Equinox chief to members: ‘I’m sorry for the impact’ of Trump fundraiser ‘on our community’

That gathering, along with another Hamptons fundraiser, raked in about $12 million, RNC Chair Ronna McDaniel said in a tweet Friday. Equinox and SoulCycle issued a joint statement last week saying, “As is consistent with our policies, no company profits are used to fund politicians. Read the entire letter from Harvey Spevak:To our Equinox Community -The last week has been difficult for all. I am sorry for the impact it has had on our community – and I’m sorry we haven’t said more. I’m proud that


That gathering, along with another Hamptons fundraiser, raked in about $12 million, RNC Chair Ronna McDaniel said in a tweet Friday. Equinox and SoulCycle issued a joint statement last week saying, “As is consistent with our policies, no company profits are used to fund politicians. Read the entire letter from Harvey Spevak:To our Equinox Community -The last week has been difficult for all. I am sorry for the impact it has had on our community – and I’m sorry we haven’t said more. I’m proud that
Equinox chief to members: ‘I’m sorry for the impact’ of Trump fundraiser ‘on our community’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-15  Authors: jordan mcdonald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, team, values, community, week, impact, sorry, company, members, worked, chief, million, support, fundraiser, im, trump, equinox


Equinox chief to members: 'I'm sorry for the impact' of Trump fundraiser 'on our community'

That gathering, along with another Hamptons fundraiser, raked in about $12 million, RNC Chair Ronna McDaniel said in a tweet Friday.

As news of the Ross fundraiser trickled out, it spurred waves of member cancellations and outcry from celebrities like Chrissy Teigen and Billy Eichner.

“There are a handful of billionaires who own everything and many support Trump,” Eichner wrote on Twitter. “Practically speaking, it’s probably impossible to completely avoid them. But considering @Equinox’s clientele and how they’ve pandered to us, this one feels particularly hypocritical and shameful.”

Equinox and SoulCycle issued a joint statement last week saying, “As is consistent with our policies, no company profits are used to fund politicians. We are committed to all our members and the communities we live in. We believe in tolerance and equality, and will always stay true to those values.”

Read the entire letter from Harvey Spevak:

To our Equinox Community –

The last week has been difficult for all. I am sorry for the impact it has had on our community – and I’m sorry we haven’t said more. We have not been ignoring the situation. I have been in our clubs listening to our teams and members. I really appreciate the open and honest feedback I received. It’s been heartfelt and, in many instances, emotional. I’m proud that even during this difficult time our community is one that listens and respects each other.

Many of you have asked for clarification on Stephen Ross’s investment in Equinox. Mr. Ross is not the majority investor in Equinox. He is one of the investors including myself. He does not run the company. I do. I am the Executive Chairman of Equinox and have led the vision and strategic direction of the company since I joined in 1999. Our focus has always been about building a community centered on our values, not politics.

When I joined Equinox over 20 years ago, I worked with our then small team to create values that would guide us forward. They are the foundation of our culture, a culture based on equality, diversity, inclusivity, integrity, empathy and mutual respect. A community where everyone is welcome.

We live our values every day, which means giving back to the communities that have given us so much. We have helped Cycle for Survival raise $42 million for rare cancer research this year alone. We have trained injured veterans returning from war zones to climb the seven highest summits through The Heroes Project. We have partnered with Move for Minds to raise funds and awareness around brain health and women-based Alzheimer’s research. We have worked with The Felix Organization, a charity focused on enriching lives of children in foster care. And we have been a proud partner of House Lives Matter, supporting the House Ballroom Community comprised of sexual and gender minority people of color (LGBTQ and gender non-conforming). Every one of these commitments was started with a single idea reflecting the priorities of our members and employees.

While I don’t have all the answers, what we have heard from many of you is that you would like Equinox to immediately help amplify your voice in support of causes we as a community have always held close. As a next step, Equinox will make a $1 million donation to benefit the five charities mentioned above. From August 17 through August 31, every check-in will be an opportunity for our members and employees to select how our donation will be allocated among the causes.

I want to thank our amazing team and all they do in service of you, our members. It pains me to see how this has been impacting them and I am truly grateful for their commitment, passion and dedication. We will continue to listen to your thoughts and ideas, and while we have a lot of work to do, I am confident that together we will come out a stronger community.

