Boeing says disabled alert on 737 Max wasn’t necessary for safe operation of aircraft

Boeing said Sunday a standard alert that had been disabled on the 737 Max jet due to a glitch was not necessary to safely operate the aircraft. The 737 Max was grounded by the FAA in March in the wake of two fatal crashes that killed 346 people. Just months after the Lion Air crash, a Boeing 737 Max 8 went down just minutes after taking off from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Neither the angle of attack indicator nor the AOA Disagree alert are necessary for the safe operation of the airplane. In 2017, w


Boeing said Sunday a standard alert that had been disabled on the 737 Max jet due to a glitch was not necessary to safely operate the aircraft. The 737 Max was grounded by the FAA in March in the wake of two fatal crashes that killed 346 people. Just months after the Lion Air crash, a Boeing 737 Max 8 went down just minutes after taking off from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Neither the angle of attack indicator nor the AOA Disagree alert are necessary for the safe operation of the airplane. In 2017, w
Boeing says disabled alert on 737 Max wasn’t necessary for safe operation of aircraft Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-05  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, standard, boeing, safe, alert, max, aoa, 737, operation, necessary, software, disabled, wasnt, air, aircraft, indicator, disagree


Boeing says disabled alert on 737 Max wasn't necessary for safe operation of aircraft

Boeing said Sunday a standard alert that had been disabled on the 737 Max jet due to a glitch was not necessary to safely operate the aircraft.

Boeing’s statement comes after Southwest Airlines, the company’s largest 737 Max customer, said Boeing did not inform it about the disabled alert until after the fatal crash of a Lion Air 737 Max in Indonesia last October.

Known as an angle-of-attack disagree light, the indicator flashes if an aircraft’s angle-of-attack sensors transmit faulty data about the pitch of the plane’s nose.

Boeing said the disagree light was included as a standard, stand-alone feature on the 737 Max, but it was linked to another optional feature called an angle-of-attack indicator. The disagree light would only work if airlines opted for the angle-of-attack indicator.

In 2017, well before the Lion Air crash, engineers discovered the 737 Max display software didn’t meet the requirements for the disagree alert. Boeing then followed its “standard process for determining the appropriate resolution of such issues,” the company said in a statement Sunday.

“That review, which involved, multiple company subject matter experts, determined that the absence of the AOA Disagree alert did not adversely impact airplane safety or operation,” the statement continued. “Accordingly, the review concluded, the existing functionality was acceptable until the alert and the indicator could be de-linked in the next planned display system software update.”

Though engineers were investigating, Boeing said senior company leadership wasn’t involved in the review and “first became aware of this issue in the aftermath of the Lion Air accident.”

The 737 Max was grounded by the FAA in March in the wake of two fatal crashes that killed 346 people. Just months after the Lion Air crash, a Boeing 737 Max 8 went down just minutes after taking off from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Several major airlines have extended Max flight cancellations through the summer. American has canceled Max flights through Aug. 19, totaling 115 flights per day, while Southwest has canceled through Aug. 5 and United through June 5.

In Sunday’s statement, Boeing said it discussed the status of the AOA disagree alert with the Federal Aviation Administration after the Lion Air crash. The company convened a safety review board in December 2018, which confirmed that the absence of the instrument did not present a safety issue, Boeing said.

Boeing plans to issue a software update to implement the AOA disagree alert as a standard, standalone feature when the Max returns to service.

