Google’s DeepMind says its A.I. tech can spot acute kidney disease 48 hours before doctors spot it

Five years after Google acquired DeepMind, the health and artificial intelligence group is unveiling its biggest breakthrough yet in health care. Its technology is able to predict if a patient has potentially fatal kidney injuries 48 hours before many symptoms can be recognized by doctors. “We’ve been really excited for the potential of using AI to support clinicians moving care from reactive to proactive and preventative,” said Dominic King, DeepMind’s co-founder and clinical lead, in an interv


Five years after Google acquired DeepMind, the health and artificial intelligence group is unveiling its biggest breakthrough yet in health care. Its technology is able to predict if a patient has potentially fatal kidney injuries 48 hours before many symptoms can be recognized by doctors. “We’ve been really excited for the potential of using AI to support clinicians moving care from reactive to proactive and preventative,” said Dominic King, DeepMind’s co-founder and clinical lead, in an interv
Google’s DeepMind says its A.I. tech can spot acute kidney disease 48 hours before doctors spot it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-31  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, kidney, disease, doctors, serious, google, deepmind, symptoms, technology, googles, ai, health, using, hours, tech, spot, acute


Google's DeepMind says its A.I. tech can spot acute kidney disease 48 hours before doctors spot it

Five years after Google acquired DeepMind, the health and artificial intelligence group is unveiling its biggest breakthrough yet in health care. Its technology is able to predict if a patient has potentially fatal kidney injuries 48 hours before many symptoms can be recognized by doctors.

In a paper published on Wednesday in the journal Nature, DeepMind researchers said their algorithms correctly predicted 90 percent of acute kidney injuries that would end up requiring dialysis. The work was the result of a project with the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs to help doctors get a head start on treatment.

“We’ve been really excited for the potential of using AI to support clinicians moving care from reactive to proactive and preventative,” said Dominic King, DeepMind’s co-founder and clinical lead, in an interview.

About 2 million people die every year across the globe from acute kidney injury, according to researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The condition, which involves a sudden episode of kidney failure or damage, can be tricky for doctors to diagnose because there aren’t always immediate and clear symptoms. Studies have shown that catching it early can decrease the likelihood of serious injury or death.

In 2014, Google acquired DeepMind for a reported $500 million as it looked to expand in AI and bring in top industry experts to work on hard problems involving machine learning. As Alphabet and its various units have stepped into the health-care space in the past few years, much of the focus has been on using its technology to predict serious health outcomes before they happen.

DeepMind’s health projects will soon be folded into Google Health, led by David Feinberg. The group hasn’t said much publicly beyond its website, which says it’s studying how AI can be used to assist in “diagnosing cancer, predicting patient outcomes, preventing blindness, and much more.” Much of its team remains based in the U.K., although its health unit is expected to relocate to Google’s Silicon Valley headquarters.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-31  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, kidney, disease, doctors, serious, google, deepmind, symptoms, technology, googles, ai, health, using, hours, tech, spot, acute


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This blind spot is putting financial advisors and their clients at risk

The Securities and Exchange Commission, as well as state securities regulators, are paying close attention to financial advisors’ cybersecurity practices. Whether you directly manage clients’ assets or your practice specializes in financial planning, you’ll need to protect your customers’ data. Last September, New York-based Voya Financial Advisors paid the SEC $1 million to settle charges regarding a data breach that compromised customers’ personal information. These alerts highlight vulnerabil


The Securities and Exchange Commission, as well as state securities regulators, are paying close attention to financial advisors’ cybersecurity practices. Whether you directly manage clients’ assets or your practice specializes in financial planning, you’ll need to protect your customers’ data. Last September, New York-based Voya Financial Advisors paid the SEC $1 million to settle charges regarding a data breach that compromised customers’ personal information. These alerts highlight vulnerabil
This blind spot is putting financial advisors and their clients at risk Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financial, sec, clients, firms, putting, risk, cybersecurity, blind, advisors, staff, spot, client, compliance, data


