Medallia soars more than 75% in IPO

Medallia surged more than 75% in its market debut on Friday, becoming the latest cloud software company to attract public market investors. Medallia joined Zoom, Crowdstrike and PagerDuty as cloud software providers with strong opening days this year. Slack also saw a sharp rise on its first day of trading, but the chat app developer used a direct listing instead of the traditional IPO to enter the public market. Medallia CEO Leslie Stretch, appearing on CNBC’s “Squawk Box,” said the company is


Medallia surged more than 75% in its market debut on Friday, becoming the latest cloud software company to attract public market investors. Medallia joined Zoom, Crowdstrike and PagerDuty as cloud software providers with strong opening days this year. Slack also saw a sharp rise on its first day of trading, but the chat app developer used a direct listing instead of the traditional IPO to enter the public market. Medallia CEO Leslie Stretch, appearing on CNBC’s “Squawk Box,” said the company is
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: jesse pound, brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, soars, company, public, software, market, ipo, zoom, traditional, 75, customer, million, medallia, stretch, trading


Medallia soars more than 75% in IPO

Medallia surged more than 75% in its market debut on Friday, becoming the latest cloud software company to attract public market investors.

The San Francisco-based company, which sells software tools to help companies monitor customer satisfaction, was initially priced at $21 per share but broke the $35 per share mark soon after trading began. The company said in a SEC filing on July 8 that it expected shares to price between $16 and $18. The stock climbed as high as $39.56 before closing at $37.05, giving it a market valuation of more than $4.5 billion.

Medallia joined Zoom, Crowdstrike and PagerDuty as cloud software providers with strong opening days this year. All three saw at least a 50% jump, with Zoom posting the biggest gain of 72% when the videoconferencing company debuted in April.

Slack also saw a sharp rise on its first day of trading, but the chat app developer used a direct listing instead of the traditional IPO to enter the public market.

Medallia CEO Leslie Stretch, appearing on CNBC’s “Squawk Box,” said the company is an alternative to traditional customer survey vendors. The company has recently signed agreements with Salesforce and Adobe, Stretch said.

“It’s great to go to market with leaders like that,” Stretch said, shortly after trading began. “Both Adobe and Salesforce completely understand that the customer is at the center of every digital transformation, and we’re the center of that.”

Medalia’s competitors include SurveyMonkey, which went public last September, and Qualtrics, which SAP bought for $8 billion in November just ahead of the company’s IPO.

Revenue in the fiscal year that ended in January rose 20% to $313.6 million, Medallia said in a regulatory filing. Its net loss widened to $82.2 million from $70.36 million as sales and marketing costs jumped 26%.

Prior to the offering, Sequoia Capital owned 40% of the company, an unusually large stake for a venture firm at this stage. At Friday’s high, Sequoia stake was worth about $1.8 billion.

WATCH: Billionaire Marc Lasry and A-Rod weigh in on the IPO market


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: jesse pound, brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, soars, company, public, software, market, ipo, zoom, traditional, 75, customer, million, medallia, stretch, trading


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Dell and Microsoft pour millions into A.I. start-ups that are reshaping the workforce

Among them is Microsoft’s M12 venture fund and Dell Technologies Capital. “Our goal is to get a window on innovation,” says Scott Darling, president of Dell Technologies Capital, who notes that Michael Dell reviews every single deal the fund invests in. In Dell Technologies’ case it has invested more than $600 million in about 100 investments over the last six years. Here’s why Nagraj Kashyap, corporate vice president and global head of Microsoft’s M12, a venture fund focusing on enterprise soft


Among them is Microsoft’s M12 venture fund and Dell Technologies Capital. “Our goal is to get a window on innovation,” says Scott Darling, president of Dell Technologies Capital, who notes that Michael Dell reviews every single deal the fund invests in. In Dell Technologies’ case it has invested more than $600 million in about 100 investments over the last six years. Here’s why Nagraj Kashyap, corporate vice president and global head of Microsoft’s M12, a venture fund focusing on enterprise soft
Dell and Microsoft pour millions into A.I. start-ups that are reshaping the workforce Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: lori ioannou, valentina sanchez, laura wronski, senior research scientist, surveymonkey, jon cohen, chief research officer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ai, dell, millions, microsoft, corporate, startups, startup, data, software, venture, pour, reshaping, companies, technologies, workforce


