Americans spend over $1,000 a year on lotto tickets

Despite the long odds, thousands of Americans will buy tickets for a chance to win. Consumers each spend an average of about $86 a month on lottery tickets, including everything from scratch-off cards that come out of vending machines to entries for the Powerball and Mega Millions competitions. Spending several hundred dollars a year on lottery tickets can make a big dent in your budget. Yet Americans earning less than $30,000 admit to spending about 13% of their income on lottery tickets, Bankr


Despite the long odds, thousands of Americans will buy tickets for a chance to win.
Consumers each spend an average of about $86 a month on lottery tickets, including everything from scratch-off cards that come out of vending machines to entries for the Powerball and Mega Millions competitions.
Spending several hundred dollars a year on lottery tickets can make a big dent in your budget.
Yet Americans earning less than $30,000 admit to spending about 13% of their income on lottery tickets, Bankr
Americans spend over $1,000 a year on lotto tickets Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-12  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, according, lottery, 1000, savings, things, spend, chance, clarke, month, spending, americans, lotto, tickets


Americans spend over $1,000 a year on lotto tickets

You have about a one in 302,575,350 chance of winning the Mega Millions $340 million jackpot that’s up for grabs in Friday night’s drawing.

To put that in perspective, you have a far greater chance of being attacked by a grizzly bear while on vacation at a U.S. National Park. And even that only happens every one in 2.7 million visits, according to the National Park Service.

Despite the long odds, thousands of Americans will buy tickets for a chance to win. About half of Americans play state lotteries, with total sales topping $71 billion in 2017 (the most recent year on file), according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Consumers each spend an average of about $86 a month on lottery tickets, including everything from scratch-off cards that come out of vending machines to entries for the Powerball and Mega Millions competitions.

Spending on lotto tickets adds up to about $1,038 each year per consumer, according to a recent survey commissioned by Bankrate of over 2,300 U.S. adults. It’s worth noting that Bankrate’s results are slightly higher than the $70 a month that the Bureau of Labor Statistics found the average American spent between the third quarter of 2017 and the second quarter of 2018.

Spending several hundred dollars a year on lottery tickets can make a big dent in your budget. Especially if your paycheck isn’t that big to begin with. Yet Americans earning less than $30,000 admit to spending about 13% of their income on lottery tickets, Bankrate found.

“$1 means different things to different people,” says Aaron Clarke, a certified financial planner with Halpern Financial. A person who makes $500,000 per year probably isn’t worried about $1,000 nearly as much as someone who makes $30,000. “That same $1,000 means much more to you when you make less,” Clarke says.

But this type of spending is far from an outlier. Compared to lottery ticket sales, Americans spend more each month on things such as cable, subscription boxes and rideshare apps like Uber and Lyft, as well as daily purchases such as lunch, takeout dinners and drinks with friends. Impulse purchases alone amount to $109 per month, according to a poll of 2,000 U.S. adults commissioned by Ladder and conducted by OnePoll in April.

There are psychological reasons why Americans continue to play the lottery even though they know the odds, writes Penn State psychology professor Kevin Bennett. Humans are wired to have unrealistic optimism when it comes to the probability of something happening, for one.

It’s also a habit that’s easy to rationalize, since a chance to play typically only sets you back a buck or two. “Similar to smoking, the lottery is easier to justify when you only buy one pack at a time or one ticket every day,” Bennett writes. “It looks a lot less tempting, though, when you consider the total sum of money spent.”

If you are looking to curb your spending on guilty pleasures like lottery tickets, Clarke recommends creating a long-term financial plan that can then be broken down into a monthly budget. “If someone would like to accomplish other things like college savings, retirement savings or paying off debt, then having the plan to refer to helps remind you that they have a higher priority than this spending,” Clarke says.

The most important thing to remember is to ask yourself: Did I plan for this purchase? If you did, and you’re still meeting all the other expenses and savings goals you have in place, then spending $1,000 on lottery tickets really isn’t as impactful, Clarke adds.