This blind spot is putting financial advisors and their clients at risk

Maskot | Maskot | Getty Images

It’s an email every financial advisor should expect to receive at least once. Financial advisor Charles Failla recalls receiving an email from a client asking for about $5,000. She was vacationing in the Caribbean and claimed the hotel where she was staying didn’t accept credit cards. “She needed cash,” said Failla, certified financial planner and principal at Sovereign Financial Group in New York. “I said, ‘I know you’re on vacation, but call me collect. I need to confirm it’s you before I send money to a Caribbean island.'” After several emails, the client was able to track down a phone and confirm her identity. “She understood and appreciated it,” Failla said. “It’s definitely a policy at our firm: You get an email asking for money? Verify it with the client via telephone.”

He was right to be suspicious. Last year, victims lost $2.7 billion to cybercrime, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The Securities and Exchange Commission, as well as state securities regulators, are paying close attention to financial advisors’ cybersecurity practices. Whether you directly manage clients’ assets or your practice specializes in financial planning, you’ll need to protect your customers’ data. Even large companies aren’t immune to internet scammers. Last September, New York-based Voya Financial Advisors paid the SEC $1 million to settle charges regarding a data breach that compromised customers’ personal information. Though advisors themselves are under pressure to protect their firms from cyberattacks, they’re often unsure where to start. “We’re always getting hackers trying to break into the firewall and go on phishing expeditions, but people don’t think about what they will do when they have a breach,” said Michelle Jacko, CEO of Core Compliance & Legal Services in San Diego.

SEC priorities

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in Washington, D.C. Adam Jeffery | CNBC

The SEC’s Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations highlighted cybersecurity as a 2019 examination priority. There are two types of audits advisors should expect from the federal regulator, according to Wes Stillman, CEO of RightSize Solutions, a cybersecurity consultancy in Lenexa, Kansas. “Cybersecurity is part of the normal SEC exam: There might be 13 to 15 questions around information technology and cybersecurity,” he said. “Then there’s the big cyber sweep: Forty-plus questions around policy, cybersecurity and all that good stuff.”

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In either case, regulators want to make sure advisors have written policies and procedures around the rules and methods used to safeguard devices and data. This manual should include the firm’s approach toward mobile computing, virus protection, remote access and more. It needs to be kept current, and staff members must be trained on how to follow it. “We run into people who say ‘Sure, we have a written policy,’ and it’s referencing SkyTel pagers and 56K modems,” said Greg Goldstein, president of Highridge Technology in Ho-Ho-Kus, New Jersey. “That’s almost worse than not having a policy at all.” Firms need a written incident response plan, spelling out the necessary steps to address a cybersecurity incident, vulnerability assessments and details on who is responsible for implementing the plan after a data breach. “Everyone needs to know their role, including legal counsel,” said Bryan Baas, managing director of compliance for TD Ameritrade Institutional. “When the roof comes crashing down, you won’t have the time or the patience to field questions on what happened and what do we do.”

Taking a cue

Hero Images | Getty Images

Advisors should be aware of three key risk alerts from the SEC Inspections and Examinations, said Jacko of Core Compliance. These alerts highlight vulnerabilities SEC staff has spotted while examining advisory practices. One recommends establishing rules around electronic communication, including reviewing employees’ use of social media and ramping up security around remote access to email. A second risk alert addresses the use of policies and procedures on customer privacy and establishing safeguards to protect client records. During its exams, SEC staff “observed registrants’ employees who regularly stored and maintained customer information on their personal laptops,” according to the risk alert. Firm policies and procedures didn’t address how to safeguard clients’ data, the SEC said.

When the roof comes crashing down, you won’t have the time or the patience to field questions on what happened and what do we do. Bryan Baas managing director of compliance for TD Ameritrade Institutional

Finally, a third risk alert, issued in May, covers client data protection when firms use cloud-based storage. Indeed, the SEC’s exam staff found that some firms didn’t properly configure the security settings on their network storage solutions to protect against hackers. The SEC also uncovered another vulnerability: Some advisory firms failed to make sure their third-party vendors’ cybersecurity practices were up to snuff. “These cybersecurity issues transcend registered investment advisors,” said Failla. “A lot of these cracks in security come from the relationships businesses have with third-party vendors.”

