AT&T will soon automatically block annoying robocalls

AT&T said this week that it will soon block spam calls or alert customers of suspected spammers. The FCC mandated in February that U.S. carriers need to help stop spam calls. T-Mobile already offers customers two free tools, Scam Block and Scam ID, but Scam Block needs to be turned on first. The Google Pixel 3 and Pixel 3a can automatically screen calls for you, while iOS 13, which will roll out this fall, uses Siri to automatically silence calls from unknown numbers. Correction: A previous vers


AT&T said this week that it will soon block spam calls or alert customers of suspected spammers. The FCC mandated in February that U.S. carriers need to help stop spam calls. T-Mobile already offers customers two free tools, Scam Block and Scam ID, but Scam Block needs to be turned on first. The Google Pixel 3 and Pixel 3a can automatically screen calls for you, while iOS 13, which will roll out this fall, uses Siri to automatically silence calls from unknown numbers. Correction: A previous vers
AT&T will soon automatically block annoying robocalls Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, att, customers, calls, soon, annoying, scam, users, automatically, suspected, spam, robocalls, turned, unwanted, block


AT&T will soon automatically block annoying robocalls

AT&T said this week that it will soon block spam calls or alert customers of suspected spammers. The blocking will first activate for new lines and will then be applied to all existing accounts, the carrier said on Tuesday.

The feature will be on by default but can be turned off by users who don’t want it, per rules set by the Federal Communications Commission that require carriers to let customers opt out.

The FCC mandated in February that U.S. carriers need to help stop spam calls. Hiya, a spam-blocking app, estimates that 25.3 billion unwanted robocalls were received by U.S. wireless customers in the first half of this year alone, even to people who are registered on the Do Not Call list.

AT&T’s service is the first that will be on by default, instead of requiring users to opt in or download a separate app.

T-Mobile already offers customers two free tools, Scam Block and Scam ID, but Scam Block needs to be turned on first. Sprint charges a $2.99 fee for Premium Caller ID, and Verizon alerts customers if a call is from a suspected spammer. Google and Apple have worked to add spam blocking into Android and iOS too.

The Google Pixel 3 and Pixel 3a can automatically screen calls for you, while iOS 13, which will roll out this fall, uses Siri to automatically silence calls from unknown numbers.

Correction: A previous version of this story included an incorrect number of unwanted robocalls.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, att, customers, calls, soon, annoying, scam, users, automatically, suspected, spam, robocalls, turned, unwanted, block


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Kimchi stew, Spam and rice: Netflix film ‘Always Be My Maybe’ celebrates Asian cuisine in American life

Characters Marcus Kim and Sasha Tran eat together after reconnecting as adults in the Netflix film “Always Be My Maybe.” Kimchi jjigae or kimchi stew is heavily featured in the film in all of its steaming, fiery-red glory. Kimchi consumption at restaurants increased more than 16% this year as fusion dishes like kimchi pizza, kimchi grilled cheese and kimchi fries have started trending, according to market research firm NPD. Ku said the Spam, rice and furikake dish Sasha makes in the opening scen


Characters Marcus Kim and Sasha Tran eat together after reconnecting as adults in the Netflix film “Always Be My Maybe.” Kimchi jjigae or kimchi stew is heavily featured in the film in all of its steaming, fiery-red glory. Kimchi consumption at restaurants increased more than 16% this year as fusion dishes like kimchi pizza, kimchi grilled cheese and kimchi fries have started trending, according to market research firm NPD. Ku said the Spam, rice and furikake dish Sasha makes in the opening scen
Kimchi stew, Spam and rice: Netflix film ‘Always Be My Maybe’ celebrates Asian cuisine in American life Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-15  Authors: elizabeth myong, huileng tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cuisine, life, spam, kimchi, rice, stew, sasha, maybe, jjigae, jollibee, restaurant, food, celebrates, netflix, film


Kimchi stew, Spam and rice: Netflix film 'Always Be My Maybe' celebrates Asian cuisine in American life

Characters Marcus Kim and Sasha Tran eating together as teenagers in the Netflix film “Always Be My Maybe” Netflix

It’s 1996 in San Francisco and a young Marcus Kim does not want to be “that” kid at school – the one sitting in the corner of the lunchroom with the stinky, bright-red kimchi jjigae, a type of Korean stew. Desperate to avoid humiliation, he runs next door to his friend Sasha Tran, begging her to help his family finish the kimchi jjigae before school the next day. “Nobody wants to sit next to that kid with thermos soup!” Marcus says frantically. “Only the other kids with thermos soup, and I don’t want to sit next to those losers!” Sasha jokingly closes the door in his dejected face before opening it again smiling and laughing. She agrees to run next door and join his family for dinner: “You’re like my best friend,” she says. The new Netflix film “Always Be My Maybe” is the story of childhood sweethearts Marcus, played by Randall Park, and Sasha, played by Ali Wong, who have a falling out as teenagers only to reconnect later in life. Loosely inspired by the classic “When Harry Met Sally,” food plays a central role in the film, but it trades in pastrami sandwiches at Katz’s Deli for shumai, chicken feet, Spam and rice, and kimchi jjigae. Flash forward to 2019 in the film and times have changed. Kimchi jjigae is now a trendy food being sold at a restaurant run by a celebrity chef – who is none other than Sasha Tran.