Don’t miss: Here are 3 mistakes to avoid if you win a jackpot

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-12  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, according, lottery, 1000, savings, things, spend, chance, clarke, month, spending, americans, lotto, tickets


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Chevron CEO defends massive write down, saying good performance ‘isn’t good enough’

Chevron Chairman and CEO Michael Wirth defended the energy giant’s expected fourth-quarter write-down of up to $11 billion of assets, saying that while “business is good,” it could be better. “Good isn’t good enough,” Wirth said on CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” The nation’s second-largest oil company is also considering selling some natural gas projects and may sell shale gas properties. “We regularly take a look at long-term outlook for commodity markets,” Wirth said. Chevron will also spend $2.8 billio


Chevron Chairman and CEO Michael Wirth defended the energy giant’s expected fourth-quarter write-down of up to $11 billion of assets, saying that while “business is good,” it could be better.
“Good isn’t good enough,” Wirth said on CNBC’s “Squawk Box.”
The nation’s second-largest oil company is also considering selling some natural gas projects and may sell shale gas properties.
“We regularly take a look at long-term outlook for commodity markets,” Wirth said.
Chevron will also spend $2.8 billio
Chevron CEO defends massive write down, saying good performance ‘isn’t good enough’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-11  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spend, saying, write, performance, good, ceo, oil, billion, isnt, gas, wirth, spending, defends, massive, assets, shale, plans, chevron, markets


Chevron CEO defends massive write down, saying good performance 'isn't good enough'

Chevron Chairman and CEO Michael Wirth defended the energy giant’s expected fourth-quarter write-down of up to $11 billion of assets, saying that while “business is good,” it could be better.

“Good isn’t good enough,” Wirth said on CNBC’s “Squawk Box.”

Chevron said on Tuesday it plans to write down the value of its assets by $10 billion to $11 billion in the current quarter, relating to a deepwater Gulf of Mexico project and shale gas in Appalachia. The nation’s second-largest oil company is also considering selling some natural gas projects and may sell shale gas properties.

“We regularly take a look at long-term outlook for commodity markets,” Wirth said. “As we do that, we also look at assets and which will deliver the highest returns on investment for our shareholders.”

Wirth added that the company’s assets in the U.S. Northeast, and some in Canada, “simply don’t compete as well for our investment dollar as others do.”

California-based Chevron has said it plans to hold its 2020 spending program at $20 billion, joining other energy firms in restraining spending after the collapse in oil prices earlier this decade.

Wirth noted that the $20 billion price tag is a hefty cost, but said that it’s been cut in half cover the past five years.

“We’ve actually brought our spending down as commodity markets reset — and I like to tell our people, in a commodity business, capital discipline always matters and cost discipline always matters,” he added.

The company plans to spend $4 billion next year in the Permian Basin, the top U.S. oil field in Texas and New Mexico, and another $1 billion on international shale projects. It had planned to spend around $5.2 billion this year.

Chevron will also spend $2.8 billion on its business that refines, transports and markets fuels and petrochemicals, up about $300 million from this year’s budget.

Last month, Chevron, which has been a strong-performer among the oil majors, reported a 36% drop in third-quarter profit, hit by lower oil and gas prices and refining margins. It also warned higher costs would affect fourth-quarter results.

— Reuters contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-11  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spend, saying, write, performance, good, ceo, oil, billion, isnt, gas, wirth, spending, defends, massive, assets, shale, plans, chevron, markets


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Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan says confident consumers are spending 5.5% more this year

Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan said Wednesday the lender’s customers spent about 5.5% more this year over 2018, a bullish sign for the U.S. economy. “People are spending, and that’s good news for the U.S. economy,” Moynihan told CNBC’s Wilfred Frost on “Squawk Alley.” “That helps sustain this long, long growth session we’ve had.” Moynihan said the data comes from more than $3 trillion in Bank of America card transactions, checks and ATM withdrawals. Bank of America shares have surged 37% thi


Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan said Wednesday the lender’s customers spent about 5.5% more this year over 2018, a bullish sign for the U.S. economy.
“People are spending, and that’s good news for the U.S. economy,” Moynihan told CNBC’s Wilfred Frost on “Squawk Alley.”
“That helps sustain this long, long growth session we’ve had.”
Moynihan said the data comes from more than $3 trillion in Bank of America card transactions, checks and ATM withdrawals.
Bank of America shares have surged 37% thi
Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan says confident consumers are spending 5.5% more this year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-11  Authors: hugh son
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, withdrawalsearlier, trillion, america, consumers, brian, weve, moynihan, revenue, wilfred, spending, told, bank, ceo, confident, long


Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan says confident consumers are spending 5.5% more this year

Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan said Wednesday the lender’s customers spent about 5.5% more this year over 2018, a bullish sign for the U.S. economy.

