams and Glick did not take a salary during that time (Ostoich was not yet full time) and Williams’ co-foun
Rodney Williams: From six-figure Procter & Gamble gig to CEO of LISNR Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-29  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, sixfigure, gig, rodney, knew, going, debt, think, lisnr, paying, savings, ceo, procter, team, delay, gamble, williams


Rodney Williams: From six-figure Procter & Gamble gig to CEO of LISNR

In August 2012, Williams left P&G to work full-time on Lisnr and the first version of the product launched in March 2013.

Lisnr raised $850,000 in seed funding in the summer of 2013 according to public fundraising database Crunchbase, but it barely carried the company to its next round of funding. At the end of 2013, facing a cash shortfall, Williams started paying the salaries of his 12-member team with savings he had collected from his time working at P&G. At the time, he says, he was paying north of $30,000 a month in payroll.

“As a start-up, as a technology company, as an entrepreneur … there comes a point in time where the success that you know is coming is delayed. And sometimes that delay is a monetary delay. And at the end of 2013, getting into 2014, we had a monetary delay,” Williams tells CNBC Make It. “I knew that we had revenue coming in; I knew that we were going to hit milestones, that were going to make this company extremely attractive to series A investors. But I knew there was a three- to four-month gap.”

So Williams stepped up.

“I kind of stayed home that Christmas [2013]. And I emptied the bank account. And I emptied the credit cards. And I just think it’s one of those tales that all entrepreneurs and founders have, where you’re going to go out and believe in this project or company so wholeheartedly that you should risk it all,” he says.

Both Williams and Glick did not take a salary during that time (Ostoich was not yet full time) and Williams’ co-founders paid for other business expenses. “It was a team effort,” Williams says.

As for whether paying the salaries put him in debt? “Definitely. Definitely I was in debt. I was in debt. I had depleted my savings, I depleted my — I didn’t pay myself: I was behind on my bills, I maxed out every credit card that I could,” says Williams. He was “close to 100,000″ dollars in debt, he says.

“And yeah, you know, you took a risk,” he says. “It could have ended up really, really bad, right?”

But Williams had a reason to be hopeful. “I do also remember in those three to four months we actually closed over a half a million dollars worth of contracts, so I knew we were going to get funded. The business was still growing,” says Williams. It’s typical that a big client pays 90 days after a product is delivered, says Williams. “I think all founders, all entrepreneurs go through that. … That’s just a part of believing in something that no one else does.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-29  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, sixfigure, gig, rodney, knew, going, debt, think, lisnr, paying, savings, ceo, procter, team, delay, gamble, williams


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Koch network attacks Senators who voted against spending cuts

Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota, Joe Donnelly of Indiana, Claire McCaskill of Missouri, Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin and Montana’s Jon Tester. The campaign will also admonish the two Republicans who voted against the proposal but are not up for re-election this year — Sens. “Freezing discretionary spending for FY2019 would be a down payment toward solving our larger spending problem,” the goup’s chief of government affairs, Brent Gardner, said in the letter. It’s the latest move by the Koch network


Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota, Joe Donnelly of Indiana, Claire McCaskill of Missouri, Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin and Montana’s Jon Tester. The campaign will also admonish the two Republicans who voted against the proposal but are not up for re-election this year — Sens. “Freezing discretionary spending for FY2019 would be a down payment toward solving our larger spending problem,” the goup’s chief of government affairs, Brent Gardner, said in the letter. It’s the latest move by the Koch network
Koch network attacks Senators who voted against spending cuts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-27  Authors: brian schwartz, patrick t fallon, the washington post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sixfigure, koch, senators, network, voted, support, sens, bill, cuts, americans, attacks, prosperity, spending


Koch network attacks Senators who voted against spending cuts

Starting over Fourth of July weekend, the political network funded by billionaire industrialist Charles Koch is planning to release attack ads targeting seven senators who voted against President Donald Trump’s $15.4 billion spending cuts package

The six-figure digital, radio and direct mail ad blitz from Americans for Prosperity will focus its wrath on five vulnerable Democrats who are trying to maintain their seats in the midterms: Sens. Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota, Joe Donnelly of Indiana, Claire McCaskill of Missouri, Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin and Montana’s Jon Tester.

The campaign will also admonish the two Republicans who voted against the proposal but are not up for re-election this year — Sens. Richard Burr or North Carolina and Susan Collins of Maine.

Heitkamp, Donnelly and McCaskill are in races that are considered toss-ups by Larry Sabato’s Crystal Ball, while Baldwin and Tester are in states marked as leaning Democrat.

The bill failed to pass through the Senate by 50 to 48.

“The failure to cut less than a half a cent from every federal dollar spent is indicative of a rampant overspending problem that unfortunately often has bipartisan support, Americans for Prosperity spokesman Bill Riggs said in a statement. “If these senators couldn’t even bring themselves to cut a sliver of unspent or expired funds, how can anyone expect them to take on our larger fiscal challenges?”

Americans for Prosperity will also be sending a letter to the leaders of the House and Senate Appropriations Committees demanding a freeze on federal spending in 2019 by keeping costs at 2018 levels.

“Freezing discretionary spending for FY2019 would be a down payment toward solving our larger spending problem,” the goup’s chief of government affairs, Brent Gardner, said in the letter. “To fix the rest of the budget, comprehensive reforms must be made to mandatory spending, including Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid — these programs are the biggest drivers of spending over the next 10 and well beyond.”

It’s the latest move by the Koch network to go after lawmakers from both parties for not backing free market initiatives or to sometimes reward those who do.

On Monday, Freedom Partners, an organization that’s part of the Koch political network, launched a six-figure television and radio ad campaign that rages against the import tariffs being implemented by Trump.

Earlier this month, Americans for Prosperity published digital ads thanking Heitkamp for co-sponsoring the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief and Consumer Protect Act, which rolls back Dodd-Frank regulations mainly on community banks or those with less than $100 billion in assets.

The bill recently passed in Congress with bipartisan support.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-27  Authors: brian schwartz, patrick t fallon, the washington post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sixfigure, koch, senators, network, voted, support, sens, bill, cuts, americans, attacks, prosperity, spending


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