Dell and Microsoft pour millions into A.I. start-ups that are reshaping the workforce

Dell Technologies’ founder and CEO Michael Dell Drew Angerer | Getty Images

As unions, corporations and governments debate what effect artificial intelligence, machine learning and automation will have on the future of the workforce, venture capital investors are identifying the most interesting start-up investments that may help steer this historic paradigm shift. Among them is Microsoft’s M12 venture fund and Dell Technologies Capital. Both aim to advance human progress and focus on start-ups they can mentor with their companies’ own technical expertise and market know-how. “Our goal is to get a window on innovation,” says Scott Darling, president of Dell Technologies Capital, who notes that Michael Dell reviews every single deal the fund invests in. “We need to plug into the external entrepreneurial ecosystem. This is so important, since the pace of technology is stunning.” As Darling explains, the ROI on successful start-ups is so large that the dollars flowing into these ventures by investors has boomed. That’s because the market for these technology products is typically huge. In Dell Technologies’ case it has invested more than $600 million in about 100 investments over the last six years. Of these, there have been 40 exits and five IPOs, with a combined market value of over $50 billion, including Docusign, Cylance, MongoDB and Zscaler. More from At Work:

Perhaps money can buy you happiness — at least at work

A third of US workers seriously considered quitting their job in the last 3 months. Here’s why Nagraj Kashyap, corporate vice president and global head of Microsoft’s M12, a venture fund focusing on enterprise software, AI, cybersecurity and cloud computing, agrees. “Innovation isn’t limited to our corporate boundaries. It is an exciting time to see how AI is transforming the workplace. Already we see it becoming more distributed, more flexible and diverse.” The success quotient for these corporate funds and the companies they invest in has been high for a key reason. Dell and Microsoft invest in companies they can help make commercially viable and often plug them into their product development, sales and distribution networks. This helps start-ups gain product adoption— and a first-mover advantage. For example, Microsoft has partnered with corporate education start-up GO1.com after its venture arm, M12, led a Series B round investment of $30 million last June. The Australian start-up that emerged from the Y Combinator accelerator is the Netflix of training. GO1.com offers a SaaS subscription service that plugs into any software platform, allowing HR departments to tap 50,000 training courses — everything from compliance and leadership training to IT skills — in multiple languages for their workforces. GO1.com is growing its service 300% annually, according to co-founder and chief operating officer Chris Eigeland. Its product has been integrated into the Microsoft Teams chat software, along with Microsoft Dynamics 365 enterprise resource planning and CRM software. This has helped the four-year-old start-up garner 1.5 million learners and more than 1,500 customers worldwide. “The biggest challenge employers face today is in reskilling and finding the right piece of training to suit their particular needs,” says Eigeland. “Advances in technology, a more transient workforce and a focus on specialization by profession are the trends we are seeing.”

Coping with change at warp speed

Matthew Carroll, CEO of Immuta, a data governance start-up in Maryland that attracted funding from Dell Technologies in its $20 million Series B financing last year, also believes that employees are being swept up in a whirlwind of change. The company that is run by former U.S. National Security Agency techies has developed a method to govern how data is used by machine-learning algorithms without breaching privacy laws. “Very soon in the future, I believe every employee will have automation tools and they will be data analysts doing their jobs every day,” he says. Right now the speed at which companies are adopting AI, machine learning and data analytics is posing a serious risk. “Companies need to ensure data is being used appropriately and privacy is being respected without breaking any government regulations,” he says. “Machine learning is booming, and we still don’t know the long-term consequences of it yet.”

Nagraj Kashyap, corporate vice president and global head of M12 Nate Gowdy/Microsoft

The companies that do this best will be able to attract the best talent. “Millennials are going to want to work for employers that use data responsibly. This will be a big issue for employees,” says Carroll, who contends that as a former intelligence operative, he looks at the world through a safety lens. “We think of our product as a control layer that determines who [man or machine] should see or use company data,” he says. Immuta’s SaaS enterprise platform connects to any data source in the cloud or on premises through any tool so data scientists don’t have to write code or copy the data. It lets legal teams build rules and controls onto the data so they maintain regulatory compliance. Carroll sees a $30 billion market for automating data governance as machine learning goes mainstream in corporate America. According to Gartner, global business value derived from AI will reach a staggering $3.9 trillion by 2022. Yet legacy forms of data management for AI are counterproductive and not advanced enough. That is why Dell is looking at potentially licensing the software and then bundling it with its own product offerings to sell to OEMs.