With gratitude,

Harvey Spevak

EQUINOX | Executive Chairman, Managing Partner


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-15  Authors: jordan mcdonald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, team, values, community, week, impact, sorry, company, members, worked, chief, million, support, fundraiser, im, trump, equinox


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Versace, Givenchy and Coach say sorry over Chinese T-shirt anger

American fashion brand Coach, French label Givenchy and Italian luxury brand Versace have been boycotted by some Chinese social media stars for suggesting that places like Hong Kong and Macau are separate from China. The Versace label and its artistic director Donatella Versace apologized on Sunday after images of a T-shirt pairing cities with their countries stated “Macau, Macau” and “Hong Kong, Hong Kong” were criticized on social media. Yang Mi, a popular actress in China, ended her contract


American fashion brand Coach, French label Givenchy and Italian luxury brand Versace have been boycotted by some Chinese social media stars for suggesting that places like Hong Kong and Macau are separate from China. The Versace label and its artistic director Donatella Versace apologized on Sunday after images of a T-shirt pairing cities with their countries stated “Macau, Macau” and “Hong Kong, Hong Kong” were criticized on social media. Yang Mi, a popular actress in China, ended her contract
Versace, Givenchy and Coach say sorry over Chinese T-shirt anger Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, anger, givenchy, macau, fashion, brand, chinese, luxury, sorry, hong, versace, tshirt, coach, chinas, kong, say


Versace, Givenchy and Coach say sorry over Chinese T-shirt anger

American fashion brand Coach, French label Givenchy and Italian luxury brand Versace have been boycotted by some Chinese social media stars for suggesting that places like Hong Kong and Macau are separate from China.

The Versace label and its artistic director Donatella Versace apologized on Sunday after images of a T-shirt pairing cities with their countries stated “Macau, Macau” and “Hong Kong, Hong Kong” were criticized on social media. Yang Mi, a popular actress in China, ended her contract with Versace, owned by Capri Holdings, over the issue.

“Versace reiterates that we love China deeply, and resolutely respect China’s territory and national sovereignty,” the company said in a statement.

Donatella Versace also stated on her Instagram account: “Never have I wanted to disrespect China’s National Sovereignty and this is why I wanted to personally apologize for such inaccuracy and for any distress that it might have caused.”

Chinese supermodel Liu Wen, a brand ambassador for Coach, said on Weibo she had severed her endorsement deal with the American brand over a similar T-shirt, which listed Taiwan as a country.

“I apologise to everyone for the damage that I have caused as a result of my less-careful choice of brand!” she said in a post that was ‘liked’ hundreds of thousands of times.”

“I love my motherland, and I steadfastly safeguard China’s sovereignty.”

Coach, owned by Tapestry, posted an apology on its Twitter account on Monday, saying it removed the T-shirts from sale after it found a “serious inaccuracy” in May 2018.

In 2018, China appeared to increase its policing of how overseas companies refer to territories such as Hong Kong and Macau, both of which are Chinese territories but run with a high degree of autonomy.

Jackson Yee, a singer with Chinese boy band TFBoys, said he was no longer working with Givenchy, the LVMH-owned brand, after one of the band’s world tour T-shirts also referred to Hong Kong, Hong Kong, and Macau, Macau. Givenchy posted an apology in its Weibo account on Monday.

China is a key market for luxury goods makers, with Chinese people accounting for a third of all global spending, although a weaker yuan will make imported goods more expensive.

This isn’t the first time luxury brands have been criticized by Chinese consumers. Italian fashion house Dolce and Gabbana canceled a fashion show in Shanghai in 2018 after posting a series of videos on Instagram showing a Chinese woman how to use chopsticks.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, anger, givenchy, macau, fashion, brand, chinese, luxury, sorry, hong, versace, tshirt, coach, chinas, kong, say


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As Juul grapples with teen vaping ‘epidemic,’ CEO tells parents ‘I’m sorry’

The Food and Drug Administration has declared teen vaping an “epidemic,” citing federal survey data that showed nearly 21% of high school students vaped last year. Former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb and health care advocates blame the surge in teen vaping on Juul. Grace told CNBC that a friend of hers bought the Juul pods and devices from a gas station. Yet Juul’s critics point to the company’s initial advertising campaign, which featured bright colors and young looking models, as evidence t