“People are spending, and that’s good news for the U.S. economy,” Moynihan told CNBC’s Wilfred Frost on “Squawk Alley.” “That helps sustain this long, long growth session we’ve had.”

Moynihan said the data comes from more than $3 trillion in Bank of America card transactions, checks and ATM withdrawals.

Earlier Wednesday, Moynihan told analysts at a conference that fourth-quarter trading revenue is expected to climb 7% to 8% from a year earlier, and that investment banking revenue was headed 3% to 4% higher.

Bank of America shares have surged 37% this year amid a broad rebound in bank stocks.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-11  Authors: hugh son
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, withdrawalsearlier, trillion, america, consumers, brian, weve, moynihan, revenue, wilfred, spending, told, bank, ceo, confident, long


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This brilliant spending strategy is helping one couple pay off $400,000 in student loans in 5 years

Kayla, 32, and Ryan, 33, finished their graduate programs in 2014 with degrees in physical therapy and prosthetics and orthotics, respectively — and a combined 24 student loans. The principal on the couple’s student debt added up to $336,676.17 and it has kept growing, with interest averaging 6.5% across all of their loans. To help them focus on debt repayment, the couple turned to a new spending strategy: a zero-based budget, where your income minus your expenses equals zero and there’s no room


Kayla, 32, and Ryan, 33, finished their graduate programs in 2014 with degrees in physical therapy and prosthetics and orthotics, respectively — and a combined 24 student loans.
The principal on the couple’s student debt added up to $336,676.17 and it has kept growing, with interest averaging 6.5% across all of their loans.
To help them focus on debt repayment, the couple turned to a new spending strategy: a zero-based budget, where your income minus your expenses equals zero and there’s no room
This brilliant spending strategy is helping one couple pay off $400,000 in student loans in 5 years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-10  Authors: ivana pino
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, month, zerobased, strategy, student, ryan, spending, pay, budget, debt, income, loans, couple, 400000, kayla, helping, brilliant, theyve, andersons


This brilliant spending strategy is helping one couple pay off $400,000 in student loans in 5 years

For Kayla and Ryan Anderson, “zero” doesn’t just represent their goal of being debt-free. It’s also a key number in the spending strategy they’re using to get there. Kayla, 32, and Ryan, 33, finished their graduate programs in 2014 with degrees in physical therapy and prosthetics and orthotics, respectively — and a combined 24 student loans. The principal on the couple’s student debt added up to $336,676.17 and it has kept growing, with interest averaging 6.5% across all of their loans. Their four largest loans accrued interest at a rate of 7.9%. To help them focus on debt repayment, the couple turned to a new spending strategy: a zero-based budget, where your income minus your expenses equals zero and there’s no room for frivolous spending. They adopted it as part of a commitment to Dave Ramsey’s Seven Baby Steps, the second of which is to pay off all of your debt using the snowball method and knock out your smallest balances first. “It’s those structures and that system that have helped us learn a financial lifestyle that is sustainable,” says Kayla. “It’s not like a quick-fix diet.” More from Grow:

The one big decision that can help you get out of debt faster

3 simple ways to cut travel costs this holiday season

What’s best to buy from Costco for your holiday parties Since 2016, they’ve been chronicling their journey on the Instagram account @DumpingDebtWithDave, where they’ve shared their challenges and victories with over 6,000 followers, and connected with others who owed six figures. “What I’m finding is that we are not alone in this,” says Kayla. After almost five years, seven baby steps, one baby, 12 different jobs and countless hours of overtime, the Andersons have repaid $377,744, and are on track to pay off the remainder by December 2019. That means they’ll have paid back about $400,000 total in five years.

Strategy: A Zero-Based Budget

A zero-dollar based budget ensures that every cent is working towards a greater goal — in this case, being debt-free. Each month, the Andersons kick off their zero-based budget by calculating their combined income and breaking their expenses into different categories. Kayla, a physical therapist, and Ryan, a product development engineer, earn an average combined income of around $115,000 — although that number can fluctuate depending on how many overtime hours they pick up, and what Ryan brings in doing bike tuneups as a side hustle. When they sit down to do their monthly budget, they set micro-goals — like paying off $5,000 a month in debt — and check in on long-term goals, like paying off their debt in full by Christmas 2019. That way, even with income fluctuations, they’ve managed to maintain a strict budget that allows for that steep monthly loan payment.