Here is Boeing’s full statement:

On every airplane delivered to our customers, including the MAX, all flight data and information needed to safely operate the aircraft is provided in the flight deck on the primary flight deck displays. This information is provided full-time in the pilots’ primary field of view, and it always has been. Air speed, attitude, altitude, vertical speed, heading and engine power settings are the primary parameters the flight crews use to safely operate the airplane in normal flight. Stick shaker and the pitch limit indicator are the primary features used for the operation of the airplane at elevated angles of attack. All recommended pilot actions, checklists, and training are based upon these primary indicators. Neither the angle of attack indicator nor the AOA Disagree alert are necessary for the safe operation of the airplane. They provide supplemental information only, and have never been considered safety features on commercial jet transport airplanes. The Boeing design requirements for the 737 MAX included the AOA Disagree alert as a standard, standalone feature, in keeping with Boeing’s fundamental design philosophy of retaining commonality with the 737NG. In 2017, within several months after beginning 737 MAX deliveries, engineers at Boeing identified that the 737 MAX display system software did not correctly meet the AOA Disagree alert requirements. The software delivered to Boeing linked the AOA Disagree alert to the AOA indicator, which is an optional feature on the MAX and the NG. Accordingly, the software activated the AOA Disagree alert only if an airline opted for the AOA indicator. When the discrepancy between the requirements and the software was identified, Boeing followed its standard process for determining the appropriate resolution of such issues. That review, which involved multiple company subject matter experts, determined that the absence of the AOA Disagree alert did not adversely impact airplane safety or operation. Accordingly, the review concluded, the existing functionality was acceptable until the alert and the indicator could be delinked in the next planned display system software update. Senior company leadership was not involved in the review and first became aware of this issue in the aftermath of the Lion Air accident. Approximately a week after the Lion Air accident, on November 6, 2018, Boeing issued an Operations Manual Bulletin (OMB), which was followed a day later by the FAA’s issuance of an Airworthiness Directive (AD). In identifying the AOA Disagree alert as one among a number of indications that could result from erroneous AOA, both the OMB and the AD described the AOA Disagree alert feature as available only if the AOA indicator option is installed. Boeing discussed the status of the AOA Disagree alert with the FAA in the wake of the Lion Air accident. At that time, Boeing informed the FAA that Boeing engineers had identified the software issue in 2017 and had determined per Boeing’s standard process that the issue did not adversely impact airplane safety or operation. In December 2018, Boeing convened a Safety Review Board (SRB) to consider again whether the absence of the AOA Disagree alert from certain 737 MAX flight displays presented a safety issue. That SRB confirmed Boeing’s prior conclusion that it did not. Boeing shared this conclusion and the supporting SRB analysis with the FAA. Boeing is issuing a display system software update, to implement the AOA Disagree alert as a standard, standalone feature before the MAX returns to service. When the MAX returns to service, all MAX production aircraft will have an activated and operable AOA Disagree alert and an optional angle of attack indicator. All customers with previously delivered MAX airplanes will have the ability to activate the AOA Disagree alert.

—CNBC’s Amanda Macia and Spencer Kimball contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-05  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, standard, boeing, safe, alert, max, aoa, 737, operation, necessary, software, disabled, wasnt, air, aircraft, indicator, disagree


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China and India will become asset management ‘powerhouses,’ top fund manager says

China and India are poised to become “real powerhouses” for the asset management industry, according to Standard Life Aberdeen Vice-Chairman Martin Gilbert. Speaking to CNBC at the first Financial Sector Conference in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Gilbert said Asia remained the key focus for asset management arm Aberdeen Standard Investments (ASI), based on the growth in retail investors and wealth in China and India. “It’s not really a retail market yet but when it is, China, India, these sort of place


China and India are poised to become “real powerhouses” for the asset management industry, according to Standard Life Aberdeen Vice-Chairman Martin Gilbert. Speaking to CNBC at the first Financial Sector Conference in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Gilbert said Asia remained the key focus for asset management arm Aberdeen Standard Investments (ASI), based on the growth in retail investors and wealth in China and India. “It’s not really a retail market yet but when it is, China, India, these sort of place
China and India will become asset management ‘powerhouses,’ top fund manager says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: elliot smith, jason alden, bloomberg via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, powerhouses, manager, asset, retail, fund, real, management, standard, industry, india, gilbert


China and India will become asset management 'powerhouses,' top fund manager says

China and India are poised to become “real powerhouses” for the asset management industry, according to Standard Life Aberdeen Vice-Chairman Martin Gilbert.

