Amazon is trying to soften its image as regulatory scrutiny of Big Tech grows

But rather than fiercely fighting every battle, Amazon looks like its ready to play nice. In March, Amazon dropped a policy that prevented merchants from offering lower prices on other websites following an investigation request by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.). Last month, the company scaled back some of its most aggressive promotion tactics after Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) And late last year Amazon raised its minimum wage to $15 following criticism of the company’s working conditions


But rather than fiercely fighting every battle, Amazon looks like its ready to play nice. In March, Amazon dropped a policy that prevented merchants from offering lower prices on other websites following an investigation request by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.). Last month, the company scaled back some of its most aggressive promotion tactics after Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) And late last year Amazon raised its minimum wage to $15 following criticism of the company’s working conditions
Amazon is trying to soften its image as regulatory scrutiny of Big Tech grows Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: eugene kim, brent lewis, denver post, getty images, david ryder
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, big, growing, tech, soften, sen, stores, scrutiny, amazon, trying, business, winatallcost, regulatory, image, following, working, looks, grows, company


Amazon is trying to soften its image as regulatory scrutiny of Big Tech grows

Amazon’s relentless pursuit of growth in retail, cloud computing, advertising and consumer devices has put the company squarely in the sights of Washington lawmakers who are concerned about Big Tech’s growing influence over consumers. But rather than fiercely fighting every battle, Amazon looks like its ready to play nice.

In March, Amazon dropped a policy that prevented merchants from offering lower prices on other websites following an investigation request by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.). Last month, the company scaled back some of its most aggressive promotion tactics after Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) called out abusive business practices. And late last year Amazon raised its minimum wage to $15 following criticism of the company’s working conditions by Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-VT).

Amazon also confirmed to CNBC that it would soon start accepting cash at the Amazon Go cashierless stores as a growing number of cities and states push for laws that require all stores to serve the unbanked. It’s all part of a strategy to be more likable at a time when tech companies are drawing heat for behavior that looks increasingly anti-competitive.

“I believe Amazon has made the connection between likability and immunity from regulation,” said NYU business professor Scott Galloway, author of “The Four: The Hidden DNA of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google.”

This is a different company from the vigorously defensive, win-at-all-cost Amazon we’re used to seeing.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: eugene kim, brent lewis, denver post, getty images, david ryder
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, big, growing, tech, soften, sen, stores, scrutiny, amazon, trying, business, winatallcost, regulatory, image, following, working, looks, grows, company


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Putin dilutes unpopular pension reform that has hurt his popularity

President Vladimir Putin told Russians on Wednesday he had decided to dilute unpopular draft legislation to reform the pension system which has hurt his own popularity, but said a shrinking workforce meant some kind of reform was necessary. “The demographic development and labor market trends and an objective analysis of the situation show that we can’t put this off any longer. But our decisions must be fair, balanced and absolutely take into account people’s interests,” said Putin. “That’s why


President Vladimir Putin told Russians on Wednesday he had decided to dilute unpopular draft legislation to reform the pension system which has hurt his own popularity, but said a shrinking workforce meant some kind of reform was necessary. “The demographic development and labor market trends and an objective analysis of the situation show that we can’t put this off any longer. But our decisions must be fair, balanced and absolutely take into account people’s interests,” said Putin. “That’s why
Putin dilutes unpopular pension reform that has hurt his popularity Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-29  Authors: jussi nukari, lehtikuva
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hurt, women, proposals, reform, pension, dilutes, unpopular, soften, age, putin, proposed, public, putins, retirement, popularity


Putin dilutes unpopular pension reform that has hurt his popularity

President Vladimir Putin told Russians on Wednesday he had decided to dilute unpopular draft legislation to reform the pension system which has hurt his own popularity, but said a shrinking workforce meant some kind of reform was necessary.

Addressing the nation on television, Putin said the retirement age for women should be raised by five years rather than the eight years proposed by the government, and made detailed proposals to soften other aspects of the legislation.

“The demographic development and labor market trends and an objective analysis of the situation show that we can’t put this off any longer. But our decisions must be fair, balanced and absolutely take into account people’s interests,” said Putin.

“That’s why I am proposing a raft of measures that will allow us to soften the decisions taken as much as possible.”

The original proposals, which envisaged raising the retirement age to 65 from 60 for men and to 63 from 55 for women, have pushed Putin’s own popularity down to its lowest level in more than four years and stirred protests.

Putin said the draft legislation going through the State Duma, the lower house of parliament, would be amended to reflect his own ideas in the near future.