Characters Marcus Kim and Sasha Tran eat together after reconnecting as adults in the Netflix film “Always Be My Maybe.” Netflix

The film is fictional, but Americans growing taste for Asian cuisine is not. From 2004-2018, sales for limited-service restaurants specializing in Asian-Pacific cuisine grew 114% in the U.S., according to Euromonitor International. Niki Nakayama, chef and owner of the Michelin-starred n/naka, worked as a food consultant for “Always Be My Maybe,” bringing to life the dishes at the film’s fictional restaurant Maximalist. Nakayama, who has been known to carefully track her diners’ preferences, said she’s noticed that people are more open minded than ever before. “I think nowadays, people are definitely open to trying everything a lot more than they used to be just because of the exposure,” she said. Her award-winning restaurant n/naka is one of the only in the Western world that specializes in Kaiseki, a traditional multicourse Japanese meal. Diners must make reservations months in advance to even have a chance of securing a spot at her restaurant. Nakayama said Japanese food can have unfamiliar textures or tastes to those who don’t typically eat it, but she sees that as part of its beauty.

Ali Wong (left) and Chef Niki Nakayama behind-the-scenes during the filming of “Always Be My Maybe.” Source: Netflix

“There are a lot of things that are slimy, sticky, chewy, firm and bite you back even though you don’t want it to,” she said with a chuckle. “For ourselves, we have to be mindful of that when we’re serving people things that may be of different textures and flavors. We do our part by sending out things in smaller doses so that it becomes something that they can acclimate towards.” Kimchi jjigae or kimchi stew is heavily featured in the film in all of its steaming, fiery-red glory. It’s a lesser-known dish, but American diners have become much more familiar with kimchi in recent years. Kimchi consumption at restaurants increased more than 16% this year as fusion dishes like kimchi pizza, kimchi grilled cheese and kimchi fries have started trending, according to market research firm NPD.

Kimchi jjigae Source: Netflix

And Robert Ji-Song Ku, a food studies professor at SUNY Binghamton in New York, said audiences shouldn’t be surprised to see Spam in the film’s opening scene. He has extensively studied the trend of “dubious foods” becoming mainstream, a topic he has written on extensively in his book “Dubious Gastronomy: The Cultural Politics of Eating Asian in the USA.” Ku said the Spam, rice and furikake dish Sasha makes in the opening scene would not have been viewed so positively years ago. Once seen as a lesser substitute or just bad, the canned meat is now a favorite to add a salty, fatty flavor to many Asian dishes.

A young Sasha Tran makes Spam, rice and furikake in the opening scene of “Always Be My Maybe” Source: Netflix

Hormel Foods, which owns Spam, experienced its fourth consecutive year of growth in 2019 and expects the trend to continue. CEO Jim Spree told CNBC in an interview that the company has noticed the growing demand of Spam. “We know consumers are connecting with it [spam] in ways they never have before,” he said. In fact, now Spam is frequently used in Korean budae jjigae or army stew, Japanese musubi which is nori-wrapped rice and meat, and Hawaiian loco moco or rice bowl. In terms of rising trends, Ku believes that Filipino food will be the next big thing. He said with the public’s increasing familiarity with Asian food, diners are more eager to experience new flavor profiles. One of the most obvious signs of this growth is Jollibee Foods, a Filipino fast-dining chain which started in the 1970s with just two ice cream parlors and now has an estimated 4,300 stores in 21 countries. In an interview with CNBC, Jollibee CEO Ernesto Tanmantiong said he wants to give McDonald’s and KFC a run for their money “hopefully in the future.” Tanmantiong is confident about the growing taste for Jollibee in the U.S. When Jollibee opened its first store in New York City last year, he said the first day of sales “went far beyond our expectations”. “What pleasantly surprised us was the number of non-Filipinos visiting our stores,” he said. “We observed that actually 50% of the customers who went to our stores were actually non-Filipinos.”