Speaking to CNBC at the first Financial Sector Conference in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Gilbert said Asia remained the key focus for asset management arm Aberdeen Standard Investments (ASI), based on the growth in retail investors and wealth in China and India.

“It’s not really a retail market yet but when it is, China, India, these sort of places are going to be real powerhouses for the asset management industry,” Gilbert said.

ASI expanded its Asian investment team in November 2018, with four portfolio managers joining in Shanghai and Hong Kong to bolster its China fixed income and equities expertise.

Gilbert said China’s top-down economy and political structure meant that “you need to be close to the government in China and as far away from the government as possible in India.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: elliot smith, jason alden, bloomberg via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, powerhouses, manager, asset, retail, fund, real, management, standard, industry, india, gilbert


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Tesla starts offering leases for Model 3

Tesla on Thursday started leasing out its Model 3 sedan in the United States, in a financing option that would increase the electric car maker’s customer base. Tesla said that it would begin bundling its autopilot software as a standard feature on all cars, raising the base price, and would drop the entry-level Model 3 Standard from online ordering. As a result, the lowest-priced Model 3 available for order on its online menu in the United States is now the $39,500 Standard Plus, which includes


Tesla on Thursday started leasing out its Model 3 sedan in the United States, in a financing option that would increase the electric car maker’s customer base. Tesla said that it would begin bundling its autopilot software as a standard feature on all cars, raising the base price, and would drop the entry-level Model 3 Standard from online ordering. As a result, the lowest-priced Model 3 available for order on its online menu in the United States is now the $39,500 Standard Plus, which includes
Tesla starts offering leases for Model 3 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: dursun aydemir, anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tesla, offering, online, states, united, version, car, plus, model, starts, variant, leases, standard


Tesla starts offering leases for Model 3

Tesla on Thursday started leasing out its Model 3 sedan in the United States, in a financing option that would increase the electric car maker’s customer base.

Tesla said its customers in the United States would be able to lease any Model 3 variant for a small down payment and monthly payments thereafter, but they will not have the option to buy the car at the end of the lease.

Tesla said that it would begin bundling its autopilot software as a standard feature on all cars, raising the base price, and would drop the entry-level Model 3 Standard from online ordering.

As a result, the lowest-priced Model 3 available for order on its online menu in the United States is now the $39,500 Standard Plus, which includes Autopilot.

The company in February had rolled out its long-awaited $35,000 version of the car with great fanfare.

The company also said the Standard variant of Model 3 will now be a software-limited version of the Standard Plus, to simplify production.

As part of the changes to its online ordering, Tesla said the Model 3 Standard variant and the Model 3 Long Range Rear-Wheel Drive will be taken off the online ordering menu but will still be available for order by phone or in stores.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: dursun aydemir, anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tesla, offering, online, states, united, version, car, plus, model, starts, variant, leases, standard


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Lost these tax breaks on your federal return? Your state might let you have them

Late filers: Don’t shred those receipts just yet. You might be able to nab a break on your state tax return. It’s the first time taxpayers are submitting returns under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. This overhaul of the federal tax code roughly doubled the standard deduction to $12,000 for single filers ($24,000 for married-filing-jointly), did away with personal exemptions and limited itemized deductions. As a result of these changes, about 30 million fewer households will itemize in 2018, compared


Late filers: Don’t shred those receipts just yet. You might be able to nab a break on your state tax return. It’s the first time taxpayers are submitting returns under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. This overhaul of the federal tax code roughly doubled the standard deduction to $12,000 for single filers ($24,000 for married-filing-jointly), did away with personal exemptions and limited itemized deductions. As a result of these changes, about 30 million fewer households will itemize in 2018, compared
Lost these tax breaks on your federal return? Your state might let you have them Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: darla mercado, guido mieth, digitalvision, getty images, martinprescott, peopleimages
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taxpayers, submitting, state, filers, shred, standard, tax, single, 2018, let, return, lost, taxation, federal, breaks


Lost these tax breaks on your federal return? Your state might let you have them

Late filers: Don’t shred those receipts just yet. You might be able to nab a break on your state tax return.