The Food and Drug Administration has declared teen vaping an “epidemic,” citing federal survey data that showed nearly 21% of high school students vaped last year. Former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb and health care advocates blame the surge in teen vaping on Juul. Grace told CNBC that a friend of hers bought the Juul pods and devices from a gas station. Yet Juul’s critics point to the company’s initial advertising campaign, which featured bright colors and young looking models, as evidence t
As Juul grapples with teen vaping ‘epidemic,’ CEO tells parents ‘I’m sorry’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-13  Authors: angelica lavito
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vaping, company, pods, parents, grapples, tells, teen, epidemic, burns, sorry, ceo, ecigarettes, nicotine, juul, im, fda, products


As Juul grapples with teen vaping 'epidemic,' CEO tells parents 'I'm sorry'

Kevin Burns, CEO, JUUL, left, and CNBC’s Carl Quintanilla Source: CNBC

Kevin Burns, CEO of Juul Labs ⁠— the maker of the bestselling e-cigarette in the U.S. and center of federal regulators’ crackdown into what they’re calling a teen vaping “epidemic” ⁠— has a message for parents whose children are addicted to his company’s products: “I’m sorry.” Since launching in 2015, Juul has quickly come to dominate the e-cigarette industry with roughly 40% of the market, becoming such a dominant player that Altria, the top U.S. cigarette company, invested $12.8 billion for a 35% stake in the San Francisco-based start-up. But the company has a problem: Its vapes are incredibly popular with teenagers. The Food and Drug Administration has declared teen vaping an “epidemic,” citing federal survey data that showed nearly 21% of high school students vaped last year. Former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb and health care advocates blame the surge in teen vaping on Juul. CNBC’s Carl Quintanilla interviewed Burns for a documentary, “Vaporized: America’s E-cigarette Addiction,” which premiers Monday at 10 p.m. ET. Quintanilla, who toured one of Juul’s manufacturing facilities in Wisconsin with Burns, asked him what he would say to a parent with a child who was addicted to Juul. “First of all, I’d tell them that I’m sorry that their child’s using the product,” said Burns, who joined Juul in late 2017. “It’s not intended for them. I hope there was nothing that we did that made it appealing to them. As a parent of a 16-year-old, I’m sorry for them, and I have empathy for them, in terms of what the challenges they’re going through.”

The company has tried to combat youth use by shutting down its social media accounts and pulling fruity flavors like creme and mango from retailers. So far, that hasn’t stopped criticism. The company’s hometown of San Francisco banned sales of e-cigarettes last month. E-cigarettes are being marketed to adults to help them quit smoking while still getting their nicotine fix. But they’ve come under fire in recent months for their growing popularity among teens. Federal data shows about 3 million U.S. high school students vaped last year. That is prompting fears e-cigarettes are addicting a new generation of nicotine after decades of cigarette smoking rates plummeting. Pam Debono’s daughter Grace picked up a Juul in the summer of 2017. At the time she was 15 and Juul was starting to take off. Pam Debono calls it “the summer of Juul,” when she started finding plastic covers everywhere that she “didn’t really have a clue what they were.”

Grace told CNBC that a friend of hers bought the Juul pods and devices from a gas station. Both girls were 15 at the time. Grace said she would hit her Juul first thing in the morning and would puff on it all day, going through one nicotine pod per day — about as much nicotine as a pack of cigarettes. “It would always be in my hands,” she said. “Like, it would always just be with me, you know? And so I would always just, like, hit it ’cause it was just so easy.” Stanford pediatrics professor Bonnie Halpern-Felsher said her research team found kids are “more addicted” to Juul than other products because the nicotine level in Juul pods is “astronomically high.” Juul pods contain 5% nicotine, whereas other pods before Juul’s introduction contained between roughly 1% and 2.4% on average, according to the Truth Initiative, a nonprofit dedicated to eradicating tobacco. The company has since introduced lower dosages with 3% nicotine for some of its flavors. Juul says its products are meant for adults, not minors like Grace. The company supports raising the minimum smoking age to 21 to keep teenagers from buying its e-cigarettes. Yet Juul’s critics point to the company’s initial advertising campaign, which featured bright colors and young looking models, as evidence that Juul fueled the surge in teen vaping. Co-founder Adam Bowen said in retrospect the ads were “inappropriate.”