Establishing practices

Linus Strandholm | EyeEm | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financial, sec, clients, firms, putting, risk, cybersecurity, blind, advisors, staff, spot, client, compliance, data


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Gold spikes above $1,400 per ounce to prices not seen in nearly 6 years

Gold prices soared for a second day in a row on Friday, touching levels not seen in almost 6 years. As of 12:16 p.m. HK/SIN, spot gold jumped 1.3% to about $1,405.83 per ounce — soaring past the $1,400 level for the first time since September 2013. The U.S. dollar index, which tracks the greenback against a basket of currencies, also tumbled to 96.543 after touching levels above 97.6 earlier in the week. “Gold prices have recovered from their lows and we think this rise could be sustainable,” st


Gold prices soared for a second day in a row on Friday, touching levels not seen in almost 6 years. As of 12:16 p.m. HK/SIN, spot gold jumped 1.3% to about $1,405.83 per ounce — soaring past the $1,400 level for the first time since September 2013. The U.S. dollar index, which tracks the greenback against a basket of currencies, also tumbled to 96.543 after touching levels above 97.6 earlier in the week. “Gold prices have recovered from their lows and we think this rise could be sustainable,” st
Gold spikes above $1,400 per ounce to prices not seen in nearly 6 years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gold, 1400, spikes, note, nearly, seen, stimulus, central, spot, ounce, prices, bank, levels, level, touching


Gold spikes above $1,400 per ounce to prices not seen in nearly 6 years

Melted gold flows out of a smelter into a mould of a one kilogram bar at a plant of gold refiner and bar manufacturer Argor-Heraeus SA in the southern Swiss town of Mendrisio.

Gold prices soared for a second day in a row on Friday, touching levels not seen in almost 6 years.

As of 12:16 p.m. HK/SIN, spot gold jumped 1.3% to about $1,405.83 per ounce — soaring past the $1,400 level for the first time since September 2013. Gold futures also rose 0.92% to $1,409.70 per ounce.

Gold prices surged a day earlier, after the U.S. Federal Reserve opened the door for a possible rate cut in the future, sending the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note below 2% — a key psychological level — for the first time since November 2016.

The U.S. dollar index, which tracks the greenback against a basket of currencies, also tumbled to 96.543 after touching levels above 97.6 earlier in the week.

“Gold prices have recovered from their lows and we think this rise could be sustainable,” strategists at Singapore’s DBS Group Research wrote in a note. “Rising political tensions, lower bond yields and (a U.S. dollar) on the verge of reversing should make the rest of 2019 very interesting for the metal.”

Also on Thursday, European Central Bank President Mario Draghi said “additional stimulus will required” if the economic situation worsens in the coming months. Bank of Japan Governor Haruhiko Kuroda also indicated on Thursday the central bank would “consider expanding stimulus without hesitation ” — should the economy lose momentum toward achieving the ever elusive 2% inflation target.

Tensions in the Middle East also continue to linger following Iran shooting down a U.S. drone on Thursday.

With central banks loosening monetary policy, and US growth potentially peaking amid elevated geopolitical risks, Analysts at Citi said in a Thursday note that they were updating their longstanding bullish targets for gold.

“We published a 6-12m point-price of $1,400/oz in January and we now roll that forward to a $1,450 0-3m target, contingent on a dovish July FOMC (e.g. 50 bps and further signaling),” they said.