The A.I. boom sweeping the industry

Using AI to empower an organization and boost efficiency is another area that start-up’s like Noodle.ai are targeting. The San Francisco-based start-up provides AI-as-a-service, explains Noodle.ai CEO Stephen Pratt. The company, which attracted $35 million in a venture capital round led by Dell Technologies Capital and TPG Growth last year, builds a customized in-house platform for clients called the Beast, which serves as the Office 365 of AI applications for general business purposes. It improves inventory and energy management, manufacturing and the supply chain. Noodle.ai engineers and data scientists build three-component machine-learning systems that consist of a sensory engine that finds patterns in data, a prediction engine that calculates what’s likely to happen in a business, and a recommendation engine that surfaces actions to meet objectives. Results selected from the recommendation engine are fed back into the system, starting the cycle over.

The start-up’s clients include XoJet, one of the world’s largest private aviation platforms; and American steel producer Big River Steel. In XoJet’s case, Noodle.ai produced a learning algorithm that takes into account thousands of variables to determine the right prices for airfare, which boosted the company’s profitability by 5%. And for Big River Steel in Arkansas, it used more than 30,000 sensors and AI to predict how much electricity would be consumed by the mill’s machines so it could sell excess energy back to the electric company.

AI will dramatically change the workplace over the next 5 to 10 years. It is those companies keeping on top of the pace of innovation that will thrive. Nagraj Kashyap corporate vice president and global head of M12,


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: lori ioannou, valentina sanchez, laura wronski, senior research scientist, surveymonkey, jon cohen, chief research officer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ai, dell, millions, microsoft, corporate, startups, startup, data, software, venture, pour, reshaping, companies, technologies, workforce


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Microsoft, Adobe and SAP are making progress in their campaign against Salesforce

Adobe, Microsoft and SAP announced their Open Data Initiative in September, and representatives from the three companies meet each week. Microsoft could use the program to boost its cloud-based Dynamics 365 for Sales product, which lags behind Salesforce’s Sales Cloud. Daniel Newman, principal analyst at Futurum Research, said he’s confident the Open Data Initiative will help that campaign. The Open Data Initiative announcement came a few months after the MuleSoft deal. WATCH: Microsoft CEO: Tru


Adobe, Microsoft and SAP announced their Open Data Initiative in September, and representatives from the three companies meet each week. Microsoft could use the program to boost its cloud-based Dynamics 365 for Sales product, which lags behind Salesforce’s Sales Cloud. Daniel Newman, principal analyst at Futurum Research, said he’s confident the Open Data Initiative will help that campaign. The Open Data Initiative announcement came a few months after the MuleSoft deal. WATCH: Microsoft CEO: Tru
Microsoft, Adobe and SAP are making progress in their campaign against Salesforce Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, adobe, microsofts, making, software, cloud, microsoft, data, companies, salesforce, open, initiative, sales, sap, campaign, progress


Microsoft, Adobe and SAP are making progress in their campaign against Salesforce

REDMOND, Wash. — Old-guard software providers Adobe, Microsoft and SAP have a working demonstration of software for collecting data from certain products they offer and sending them all to one place for additional analysis.

The resulting work, if widely adopted, could end up slowing the growth of Salesforce, the 20-year-old company that leads the market for sales tools.

Adobe, Microsoft and SAP announced their Open Data Initiative in September, and representatives from the three companies meet each week. HP Inc. is the latest company to express interest in using the technology that comes out of the collaboration, following Unilever and others.

With the fruits of the Open Data Initiative, companies will no longer need to have engineers spend time getting all their data ready for further crunching, nor will they need teams of data scientists, Alysa Taylor, corporate vice president for business applications and global industry, told CNBC in an interview last week at Microsoft headquarters in Redmond.

For instance, in a few clicks a business user will be able to send data from enterprise software like Microsoft Dynamics, Adobe Experience Platform or SAP’s C/4HANA into the Azure Data Lake data warehouse service that’s available in Microsoft’s public cloud. Richard Riley, senior director for Microsoft’s Power Platform series of products, showed CNBC how this task could be performed in a few minutes.

The data gets cleaned up so that it can all be aggregated together in an agreed-upon format. From there, artificial-intelligence systems can make predictions based on all the available data, which can then be sent back into the enterprise software from Microsoft, Adobe and SAP.