Ryan Anderson drafts the family budget. Provided

Here’s what their zero-based budget looks like: Categories like food ($400), rent ($1,100), or transportation ($125) are “fixed” expenses that remain the same month to month. Everything else falls under “extras” which include their phone and internet bills ($30 apiece). They also put money aside for emergencies, like car repairs. And they include $50 ($25 each) for “fun money” in the budget to spend as they wish. After allocating funds into those categories, every extra penny goes towards debt, says Kayla. In most months, they put about $4,500 toward their balances. Any extra income from side hustles or tax refunds also goes to reducing their debt; their largest payment was $68,000 Ryan inherited from his grandmother. Having grown up without any real financial stability, Kayla says the desire to create security for her family has motivated her to maintain this tight budget for so long.

Celebration: Root beer

Each time the Andersons reach one of their micro-goals, like paying off one of their loans, they have a micro-reward. “It seems like such a small thing, but we go and we find the fanciest root beer we can find and we split it,” says Kayla. “We just talk about how far we’ve come, and we look back at our numbers and we dream about the future. That has definitely been a big motivator to keep us on the path.” The Andersons have also shared their major updates and successes with their Instagram followers. Their most recent post shared that they’ve met their micro-goal for the month of June: getting under $30,000 of debt. They plan to go big when they become debt-free. “We’re going to get a keg of root beer,” Kayla says. “We’re just going to celebrate with our friends and family who have supported us through this whole crazy journey.”

Opportunity: College, a home, and fancy shampoo


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-10  Authors: ivana pino
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, month, zerobased, strategy, student, ryan, spending, pay, budget, debt, income, loans, couple, 400000, kayla, helping, brilliant, theyve, andersons


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Saudi 2020 budget forecasts slight drop in spending, pick-up in growth

Saudi Arabia on Monday announced a 1.02 trillion riyal ($272.00 billion) budget for 2020, a slight fall in spending that reversed three years of expenditure hikes aimed at spurring growth. Revenues in 2020 are forecast at 833 billion riyals, widening the budget deficit to 187 billion riyals, or 6.4% of gross domestic product (GDP), as compared with a projected deficit of 131 billion riyals in 2019, according to the budget document. “The (2020 budget) revenue projections look realistic in our vie


Saudi Arabia on Monday announced a 1.02 trillion riyal ($272.00 billion) budget for 2020, a slight fall in spending that reversed three years of expenditure hikes aimed at spurring growth.
Revenues in 2020 are forecast at 833 billion riyals, widening the budget deficit to 187 billion riyals, or 6.4% of gross domestic product (GDP), as compared with a projected deficit of 131 billion riyals in 2019, according to the budget document.
“The (2020 budget) revenue projections look realistic in our vie
Saudi 2020 budget forecasts slight drop in spending, pick-up in growth Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-09
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, riyals, oil, spending, saudi, billion, 2020, growth, gdp, revenue, forecasts, budget, pickup, expenditure, drop, slight


Saudi 2020 budget forecasts slight drop in spending, pick-up in growth

Saudi Arabia on Monday announced a 1.02 trillion riyal ($272.00 billion) budget for 2020, a slight fall in spending that reversed three years of expenditure hikes aimed at spurring growth.

Revenues in 2020 are forecast at 833 billion riyals, widening the budget deficit to 187 billion riyals, or 6.4% of gross domestic product (GDP), as compared with a projected deficit of 131 billion riyals in 2019, according to the budget document.

Finance Minister Mohammed al-Jadaan told reporters the 2020 budget was conservative on expenditure due to the global economic outlook, but that the government would continue to pay a cost of living allowance to citizens.

The Saudi state news agency SPA quoted Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman as saying: “The 2020 budget comes amid challenges, risks and protectionist policies facing the global economy, which requires flexibility in managing public finances and enhancing the ability of the economy to face these challenges and risks.”

The budget comes ahead of the listing later this week of state-owned oil giant Saudi Aramco.

Finance Minister Jadaan said the proceeds from Aramco’s share offering would be reinvested, helping to create more revenue channels for the government.

Aramco priced its initial public offering at 32 riyals ($8.53) per share on Thursday, raising $25.6 billion and beating Alibaba Group Holding Ltd’s record $25 billion listing in 2014.

“The (2020 budget) revenue projections look realistic in our view – oil and non-oil,” said Monica Malik, chief economist at Abu Dhabi Commercial Bank. “The pullback in current expenditure could be more difficult.”

Oil revenue is expected to fall to 513 billion riyals in 2020, from an estimated 602 billion riyals in 2019, the budget document says.