“When we launched Juul, we had a campaign that was arguably too kind of lifestyle-oriented, too flashy,” he said. “It lasted less than six months. It was in the early days of the product introduction. We think it had no impact on sales.” Gottlieb, the former FDA commissioner, says the surge in teen vaping caught the FDA by surprise. While at the agency, Gottlieb delayed a key deadline that would have forced e-cigarettes to undergo FDA review by now and could have removed some from the market. He now isn’t sure if he made the right decision. “It’s a good question [whether the delay was a mistake], and it’s a question I get all the time,” Gottlieb said. “And we struggle with it.” The FDA review process calls for the agency to weigh the net public health benefit — meaning it needs to weigh how many adults will benefit from them versus how many teens might be harmed — when deciding whether to allow products to stay on the market.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-13  Authors: angelica lavito
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vaping, company, pods, parents, grapples, tells, teen, epidemic, burns, sorry, ceo, ecigarettes, nicotine, juul, im, fda, products


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YouTube CEO says ‘sorry,’ but defends hosting videos with homophobic slurs

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks during the opening keynote address at the Google I/O 2017 Conference at Shoreline Amphitheater on May 17, 2017 in Mountain View, California. Maza said that he has been the subject of targeted harassment for years that included both anti-gay and anti-Mexican slurs. But, she added, YouTube looked at the videos in question, “and in the end, we decided it was not violative of our policy.” Wojcicki said that YouTube has a “high bar” for what counts as malicious mater


YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks during the opening keynote address at the Google I/O 2017 Conference at Shoreline Amphitheater on May 17, 2017 in Mountain View, California. Maza said that he has been the subject of targeted harassment for years that included both anti-gay and anti-Mexican slurs. But, she added, YouTube looked at the videos in question, “and in the end, we decided it was not violative of our policy.” Wojcicki said that YouTube has a “high bar” for what counts as malicious mater
YouTube CEO says ‘sorry,’ but defends hosting videos with homophobic slurs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: dylan byers, david ingram
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, homophobic, hosting, videos, harassment, conference, ceo, youtubes, defends, susan, slurs, youtube, sorry, wojcicki, services


YouTube CEO says 'sorry,' but defends hosting videos with homophobic slurs

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks during the opening keynote address at the Google I/O 2017 Conference at Shoreline Amphitheater on May 17, 2017 in Mountain View, California.

SCOTTSDALE, Arizona — YouTube’s chief executive apologized on Monday for the hurt she said is caused by videos with anti-gay slurs, but said the company was right to let the videos remain on its service.

CEO Susan Wojcicki, in an on-stage interview at the tech-focused Code Conference in Scottsdale, Arizona, spoke publicly for the first time since YouTube last week imposed a stricter ban on hate speech, including videos that promote ideas of racial superiority.

But rather than being lauded for tackling Nazism, Wojcicki was met with a barrage of questions about videos she has decided to leave up. The questions were prompted by journalist Carlos Maza launching a campaign last month to bring attention to homophobic abuse and harassment he says he received from a conservative YouTube personality.

Maza said that he has been the subject of targeted harassment for years that included both anti-gay and anti-Mexican slurs. Several activists are lobbying to ban YouTube’s parent company, Google, from the San Francisco Pride march this month over what they see as the service’s inaction.

“I know the decision we made was very hurtful to the LGBTQ community,” Wojcicki said. “That was not our intention at all. We’re really sorry about that.”

But, she added, YouTube looked at the videos in question, “and in the end, we decided it was not violative of our policy.”

“I do agree this was the right decision,” she said.

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Deadly New York helicopter crash brings ‘a level of PTSD from 9/11’

Wojcicki, a high-profile Silicon Valley executive, faced a skeptical crowd at the annual conference for tech and media professionals. When Ina Fried, a journalist from Axios, suggested during a question-and-answer period that Wojcicki wasn’t actually sorry, the audience greeted the question with applause.

YouTube, like Facebook and other online services that rely on users for content, is facing growing scrutiny over material that shows violence, promotes hatred or is objectionable in other ways. The service’s rulebook bans harassment, for example, but only when it is “malicious.”