Microsoft could use the program to boost its cloud-based Dynamics 365 for Sales product, which lags behind Salesforce’s Sales Cloud. Daniel Newman, principal analyst at Futurum Research, said he’s confident the Open Data Initiative will help that campaign.

Simultaneously Microsoft is looking to get more usage of Azure through the project. Microsoft is second only to Amazon Web Services in the public cloud market.

Salesforce has been moving more and more into Microsoft’s turf. It has recently shown a willingness to fit its cloud-based offerings into the software companies are already running in-house, which is Microsoft’s historical stronghold. It acquired app integration company MuleSoft and data analytics company Tableau, both of which can hook in with on-premises systems. The Open Data Initiative announcement came a few months after the MuleSoft deal.

“This is a sparring match that’s been going on for a while now,” Newman said.

WATCH: Microsoft CEO: Trust is foundational to Open Data Initiative


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, adobe, microsofts, making, software, cloud, microsoft, data, companies, salesforce, open, initiative, sales, sap, campaign, progress


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Symantec and Broadcom cease deal negotiations: Sources

Symantec and Broadcom have ceased deal negotiations, sources tell CNBC’s David Faber. The people familiar with the matter added that Symantec would not accept less than $28 a share. Symantec had surged earlier this month after it was revealed that Broadcom was in advanced talks to acquire the security software vendor. Even without Symantec, Broadcom has been working to acquire an infrastructure software company and has considered Tibco, three people familiar with the matter told CNBC earlier thi


Symantec and Broadcom have ceased deal negotiations, sources tell CNBC’s David Faber. The people familiar with the matter added that Symantec would not accept less than $28 a share. Symantec had surged earlier this month after it was revealed that Broadcom was in advanced talks to acquire the security software vendor. Even without Symantec, Broadcom has been working to acquire an infrastructure software company and has considered Tibco, three people familiar with the matter told CNBC earlier thi
Symantec and Broadcom cease deal negotiations: Sources Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sources, deal, negotiations, software, billion, broadcom, symantec, cease, security, familiar, tibco, technologies, share, matter


Symantec and Broadcom cease deal negotiations: Sources

Symantec and Broadcom have ceased deal negotiations, sources tell CNBC’s David Faber. The people familiar with the matter added that Symantec would not accept less than $28 a share.

People familiar with the matter added that Broadcom indicated in early conversations that it would be willing to pay $28.25 per share for Symantec, but that following due diligence knocked that figure down below $28.

Symantec had surged earlier this month after it was revealed that Broadcom was in advanced talks to acquire the security software vendor. Faber had reported the two sides were negotiating a price and had seen possible synergies of $1.5 billion.

Symantec shares dropped 12.8% to $22.30 on Monday.

Symantec has been dogged in recent years by management turnover and a softer core business as cloud security companies have captured enterprise market share and as newer companies offer ways to protect mobile devices.

Chipmaker Broadcom, in the middle of an acquisition sprint, bought CA Technologies for $19 billion last year and tried to purchase Qualcomm before the U.S. Department of Justice blocked the deal.

Even without Symantec, Broadcom has been working to acquire an infrastructure software company and has considered Tibco, three people familiar with the matter told CNBC earlier this month. Vista Equity Partners acquired Tibco for $4.3 billion in 2014.

Still, the acquisition of a software company could give Broadcom a needed boost as trade tensions hurt its core semiconductor business and its relationship with Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei. Broadcom cut its forecast for chip sales this year by $2 billion after Huawei was blacklisted in May from buying U.S. technologies.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sources, deal, negotiations, software, billion, broadcom, symantec, cease, security, familiar, tibco, technologies, share, matter


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United Airlines extends Boeing 737 Max cancellations to early November

United Airlines on Friday said it will extend its Boeing 737 Max groundings through Nov. 3, amounting to 2,100 cancellations in September and 2,900 in October. United, which has 14 Max jets in its fleet, had previously removed the jets from its schedule through Aug. 3. “We are continuing to work through the schedule to try and swap and upgauge aircraft to mitigate the disruption caused by the grounding of the MAX,” United said in a statement. The 737 Max has been grounded worldwide since mid-Mar


United Airlines on Friday said it will extend its Boeing 737 Max groundings through Nov. 3, amounting to 2,100 cancellations in September and 2,900 in October. United, which has 14 Max jets in its fleet, had previously removed the jets from its schedule through Aug. 3. “We are continuing to work through the schedule to try and swap and upgauge aircraft to mitigate the disruption caused by the grounding of the MAX,” United said in a statement. The 737 Max has been grounded worldwide since mid-Mar
United Airlines extends Boeing 737 Max cancellations to early November Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: emma newburger
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United Airlines extends Boeing 737 Max cancellations to early November

United Airlines on Friday said it will extend its Boeing 737 Max groundings through Nov. 3, amounting to 2,100 cancellations in September and 2,900 in October.