We are closing in on the final days of the 2018 filing season. It’s the first time taxpayers are submitting returns under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

This overhaul of the federal tax code roughly doubled the standard deduction to $12,000 for single filers ($24,000 for married-filing-jointly), did away with personal exemptions and limited itemized deductions.

As a result of these changes, about 30 million fewer households will itemize in 2018, compared to 2017, according to the Joint Committee on Taxation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: darla mercado, guido mieth, digitalvision, getty images, martinprescott, peopleimages
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taxpayers, submitting, state, filers, shred, standard, tax, single, 2018, let, return, lost, taxation, federal, breaks


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Standard Chartered expected to pay just over $1 billion to resolve US, UK probes

London-based Standard Chartered is expected to pay slightly more than $1 billion to resolve a nearly five-year-old investigation of potential U.S. sanctions violations tied to its banking for Iran-controlled entities in Dubai, as well as a related U.K. probe, according to a person familiar with the matter. A spokeswoman for Standard Chartered declined to comment. Investigators said the company also once had an account with Standard Chartered, the person said. Standard Chartered said in February


London-based Standard Chartered is expected to pay slightly more than $1 billion to resolve a nearly five-year-old investigation of potential U.S. sanctions violations tied to its banking for Iran-controlled entities in Dubai, as well as a related U.K. probe, according to a person familiar with the matter. A spokeswoman for Standard Chartered declined to comment. Investigators said the company also once had an account with Standard Chartered, the person said. Standard Chartered said in February
Standard Chartered expected to pay just over $1 billion to resolve US, UK probes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: anthony kwan, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, resolve, person, probes, fca, related, uk, million, standard, familiar, chartered, billion, pay, expected, financial, probe


Standard Chartered expected to pay just over $1 billion to resolve US, UK probes

London-based Standard Chartered is expected to pay slightly more than $1 billion to resolve a nearly five-year-old investigation of potential U.S. sanctions violations tied to its banking for Iran-controlled entities in Dubai, as well as a related U.K. probe, according to a person familiar with the matter.

Authorities are aiming for the bank to settle on Tuesday morning, two sources said.

Standard Chartered has been operating under deferred prosecution agreements with U.S. authorities since 2012, when it paid $667 million for illegally moving millions of dollars through the U.S. financial system on behalf of customers in Iran, Sudan, Libya and Burma.

The agreement has been extended numerous times, the last one extended for 10 days and set to expire on Wednesday.

The expected total payout also covers a roughly $134 million penalty from Britain’s Financial Conduct Authority related to historical financial crime controls.

A spokeswoman for Standard Chartered declined to comment.

The U.S. Department of Justice, the U.S. Attorney’s office in Washington, the Federal Reserve, the Manhattan District Attorney and the New York Department of Financial Services also declined to comment. The FCA also declined to comment.

The latest U.S. investigation stems in part from evidence found during a probe of French bank BNP Paribas, which paid a record $8.9 billion in penalties and pleaded guilty in 2014 to sanctions-related charges, people familiar with the matter have told Reuters.

Investigators found BNP had done business with a Dubai-registered corporation that acted as a front for an Iranian entity, a person familiar with the matter told Reuters in 2014. Investigators said the company also once had an account with Standard Chartered, the person said.

Standard Chartered said in February it had set aside $900 million related to the potential resolution of violations of U.S. sanctions and foreign exchange trading. That sum also included the FCA penalty.

A resolution of the FCA probe is expected the same time as the U.S. settlements.