Wojcicki said that YouTube has a “high bar” for what counts as malicious material, and that the service faced a challenge in being consistent. She said the same rules needed to apply across the board, including to late-night comedy shows or rap music videos.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: dylan byers, david ingram
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, homophobic, hosting, videos, harassment, conference, ceo, youtubes, defends, susan, slurs, youtube, sorry, wojcicki, services


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Fashion label Burberry apologizes for ‘suicide’ hoodie

Burberry apologized after a hoodie with ropes resembling a noose was featured in a catwalk event at London Fashion Week. He added that Burberry would “reflect on this, learn from it, and put in place all necessary actions to ensure it does not happen again.” The hoodie was one of the items unveiled in the Tempest collection in a show presented by Burberry’s Chief Creative Officer Riccardo Tisci on Sunday. Kennedy blasted the brand in an Instagram post this week, saying that “suicide is not fashi


Burberry apologized after a hoodie with ropes resembling a noose was featured in a catwalk event at London Fashion Week. He added that Burberry would “reflect on this, learn from it, and put in place all necessary actions to ensure it does not happen again.” The hoodie was one of the items unveiled in the Tempest collection in a show presented by Burberry’s Chief Creative Officer Riccardo Tisci on Sunday. Kennedy blasted the brand in an Instagram post this week, saying that “suicide is not fashi
Fashion label Burberry apologizes for ‘suicide’ hoodie Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: chloe taylor, photo vianney le caer, invision
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fashion, apologizes, tisci, resembling, label, theme, runway, sorry, does, hoodie, burberrys, burberry, suicide, collection, statement


Fashion label Burberry apologizes for 'suicide' hoodie

Burberry apologized after a hoodie with ropes resembling a noose was featured in a catwalk event at London Fashion Week.

“We are deeply sorry for the distress caused by one of the products that featured in our A/W 2019 runway collection,” Marco Gobbetti, Burberry’s CEO, said in a statement emailed to CNBC.

“Though the design was inspired by the marine theme that ran throughout the collection, it was insensitive and we made a mistake.”

He added that Burberry would “reflect on this, learn from it, and put in place all necessary actions to ensure it does not happen again.”

The hoodie was one of the items unveiled in the Tempest collection in a show presented by Burberry’s Chief Creative Officer Riccardo Tisci on Sunday. It has since been removed from the collection.

Criticism from Liz Kennedy — one of the British fashion house’s own models — led to online backlash. Kennedy blasted the brand in an Instagram post this week, saying that “suicide is not fashion.”

“Riccardo Tisci and everyone at Burberry it is beyond me how you could let a look resembling a noose hanging from a neck out on the runway,” she said. “How could anyone overlook this and think it would be okay to do this especially in a line dedicated to young girls and youth.”

In an emailed statement, Tisci said we was “deeply sorry for the distress” caused by the hoodie.

“While the design was inspired by a nautical theme, I realize that it was insensitive,” he said. “It does not reflect my values nor Burberry’s and we have removed it from the collection. I will make sure that this does not happen again.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: chloe taylor, photo vianney le caer, invision
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fashion, apologizes, tisci, resembling, label, theme, runway, sorry, does, hoodie, burberrys, burberry, suicide, collection, statement


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Fashion label Burberry apologizes for ‘suicide’ hoodie

Burberry apologized after a hoodie with ropes resembling a noose was featured in a catwalk event at London Fashion Week. He added that Burberry would “reflect on this, learn from it, and put in place all necessary actions to ensure it does not happen again.” The hoodie was one of the items unveiled in the Tempest collection in a show presented by Burberry’s Chief Creative Officer Riccardo Tisci on Sunday. Kennedy blasted the brand in an Instagram post this week, saying that “suicide is not fashi


Burberry apologized after a hoodie with ropes resembling a noose was featured in a catwalk event at London Fashion Week. He added that Burberry would “reflect on this, learn from it, and put in place all necessary actions to ensure it does not happen again.” The hoodie was one of the items unveiled in the Tempest collection in a show presented by Burberry’s Chief Creative Officer Riccardo Tisci on Sunday. Kennedy blasted the brand in an Instagram post this week, saying that “suicide is not fashi
Fashion label Burberry apologizes for ‘suicide’ hoodie Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: chloe taylor, photo vianney le caer, invision
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, collection, resembling, fashion, apologizes, hoodie, theme, does, label, burberrys, sorry, runway, burberry, tisci, statement, suicide


Fashion label Burberry apologizes for 'suicide' hoodie

Burberry apologized after a hoodie with ropes resembling a noose was featured in a catwalk event at London Fashion Week.

