France’s Macron announces tax cuts, wage increases after violent protests

President Emmanuel Macron on Monday announced wage rises for the poorest workers and tax cuts for pensioners, offering concessions after weeks of often violent protests that have challenged his authority. “We want a France where one can live in dignity through one’s work and on this we have gone too slowly,” Macron said on primetime television. He said people on the minimum wage would see their salaries increase by 100 euros a month from 2019 without extra costs to employers. Pensioners earning


President Emmanuel Macron on Monday announced wage rises for the poorest workers and tax cuts for pensioners, offering concessions after weeks of often violent protests that have challenged his authority. “We want a France where one can live in dignity through one’s work and on this we have gone too slowly,” Macron said on primetime television. He said people on the minimum wage would see their salaries increase by 100 euros a month from 2019 without extra costs to employers. Pensioners earning
France’s Macron announces tax cuts, wage increases after violent protests Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: guillaume souvant, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wage, workers, macron, increases, tax, cuts, taxes, street, protests, spending, social, announces, increase, france, pensioners, frances, violent


France's Macron announces tax cuts, wage increases after violent protests

President Emmanuel Macron on Monday announced wage rises for the poorest workers and tax cuts for pensioners, offering concessions after weeks of often violent protests that have challenged his authority.

In his first national address following two weekends of the worst unrest in France in years, Macron sought to restore calm after accusations that his political methods and economic policies were fracturing the country.

“We want a France where one can live in dignity through one’s work and on this we have gone too slowly,” Macron said on primetime television.

“I ask the government and parliament to do what is necessary.”

The president’s address came 48 hours after protesters fought street battles with riot police in Paris, hurling missiles, torching cars and looting shops.

Macron faces a delicate task: he needs to persuade the middle class and blue-collar workers that he hears their anger over a squeeze on household spending, without being exposed to charges of caving in to street politics.

He said people on the minimum wage would see their salaries increase by 100 euros a month from 2019 without extra costs to employers. Pensioners earning less than 2,000 euros would see recent increase in social security taxes scrapped.

But he also said he would stick to his reform agenda and refused to reinstate a wealth tax.

“We will respond to the economic and social urgency with strong measures, by cutting taxes more rapidly, by keeping our spending under control, but not with U-turns,” Macron said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: guillaume souvant, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wage, workers, macron, increases, tax, cuts, taxes, street, protests, spending, social, announces, increase, france, pensioners, frances, violent


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Facebook ramps up ad transparency ahead of India’s 2019 general elections

Advertisers in India who want to run political ads on Facebook will need to confirm their identity and location to prevent abuse of the system ahead of the 2019 general elections, the social networking site said. As the world’s largest democracy heads to polls next year for its general elections, Facebook announced Thursday that the new transparency measures were aimed at defending any possible foreign interference in the polls. Advertisers seeking to run ads related to Indian politics will have


Advertisers in India who want to run political ads on Facebook will need to confirm their identity and location to prevent abuse of the system ahead of the 2019 general elections, the social networking site said. As the world’s largest democracy heads to polls next year for its general elections, Facebook announced Thursday that the new transparency measures were aimed at defending any possible foreign interference in the polls. Advertisers seeking to run ads related to Indian politics will have
Facebook ramps up ad transparency ahead of India’s 2019 general elections Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: harini v, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, identity, ads, indias, ad, social, run, transparency, location, ramps, general, interference, facebook, ahead, elections, 2019, political


Facebook ramps up ad transparency ahead of India's 2019 general elections

Advertisers in India who want to run political ads on Facebook will need to confirm their identity and location to prevent abuse of the system ahead of the 2019 general elections, the social networking site said.

As the world’s largest democracy heads to polls next year for its general elections, Facebook announced Thursday that the new transparency measures were aimed at defending any possible foreign interference in the polls.

Advertisers seeking to run ads related to Indian politics will have to use their devices to submit proof of identity and location. This confirmation process might take a few weeks, the social media firm said.

“It’s important that people know more about the ads they see — especially those that reference political figures, political parties, elections, and legislation. That’s why we’re making big changes to the way we manage these ads on Facebook and Instagram,” Facebook said. “By authorizing advertisers and bringing more transparency to ads, we can better defend against foreign interference in India’s elections.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: harini v, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, identity, ads, indias, ad, social, run, transparency, location, ramps, general, interference, facebook, ahead, elections, 2019, political


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Google shutting down social network sooner because of new security bug

Google is shutting down its beleaguered social network sooner than expected in the wake of a new security issue that affected 52.5 million users. Google Plus received its initial kiss of death in early October, when the company revealed that a security bug had exposed the account information of 500,000 users, including their names, email addresses and occupations. At the time, Google planned to shut down the social network by August 2019. However, it now plans to shut down Google Plus by April 2