Customers dine inside a Jollibee restaurant on April 11, 2018 in Milan, Italy. Jollibee Food Corporation, a Filipino chain of fast food restaurants and the largest Asian food services company, has chosen Milan, home of the biggest Filipino community in Europe, to open its first European branch. Emanuele Cremaschi / Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-15  Authors: elizabeth myong, huileng tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cuisine, life, spam, kimchi, rice, stew, sasha, maybe, jjigae, jollibee, restaurant, food, celebrates, netflix, film


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YouTube removed 1.6 million channels last quarter, mostly for being spam or scams

YouTube removed 7.85 million videos and 1.67 million channels between July and September, according to its latest YouTube Community Guidelines enforcement report. This is the fourth such report YouTube has published, but the first that includes information about removing channels, versus just individual videos. YouTube says that most of the videos it removed — 79.6 percent — violated its policies on spam, misleading content or scams, while 12.6 percent were removed for nudity or sexual content.


YouTube removed 7.85 million videos and 1.67 million channels between July and September, according to its latest YouTube Community Guidelines enforcement report. This is the fourth such report YouTube has published, but the first that includes information about removing channels, versus just individual videos. YouTube says that most of the videos it removed — 79.6 percent — violated its policies on spam, misleading content or scams, while 12.6 percent were removed for nudity or sexual content.
YouTube removed 1.6 million channels last quarter, mostly for being spam or scams Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-13  Authors: jillian donfro, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, conspiracy, million, 16, view, content, videos, violence, youtube, channels, spam, removed, report, quarter, scams


YouTube removed 1.6 million channels last quarter, mostly for being spam or scams

Google’s battle against inappropriate content on its video platform rages on.

YouTube removed 7.85 million videos and 1.67 million channels between July and September, according to its latest YouTube Community Guidelines enforcement report. This is the fourth such report YouTube has published, but the first that includes information about removing channels, versus just individual videos.

YouTube will delete a channel entirely if it receives three strikes within three months or commits a single egregious violation, like child sexual exploitation. The most high-profile removal of the year came in August, when YouTube deleted the channel of right-wing conspiracy theorist and InfoWars radio host Alex Jones.

YouTube says that most of the videos it removed — 79.6 percent — violated its policies on spam, misleading content or scams, while 12.6 percent were removed for nudity or sexual content. Only about 1 percent of channels were removed for promotion of violence, violent extremism, harassment or hateful or abusive content, although videos of that nature have attracted the most scrutiny in the past year.

The site has been the recent the subject of several investigations showing how it highlights extreme content, like conspiracy theories or hyperpartisan points of view, over more measured videos. Google CEO Sundar Pichai was grilled during his congressional testimony earlier this week about a specific a conspiracy theory about Hillary Clinton and other politicians and celebrities drinking children’s blood.

Pichai said that YouTube is “constantly undertaking efforts to deal with misinformation,” but that there was “more work to be done.”

The crux of the issue is that while YouTube’s “Community Guidelines” include removing videos that “incite harm or violence,” it does not remove videos simply for containing falsehoods. Although conspiracies, like the infamous #Pizzagate theory that led to shooting in a Washington, D.C., pizza shop, may ultimately inspire acts of violence, the videos don’t explicitly do so, which means that YouTube generally won’t remove them. In the past year, YouTube has made efforts to surface more authoritative content and has started linking videos that promote conspiracy theories to “fact-based” sites like Wikipedia pages. Late last year, Google vowed to have 10,000 people focused on content violations by the end of 2018, and a spokesperson tells CNBC that it’s on target to hit that goal.

YouTube said that 80 percent of the videos it removed in the third quarter were first detected by machines and that of those, 74.5 percent never received a single view.

For the first time, YouTube also broke out the number of violative comments it removed: 224 million in the third quarter.

You can view the full report here.

WATCH: Google’s Larry Page has backed two flying-car start-ups — here’s a look inside one of them


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-13  Authors: jillian donfro, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, conspiracy, million, 16, view, content, videos, violence, youtube, channels, spam, removed, report, quarter, scams


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Google Maps spam fighters

Yet several months later, Waddington noticed that someone had created very similar listings and reviews from fresh accounts. Alphabet investors see Google Maps as a huge, untapped opportunity. Google’s other mapping app, Waze, recently launched new local business ads that could be a blueprint for Maps’ eventual strategy. This hurts both honest business owners who don’t use deceptive tactics and consumers who have come to rely on Google Maps to find information about the world around them. They s


Yet several months later, Waddington noticed that someone had created very similar listings and reviews from fresh accounts. Alphabet investors see Google Maps as a huge, untapped opportunity. Google’s other mapping app, Waze, recently launched new local business ads that could be a blueprint for Maps’ eventual strategy. This hurts both honest business owners who don’t use deceptive tactics and consumers who have come to rely on Google Maps to find information about the world around them. They s
Google Maps spam fighters Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-13  Authors: jillian donfro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spam, local, service, fighters, listings, waddington, business, maps, issues, reviews, later, google


Google Maps spam fighters

“I looked into it later and found over 40 listings that were part of this ring of fake listings for a nurse practitioner service that comes to you,” Waddington says. He reported them all, as well as the profiles that had written reviews for every one of them. Google deleted the bunch. Yet several months later, Waddington noticed that someone had created very similar listings and reviews from fresh accounts.