Other banks to settle with U.S. authorities over sanctions-related misconduct over the past decade included Societe Generale, Credit Suisse, Lloyds, Barclays and HSBC.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: anthony kwan, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, resolve, person, probes, fca, related, uk, million, standard, familiar, chartered, billion, pay, expected, financial, probe


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The standard ’60-40′ portfolio of stocks and bonds just had its best quarter in a decade

It’s called the “60-40” rule — which describes a portfolio made up of 60 percent stocks and 40 percent fixed-income securities. The Vanguard Balanced Index fund, which mirrors that portfolio rule, just had its best quarter in nearly a decade with a 9.5 percent gain in the first quarter. Investors embraced the stance and bought bonds, pushing their prices higher as the yields fell. Higher rates can sometimes dampen enthusiasm for stocks because rising borrowing costs eat into corporate profits an


It’s called the “60-40” rule — which describes a portfolio made up of 60 percent stocks and 40 percent fixed-income securities. The Vanguard Balanced Index fund, which mirrors that portfolio rule, just had its best quarter in nearly a decade with a 9.5 percent gain in the first quarter. Investors embraced the stance and bought bonds, pushing their prices higher as the yields fell. Higher rates can sometimes dampen enthusiasm for stocks because rising borrowing costs eat into corporate profits an
The standard ’60-40′ portfolio of stocks and bonds just had its best quarter in a decade Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-02  Authors: kate rooney, brendan mcdermid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, yields, 6040, decade, bonds, portfolio, prices, higher, rule, best, quarter, rates, standard, investors


The standard '60-40' portfolio of stocks and bonds just had its best quarter in a decade

An old investing rule of thumb is working better than it has in a while.

It’s called the “60-40” rule — which describes a portfolio made up of 60 percent stocks and 40 percent fixed-income securities. Advisors have recommended the balance as a middle-of-the-road way of investing. It puts the majority of an investor’s money into stocks, which are riskier but higher yielding than bonds, while still having a solid amount held in government, corporate and agency bonds.

The Vanguard Balanced Index fund, which mirrors that portfolio rule, just had its best quarter in nearly a decade with a 9.5 percent gain in the first quarter.

The approach is usually more of a hedge. When stocks do well, it’s not typically the case that bond prices also rally. But this year has been different, thanks to the Federal Reserve.

The Fed signaled in January that it was putting the brakes on raising its short-term benchmark rates. Investors embraced the stance and bought bonds, pushing their prices higher as the yields fell. That also boosted stocks. Higher rates can sometimes dampen enthusiasm for stocks because rising borrowing costs eat into corporate profits and can make earnings valuation look too high.

Bond yields and prices move in opposite directions. In this case, lower yields means higher bond prices, and therefore more value for that 40 percent of an average investors’ “60-40” portfolio. With the Fed no longer a roadblock, and the economy chugging along at a respectable 2 percent growth, U.S. stocks and bonds have both been in favor this year.

In other words, the quarter was “the perfect storm, in a good way” for investors, according to Paul Schatz, president at Heritage Capital.

“The rising tide of the first quarter has lifted all ships, debris and just about anything and everything in the ocean,” Schatz said. “The 60-40 portfolio was an easy winner.”

The other factor boosting U.S. Treasurys was how good they looked compared to the rest of the world. The German and Japanese 10-year government bonds, for instance, both yield negative interest rates. Any return looks great in comparison, especially for global investors looking for a place to park their money. The U.S. 10-year yields just under 2.5 percent.

“We might think of U.S. bonds as low income — but for the rest of the world it’s like a high yield bond,” said Ken Kamen, president of Mercadien Asset Management. “Worldwide demand is helping.”