Real GDP growth was expected at 2.3% in 2020, according to the document, rebounding from an estimated 0.4% in 2019.

The new 2019 projection is lower than an earlier official forecast of 0.9% GDP growth this year, and down from 2.2% in 2018, as growth has been hurt by lower oil prices and crude production cuts agreed by OPEC nations and producers outside the exporting group.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-09
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, riyals, oil, spending, saudi, billion, 2020, growth, gdp, revenue, forecasts, budget, pickup, expenditure, drop, slight


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Streaming services like Disney+ aren’t likely to make money ‘anytime soon,’ analyst says

The streaming wars got underway last month with the launch of Disney+, the media giant’s subscription service priced at $6.99 a month, a direct competitor to Netflix. But one analyst has warned that these services are unlikely to make money in the next five years, because the amount they will take in subscription fees won’t exceed the sums needed to make new content. According to Brian Wieser, GroupM’s global president of business intelligence, streaming services will spend an extra $4 billion e


The streaming wars got underway last month with the launch of Disney+, the media giant’s subscription service priced at $6.99 a month, a direct competitor to Netflix.
But one analyst has warned that these services are unlikely to make money in the next five years, because the amount they will take in subscription fees won’t exceed the sums needed to make new content.
According to Brian Wieser, GroupM’s global president of business intelligence, streaming services will spend an extra $4 billion e
Streaming services like Disney+ aren’t likely to make money ‘anytime soon,’ analyst says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-09  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, analyst, report, billion, disney, spending, fees, soon, wieser, arent, money, services, month, subscription, likely, streaming, anytime


Streaming services like Disney+ aren't likely to make money 'anytime soon,' analyst says

The streaming wars got underway last month with the launch of Disney+, the media giant’s subscription service priced at $6.99 a month, a direct competitor to Netflix. Meanwhile, AT&T’s HBO Max and Comcast’s Peacock are set to follow in the coming months.

But one analyst has warned that these services are unlikely to make money in the next five years, because the amount they will take in subscription fees won’t exceed the sums needed to make new content.

According to Brian Wieser, GroupM’s global president of business intelligence, streaming services will spend an extra $4 billion each a year on content, making a total of $20 billion by 2024, matching the incremental $20 billion in subscription fees GroupM estimates. GroupM is the media-buying arm of ad business WPP.

“There will only be so much money to go around for subscription fees. If consumers continue to increase their spending on all forms of video (which amounted to $140 billion last year for video services, cinema and DVDs) at historical rates through 2024, there will only be an incremental $20 billion in consumer spending available for new services. This is roughly equal to the amount of new spending on content that we estimate,” Wieser said in GroupM’s worldwide media forecast report, published Monday.

“This suggests that financial contributions from these new services will not be net positive anytime soon,” the report stated.

Netflix has already seen the impact of this, with a mixed earnings report in October that showed a beat on earnings but a miss on subscribers. In January, it increased its most popular HD streaming plan from $10.99 per month to $12.99 per month and said the price increase was partially to blame for its subscriber miss. It projected 7.6 million additional subscribers for its fourth quarter, versus 8.8 million for the same quarter a year earlier.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-09  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, analyst, report, billion, disney, spending, fees, soon, wieser, arent, money, services, month, subscription, likely, streaming, anytime


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Golden State Warriors’ Klay Thompson says this is the top financial mistake he made his rookie year

Eventually, Thompson says, he got rid of his hoarding habit and started to make purchases that he knew would outlast the style trends of the NBA. Looking back, the 29-year-old says he remembers making some common financial mistakes at the start of his career. “It was great to see that check, but I lived such a great life in Pullman, [Washington] at the time on my $1,100 a month stipend. In fact, Thompson’s teammate Draymond Green says one of his biggest financial regrets is spending $21,000 in o


Eventually, Thompson says, he got rid of his hoarding habit and started to make purchases that he knew would outlast the style trends of the NBA.
Looking back, the 29-year-old says he remembers making some common financial mistakes at the start of his career.
“It was great to see that check, but I lived such a great life in Pullman, [Washington] at the time on my $1,100 a month stipend.
In fact, Thompson’s teammate Draymond Green says one of his biggest financial regrets is spending $21,000 in o
Golden State Warriors’ Klay Thompson says this is the top financial mistake he made his rookie year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-08  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warriors, hes, pullman, thompson, financial, relationships, spending, money, state, mistake, golden, rookie, career, nba, klay, washington


Golden State Warriors' Klay Thompson says this is the top financial mistake he made his rookie year

Eventually, Thompson says, he got rid of his hoarding habit and started to make purchases that he knew would outlast the style trends of the NBA.

