The 2018 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio is a near-perfect sports sedan

The minor complaints from the standard Giulia remain. The infotainment system can be a bit frustrating, asking you to negotiate CarPlay with nothing but a rotary dial. But the Quadrifoglio has one issue that the normal Giulia doesn’t: seriously frustrating brakes. A combination of poorly calibrated brake-by-wire software and racing-focused, carbon-ceramic brakes makes stopping the Giulia an exercise in frustration. It gets easier the more time you spend with it, but the best option is to just no


The minor complaints from the standard Giulia remain. The infotainment system can be a bit frustrating, asking you to negotiate CarPlay with nothing but a rotary dial. But the Quadrifoglio has one issue that the normal Giulia doesn’t: seriously frustrating brakes. A combination of poorly calibrated brake-by-wire software and racing-focused, carbon-ceramic brakes makes stopping the Giulia an exercise in frustration. It gets easier the more time you spend with it, but the best option is to just no
The 2018 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio is a near-perfect sports sedan Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-12  Authors: mack hogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, romeo, alfa, youre, giulia, keyfob, brakes, youd, frustrating, trunk, sedan, standard, quadrifoglio, carbonceramic, weirdly, nearperfect, 2018


The 2018 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio is a near-perfect sports sedan

The minor complaints from the standard Giulia remain. The infotainment system can be a bit frustrating, asking you to negotiate CarPlay with nothing but a rotary dial. It also exhibited the same problem recognizing when I pressed the “lock” or “trunk open” buttons on the keyfob, which Alfa says was probably the result of low keyfob battery.

But the Quadrifoglio has one issue that the normal Giulia doesn’t: seriously frustrating brakes. A combination of poorly calibrated brake-by-wire software and racing-focused, carbon-ceramic brakes makes stopping the Giulia an exercise in frustration. It’s weirdly difficult to apply the right amount of force, meaning you’re always either jerking the car to a stop or not slowing down as quickly as you’d like. It gets easier the more time you spend with it, but the best option is to just not get the carbon-ceramic brakes. The standard pads are supposedly better.

More concerning are the reliability issues experienced by other outlets. I did not experience any of this, but you should know about what others found.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-12  Authors: mack hogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, romeo, alfa, youre, giulia, keyfob, brakes, youd, frustrating, trunk, sedan, standard, quadrifoglio, carbonceramic, weirdly, nearperfect, 2018


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‘We should not overreact to market movements,’ says Standard Chartered chairman

English banking giant Standard Chartered’s chairman suggests that investors should “de-dramatize” the recent market sell-off. “We should not overreact to market movements even if those market movements are sizable,” José Viñals told CNBC’s Geoff Cuttmore on Thursday morning. Viñals comments came amid a stock market rout in Asia following a major Wednesday sell-off on Wall Street. Commenting on the recent market rout, Viñals said he “would de-dramatize the situation,” urging investors to “remembe


English banking giant Standard Chartered’s chairman suggests that investors should “de-dramatize” the recent market sell-off. “We should not overreact to market movements even if those market movements are sizable,” José Viñals told CNBC’s Geoff Cuttmore on Thursday morning. Viñals comments came amid a stock market rout in Asia following a major Wednesday sell-off on Wall Street. Commenting on the recent market rout, Viñals said he “would de-dramatize the situation,” urging investors to “remembe
‘We should not overreact to market movements,’ says Standard Chartered chairman Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, standard, investors, wall, chairman, vials, movements, rout, going, recent, dedramatize, rates, overreact, chartered, market


'We should not overreact to market movements,' says Standard Chartered chairman

English banking giant Standard Chartered’s chairman suggests that investors should “de-dramatize” the recent market sell-off.

“We should not overreact to market movements even if those market movements are sizable,” José Viñals told CNBC’s Geoff Cuttmore on Thursday morning.

Viñals comments came amid a stock market rout in Asia following a major Wednesday sell-off on Wall Street.

Commenting on the recent market rout, Viñals said he “would de-dramatize the situation,” urging investors to “remember what we have.”

“One needs to start from realizing that some valuations were stretched to begin with,” he said

“In a context where interest rates are going up and where growth prospects are significantly revised downwards,” he added, “this is something that is going to take some steam off equity markets.”

Nevertheless, Viñals said, the global and U.S. economies were “still growing strongly,” along with expectations and forecasts that they were going to “keep at good rates” for this year and the next.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, standard, investors, wall, chairman, vials, movements, rout, going, recent, dedramatize, rates, overreact, chartered, market


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Don’t ‘overreact’ to market movements: Standard Chartered

Don’t ‘overreact’ to market movements: Standard Chartered20 Hours AgoJosé Viñals of Standard Chartered says both the U.S. and global economies are “still growing strongly.”