United, which has 14 Max jets in its fleet, had previously removed the jets from its schedule through Aug. 3.

“We are continuing to work through the schedule to try and swap and upgauge aircraft to mitigate the disruption caused by the grounding of the MAX,” United said in a statement.

“We continue to automatically book affected customers on alternate flights. If we are unable to place them on a different flight, we will proactively reach out to try and offer other options.”

The 737 Max has been grounded worldwide since mid-March, after its anti-stall software was implicated in two deadly crashes in October and March.

Other major airlines including American and Southwest have canceled thousands of flights during the busy summer travel season, and have further removed the Max from schedules through Sept. 3 and Oct. 1, respectively. Those airlines will likely further extend cancellations.

United reports second-quarter results after the market closes on Tuesday. Delta Air Lines, which does not fly the 737 Max, said on Thursday that it’s seeing a small benefit as rivals grapple with the grounding.

Boeing deliveries are stopped until aviation regulators approve the jet’s return to service. The airplane maker said in June that it would likely take until September or later to introduce a new software fix after the Federal Aviation Administration identified a new software issue a month ago.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: emma newburger
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US tech companies face new French tax – four experts weigh in

U.S. tech companies are facing more scrutiny from Europe. France’s Senate on Thursday approved a tax on revenues from major tech companies, including Google, Amazon and Facebook, raising the ire of the White House. Stephanie Link of Nuveen sees value in one corner of the tech market. “I understand why you want to own some software, software as a service, but they do trade at 30 to 50 times forward earnings. The better value would be in the semiconductor space and even the FANG because they have


U.S. tech companies are facing more scrutiny from Europe. France’s Senate on Thursday approved a tax on revenues from major tech companies, including Google, Amazon and Facebook, raising the ire of the White House. Stephanie Link of Nuveen sees value in one corner of the tech market. “I understand why you want to own some software, software as a service, but they do trade at 30 to 50 times forward earnings. The better value would be in the semiconductor space and even the FANG because they have
US tech companies face new French tax – four experts weigh in Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, tech, tax, white, stocks, software, face, french, youve, value, experts, think, weigh, trade, regulation


US tech companies face new French tax – four experts weigh in

U.S. tech companies are facing more scrutiny from Europe.

France’s Senate on Thursday approved a tax on revenues from major tech companies, including Google, Amazon and Facebook, raising the ire of the White House.

Here’s what the impact could be.

Larry McDonald of Bear Traps Report says the political pressure will hurt tech stocks ahead of the next election:

“You’re talking about companies that are trading at 6 to 10 times sales, earnings multiples are up near 20, and you’ve got a perfect storm coming. You’ve got a number of debates on the Democratic party side, they know that Trump stole a large section of democrats and independents in the last election so they’re moving to the populist realm and then you’ve got a White House that sees this… you’re talking about a White House and Elizabeth Warren and Bernie [Sanders] that are really going to come down hard and pressure the DoJ to act.”

Mark Mahaney, lead internet analyst at RBC Capital, says the threat of increased regulation is coming.

“I look at these large platforms – Google, Facebook, Twitter perhaps – their biggest threats are competition, maturity and regulation but regulation has clearly rared up over the last three or four years to something I don’t think we’ve ever seen before. I think the break-up risk of these assets is extremely low but that there’ll be increased regulations, fines, some restrictions on targeting.”

John Freeman of CFRA Research says the opportunities outweigh the risk.

“Outside of the regulatory risk, these businesses are doing very, very well and I don’t think that valuation is really a concern for those companies at least relative to their growth prospects… I would take issue with their call on software stocks particularly software-as-a-service stocks or cloud stocks. There may be a couple that are overvalued and I think they stand out but I think what’s underappreciated here is the tremendous amount of operating leverage that these businesses have inherently.”