“I made some mistakes like hoarding, especially with the clothes,” he tells host Maverick Carter on a recent episode of the podcast ” Kneading Dough .” “I mean I would just have a full closet and I would only wear about 5% of the closet, and I’m like, ‘What am I going to do with all of these extra clothes?'”

Since entering the NBA in 2011, he’s not only earned millions in his career through contract money and endorsement deals, but he’s also won three championship rings and made it to the NBA All-Star game five times. Looking back, the 29-year-old says he remembers making some common financial mistakes at the start of his career.

“It’s not like money made me happy,” he says, while talking about using his first big paycheck to buy a pool table that he still has to this day. “It was great to see that check, but I lived such a great life in Pullman, [Washington] at the time on my $1,100 a month stipend. That went so far in Pullman. I could get as much Taco Del Mar as I wanted or I could go to Target and have a field day.”

Though his NBA career has afforded him a more lavish lifestyle than his upbringing in Portland, Oregon, or his time at Washington State University, Thompson says he’s learned that wealth is nothing more than a mindset. “If you have relationships and experiences around you, those are priceless,” he says. “You know, it’s better than any car you can get or any big house. It’s just about those relationships to me.”

Thompson, who made Forbes’ “World Highest-Paid Athlete” list in 2019 with an earning of $34.3 million for the year, isn’t the only NBA player who’s admitted to carelessly spending money early in their career. In fact, Thompson’s teammate Draymond Green says one of his biggest financial regrets is spending $21,000 in one night at the club.

“That’s $21,000 that I can never get back,” he said on previous episode of “Kneading Dough.” “People say: ‘That isn’t nothing to you.’ $20,000 is still $20,000. I don’t care how much money you have, it’s still $20,000.”

Green, who has since changed his frivolous spending habits, says he’s now pursuing a new financial goal of becoming a billionaire by 40. The 29-year-old, who agreed to a four-year, $100 million extension with the Warriors earlier this year, says that joining the billion-dollar club will be “a tough task for sure.” But, he says, “I think I can reach it.”

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Don’t miss: Patriots’ Joejuan Williams lives off 10% of his income and says a high school finance class taught him how to save


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-08  Authors: courtney connley
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‘Give gifts of money’ this holiday season, says etiquette expert

The best way to give a gift is to give people what they want, not what you think they should have, says Elaine Swann, an etiquette expert. Across all generations, money for personal spending is the No. 1 present when ranked against tangible gifts, experiences, and money for bills or experiences, according to the Zelle study, but younger people are on record as being the most excited. “Millennials have definitely changed the landscape in terms of the way we give gifts now,” says Swann. Here are s


The best way to give a gift is to give people what they want, not what you think they should have, says Elaine Swann, an etiquette expert.
Across all generations, money for personal spending is the No.
1 present when ranked against tangible gifts, experiences, and money for bills or experiences, according to the Zelle study, but younger people are on record as being the most excited.
“Millennials have definitely changed the landscape in terms of the way we give gifts now,” says Swann.
Here are s
‘Give gifts of money’ this holiday season, says etiquette expert Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-07  Authors: ivana pino
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, holiday, way, prefer, perfect, spending, gifts, zelle, expert, etiquette, money, gift, season, personal, experiences


'Give gifts of money' this holiday season, says etiquette expert

During the holidays, you might feel extra pressure to shop for the perfect gift for each of your friends and family members, but if what you really want to do is skip the shopping trip and send them cash, that’s perfectly acceptable. In fact, your recipient might well prefer it.

About two-thirds of people say that they prefer the gift of money to pay for experiences, bills, or personal spending, according to a 2019 online survey of U.S. adults conducted by Early Warning Services, LLC, the network operator behind the Zelle payments network.

While giving money seems impersonal, it can be the greatest gift of all for those who need cash to cover their expenses, or for those whose idea of the perfect gift is the freedom to treat themselves.

The best way to give a gift is to give people what they want, not what you think they should have, says Elaine Swann, an etiquette expert. That can mean sending them money so that they can choose how they want to spend it.

Giving the gift of money is becoming more widely accepted, too: “It used to be a taboo thing to give money or ask for it, but it’s now becoming part of our society to give gifts of money and then to graciously accept those gifts as well,” says Swann.