He did not propose reducing the proposed age at which men will retire. Opinion polls showed that around 90 percent of the population opposed the original proposals and Putin’s political opponents, including opposition leader

Alexei Navalny, have tried to tap into public anger by organizing protests.

A court sentenced Navalny to 30 days in jail on Monday after convicting him of breaking public protest laws, a move he said was illegal and aimed at stopping him leading a rally against pension reform next month.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-29  Authors: jussi nukari, lehtikuva
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hurt, women, proposals, reform, pension, dilutes, unpopular, soften, age, putin, proposed, public, putins, retirement, popularity


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Under pressure to soften Brexit plans, Theresa May signals faster pace

European leaders told Prime Minister Theresa May on Thursday to soften some of her red lines on Brexit, warning her that time was running out to prevent Britain crashing out of the European Union without a deal. At an EU summit focused more on a crisis over migration than on Brexit, the region’s leaders expressed rising frustration over the lack of progress in the talks, just nine months before Britain is due to leave. “We did expect that we would make more progress, or any progress, at this sum


European leaders told Prime Minister Theresa May on Thursday to soften some of her red lines on Brexit, warning her that time was running out to prevent Britain crashing out of the European Union without a deal. At an EU summit focused more on a crisis over migration than on Brexit, the region’s leaders expressed rising frustration over the lack of progress in the talks, just nine months before Britain is due to leave. “We did expect that we would make more progress, or any progress, at this sum
Under pressure to soften Brexit plans, Theresa May signals faster pace Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-28  Authors: jack taylor, getty images, luke macgregor, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, leaders, faster, minister, plans, pressure, summit, red, theresa, prime, signals, progress, pace, talks, soften, told, brexit


Under pressure to soften Brexit plans, Theresa May signals faster pace

European leaders told Prime Minister Theresa May on Thursday to soften some of her red lines on Brexit, warning her that time was running out to prevent Britain crashing out of the European Union without a deal.

At an EU summit focused more on a crisis over migration than on Brexit, the region’s leaders expressed rising frustration over the lack of progress in the talks, just nine months before Britain is due to leave.

May has hesitated to spell out detailed plans for Britain’s departure from the EU because of divisions in her ruling Conservative Party and government over the terms of Britain’s biggest foreign policy shift in almost half a century.

“We did expect that we would make more progress, or any progress, at this summit in June … That hasn’t been,” Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar told reporters after arriving in Brussels.

“We, as 27 member states, are willing to be more flexible but, in order to be flexible, the United Kingdom needs to soften some of its red lines.”

His comments that Ireland would prepare ports and airports for a so-called “no deal” Brexit sent the euro lower against the dollar, and increased pressure on the British leader to start pushing the talks forward.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-28  Authors: jack taylor, getty images, luke macgregor, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, leaders, faster, minister, plans, pressure, summit, red, theresa, prime, signals, progress, pace, talks, soften, told, brexit


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Apple sinks into correction territory

Apple sank into correction territory Tuesday, falling below $163 for the first time since February. Shares were off more than 11.5 percent since March 13 — when the stock hit an all-time intraday high of $183.50. Wall Street is increasingly wary of the stock as evidence piles up that iPhone demand will soften. The company is also reeling from reports of currently weak iPhone sales and one analyst’s prediction that the high-end iPhone X would be killed off this year — though not everyone agrees w


Apple sank into correction territory Tuesday, falling below $163 for the first time since February. Shares were off more than 11.5 percent since March 13 — when the stock hit an all-time intraday high of $183.50. Wall Street is increasingly wary of the stock as evidence piles up that iPhone demand will soften. The company is also reeling from reports of currently weak iPhone sales and one analyst’s prediction that the high-end iPhone X would be killed off this year — though not everyone agrees w
Apple sinks into correction territory Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-24  Authors: sara salinas, josh edelson, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sinks, street, sank, iphone, soften, sales, territory, weak, stock, correction, apple, wary


Apple sinks into correction territory

Apple sank into correction territory Tuesday, falling below $163 for the first time since February.

Shares were off more than 11.5 percent since March 13 — when the stock hit an all-time intraday high of $183.50.