The amount a retail investor should put in stocks versus bonds has a lot to do with their tolerance for risk and how close they are to retiring. Advisors often recommend that younger investors invest a greater portion of their money in stocks, or around 80 percent. Someone who is retired, on the other hand, might put 30 percent in stocks and have 70 percent in bonds.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-02  Authors: kate rooney, brendan mcdermid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, yields, 6040, decade, bonds, portfolio, prices, higher, rule, best, quarter, rates, standard, investors


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Kavanaugh, Gorsuch suggest letting states figure out gerrymandering as SCOTUS hears case

Kavanaugh asked Allison Riggs, a voting rights attorney who was representing the state’s League of Women Voters in their case against North Carolina. The case involved a North Carolina map drawn in 2016 that was explicitly designed to maintain a 10-3 advantage for Republicans. North Carolina defended the gerrymandering on the basis that redistricting is an inherently political activity that courts should not get mired in. The suit against North Carolina was brought by the good government group C


Kavanaugh asked Allison Riggs, a voting rights attorney who was representing the state’s League of Women Voters in their case against North Carolina. The case involved a North Carolina map drawn in 2016 that was explicitly designed to maintain a 10-3 advantage for Republicans. North Carolina defended the gerrymandering on the basis that redistricting is an inherently political activity that courts should not get mired in. The suit against North Carolina was brought by the good government group C
Kavanaugh, Gorsuch suggest letting states figure out gerrymandering as SCOTUS hears case Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: tucker higgins, john w schoen, logan cyrus, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gerrymandering, suggest, carolina, courts, kavanaugh, hears, states, gorsuch, case, voters, suggested, standard, map, court, letting, north, scotus, figure


Kavanaugh, Gorsuch suggest letting states figure out gerrymandering as SCOTUS hears case

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump’s two appointees to the Supreme Court suggested on Tuesday that partisan gerrymandering of congressional districts is already being solved by state action, a possible sign that the nation’s top court, dominated by a 5-4 conservative majority, will not step into the matter.

The Supreme Court has never blocked a congressional map for being too politically partisan, although cases have frequently come before the panel on the issue.

Justice Anthony Kennedy, whom Justice Brett Kavanaugh replaced on the court last year, had suggested that there may be room for a “workable standard,” though so far one has eluded the court. Kavanaugh’s own views remain largely unknown.

But questions from Kavanaugh and fellow Trump appointee Neil Gorsuch, during a case involving a congressional map drawn by North Carolina Republicans, suggested that no legal fix may be forthcoming – at least at the national level.

“What about, to pick up on something Justice Gorsuch said earlier, that there is a fair amount of activity going on in the states on redistricting and attention in Congress and in state supreme courts?” Kavanaugh asked Allison Riggs, a voting rights attorney who was representing the state’s League of Women Voters in their case against North Carolina.

“In other words…have we really reached the moment, even though it would be a big lift for this court to get involved, where the other actors can’t do it?” he asked.

Gorsuch, for his part, noted that there was “a lot of movement in this area,” including in his home state of Colorado, where voters reigned in the practice last year. Voters in Missouri, Ohio, Utah and Michigan also acted on the issue.

To be sure, questions that justices ask at oral argument are not a perfect gauge for how they will vote.

And complicating matters, during another portion of Tuesday’s argument, Kavanaugh appeared to question whether extreme gerrymandering could violate the Constitution’s guarantee of equal protection.

“What will Kavanaugh do? It is a more interesting question than I thought before,” wrote Rick Hasen, an election law expert and professor at the University of California, Irvine.

The case involved a North Carolina map drawn in 2016 that was explicitly designed to maintain a 10-3 advantage for Republicans.

David Lewis, a member of the state’s general assembly, has said that he proposed a 10-3 Republican advantage “because I do not believe it’s possible to draw a map with 11 Republicans and two Democrats.”

North Carolina defended the gerrymandering on the basis that redistricting is an inherently political activity that courts should not get mired in.

The suit against North Carolina was brought by the good government group Common Cause as well as the League of Women Voters. Attorneys for both groups argued separately Tuesday.

The issue is particularly significant at the moment because districts are generally redrawn once every ten years along with the national census.

The next census will be conducted in 2020. Republicans primarily benefited from gerrymandering after the nation’s last census. During the November 2018 midterms, in which the Democrats took over the House of Representatives, the GOP advantage stemmed Republican losses, a recent analysis by the Associated Press found.