— Correction: This article was updated to reflect that spot gold prices crossed the $1,400 mark for the first time since September 2013.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gold, 1400, spikes, note, nearly, seen, stimulus, central, spot, ounce, prices, bank, levels, level, touching


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‘Everybody’s so down in the dumps’: Illinois farmers give up on planting after floods and throw party instead

Puddles are seen in farm fields as heavy rains caused unprecedented delays in U.S. corn planting this spring, near Sheffield, Illinois, U.S., June 13, 2019. Picture taken June 13, 2019. Nationwide, farmers are expected to harvest the smallest corn crop in four years, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. McKnight, who attended the party, said farmers returned Golden Harvest corn seed, made by ChemChina’s Syngenta. Corn farmer James McCune, who organised the “Prevent Plant Party”, sits


Puddles are seen in farm fields as heavy rains caused unprecedented delays in U.S. corn planting this spring, near Sheffield, Illinois, U.S., June 13, 2019. Picture taken June 13, 2019. Nationwide, farmers are expected to harvest the smallest corn crop in four years, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. McKnight, who attended the party, said farmers returned Golden Harvest corn seed, made by ChemChina’s Syngenta. Corn farmer James McCune, who organised the “Prevent Plant Party”, sits
‘Everybody’s so down in the dumps’: Illinois farmers give up on planting after floods and throw party instead Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, seed, acres, 2019, party, illinois, spot, throw, planting, everybodys, instead, farmers, 13, crop, floods, corn, dumps


'Everybody's so down in the dumps': Illinois farmers give up on planting after floods and throw party instead

Puddles are seen in farm fields as heavy rains caused unprecedented delays in U.S. corn planting this spring, near Sheffield, Illinois, U.S., June 13, 2019. Picture taken June 13, 2019. Tom Polansek | REUTERS

The Happy Spot was a little depressed. Dozens of corn farmers and those who sell them seed, chemicals and equipment gathered on Thursday at the restaurant in Deer Grove, Illinois, after heavy rains caused unprecedented delays in planting this year and contributed to record floods across the central United States. The storms have left millions of acres unseeded in the $51 billion U.S. corn market and put crops that were planted late at a greater risk for damage from severe weather during the growing season. Together, the problems heap more pain on a farm sector that has suffered from years of low crop prices and a U.S.-China trade war that is slowing agricultural exports. Forecasts for even more rain sent U.S. corn futures to a five-year high on Friday, though fewer farmers will benefit from soaring prices because of the planting disruptions. James McCune, a farmer from Mineral, Illinois, was unable to plant 85% of his intended corn acres and wanted to commiserate with his fellow farmers by hosting the “Prevent Plant Party” at The Happy Spot. He invited them to swap stories while tucking in to fried chicken and a keg of beer in Deer Grove, a village of about 50 people located 120 miles west of Chicago. “Everybody’s so down in the dumps,” McCune said.

A sign at The Happy Spot restaurant in Deer Grove, Illinois, U.S., June 13, 2019. Picture taken June 13, 2019. Tom Polansek | Reuters

McCune returned his unused corn seed to a local dealer for Pioneer, a part of Corteva Inc, after planting just 900 acres of corn out of the 6,000 acres he intended to put in the ground. Bureau County, Illinois, where McCune lives, has the fourth-highest risk of all U.S. counties for corn acres to go unplanted this year because of rains, behind three counties in Nebraska, according to Gro Intelligence. Nationwide, farmers are expected to harvest the smallest corn crop in four years, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The agency last week reduced its planting estimate by 3.2% from May and its yield estimate by 5.7%. Farmers think more cuts are likely as the late-planted crop could face damage from hot summer weather and an autumn frost. “An early frost will turn this world upside down,” Rock Katschnig, a farmer from Prophetstown, Illinois, said at the party.

Phone quits ringing

Planting problems mean that growers need less seed and herbicides than expected, which is bad news for salesmen like Greg McKnight of Barman Seed in Woodhull, Illinois. McKnight, who attended the party, said farmers returned Golden Harvest corn seed, made by ChemChina’s Syngenta. They are either seeking refunds on herbicides or asking Barman to hold their chemicals in storage until next year, he said. McKnight also sells used 18-wheeler trucks to farmers to haul grain. He thinks financial uncertainty linked to the crop problems will slice his sales in half this year. “Since all this rain began, it’s like shutting the light switch off,” McKnight said. “My phone has quit ringing on sales.”