Google is shutting down its beleaguered social network sooner than expected in the wake of a new security issue that affected 52.5 million users. Google Plus received its initial kiss of death in early October, when the company revealed that a security bug had exposed the account information of 500,000 users, including their names, email addresses and occupations. At the time, Google planned to shut down the social network by August 2019. However, it now plans to shut down Google Plus by April 2
Google shutting down social network sooner because of new security bug Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: jillian donfro, sean gallup, getty images, cnbc, jeniece pettitt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, security, shut, google, bug, plus, network, shutting, set, data, users, sooner, information, social


Google shutting down social network sooner because of new security bug

Google is shutting down its beleaguered social network sooner than expected in the wake of a new security issue that affected 52.5 million users.

Google Plus received its initial kiss of death in early October, when the company revealed that a security bug had exposed the account information of 500,000 users, including their names, email addresses and occupations. At the time, Google planned to shut down the social network by August 2019.

But in a blog post Monday Google wrote that it discovered a second bug that allowed the profile information of 52.5 million users to be viewable by developers, even if the profiles were set to private, using one of Google’s application programming interfaces, or APIs, for six days in November. Once again, the available data included information like users’ names, email addresses, occupations and ages.

Google said that the bug did not give third-party apps access to users’ financial data or passwords and that it didn’t find any evidence that the private profile information was accessed or misused. However, it now plans to shut down Google Plus by April 2019, and access to its APIs in the next 90 days.

Google’s initial security bug raised hackles in Washington and with the general public because The Wall Street Journal reported at the time that Google didn’t disclose it for months because it feared regulatory scrutiny and reputational damage.

Monday’s disclosure comes a day before Google CEO Sundar Pichai is set to testify before Congress about transparency and accountability.

“We understand that our ability to build reliable products that protect your data drives user trust,” Google’s blog post said.

“We have always taken this seriously, and we continue to invest in our privacy programs to refine internal privacy review processes, create powerful data controls, and engage with users, researchers, and policymakers to get their feedback and improve our programs.”

The enterprise version of Google Plus will remain active.

WATCH:Meet the man behind Google Assistant’s personality – Ryan Germick


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: jillian donfro, sean gallup, getty images, cnbc, jeniece pettitt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, security, shut, google, bug, plus, network, shutting, set, data, users, sooner, information, social


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Facebook emails show EU must toughen regulation on social media ‘monopoly,’ lawmaker says

A European lawmaker has called for updated regulation on Facebook and other social networks after a trove of revelatory emails was released by the British Parliament. Internal documents made public Wednesday by Britain’s digital, culture, media and sport committee showed senior executives at Facebook — including CEO Mark Zuckerberg — discussing the prospect of charging developers for access to user data and shutting off competitor Vine’s access to the data. Claude Moraes, a member of the Europea


A European lawmaker has called for updated regulation on Facebook and other social networks after a trove of revelatory emails was released by the British Parliament. Internal documents made public Wednesday by Britain’s digital, culture, media and sport committee showed senior executives at Facebook — including CEO Mark Zuckerberg — discussing the prospect of charging developers for access to user data and shutting off competitor Vine’s access to the data. Claude Moraes, a member of the Europea
Facebook emails show EU must toughen regulation on social media ‘monopoly,’ lawmaker says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-07  Authors: ryan browne, john thys, afp, getty images, sopa images, contributor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, media, lawmaker, european, elections, regulation, eu, parliament, toughen, democracy, emails, online, facebook, social, data, monopoly, moraes


Facebook emails show EU must toughen regulation on social media 'monopoly,' lawmaker says

A European lawmaker has called for updated regulation on Facebook and other social networks after a trove of revelatory emails was released by the British Parliament.

Internal documents made public Wednesday by Britain’s digital, culture, media and sport committee showed senior executives at Facebook — including CEO Mark Zuckerberg — discussing the prospect of charging developers for access to user data and shutting off competitor Vine’s access to the data.

Claude Moraes, a member of the European Parliament representing the U.K.’s Labour party, said in response to the news that the European Commission, the executive arm of the European Union, should revamp its competition rules to probe the “possible monopoly” of social media giants and to “audit the advertising industry on social media.”

“In the European Parliament, we have repeatedly raised concerns about the manipulation of online data and have made clear that competition law is crucial to make sure that the dominant players are accountable and that democracy is protected from excessive market power,” Moraes told CNBC in an emailed statement Thursday.