“We are deeply sorry for the distress caused by one of the products that featured in our A/W 2019 runway collection,” Marco Gobbetti, Burberry’s CEO, said in a statement emailed to CNBC.

“Though the design was inspired by the marine theme that ran throughout the collection, it was insensitive and we made a mistake.”

He added that Burberry would “reflect on this, learn from it, and put in place all necessary actions to ensure it does not happen again.”

The hoodie was one of the items unveiled in the Tempest collection in a show presented by Burberry’s Chief Creative Officer Riccardo Tisci on Sunday. It has since been removed from the collection.

Criticism from Liz Kennedy — one of the British fashion house’s own models — led to online backlash. Kennedy blasted the brand in an Instagram post this week, saying that “suicide is not fashion.”

“Riccardo Tisci and everyone at Burberry it is beyond me how you could let a look resembling a noose hanging from a neck out on the runway,” she said. “How could anyone overlook this and think it would be okay to do this especially in a line dedicated to young girls and youth.”

In an emailed statement, Tisci said we was “deeply sorry for the distress” caused by the hoodie.

“While the design was inspired by a nautical theme, I realize that it was insensitive,” he said. “It does not reflect my values nor Burberry’s and we have removed it from the collection. I will make sure that this does not happen again.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: chloe taylor, photo vianney le caer, invision
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, collection, resembling, fashion, apologizes, hoodie, theme, does, label, burberrys, sorry, runway, burberry, tisci, statement, suicide


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Mark Cuban to Mavericks sexual harassment victims: ‘I’m just sorry I didn’t see it’

In an emotional interview with ESPN, Cuban issued an apology to the victims and families who were affected by these incidents. “I’m just sorry I didn’t see it,” he said. Cuban continued, saying, “In hindsight, it was staring me right in the face and I missed it.” “The way I felt is nothing compared to the way [the victims] felt,” said an emotional Cuban. Don’t miss: 5 ways men can address—and help prevent—sexual harassment at work


In an emotional interview with ESPN, Cuban issued an apology to the victims and families who were affected by these incidents. “I’m just sorry I didn’t see it,” he said. Cuban continued, saying, “In hindsight, it was staring me right in the face and I missed it.” “The way I felt is nothing compared to the way [the victims] felt,” said an emotional Cuban. Don’t miss: 5 ways men can address—and help prevent—sexual harassment at work
Mark Cuban to Mavericks sexual harassment victims: ‘I’m just sorry I didn’t see it’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-19  Authors: courtney connley, omar vega, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, culture, way, investigation, work, sorry, cuban, sexual, harassment, im, didnt, behavior, mavericks, victims, mark, workplace, help


Mark Cuban to Mavericks sexual harassment victims: 'I'm just sorry I didn't see it'

The Dallas Mavericks released the full results of a seven-month investigation on Wednesday that found “numerous instances of sexual harassment and other improper workplace conduct” had taken place over the past 20 years at the organization, according to the Dallas Morning News.

Sports Illustrated first reported the allegations in an exclusive story in February. After interviewing more than a dozen current and former employees, the outlet described the corporate culture as “rife with misogyny and predatory sexual behavior” including “public fondling by the team president; outright domestic assault by a high-profile member of the Mavs.com staff; unsupportive or even intimidating responses from superiors who heard complaints of inappropriate behavior from their employees; even an employee who openly watched pornography at his desk.”

The investigation found no wrongdoing by Mavericks owner Mark Cuban, but due to what the investigation deemed “institutional and other failures,” Cuban has agreed to donate $10 million to organizations that support the leadership and development of women in sports and that work to combat domestic violence.

In an emotional interview with ESPN, Cuban issued an apology to the victims and families who were affected by these incidents.

“I’m just sorry I didn’t see it,” he said. “I’m sorry I didn’t recognize it. I just hope that out of this we’ll be better and we can avoid it and we help make everybody just smarter about the whole thing.”

Cuban continued, saying, “In hindsight, it was staring me right in the face and I missed it.” Cuban says he wishes he had paid closer attention to the business of the organization.

NBA Commissioner Adam Silver issued a statement calling the findings of the investigation “disturbing and heartbreaking.”