Corn farmer James McCune, who organised the “Prevent Plant Party”, sits at The Happy Spot restaurant in Deer Grove, Illinois, U.S., June 13, 2019. Picture taken June 13, 2019. Tom Polansek | REUTERS

The U.S. government announced a $16 billion aid package to help farmers hurt by reduced sales to China – but only those who manage to plant a crop are eligible for payments. U.S. President Donald Trump also recently signed a $19 billion disaster relief bill that included more than $3 billion for expenses related to losses of crops, including those prevented from planting, according to the office of Sen. Charles Grassley of Iowa. Grassley said he added an amendment in the bill to include grains that are stored on farms in an indemnity program, after bins holding corn burst during floods in Iowa, Nebraska and Missouri. Floods that delayed seed shipments contributed to a 28% slump in quarterly profit for Corteva’s former parent company, DowDuPont.

Grain elevators, equipment dealers


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, seed, acres, 2019, party, illinois, spot, throw, planting, everybodys, instead, farmers, 13, crop, floods, corn, dumps


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People who live in these cities earn the highest salaries in the world, research shows

Average salaries in San Francisco have risen by 31% since 2018, with the city taking the crown for the highest-paying city in the world this year, according to Deutsche Bank research. In 2019, people in San Francisco can expect to be paid an average of $6,526 per month — that’s 142% more than the average New Yorker’s income. New York City, with average monthly earnings hitting $4,612, was the third highest-paying city in the world. Monthly salaries saw a year-on-year increase of 12% in New York,


Average salaries in San Francisco have risen by 31% since 2018, with the city taking the crown for the highest-paying city in the world this year, according to Deutsche Bank research. In 2019, people in San Francisco can expect to be paid an average of $6,526 per month — that’s 142% more than the average New Yorker’s income. New York City, with average monthly earnings hitting $4,612, was the third highest-paying city in the world. Monthly salaries saw a year-on-year increase of 12% in New York,
People who live in these cities earn the highest salaries in the world, research shows Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-22  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, earn, world, cities, average, city, san, shows, research, monthly, salaries, francisco, york, spot, highest, earnings, live


People who live in these cities earn the highest salaries in the world, research shows

Average salaries in San Francisco have risen by 31% since 2018, with the city taking the crown for the highest-paying city in the world this year, according to Deutsche Bank research.

In 2019, people in San Francisco can expect to be paid an average of $6,526 per month — that’s 142% more than the average New Yorker’s income.

Deutsche Bank’s analysis, which compared incomes and living costs in 56 cities worldwide, found that average earnings in San Francisco, where residents had the strongest purchasing power in the world, had increased by 88% over the last five years.

Zurich, Switzerland, came in second, offering an average monthly income of $5,896, although it lost the top spot this year after seeing average earnings decline by 18% over the last five years.

New York City, with average monthly earnings hitting $4,612, was the third highest-paying city in the world. Monthly salaries saw a year-on-year increase of 12% in New York, helping the city hold onto the third spot in the ranking.

Boston and Chicago, which both offer monthly incomes in excess of $4,000, were also ranked among the 10 highest paying cities.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-22  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, earn, world, cities, average, city, san, shows, research, monthly, salaries, francisco, york, spot, highest, earnings, live


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Why Nintendo’s guidance was ‘extra conservative’

Why Nintendo’s guidance was ‘extra conservative’4:26 AM ET Fri, 26 April 2019Serkan Toto of Kantan Games says Nintendo may be back at its own game of “low-balling” hardware and software sales guidance. He also says the company is in a “very good spot” for now.