The justices heard a similar gerrymandering case in 2017, but ultimately dodged the central question. In a concurrence authored by Justice Elena Kagan and joined by other members of the court’s liberal wing, Kagan suggested that courts would ultimately come up with a fix.

One central point of contention is whether any new standard would result in an onslaught of new litigation before the top court.

Paul Clement, an attorney representing North Carolina, warned that “these cases will come. They will come in large numbers,” he said.

“And once you get into the political thicket, you will not get out, and you will tarnish the image of this court for the other cases where it needs that reputation for independence so people can understand the fundamental difference between judging and all other politics,” Clement said.

But some of the court’s liberals took issue with that argument. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg told Clement that he was making the same argument that had been used to argue against the one-person-one-vote rule that the court ultimately endorsed, and that no such wave of litigation resulted.

Justice Stephen Breyer, known as a pragmatist on the bench, put forward his own standard. What if, he said, gerrymandering were barred in extreme cases — defined as those where the party that wins a majority of the vote only gets a third, or less, representation?

Clement retorted that “there is no standard deviation from proportional representation clause in the Constitution.”

Later on Tuesday, the court heard a dispute brought by Republican voters in Maryland who live in a district that was gerrymandered by Democrats.

Decisions are expected by late June.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: tucker higgins, john w schoen, logan cyrus, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gerrymandering, suggest, carolina, courts, kavanaugh, hears, states, gorsuch, case, voters, suggested, standard, map, court, letting, north, scotus, figure


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Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Nike, Cintas, GameStop and more

Check out the companies making headlines after the bell:Shares of Nike dropped more than 3 percent in extending trading Thursday following the release of the retailers better-than-expected third-quarter earnings results. Nike posted earnings per share of 68 cents, beating estimates of 65 cents, according to Refinitiv. Cintas shares dipped as much as 3 percent after hours Thursday on mixed third-quarter earnings. GameStop shares popped slightly in extended trading on news that the gaming company


Check out the companies making headlines after the bell:Shares of Nike dropped more than 3 percent in extending trading Thursday following the release of the retailers better-than-expected third-quarter earnings results. Nike posted earnings per share of 68 cents, beating estimates of 65 cents, according to Refinitiv. Cintas shares dipped as much as 3 percent after hours Thursday on mixed third-quarter earnings. GameStop shares popped slightly in extended trading on news that the gaming company
Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Nike, Cintas, GameStop and more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: maggie fitzgerald, spencer platt, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thirdquarter, making, gamestop, sherman, cintas, share, nike, company, hours, cents, moves, stocks, biggest, billion, standard, earnings, trading, revenue


Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Nike, Cintas, GameStop and more

Check out the companies making headlines after the bell:

Shares of Nike dropped more than 3 percent in extending trading Thursday following the release of the retailers better-than-expected third-quarter earnings results. Nike posted earnings per share of 68 cents, beating estimates of 65 cents, according to Refinitiv. Revenue came in-line with Wall Street’s expectations at $9.61 billion. The stock was down on weaker-than-expected sales growth in North America.

Cintas shares dipped as much as 3 percent after hours Thursday on mixed third-quarter earnings. The business services company reported $1.68 billion in revenue, slightly missing estimates of $1.69 billion. Earnings per share were $1.84, beating the $1.71 forecast by analysts surveyed by Refinitiv.

Shares of Caleres fell more than 6 percent after market close Thursday following weak fourth-quarter earnings. The footwear company missed on the top and bottom lines. Caleres posted earnings per share of 38 cents on revenues of $720 million. Analysts forecast earnings per share of 45 cents on revenues of $738 million, according to Refinitiv.

GameStop shares popped slightly in extended trading on news that the gaming company named George Sherman as its CEO, effective April 2019. Sherman succeeds Shane Kim, who has served as interim chief executive officer since May 2018. Sherman has leading rolls at retailers Best Buy, Target, and Home Depot.