Across all generations, money for personal spending is the No. 1 present when ranked against tangible gifts, experiences, and money for bills or experiences, according to the Zelle study, but younger people are on record as being the most excited. “Millennials have definitely changed the landscape in terms of the way we give gifts now,” says Swann.

Here are some guidelines for graciously giving the gift of money over the holiday season.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-07  Authors: ivana pino
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, holiday, way, prefer, perfect, spending, gifts, zelle, expert, etiquette, money, gift, season, personal, experiences


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Japan’s households cut spending amid impacts from sales tax, typhoon

Customers browse snacks and confectionary at a store in a shopping street in Kitakyushu, Fukuoka, Japan, on Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017. Japanese households cut their spending for the first time in almost a year in October as a sales tax hike prompted consumers to rein in expenses and natural disasters disrupted business. That marked a sharp reversal from the 9.5% jump in September, the fastest growth on record as consumers rushed to buy goods before the Oct. 1 sales tax hike from 8% to 10%. “Not o


Customers browse snacks and confectionary at a store in a shopping street in Kitakyushu, Fukuoka, Japan, on Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017.
Japanese households cut their spending for the first time in almost a year in October as a sales tax hike prompted consumers to rein in expenses and natural disasters disrupted business.
That marked a sharp reversal from the 9.5% jump in September, the fastest growth on record as consumers rushed to buy goods before the Oct. 1 sales tax hike from 8% to 10%.
“Not o
Japan’s households cut spending amid impacts from sales tax, typhoon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amid, spending, japans, households, consumers, weaker, cut, wont, typhoon, consumer, research, hike, sales, tax, impacts


Japan's households cut spending amid impacts from sales tax, typhoon

Customers browse snacks and confectionary at a store in a shopping street in Kitakyushu, Fukuoka, Japan, on Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017.

Japanese households cut their spending for the first time in almost a year in October as a sales tax hike prompted consumers to rein in expenses and natural disasters disrupted business.

Household spending dropped 5.1% in October from a year earlier, government data showed on Friday, down for the first time in 11 months and the biggest fall since March 2016 when spending fell 5.3% and weaker than the median forecast for a 3.0% decline.

That marked a sharp reversal from the 9.5% jump in September, the fastest growth on record as consumers rushed to buy goods before the Oct. 1 sales tax hike from 8% to 10%.

“Not only is the sales tax hike hurting consumer spending but impacts from the typhoon also accelerated the decline in the spending,” said Taro Saito, executive research fellow at NLI Research Institute.

“We expect the economy overall and consumer spending will contract in the current quarter and then moderately pick up January-March but such recovery won’t be strong enough.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amid, spending, japans, households, consumers, weaker, cut, wont, typhoon, consumer, research, hike, sales, tax, impacts


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How America’s obsession with pets helped create a $72-billion-a-year industry

How America’s obsession with pets helped create a $72-billion-a-year industryCute puppies. Pet supplements, a smart cat litter box and specialty veterinary practices. U.S. pet spending hit $72 billion in 2018, an increase of more than $3 billion from the prior year. And with pet ownership on the rise, the industry could grow into an even bigger business. Here’s how America’s love for pets turned into big business.


How America’s obsession with pets helped create a $72-billion-a-year industryCute puppies.
Pet supplements, a smart cat litter box and specialty veterinary practices.
U.S. pet spending hit $72 billion in 2018, an increase of more than $3 billion from the prior year.
And with pet ownership on the rise, the industry could grow into an even bigger business.
Here’s how America’s love for pets turned into big business.
How America’s obsession with pets helped create a $72-billion-a-year industry Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, create, 72billionayear, pet, veterinary, turned, spending, helped, americas, business, specialty, pets, obsession, supplements, industry, billion


How America's obsession with pets helped create a $72-billion-a-year industry

How America’s obsession with pets helped create a $72-billion-a-year industry

Cute puppies. Kittens. Instagram dogs. Pet supplements, a smart cat litter box and specialty veterinary practices. Americans are spending more and more on their pets. U.S. pet spending hit $72 billion in 2018, an increase of more than $3 billion from the prior year. And with pet ownership on the rise, the industry could grow into an even bigger business. Here’s how America’s love for pets turned into big business.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, create, 72billionayear, pet, veterinary, turned, spending, helped, americas, business, specialty, pets, obsession, supplements, industry, billion


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