Why Nintendo’s guidance was ‘extra conservative’4:26 AM ET Fri, 26 April 2019Serkan Toto of Kantan Games says Nintendo may be back at its own game of “low-balling” hardware and software sales guidance. He also says the company is in a “very good spot” for now.
Why Nintendo’s guidance was ‘extra conservative’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-26
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, extra, toto, hardware, conservative, sales, nintendo, spot, lowballing, kantan, guidance, nintendos, software


Why Nintendo's guidance was 'extra conservative'

Why Nintendo’s guidance was ‘extra conservative’

4:26 AM ET Fri, 26 April 2019

Serkan Toto of Kantan Games says Nintendo may be back at its own game of “low-balling” hardware and software sales guidance. He also says the company is in a “very good spot” for now.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-26
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, extra, toto, hardware, conservative, sales, nintendo, spot, lowballing, kantan, guidance, nintendos, software


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How to answer the 7 most annoying job interview questions (and spot 2 that are illegal to ask)

You can never be too prepared for a job interview. Doing the all the right things before the big day can still leave room for surprises, especially if your interviewers have a few tricky questions up their sleeves. While some hiring managers prefer to call them “advanced” interview questions, job candidates view them as “annoying” or “frustrating,” often because they are poorly worded, have no right or wrong answer or just seem irrelevant. Whatever the reason, chances are that you’ll get caught


You can never be too prepared for a job interview. Doing the all the right things before the big day can still leave room for surprises, especially if your interviewers have a few tricky questions up their sleeves. While some hiring managers prefer to call them “advanced” interview questions, job candidates view them as “annoying” or “frustrating,” often because they are poorly worded, have no right or wrong answer or just seem irrelevant. Whatever the reason, chances are that you’ll get caught
How to answer the 7 most annoying job interview questions (and spot 2 that are illegal to ask) Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: debcarreau, hours, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wrong, questions, view, illegal, ask, job, worded, annoying, youll, interview, right, spot, answer


How to answer the 7 most annoying job interview questions (and spot 2 that are illegal to ask)

You can never be too prepared for a job interview. Doing the all the right things before the big day can still leave room for surprises, especially if your interviewers have a few tricky questions up their sleeves.

While some hiring managers prefer to call them “advanced” interview questions, job candidates view them as “annoying” or “frustrating,” often because they are poorly worded, have no right or wrong answer or just seem irrelevant. Whatever the reason, chances are that you’ll get caught in one.

Here are seven examples of the most annoying — and commonly asked — interview questions, along with tips on how to answer them with ease and intelligence.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: debcarreau, hours, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wrong, questions, view, illegal, ask, job, worded, annoying, youll, interview, right, spot, answer


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Top 10 most innovative companies, according to Fast Company

Apple has been dethroned as the world’s most innovative company, according to Fast Company. The tech giant fell to No. 17 in Fast Company’s 50 most innovative companies in the world for 2019, after taking the top spot last year. “They didn’t really break new ground with their devices, and hardware sales were sluggish,” Fast Company senior editor Amy Farley told CNBC on Wednesday.


Apple has been dethroned as the world’s most innovative company, according to Fast Company. The tech giant fell to No. 17 in Fast Company’s 50 most innovative companies in the world for 2019, after taking the top spot last year. “They didn’t really break new ground with their devices, and hardware sales were sluggish,” Fast Company senior editor Amy Farley told CNBC on Wednesday.
Top 10 most innovative companies, according to Fast Company Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: michelle fox, heidi petty, getty images, kevork djansezian, getty images sport, source, stitch fix
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, taking, spot, according, innovative, worlds, fast, told, yearthey, world, companies, company


Top 10 most innovative companies, according to Fast Company

Apple has been dethroned as the world’s most innovative company, according to Fast Company.

The tech giant fell to No. 17 in Fast Company’s 50 most innovative companies in the world for 2019, after taking the top spot last year.

“They didn’t really break new ground with their devices, and hardware sales were sluggish,” Fast Company senior editor Amy Farley told CNBC on Wednesday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: michelle fox, heidi petty, getty images, kevork djansezian, getty images sport, source, stitch fix
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, taking, spot, according, innovative, worlds, fast, told, yearthey, world, companies, company


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Top 10 most innovative companies, according to Fast Company

Apple has been dethroned as the world’s most innovative company, according to Fast Company. The tech giant fell to No. 17 in Fast Company’s 50 most innovative companies in the world for 2019, after taking the top spot last year. “They didn’t really break new ground with their devices, and hardware sales were sluggish,” Fast Company senior editor Amy Farley told CNBC on Wednesday.