He added: “Facebook is now on notice that we cannot continue to undermine the trust citizens place, not only in our online platforms, but our democracy itself. Action must be taken to protect our elections and citizens’ right to private life, and if Facebook doesn’t like it then they should know that we don’t like interference and disruption of our elections either.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-07  Authors: ryan browne, john thys, afp, getty images, sopa images, contributor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, media, lawmaker, european, elections, regulation, eu, parliament, toughen, democracy, emails, online, facebook, social, data, monopoly, moraes


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Google shutting down Allo

Google plans to kill chat app Allo by the middle of next year, the company said in a blog post, confirming a report earlier on Wednesday about the product’s imminent demise. Despite owning the world’s dominant smartphone operating system in Android, Google has never been able to create a chat experience to rival Apple’s iMessage or Facebook’s Messenger and WhatsApp. Meanwhile, Google will focus fully on the development of Messages, its other chat app for Android phones. That initiative was the b


Google plans to kill chat app Allo by the middle of next year, the company said in a blog post, confirming a report earlier on Wednesday about the product’s imminent demise. Despite owning the world’s dominant smartphone operating system in Android, Google has never been able to create a chat experience to rival Apple’s iMessage or Facebook’s Messenger and WhatsApp. Meanwhile, Google will focus fully on the development of Messages, its other chat app for Android phones. That initiative was the b
Google shutting down Allo Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-06  Authors: jillian donfro, stephen lam
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, social, yeargoogle, google, products, earlier, android, allo, apps, users, chat, shutting, work


Google shutting down Allo

Google plans to kill chat app Allo by the middle of next year, the company said in a blog post, confirming a report earlier on Wednesday about the product’s imminent demise.

Despite owning the world’s dominant smartphone operating system in Android, Google has never been able to create a chat experience to rival Apple’s iMessage or Facebook’s Messenger and WhatsApp.

Allo, which launched two years ago to much fanfare, will only work until March 2019, at which point users will have to download any conversations they want to save. Meanwhile, Google will focus fully on the development of Messages, its other chat app for Android phones. Earlier this year, Google announced that it was working with mobile carriers on a new Rich Communication Services (RCS) standard, an upgrade to classic SMS texting, to make messaging work better across Android devices, and bring users features like read receipts and seamless group chats.

That initiative was the beginning of the end for Allo, which saw its product lead defect to Facebook earlier this year.

Google also said in its blog post that it plans to support another one of its chat apps, Hangouts, until it makes two of its enterprise apps, Hangouts Chat and Meet, available for non-paying users.

A Google employee tweeted earlier on Thursday that Meet and Chat would launch for regular consumers next year:

Google has long had a complicated, messy strategy when it comes to chat apps, and has axed a laundry list of communication products, including the original GChat, the social network Buzz, and the collaboration tool Wave. Earlier this year, it announced it was shutting down its social network Google Plus after it discovered a security bug that left private profile data exposed.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-06  Authors: jillian donfro, stephen lam
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, social, yeargoogle, google, products, earlier, android, allo, apps, users, chat, shutting, work


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Social media detox: What it is like to quit Instagram and Facebook

Social media detox — why quitting Instagram and Facebook made me happier9 Hours AgoCNBC technology reporter Christina Farr deleted Facebook and Instagram from her phone in August, and hasn’t checked either app since. Here’s how her social media detox has improved her life.


Social media detox — why quitting Instagram and Facebook made me happier9 Hours AgoCNBC technology reporter Christina Farr deleted Facebook and Instagram from her phone in August, and hasn’t checked either app since. Here’s how her social media detox has improved her life.
Social media detox: What it is like to quit Instagram and Facebook Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-04  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, social, technology, life, phone, facebook, reporter, instagram, detox, quitting, quit, media


Social media detox: What it is like to quit Instagram and Facebook

Social media detox — why quitting Instagram and Facebook made me happier

9 Hours Ago

CNBC technology reporter Christina Farr deleted Facebook and Instagram from her phone in August, and hasn’t checked either app since. Here’s how her social media detox has improved her life.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-04  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, social, technology, life, phone, facebook, reporter, instagram, detox, quitting, quit, media


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Social media detox: Christina Farr quits Instagram, Facebook

The first time I truly took a break from social media was in 2015, at a summer camp for burned-out adults called “Camp Grounded.” I recall arguing with friends about whether our experience was essentially a PG version of Burning Man, or a harbinger of something bigger, a growing discontent among millennials with social media. At that time, social media companies seemed unstoppable, a daily part of life. Instagram and Facebook were a habit that very few people questioned, with a few notable excep


The first time I truly took a break from social media was in 2015, at a summer camp for burned-out adults called “Camp Grounded.” I recall arguing with friends about whether our experience was essentially a PG version of Burning Man, or a harbinger of something bigger, a growing discontent among millennials with social media. At that time, social media companies seemed unstoppable, a daily part of life. Instagram and Facebook were a habit that very few people questioned, with a few notable excep
Social media detox: Christina Farr quits Instagram, Facebook Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-01  Authors: christina farr, chris michel
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, media, starting, facebook, instagram, farr, christina, companies, friends, camp, growing, reports, quits, social, detox


Social media detox: Christina Farr quits Instagram, Facebook

The first time I truly took a break from social media was in 2015, at a summer camp for burned-out adults called “Camp Grounded.”