Wall Street is increasingly wary of the stock as evidence piles up that iPhone demand will soften. The company is also reeling from reports of currently weak iPhone sales and one analyst’s prediction that the high-end iPhone X would be killed off this year — though not everyone agrees with the premise.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-24  Authors: sara salinas, josh edelson, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sinks, street, sank, iphone, soften, sales, territory, weak, stock, correction, apple, wary


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Dimon spoke to Trump a month ago to soften trade policy: ‘We weren’t very effective’

J.P. Morgan Chairman and CEO Jamie Dimon says he tried to persuade President Donald Trump to change his trade policy plans. “The last time I spoke to him was a month ago. And it was about trade and obviously we weren’t very effective.” Dimon said Trump’s policies of tax reform and deregulation are positive for the U.S. economy and financial markets, but the president’s trade policy may be a negative headwind. We told him [Trump] what we thought and it wasn’t what he thought at the time,” Dimon s


J.P. Morgan Chairman and CEO Jamie Dimon says he tried to persuade President Donald Trump to change his trade policy plans. “The last time I spoke to him was a month ago. And it was about trade and obviously we weren’t very effective.” Dimon said Trump’s policies of tax reform and deregulation are positive for the U.S. economy and financial markets, but the president’s trade policy may be a negative headwind. We told him [Trump] what we thought and it wasn’t what he thought at the time,” Dimon s
Dimon spoke to Trump a month ago to soften trade policy: ‘We weren’t very effective’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-05  Authors: tae kim, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chairman, month, werent, dimon, ago, thought, china, effective, interview, spoke, trade, trump, trumps, policy, tax, soften


Dimon spoke to Trump a month ago to soften trade policy: 'We weren't very effective'

J.P. Morgan Chairman and CEO Jamie Dimon says he tried to persuade President Donald Trump to change his trade policy plans.

“I am the chairman of the Business Roundtable, so we periodically … go talk to him [Trump] about issues that are important to the business community like trade, immigration, tax and etc.,” Dimon said Thursday in an interview with Yahoo Finance. “The last time I spoke to him was a month ago. And it was about trade and obviously we weren’t very effective.”

Trade tensions between the U.S. and China have risen in recent weeks. China on Wednesday announced tariffs on 106 U.S. products, including soybeans, cars, aerospace and defense. The move came a day after the Trump administration detailed the list of Chinese imports that it aims to target with tariffs.

Dimon said Trump’s policies of tax reform and deregulation are positive for the U.S. economy and financial markets, but the president’s trade policy may be a negative headwind.

“We were very honest and he likes honesty. We told him [Trump] what we thought and it wasn’t what he thought at the time,” Dimon said.

In his annual letter to the bank’s shareholders released early Thursday, Dimon backed Trump’s efforts to get more favorable trade terms with China and other countries but suggested the U.S. work more closely with allies to bring China to the negotiating table.

See Yahoo Finance’s interview here


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-05  Authors: tae kim, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chairman, month, werent, dimon, ago, thought, china, effective, interview, spoke, trade, trump, trumps, policy, tax, soften


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Saudi king orders payouts, bonuses to soften price hikes

The government said the measures are meant to “ease the burdens” of price hikes on citizens as the state works to restructure its economy amid lower oil prices. The king also ordered that government salaries be paid before electricity bills are issued each month. A similar hashtag a few years ago prompted the government to reverse a freeze on bonuses and government perks. The government recently instituted a new welfare system reaching approximately 3 million families and 10.6 million beneficiar


The government said the measures are meant to “ease the burdens” of price hikes on citizens as the state works to restructure its economy amid lower oil prices. The king also ordered that government salaries be paid before electricity bills are issued each month. A similar hashtag a few years ago prompted the government to reverse a freeze on bonuses and government perks. The government recently instituted a new welfare system reaching approximately 3 million families and 10.6 million beneficiar
Saudi king orders payouts, bonuses to soften price hikes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-01-06  Authors: faisal al nasser
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, services, soften, king, riyals, bonuses, payouts, saudi, orders, salaries, subsidies, price, payment, hikes, tax, citizens


Saudi king orders payouts, bonuses to soften price hikes

Saudi Arabia’s King Salman has authorized a range of bonuses and payouts for citizens, including a monthly payment of 1,000 riyals ($267) for civil servants for the coming year just days after a new tax was introduced and subsidies were lifted on gasoline.

The government said the measures are meant to “ease the burdens” of price hikes on citizens as the state works to restructure its economy amid lower oil prices.

In a series of royal decrees issued overnight Saturday, the king ordered a 5,000 riyal ($1,333) payout to military personnel serving on the front lines of the kingdom’s war with Yemen, as well as a 500 riyal ($133) allowance for one year for retirees and those receiving social security.

Students’ monthly stipends will be boosted this year and the government will bear the cost of the new tax for some services and for the purchase of a first home valued at up to 850,000 riyals ($226,600). The king also ordered that government salaries be paid before electricity bills are issued each month.

On Jan.1, the government introduced a 5 percent value-added tax on goods and services, raised the price of electricity and reduced subsidies on gasoline, nearly doubling the price at the pump.