Stephanie Link of Nuveen sees value in one corner of the tech market.

“I understand why you want to own some software, software as a service, but they do trade at 30 to 50 times forward earnings. They do have operating leverage and they do have recurring revenue. That’s why they trade where they do. Expectations are high and it’s a very crowded space. The better value would be in the semiconductor space and even the FANG because they have been dragged down on regulation.”

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, tech, tax, white, stocks, software, face, french, youve, value, experts, think, weigh, trade, regulation


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Year of the Mac: Apple is showing more attention to its line of PCs as the overall industry shrinks

On Tuesday, Apple updated its MacBook Air laptop with a higher-quality “TrueTone” screen and dropped the price to $1,099, making it Apple’s least expensive laptop. It also revamped one of the 13-inch MacBook Pro models, adding a touchscreen strip to the keyboard called Touch Bar. Apple also discontinued the MacBook, a thin-and-light machine with a name that confused many Apple customers, and the older MacBook Air that didn’t include modern USB-C connectors. The update for the MacBook Air was its


On Tuesday, Apple updated its MacBook Air laptop with a higher-quality “TrueTone” screen and dropped the price to $1,099, making it Apple’s least expensive laptop. It also revamped one of the 13-inch MacBook Pro models, adding a touchscreen strip to the keyboard called Touch Bar. Apple also discontinued the MacBook, a thin-and-light machine with a name that confused many Apple customers, and the older MacBook Air that didn’t include modern USB-C connectors. The update for the MacBook Air was its
Year of the Mac: Apple is showing more attention to its line of PCs as the overall industry shrinks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: kif leswing
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Year of the Mac: Apple is showing more attention to its line of PCs as the overall industry shrinks

The new MacBook Air Todd Haselton | CNBC

Apple has spent a lot of time and effort over the last year revamping and refining a product line that accounts for just 9% of its sales. Apple dropped the “computer” from its name more than 12 years ago, but the Mac product line that predates the iPhone has received a lot of attention from Cupertino recently. Mac desktops and laptops are essential to Apple even as the company sells far more iPhones and iPads. That’s because the only way to write software for an iPhone or iPad is on a Mac, making many Mac users one of Apple’s most important kinds of customers: software professionals. On Tuesday, Apple updated its MacBook Air laptop with a higher-quality “TrueTone” screen and dropped the price to $1,099, making it Apple’s least expensive laptop. It also revamped one of the 13-inch MacBook Pro models, adding a touchscreen strip to the keyboard called Touch Bar. Apple also discontinued the MacBook, a thin-and-light machine with a name that confused many Apple customers, and the older MacBook Air that didn’t include modern USB-C connectors. It’s a total cleanup of Apple’s laptop lineup. Apple’s attention to its laptops comes as Mac sales dropped 5% in terms of unit sales in 2018, according to an IDC estimate. However, the entire PC market declined 3.7% during that year, according the same estimate. “Overall, it is a tremendous simplification of the entire MacBook lineup, and that’s a good thing,” closely followed Apple watcher John Gruber wrote Tuesday.

A regular refresh cycle

Apple CEO Tim Cook (L) and Apple chief design officer Jony Ive (R) look at the new Mac Pro during the 2019 Apple Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) at the San Jose Convention Center on June 03, 2019 in San Jose, California. Justin Sullivan | Getty Images

The refreshed models also underscore Apple’s new commitment to a regular refresh cycle for its Mac computers, so that customers don’t worry that they are buying years-old technology. People who use Mac computers for work want to know when they’re buying a new computer, often for thousands of dollars, that they’re not getting years-old technology or previous-generation Intel chips. The best way to determine this is by the number of days since the last release or refresh, since Apple doesn’t usually talk about upcoming products and doesn’t provide an update road map. The update for the MacBook Air was its first since last October, or about 252 days, according to MacRumors’ Apple release tracker. Before that, the last update to the Air was in March 2015, or 567 days before last fall’s redesign. Headed into the fall, all of Apple’s Mac products have been recently updated. The iMac got new chips in March, most MacBook Pro laptops were updated this summer and the updated fan-favorite Mac Mini was unveiled last fall. For people who need high-end, extreme-performance workstations — animators, programmers and designers — Apple revealed a new Mac Pro desktop tower in June. It starts at $6,000 and some speculate that a fully maxed-out version will cost around the price of a new sedan. The Mac Pro isn’t available in stores yet, but when it goes on sale this fall, it will be over 2,000 days since it was last updated. That’s a six-year gap that many Apple fans vocally complained about.