Don’t ‘overreact’ to market movements: Standard Chartered20 Hours AgoJosé Viñals of Standard Chartered says both the U.S. and global economies are “still growing strongly.”
Don’t ‘overreact’ to market movements: Standard Chartered Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-10
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hours, strongly, market, global, chartered, economies, dont, growing, overreact, movements, standard, vials


Don't 'overreact' to market movements: Standard Chartered

Don’t ‘overreact’ to market movements: Standard Chartered

20 Hours Ago

José Viñals of Standard Chartered says both the U.S. and global economies are “still growing strongly.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-10
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hours, strongly, market, global, chartered, economies, dont, growing, overreact, movements, standard, vials


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Rising yields could be a big problem for booming corporate profits

The big story for investors lately, though, has been the surge in bond yields, pushing the benchmark U.S. 10-year Treasury note yield to about 3.23 percent, its highest level in seven years. Friday’s nonfarm payrolls report showed unemployment at a 49-year low, a nonmanufacturing sector reading last week showed activity at its highest level since the survey began in 1997, and the National Federation of Independent Business’ small-business sentiment gauge is at its highest level since it started


The big story for investors lately, though, has been the surge in bond yields, pushing the benchmark U.S. 10-year Treasury note yield to about 3.23 percent, its highest level in seven years. Friday’s nonfarm payrolls report showed unemployment at a 49-year low, a nonmanufacturing sector reading last week showed activity at its highest level since the survey began in 1997, and the National Federation of Independent Business’ small-business sentiment gauge is at its highest level since it started
Rising yields could be a big problem for booming corporate profits Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-08  Authors: jeff cox, michael nagle, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yields, profits, problem, booming, big, wont, stocks, standard, highest, yield, corporate, note, month, rising, level, 10year


Rising yields could be a big problem for booming corporate profits

The big story for investors lately, though, has been the surge in bond yields, pushing the benchmark U.S. 10-year Treasury note yield to about 3.23 percent, its highest level in seven years. As things currently stand, not only is the 10-year above the S&P 500’s 1.81 percent dividend yield but so is the three-month note, which is currently yielding 2.22 percent and offering investors a viable risk-free alternative to a suddenly volatile stock market.

Broadly speaking, stocks in the past have done well in rising rate environments.

However, Kostin pointed out that the sudden spike in the 10-year — 33 basis points over the past month — equates to two standard deviations and is typically associated with negative returns. Goldman has found that stocks typically grow with moves of less than 1 standard deviation per month, are flat with between 1 and 2 standard deviation moves, and fall with anything above 2.

The pressure from yields comes as the economy continues to catch fire. Friday’s nonfarm payrolls report showed unemployment at a 49-year low, a nonmanufacturing sector reading last week showed activity at its highest level since the survey began in 1997, and the National Federation of Independent Business’ small-business sentiment gauge is at its highest level since it started 44 years ago.

Thus far, the acceleration in economic activity has most of Wall Street believing that the rise in yields won’t last or at least won’t halt the positive momentum. Stocks have been on a modest losing streak lately but still are around where they were a month ago when the surge in yields began.

But even some bulls are getting nervous.

“When it comes to interest rates, it appears speed defines everything and last week’s 17 [basis point] jump in 10-year yields served as another reminder that speed can kill equity market rallies. We were also reminded of this in February after yields rose at nearly the same pace,” Craig Johnson, chief market technician at Piper Jaffray, one of Wall Street’s most consistently optimistic firms, said in a note. “However, at the risk of using ‘this time it’s different,’ the technical backdrop for rates appears much different when comparing the recent rise in yields to January.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-08  Authors: jeff cox, michael nagle, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yields, profits, problem, booming, big, wont, stocks, standard, highest, yield, corporate, note, month, rising, level, 10year


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German diesel deal gives drivers choice of hardware fix or trade-in

Owners of older diesel cars in German cities where the air is particularly polluted should be able to choose between trade-in incentives and a hardware upgrade, coalition parties have agreed according to a paper seen by Reuters on Tuesday. The document, seen ahead of an official announcement of the deal, said German car-makers had agreed to offer an exchange program with attractive trade-in incentives or discounts for owners of diesel vehicles meeting the olderEuro 4 and Euro 5 emissions standar


Owners of older diesel cars in German cities where the air is particularly polluted should be able to choose between trade-in incentives and a hardware upgrade, coalition parties have agreed according to a paper seen by Reuters on Tuesday. The document, seen ahead of an official announcement of the deal, said German car-makers had agreed to offer an exchange program with attractive trade-in incentives or discounts for owners of diesel vehicles meeting the olderEuro 4 and Euro 5 emissions standar
German diesel deal gives drivers choice of hardware fix or trade-in Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-02  Authors: justin sullivan, getty images, abdulhamid hosbas, anadolu agency
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, standard, hardware, tradein, vehicles, incentives, deal, diesel, coalition, agreed, fix, euro, german, carmakers, gives, choice, drivers, parties


German diesel deal gives drivers choice of hardware fix or trade-in

Owners of older diesel cars in German cities where the air is particularly polluted should be able to choose between trade-in incentives and a hardware upgrade, coalition parties have agreed according to a paper seen by Reuters on Tuesday.