A Twitter hashtag this week garnered thousands of tweets complaining that salaries are not enough to cover the cost of living. A similar hashtag a few years ago prompted the government to reverse a freeze on bonuses and government perks. Saudis opposed to the freeze had pointed to other energy-rich Gulf countries, like the United Arab Emirates and Qatar, where government salaries are much higher.

The government recently instituted a new welfare system reaching approximately 3 million families and 10.6 million beneficiaries— or roughly half the Saudi population. Half of those families received the maximum payment of 938 riyals ($250). The minimum payment is 300 riyals ($80). The government expects to pay approximately 32 billion riyals ($8.5 billion) on the Citizen’s Account payments in 2018.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-01-06  Authors: faisal al nasser
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, services, soften, king, riyals, bonuses, payouts, saudi, orders, salaries, subsidies, price, payment, hikes, tax, citizens


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Tax bill provisions may help parents defray this massive cost

A few breaks in the tax overhaul may soften the blow of sky-high child care expenses. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the GOP’s overhaul of the tax code, includes an enhancement of the child tax credit, doubling it to $2,000 per qualifying child. Lawmakers also expanded the availability of the child tax credit to higher-income earners: This break will begin to phase out for taxpayers who are married and filing jointly with adjusted gross income of $400,000 ($200,000 for singles). Under current law, t


A few breaks in the tax overhaul may soften the blow of sky-high child care expenses. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the GOP’s overhaul of the tax code, includes an enhancement of the child tax credit, doubling it to $2,000 per qualifying child. Lawmakers also expanded the availability of the child tax credit to higher-income earners: This break will begin to phase out for taxpayers who are married and filing jointly with adjusted gross income of $400,000 ($200,000 for singles). Under current law, t
Tax bill provisions may help parents defray this massive cost Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-12-22  Authors: darla mercado, saul loeb, afp, getty images, joshua roberts, -michelle mccready, child care aware of america, -douglas a boneparth, bone fide wealth
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, help, provisions, credit, overhaul, cost, taxpayers, married, defray, soften, bill, phase, skyhigh, singles, tax, child, parents, massive


Tax bill provisions may help parents defray this massive cost

A few breaks in the tax overhaul may soften the blow of sky-high child care expenses.

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the GOP’s overhaul of the tax code, includes an enhancement of the child tax credit, doubling it to $2,000 per qualifying child.

Lawmakers also expanded the availability of the child tax credit to higher-income earners: This break will begin to phase out for taxpayers who are married and filing jointly with adjusted gross income of $400,000 ($200,000 for singles). Under current law, the child tax credit begins to phase out at $110,000 for joint filers who are married and $75,000 for singles.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-12-22  Authors: darla mercado, saul loeb, afp, getty images, joshua roberts, -michelle mccready, child care aware of america, -douglas a boneparth, bone fide wealth
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, help, provisions, credit, overhaul, cost, taxpayers, married, defray, soften, bill, phase, skyhigh, singles, tax, child, parents, massive


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Trump resists pressure to soften stance on Iran nuclear deal

President Donald Trump finds himself under immense pressure as he considers de-certifying the international nuclear deal with Iran, a move that would ignore warnings from inside and outside his administration that to do so would risk undermining U.S. credibility. Trump is expected to unveil a broad strategy on confronting Iran this week, likely on Friday. The official said Trump has been telling foreign leaders and U.S. lawmakers that his refusal to certify the Iran deal would not blow it up. Tr


President Donald Trump finds himself under immense pressure as he considers de-certifying the international nuclear deal with Iran, a move that would ignore warnings from inside and outside his administration that to do so would risk undermining U.S. credibility. Trump is expected to unveil a broad strategy on confronting Iran this week, likely on Friday. The official said Trump has been telling foreign leaders and U.S. lawmakers that his refusal to certify the Iran deal would not blow it up. Tr
Trump resists pressure to soften stance on Iran nuclear deal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-10-12  Authors: cheriss may, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, resists, deal, pressure, soften, stance, irans, tehran, trump, nuclear, iran, certify, official, walking, risk


Trump resists pressure to soften stance on Iran nuclear deal

President Donald Trump finds himself under immense pressure as he considers de-certifying the international nuclear deal with Iran, a move that would ignore warnings from inside and outside his administration that to do so would risk undermining U.S. credibility.

Trump is expected to unveil a broad strategy on confronting Iran this week, likely on Friday. There was always the chance he could still have a last-minute change of heart and certify Iran’s compliance with the 2015 accord, which he has called an “embarrassment” and the “worst deal ever negotiated.”