There were three rules: Take a camp name of your choosing, like Luna or Huckleberry, avoid talking about “W,” meaning work, and ditch all electronics at the door. At an arrival ceremony deep in the California Redwoods, volunteers in hazmat suits zipped up our devices into brown bags, leaving them locked away in a so-called “Robot Decontamination Area.”

That might seem extreme, a total gimmick.

But it prompted some deep discussion among my campmates. I recall arguing with friends about whether our experience was essentially a PG version of Burning Man, or a harbinger of something bigger, a growing discontent among millennials with social media.

At that time, social media companies seemed unstoppable, a daily part of life. Instagram and Facebook were a habit that very few people questioned, with a few notable exceptions. I had well-meaning friends who worked at these companies who believed with an almost cult-like fervor in the positive impact of bringing the world closer together.

That’s all starting to change.

Social media companies, most notably Facebook, have faced a reckoning in the past year, with reports surfacing about an infiltration of Russian propaganda to influence elections, misuse user data, and countless other examples of the platform being used for ill.

As a society, we’re starting to lose faith in our technology icons, especially in light of the questionable decisions made by the once-beloved Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, and reports about early Facebook employees who got rich and now have the luxury of preventing their own kids from using social media.

#DeleteFacebook, once unthinkable, is now a very real trend. And it poses a growing threat to Facebook’s bottom line, and its future.

Against this backdrop, in August I made a big decision. I removed Facebook and Instagram apps off my phone, and logged out on the web. I didn’t get around to fully disabling or deleting them, as I wanted to see first how I’d respond to a month-long break. Baby steps, I told myself.

I haven’t been back, and I don’t really miss them at all.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-01  Authors: christina farr, chris michel
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, media, starting, facebook, instagram, farr, christina, companies, friends, camp, growing, reports, quits, social, detox


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Kids and screen time: What’s Healthy?

How much is too much when it comes to screen time for kids? Jon Fortt sits down with three experts to discuss, including NPR’s lead education blogger Anya Kamenetz; social media influencer and author Katherine Ormerod; and child and adolescent psychologist Dr. Richard Freed.


How much is too much when it comes to screen time for kids? Jon Fortt sits down with three experts to discuss, including NPR’s lead education blogger Anya Kamenetz; social media influencer and author Katherine Ormerod; and child and adolescent psychologist Dr. Richard Freed.
Kids and screen time: What’s Healthy? Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-30  Authors: jonathan kim, jon fortt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, social, psychologist, ormerod, nprs, kidsjon, richard, kids, healthy, media, whats, lead, sits, screen


Kids and screen time: What's Healthy?

How much is too much when it comes to screen time for kids?

Jon Fortt sits down with three experts to discuss, including NPR’s lead education blogger Anya Kamenetz; social media influencer and author Katherine Ormerod; and child and adolescent psychologist Dr. Richard Freed.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-30  Authors: jonathan kim, jon fortt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, social, psychologist, ormerod, nprs, kidsjon, richard, kids, healthy, media, whats, lead, sits, screen


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Even at $6, Snap’s stock still isn’t a bargain, Cramer warns: ‘It’s an ill-advised decision to buy’

Even at $6, Snap’s stock still isn’t a bargain, Cramer warns: ‘It’s an ill-advised decision to buy’3 Hours AgoJim Cramer says it’s “ill-advised” to buy shares of social media play Snap Inc. as the company’s revenue growth decelerates and daily active user numbers drop.


Even at $6, Snap’s stock still isn’t a bargain, Cramer warns: ‘It’s an ill-advised decision to buy’3 Hours AgoJim Cramer says it’s “ill-advised” to buy shares of social media play Snap Inc. as the company’s revenue growth decelerates and daily active user numbers drop.
Even at $6, Snap’s stock still isn’t a bargain, Cramer warns: ‘It’s an ill-advised decision to buy’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-30
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, revenue, stock, user, warns, cramer, snap, illadvised, snaps, bargain, decision, isnt, shares, buy, social


Even at $6, Snap's stock still isn't a bargain, Cramer warns: 'It's an ill-advised decision to buy'

Even at $6, Snap’s stock still isn’t a bargain, Cramer warns: ‘It’s an ill-advised decision to buy’

3 Hours Ago

Jim Cramer says it’s “ill-advised” to buy shares of social media play Snap Inc. as the company’s revenue growth decelerates and daily active user numbers drop.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-30
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, revenue, stock, user, warns, cramer, snap, illadvised, snaps, bargain, decision, isnt, shares, buy, social


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