Shares of Zuora fell more than 11 percent after hours after reporting fourth-quarter earnings. The enterprise software company’s total revenue grew 29 percent year-over-year. The company adopted a new revenue recognition standard that put first-quarter and full-year guidance below the outlook under the previous revenue recognition standard.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: maggie fitzgerald, spencer platt, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thirdquarter, making, gamestop, sherman, cintas, share, nike, company, hours, cents, moves, stocks, biggest, billion, standard, earnings, trading, revenue


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StanChart: The risk of a hard Brexit seems to be ‘diminishing’

StanChart: The risk of a hard Brexit seems to be ‘diminishing’9 Hours AgoSteven Englander of Standard Chartered Bank says the British pound could have a “disorderly slide” if a hard Brexit looked likely.


StanChart: The risk of a hard Brexit seems to be ‘diminishing’9 Hours AgoSteven Englander of Standard Chartered Bank says the British pound could have a “disorderly slide” if a hard Brexit looked likely.
StanChart: The risk of a hard Brexit seems to be ‘diminishing’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brexit, likely, hours, looked, diminishing, hard, standard, stanchart, slide, pound, risk


StanChart: The risk of a hard Brexit seems to be 'diminishing'

StanChart: The risk of a hard Brexit seems to be ‘diminishing’

9 Hours Ago

Steven Englander of Standard Chartered Bank says the British pound could have a “disorderly slide” if a hard Brexit looked likely.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brexit, likely, hours, looked, diminishing, hard, standard, stanchart, slide, pound, risk


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How much money Americans are saving for retirement—and how much you need if you want to retire by 65

If you’re hoping to retire by 60, like most young people are, or even a little later in your mid-60s, you might need to up your savings. And that’s if you start saving as early as age 25. If you wait until 35 to start, you have to save 15 to 20 percent of your income to retire by 65. Most employees aren’t saving nearly that much, according to the report: “Based on our estimation, families age 25-64 are currently only saving a median of about 6 to 8 percent of income toward retirement.” Here’s th


If you’re hoping to retire by 60, like most young people are, or even a little later in your mid-60s, you might need to up your savings. And that’s if you start saving as early as age 25. If you wait until 35 to start, you have to save 15 to 20 percent of your income to retire by 65. Most employees aren’t saving nearly that much, according to the report: “Based on our estimation, families age 25-64 are currently only saving a median of about 6 to 8 percent of income toward retirement.” Here’s th
How much money Americans are saving for retirement—and how much you need if you want to retire by 65 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-12  Authors: kathleen elkins, lesia valentain, -seeing our way to financial security in the age o, stanford center on longevity
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, saving, security, americans, standard, retirementand, income, start, age, retirement, money, 65, need, retire, youre


How much money Americans are saving for retirement—and how much you need if you want to retire by 65

If you’re hoping to retire by 60, like most young people are, or even a little later in your mid-60s, you might need to up your savings.

“Most American workers aren’t saving at levels that will allow them to retire fully at age 65 at their current standard of living,” researchers at the Stanford Center on Longevity conclude in a 2018 report, “Seeing Our Way to Financial Security in the Age of Longevity.”

After considering factors such as the rate of return on investments, salary growth, life expectancy and Social Security benefits, the researchers project that, if you want to retire at age 65 and maintain your standard of living, you need to put 10 to 17 percent of your current income into a retirement account. And that’s if you start saving as early as age 25.

If you wait until 35 to start, you have to save 15 to 20 percent of your income to retire by 65. Keep in mind that this amount does not include your short-term savings, so it would be on top of any money you’re putting in an emergency fund, for example.

Most employees aren’t saving nearly that much, according to the report: “Based on our estimation, families age 25-64 are currently only saving a median of about 6 to 8 percent of income toward retirement.”

Here’s the Center’s breakdown of median contribution as a percent of income in work-based retirement plans for families at different ages.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-12  Authors: kathleen elkins, lesia valentain, -seeing our way to financial security in the age o, stanford center on longevity
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, saving, security, americans, standard, retirementand, income, start, age, retirement, money, 65, need, retire, youre


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