“Maps is still really the Wild West,” he tells CNBC.

Alphabet investors see Google Maps as a huge, untapped opportunity. Morgan Stanley analyst Brian Nowak has called the service the “most under-monetized” asset he covers. Google’s other mapping app, Waze, recently launched new local business ads that could be a blueprint for Maps’ eventual strategy.

But the service is plagued by fake reviews, ghost listings, lead generation schemes and impersonators. This hurts both honest business owners who don’t use deceptive tactics and consumers who have come to rely on Google Maps to find information about the world around them.

Google says it’s in a “constant race with local business spammers” and that it’s “heavily invested” in getting users to contribute and flag issues, while also using manual and automated systems to detect fraud.

In the last year, Google has come under fire for how much it relies on outsiders to help it find

, incorrect responses through its Home smart speaker and inappropriate videos in the trending section on YouTube.

There’s a volunteer army to fight these Maps scams, too. Waddington is part of a group of passionate “Top Contributors,” who spend countless unpaid hours answering questions and reporting spam. Many, like Waddington, have also built marketing businesses around advising people on how to legitimately use Maps’ tools, and are feeling increasingly flabbergasted that Google hasn’t found a better way to curb the abuse they can turn up so easily. They say the issues with Maps are getting worse and deserve to be in the spotlight.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-13  Authors: jillian donfro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spam, local, service, fighters, listings, waddington, business, maps, issues, reviews, later, google


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More spam calls? Do not call list violations, complaints 2017 from FTC

There were nearly 7.2 million complaints about violations to the U.S. “Do Not Call” registry this year, a big surge from the more than 5.3 million complaints in 2016. The figure is almost double the nearly 3.6 million complaints in 2015. For every 100,000 New Jersey residents, there were almost 3,600 complaints about spam calls, the FTC said. New Jersey and New Hampshire residents were also among the most likely to be on the “do not call” list. Here’s a full breakdown of state rankings by the FT


There were nearly 7.2 million complaints about violations to the U.S. “Do Not Call” registry this year, a big surge from the more than 5.3 million complaints in 2016. The figure is almost double the nearly 3.6 million complaints in 2015. For every 100,000 New Jersey residents, there were almost 3,600 complaints about spam calls, the FTC said. New Jersey and New Hampshire residents were also among the most likely to be on the “do not call” list. Here’s a full breakdown of state rankings by the FT
More spam calls? Do not call list violations, complaints 2017 from FTC Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-12-18  Authors: anita balakrishnan, bill hinton, moment mobile, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, registry, million, jersey, calls, 2017, ftc, hampshire, violations, 100000, nearly, residents, complaints, list, spam


More spam calls? Do not call list violations, complaints 2017 from FTC

There were nearly 7.2 million complaints about violations to the U.S. “Do Not Call” registry this year, a big surge from the more than 5.3 million complaints in 2016.

The figure is almost double the nearly 3.6 million complaints in 2015.

New Jersey had the highest density of complaints on the “do not call” registry in 2017, according to new data released by the Federal Trade Commission on Monday.

For every 100,000 New Jersey residents, there were almost 3,600 complaints about spam calls, the FTC said. Delaware, Florida, Virginia and New Hampshire followed close behind with over 2,700 complaints per 100,000 residents. New Jersey and New Hampshire residents were also among the most likely to be on the “do not call” list.

Alaska, Hawaii, Missouri and North Dakota were relatively spam-free this year, the report said, with fewer than 1,400 complaints per 100,000 residents.

Robocalls were the worst offenders, and the most common topic, by far, was reducing debt. Other popular spam call topics were for timeshares, warranties and medical-related calls, according to the FTC. July and August appeared to be the peak time for spam calls.

The deluge could subside soon: Earlier this year, the Federal Communications Commission gave phone companies more power to block robocalls.

Here’s a full breakdown of state rankings by the FTC and some tips on how to cut down on spam callers:

Most “do not call” list violation complaints per 100,000 residents (source FTC)


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-12-18  Authors: anita balakrishnan, bill hinton, moment mobile, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, registry, million, jersey, calls, 2017, ftc, hampshire, violations, 100000, nearly, residents, complaints, list, spam


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