Senior U.S. officials, European allies, and prominent U.S. lawmakers have told Trump that refusing to certify the deal would leave the U.S. isolated, concede the diplomatic high ground to Tehran, and ultimately risk the unraveling of the agreement.

Signed by the United States, Britain, France, Germany, Russia, China, the European Union and Iran, the deal relieved sanctions on Tehran in exchange for giving up its nuclear weapons program.

After Trump made clear three months ago he would not certify Iran’s compliance, his advisers moved to give him options to consider, a senior administration official said.

“They came up with a plan that protects the things they are concerned about but doesn’t recertify, which the president made clear he was not going to do. That ship has sailed,” according to the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

The official said Trump has been telling foreign leaders and U.S. lawmakers that his refusal to certify the Iran deal would not blow it up.

“He’s not walking away from it. The chances of him walking away from it go down if they work with him on making it better,” the official said.

White House officials said Trump is expected to announce a broad, more confrontational policy toward Iran directed at curbing its nuclear and ballistic missile programs and financial and military support for Hezbollah and other extremist groups.

Trump has said he believes the nuclear deal is too generous toward Iran and would not stop it from trying to develop a nuclear weapon.

He has criticized the agreement’s “sunset clauses,” under which some restrictions on Iran’s nuclear program would expire over time. He also wants to toughen language on ballistic missiles and inspections. The International Atomic Energy Agency says Iran is complying with the agreement.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-10-12  Authors: cheriss may, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, resists, deal, pressure, soften, stance, irans, tehran, trump, nuclear, iran, certify, official, walking, risk


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Macron: My charm offensive may soften Trump’s climate stance

French President Emmanuel Macron says his glamorous Paris charm offensive on Donald Trump was carefully calculated — and may have changed the U.S. president’s mind about climate change. After a tense, white-knuckle handshake at their first meeting in May, Macron said they gained “better, intimate knowledge of each other” during Trump’s visit to Paris last week. On their main point of contention — Trump’s withdrawal from the landmark Paris climate agreement — Macron is quoted as saying that “Dona


French President Emmanuel Macron says his glamorous Paris charm offensive on Donald Trump was carefully calculated — and may have changed the U.S. president’s mind about climate change. After a tense, white-knuckle handshake at their first meeting in May, Macron said they gained “better, intimate knowledge of each other” during Trump’s visit to Paris last week. On their main point of contention — Trump’s withdrawal from the landmark Paris climate agreement — Macron is quoted as saying that “Dona
Macron: My charm offensive may soften Trump’s climate stance Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-16  Authors: charles platiau
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, macron, charm, donald, climate, trump, saying, soften, offensive, quoted, stance, visit, image, paris, trumps


Macron: My charm offensive may soften Trump's climate stance

French President Emmanuel Macron says his glamorous Paris charm offensive on Donald Trump was carefully calculated — and may have changed the U.S. president’s mind about climate change.

Macron defended his outreach to Trump, whose “America first” policies have elicited worry and disdain in Europe.

“Our countries are friends, so we should be too,” Macron said in an interview Sunday in the Journal du dimanche newspaper.

After a tense, white-knuckle handshake at their first meeting in May, Macron said they gained “better, intimate knowledge of each other” during Trump’s visit to Paris last week.

On their main point of contention — Trump’s withdrawal from the landmark Paris climate agreement — Macron is quoted as saying that “Donald Trump listened to me. He understood the reason for my position, notably the link between climate change and terrorism.”

Increasing droughts and other extreme weather blamed on man-made climate change are worsening migration crises and conflicts in some regions as populations fight over dwindling resources.

“He said he would try to find a solution in the coming months. We spoke in detail about what could allow him to return to the Paris deal,” Macron said, according to the newspaper.

While in Paris, Trump remained non-committal about the U.S. eventually rejoining the climate agreement, telling Macron, “if it happens that will be wonderful, and if it doesn’t that will be OK too.” Trump has said the climate deal was unfair to U.S. business.

The French leader acknowledged that Trump’s Paris visit — including a formal welcome at Napoleon’s tomb, dinner in the Eiffel Tower and a place of honor at the annual Bastille Day military parade — was choreographed to give Americans a “stronger image of France” after deadly Islamic extremist attacks damaged the country’s vital tourism sector.

It was also aimed at Trump himself, who has said that Paris has been ruined by the threat of terrorism, which he ties to immigrants.

“I think Donald Trump left having a better image of France than upon his arrival,” Macron is quoted as saying.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-16  Authors: charles platiau
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, macron, charm, donald, climate, trump, saying, soften, offensive, quoted, stance, visit, image, paris, trumps


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