New software features

Apple Music will replace iTunes in macOS Catalina this fall. Apple

Apple is also supporting the Mac with new software features. For example, when Apple Arcade, the company’s gaming subscription, launches this fall, it will support Macs, not just iPhones, iPads and Apple TVs. The latest version of MacOS, called Catalina, is also seeing major changes and Apple resources dedicated to cleaning up old software that hadn’t been given a lot of attention in recent years. For example, the next version of MacOS won’t have iTunes, which had gotten bloated with lots of excess features over the years. Instead, it will have separate apps for music, podcasts and TV. You’ll also be able to sync your iPhone directly with your Mac without using iTunes. Apple also introduced a new feature that enables users to have a double-screen setup on the go by pairing an iPad to act as a MacBook’s second screen. Developers said at Apple’s conference in June that they were excited about a software development tool called Catalyst, which allows software developers to write code once and have it run on both iPhones and Macs, with the hope that some apps that were previously exclusive to the iPhone could be ported, creating a richer software ecosystem.

Keyboard problems

The keys on the keyboard take some getting adjusted to. Todd Haselton | CNBC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: kif leswing
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Apple’s new iPhone software makes it look like you’re making eye contact in video calls even if you aren’t

Apple is testing a feature in its FaceTime video chat app that makes it look like you’re making eye contact with the person you’re speaking with, even if you’re just looking at the screen instead of the camera. Normally, if you just look at the screen, it looks like you’re not looking directly at the person you’re speaking with. It’s currently in the latest beta of iOS 13, the new iPhone update that will be available to everyone this fall. When Sigmon is looking at the screen of his phone, as we


Apple is testing a feature in its FaceTime video chat app that makes it look like you’re making eye contact with the person you’re speaking with, even if you’re just looking at the screen instead of the camera. Normally, if you just look at the screen, it looks like you’re not looking directly at the person you’re speaking with. It’s currently in the latest beta of iOS 13, the new iPhone update that will be available to everyone this fall. When Sigmon is looking at the screen of his phone, as we
Apple’s new iPhone software makes it look like you’re making eye contact in video calls even if you aren’t Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, calls, software, makes, facetime, looking, making, video, youre, look, eye, contact, screen, camera, iphone, feature


Apple's new iPhone software makes it look like you're making eye contact in video calls even if you aren't

Apple is testing a feature in its FaceTime video chat app that makes it look like you’re making eye contact with the person you’re speaking with, even if you’re just looking at the screen instead of the camera. Normally, if you just look at the screen, it looks like you’re not looking directly at the person you’re speaking with. It’s currently in the latest beta of iOS 13, the new iPhone update that will be available to everyone this fall.

A Twitter user named Will Sigmon posted a good demonstration of how this works. When Sigmon is looking at the screen of his phone, as we often do during video chats, it looks like he’s making eye contact by looking at the camera. Check it out:

I tested the feature with a family member, and it didn’t work well for me yet — it was clear I wasn’t looking directly at the camera. However, I was using an iPhone XS Max with the beta software and my relative was on an older iPhone SE, which might have been part of the problem.

The option can be turned on by going to Settings > FaceTime and turning on “FaceTime Attention Correction” which says “your eye contact with the camera will be more accurate during FaceTime Video calls.”

Your mileage may vary, and it’s possible Apple doesn’t include this in the final release, but it’s a neat feature that may make FaceTime calls more personal if you can make eye contact directly, even without staring at the camera.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, calls, software, makes, facetime, looking, making, video, youre, look, eye, contact, screen, camera, iphone, feature


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Broadcom looks to old software names Symantec and Tibco as chip business deteriorates

Now, the company is in talks to acquire 37-year-old security software vendor Symantec, a company that’s been plagued by deteriorating financials and a revolving door in the C-suite. If the Symantec deal doesn’t get done, Broadcom has also been working on a deal to acquire an infrastructure software company and has considered Tibco, according to three people familiar with the matter. Buying Tibco or another infrastructure software company would be delayed or sidelined indefinitely if the Symantec