“No employee in the NBA, or any workplace for that matter, should be subject to the type of working environment described in the report,” he said, according to USA Today Sports.

Cuban reacted quickly when allegations became public earlier this year, hiring former AT&T executive Cynthia Marshall as interim CEO to help bring change to the organization’s culture. Silver praised Cuban for making quick executive changes at the company but said, “as Mark has acknowledged, he is ultimately responsible for the culture and conduct of his employees.”

Cuban emphasized in his interview with ESPN that he was unaware of Mavericks CEO Terdema Ussery’s alleged behavior, and said that never in his “wildest dreams” did he think something like this was happening at the organization.

“The way I felt is nothing compared to the way [the victims] felt,” said an emotional Cuban. “I mean, I have to recognize I made a mistake, learn from it and then try to fix it.”

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Don’t miss: 5 ways men can address—and help prevent—sexual harassment at work


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-19  Authors: courtney connley, omar vega, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, culture, way, investigation, work, sorry, cuban, sexual, harassment, im, didnt, behavior, mavericks, victims, mark, workplace, help


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Sorry, Elon—these days, only 50% of marijuana is smoked, GTI CEO says

Sorry, Elon—these days, only 50% of marijuana is smoked, GTI CEO says10 Hours AgoJim Cramer sits down with Green Thumb Industries CEO Ben Kovler, who discusses changing trends in the U.S. marijuana market and how his company is positioning to take share.


Sorry, Elon—these days, only 50% of marijuana is smoked, GTI CEO says10 Hours AgoJim Cramer sits down with Green Thumb Industries CEO Ben Kovler, who discusses changing trends in the U.S. marijuana market and how his company is positioning to take share.
Sorry, Elon—these days, only 50% of marijuana is smoked, GTI CEO says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trends, days, smoked, share, gti, sorry, ceo, thumb, says10, elonthese, marijuana, 50, positioning, sits


Sorry, Elon—these days, only 50% of marijuana is smoked, GTI CEO says

Sorry, Elon—these days, only 50% of marijuana is smoked, GTI CEO says

10 Hours Ago

Jim Cramer sits down with Green Thumb Industries CEO Ben Kovler, who discusses changing trends in the U.S. marijuana market and how his company is positioning to take share.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trends, days, smoked, share, gti, sorry, ceo, thumb, says10, elonthese, marijuana, 50, positioning, sits


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Warren Buffett: ‘There’s other things in life I want to do than tweet’ (Hint, hint, Elon Musk)

Sorry, Twitter-sphere, the Oracle of Omaha has better things to do than tweet. “I just think there’s other things in life I want to do than tweet. I am not that desperate for somebody to hear my opinion,” says Warren Buffett in an exclusive interview with CNBC’s Becky Quick on Thursday. “I put out an annual report. I do not have a daily view on all kinds of things,” says the billionaire Berkshire Hathaway chairman and CEO.


Sorry, Twitter-sphere, the Oracle of Omaha has better things to do than tweet. “I just think there’s other things in life I want to do than tweet. I am not that desperate for somebody to hear my opinion,” says Warren Buffett in an exclusive interview with CNBC’s Becky Quick on Thursday. “I put out an annual report. I do not have a daily view on all kinds of things,” says the billionaire Berkshire Hathaway chairman and CEO.
Warren Buffett: ‘There’s other things in life I want to do than tweet’ (Hint, hint, Elon Musk) Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-31  Authors: catherine clifford, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hint, things, musk, tweeti, thursdayi, think, somebody, life, theres, elon, view, sorry, warren, buffett, twittersphere


Warren Buffett: 'There's other things in life I want to do than tweet' (Hint, hint, Elon Musk)

Sorry, Twitter-sphere, the Oracle of Omaha has better things to do than tweet.

“I just think there’s other things in life I want to do than tweet. I am not that desperate for somebody to hear my opinion,” says Warren Buffett in an exclusive interview with CNBC’s Becky Quick on Thursday.

“I put out an annual report. I do not have a daily view on all kinds of things,” says the billionaire Berkshire Hathaway chairman and CEO.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-31  Authors: catherine clifford, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hint, things, musk, tweeti, thursdayi, think, somebody, life, theres, elon, view, sorry, warren, buffett, twittersphere


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