Apple has been dethroned as the world’s most innovative company, according to Fast Company. The tech giant fell to No. 17 in Fast Company’s 50 most innovative companies in the world for 2019, after taking the top spot last year. “They didn’t really break new ground with their devices, and hardware sales were sluggish,” Fast Company senior editor Amy Farley told CNBC on Wednesday.
Top 10 most innovative companies, according to Fast Company Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: michelle fox, heidi petty, getty images, kevork djansezian, getty images sport, source, stitch fix
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, taking, spot, according, innovative, worlds, fast, told, yearthey, world, companies, company


Top 10 most innovative companies, according to Fast Company

Apple has been dethroned as the world’s most innovative company, according to Fast Company.

The tech giant fell to No. 17 in Fast Company’s 50 most innovative companies in the world for 2019, after taking the top spot last year.

“They didn’t really break new ground with their devices, and hardware sales were sluggish,” Fast Company senior editor Amy Farley told CNBC on Wednesday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: michelle fox, heidi petty, getty images, kevork djansezian, getty images sport, source, stitch fix
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, taking, spot, according, innovative, worlds, fast, told, yearthey, world, companies, company


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Thailand property: Chinese buying interest has surged in recent years

Chinese investors have continued pouring their money into Thailand’s property sector even as the kingdom barrels toward an uncertain national election. Thailand will hold general elections on March 24, but Juwai CEO Carrie Law said the company hasn’t seen “a link between the Thai election and Chinese property buying.” Even though that recent coup was the second in less than a decade, the political upheaval did little to cool Thailand’s huge property increases. Chinese buyers make up 70 percent o


Chinese investors have continued pouring their money into Thailand’s property sector even as the kingdom barrels toward an uncertain national election. Thailand will hold general elections on March 24, but Juwai CEO Carrie Law said the company hasn’t seen “a link between the Thai election and Chinese property buying.” Even though that recent coup was the second in less than a decade, the political upheaval did little to cool Thailand’s huge property increases. Chinese buyers make up 70 percent o
Thailand property: Chinese buying interest has surged in recent years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-11  Authors: huileng tan, prachanart viriyaraks, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, property, interest, surged, buyers, international, thailands, thailand, buying, spot, chinese, told, started, growth, recent


Thailand property: Chinese buying interest has surged in recent years

Chinese investors have continued pouring their money into Thailand’s property sector even as the kingdom barrels toward an uncertain national election.

That underscores the Southeast Asian nation’s enduring popularity with the Chinese — tourists from Asia’s top economy have for years seen Thailand as a top spot for holidays. According to recent data from online Chinese real estate portal Juwai.com, Thailand was its most popular country when it comes to inquiries from potential real estate buyers in 2018 — climbing up from the sixth spot in 2016.

Thailand will hold general elections on March 24, but Juwai CEO Carrie Law said the company hasn’t seen “a link between the Thai election and Chinese property buying.”

“While the election is momentous for Thailand, most of the buyers we work with are unconcerned about the outcome,” she told CNBC.

Thailand’s economy has been powering ahead since its 2014 coup, reaching 3.9 percent GDP growth in 2017. That was its best in five years, but that growth is expected to slow a bit this year due to weaker global growth, the World Bank projected.

Even though that recent coup was the second in less than a decade, the political upheaval did little to cool Thailand’s huge property increases.

In fact, Sansiri — one of Thailand’s biggest developers — set up its international business unit in 2014 after seeing growing interest from foreign buyers, said Nanmanas Jiwattanakul, the company’s assistant executive vice president of international business development.

Chinese buyers make up 70 percent of Sansiri’s international sales, she said.

The development — not spurred by any marketing efforts — prompted the developer to set up showrooms in Thailand and overseas catering to such investors, she told CNBC.

“We started to drive (international sales) and also because we started seeing a number of foreign buyers in Thailand,” said Nanmanas.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-11  Authors: huileng tan, prachanart viriyaraks, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, property, interest, surged, buyers, international, thailands, thailand, buying, spot, chinese, told, started, growth, recent


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