Now, the company is in talks to acquire 37-year-old security software vendor Symantec, a company that’s been plagued by deteriorating financials and a revolving door in the C-suite. If the Symantec deal doesn’t get done, Broadcom has also been working on a deal to acquire an infrastructure software company and has considered Tibco, according to three people familiar with the matter. Buying Tibco or another infrastructure software company would be delayed or sidelined indefinitely if the Symantec
Broadcom looks to old software names Symantec and Tibco as chip business deteriorates Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: ari levy alex sherman, ari levy, alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, broadcom, sales, company, tibco, names, symantec, business, tan, customers, software, old, looks, semiconductor, billion, chip, deteriorates


Broadcom looks to old software names Symantec and Tibco as chip business deteriorates

Broadcom CEO Hock Tan announces the repatriation of his company headquarters to the United States from Singapore as U.S. President Donald Trump looks on during a ceremony in the Oval Office of the White House on November 2, 2017 in Washington, DC.

After the Trump administration blocked Broadcom’s effort to buy chipmaker Qualcomm last year, CEO Hock Tan turned his attention to software — chasing aging companies that public markets had largely forgotten.

First it was CA Technologies, which Broadcom agreed to acquire a year ago for $19 billion, snapping up a 42-year-old developer of software used by information technology teams.

Now, the company is in talks to acquire 37-year-old security software vendor Symantec, a company that’s been plagued by deteriorating financials and a revolving door in the C-suite. Bloomberg reported on Tuesday that the companies were in advanced talks, and CNBC confirmed with sources familiar with the matter that discussions had been underway.

If the Symantec deal doesn’t get done, Broadcom has also been working on a deal to acquire an infrastructure software company and has considered Tibco, according to three people familiar with the matter. Vista Equity Partners acquired Tibco for $4.3 billion in 2014. Bloomberg reported Vista was considering a Tibco sale last year.

Buying Tibco or another infrastructure software company would be delayed or sidelined indefinitely if the Symantec acquisition occurs, said the people, who asked not to be named because the discussions are confidential. Different sets of Broadcom advisors have been working on both deals simultaneously because Tan is determined to do a large acquisition this year, the people said.

The move would mark a fundamental shift for a company that’s long counted on a few big buyers of processors for a significant chunk of revenue. Broadcom estimates that Apple, which buys components for phones and tablets, accounted for 13% of sales in the latest quarter (down from 17% a year earlier) through various suppliers including Foxconn. Aggregate sales to Broadcom’s top five customers made up about 32% of revenue.

Broadcom needs software because its semiconductor business is hurting, primarily due to uncertainty surrounding Huawei. Since the Chinese networking giant was blacklisted in May from buying U.S. equipment without permission, Broadcom cut its forecast for semiconductor sales this year by $2 billion. The business was already struggling, with semiconductor solutions revenue dropping 10% or more in each of the first two quarters this year.

“It is clear that the U.S./China trade conflict, including the Huawei export ban, is creating economic and political uncertainty, and reducing visibility for our global” manufacturing customers, Tan said during the company’s fiscal second-quarter earnings call last month. “As a result, demand volatility has increased and our customers are actively reducing inventory levels to manage risk.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: ari levy alex sherman, ari levy, alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, broadcom, sales, company, tibco, names, symantec, business, tan, customers, software, old, looks, semiconductor, billion, chip, deteriorates


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Amazon keeps what you ask Alexa forever unless you delete it, so here’s how

Broadcom looks to old software names Symantec and Tibco for a… If the Symantec deal doesn’t get done, Broadcom has also been working on a deal to acquire an infrastructure software company and has considered Tibco, according to three…Technologyread more


Broadcom looks to old software names Symantec and Tibco for a… If the Symantec deal doesn’t get done, Broadcom has also been working on a deal to acquire an infrastructure software company and has considered Tibco, according to three…Technologyread more
Amazon keeps what you ask Alexa forever unless you delete it, so here’s how Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, software, forever, old, names, delete, unless, keeps, broadcom, alexa, amazon, tibco, symantec, working, looks, deal, ask, threetechnologyread, heres


Amazon keeps what you ask Alexa forever unless you delete it, so here's how

Broadcom looks to old software names Symantec and Tibco for a…

If the Symantec deal doesn’t get done, Broadcom has also been working on a deal to acquire an infrastructure software company and has considered Tibco, according to three…

Technology

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, software, forever, old, names, delete, unless, keeps, broadcom, alexa, amazon, tibco, symantec, working, looks, deal, ask, threetechnologyread, heres


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