After marathon talks, Chancellor Angela Merkel and leaders of her coalition partners announced in the early hours they had agreed on a way to cut pollution in cities while avoiding unpopular driving bans.

The document, seen ahead of an official announcement of the deal, said German car-makers had agreed to offer an exchange program with attractive trade-in incentives or discounts for owners of diesel vehicles meeting the older

Euro 4 and Euro 5 emissions standards. The current standard is Euro 6. The coalition parties said in the document that the immediate introduction of such trade-in incentives for diesel vehicles could ensure that all affected drivers of the Euro 4 and 5 standard could get another vehicle before possible driving bans are introduced.

Germany’s big car-makers Volkswagen, Daimler and BMW had no immediate comment on the deal.

The coalition parties said they expected foreign car-makers to make similar offers to their customers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-02  Authors: justin sullivan, getty images, abdulhamid hosbas, anadolu agency
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, standard, hardware, tradein, vehicles, incentives, deal, diesel, coalition, agreed, fix, euro, german, carmakers, gives, choice, drivers, parties


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8 easy ways to make flying coach feel like first class

I’ve taken hundreds of flights in economy (both domestic and international) and I know it gets uncomfortable. Also, why does it feel like the overhead bins are already full when you get on board? Of course there are some obvious ways to make your flight more bearable: Bring your own food and some sort of personal entertainment system. But there are also some sneakier ways to ensure sitting in economy isn’t a nightmare. Here are eight ways you can make flying coach feel like first class on your n


I’ve taken hundreds of flights in economy (both domestic and international) and I know it gets uncomfortable. Also, why does it feel like the overhead bins are already full when you get on board? Of course there are some obvious ways to make your flight more bearable: Bring your own food and some sort of personal entertainment system. But there are also some sneakier ways to ensure sitting in economy isn’t a nightmare. Here are eight ways you can make flying coach feel like first class on your n
8 easy ways to make flying coach feel like first class Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-28  Authors: jimmy im, nbc, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coach, feel, know, economy, standard, class, flight, domestic, easy, ways, flying, seat, inches


8 easy ways to make flying coach feel like first class

I’ve taken hundreds of flights in economy (both domestic and international) and I know it gets uncomfortable.

The seats are small (standard is about 17 inches wide on domestic airlines) with little recline and leg room (standard seat pitch — the space between your seat and the one in front of you — is 29 to 32 inches) and you never know who you’ll sit next to (a crying baby or someone with bare feet propped on the seat?). Also, why does it feel like the overhead bins are already full when you get on board?

Flying business class is obviously cushier but also expensive. The difference in price between economy and business can range from $50 to $3,000 (prices vary by factors like airline and length of flight), according to FareCompare.

Of course there are some obvious ways to make your flight more bearable: Bring your own food and some sort of personal entertainment system. But there are also some sneakier ways to ensure sitting in economy isn’t a nightmare.

Here are eight ways you can make flying coach feel like first class on your next flight.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-28  Authors: jimmy im, nbc, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coach, feel, know, economy, standard, class, flight, domestic, easy, ways, flying, seat, inches


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Two tax-friendly ways to donate money

If you want to give money to charities you believe in, you may want to consider two strategies that can help you boost your bottom line. Instead of giving cash, try donating appreciated securities, such as stocks or mutual funds, according to certified financial planner Sophia Bera, founder of Gen Y Planning. If you itemize your taxes, you can get a tax deduction for the amount that stock is worth, Bera said. That is because in order to get a charitable deduction, you need to itemize instead of


If you want to give money to charities you believe in, you may want to consider two strategies that can help you boost your bottom line. Instead of giving cash, try donating appreciated securities, such as stocks or mutual funds, according to certified financial planner Sophia Bera, founder of Gen Y Planning. If you itemize your taxes, you can get a tax deduction for the amount that stock is worth, Bera said. That is because in order to get a charitable deduction, you need to itemize instead of
Two tax-friendly ways to donate money Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-25  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, standard, giving, consider, bera, tax, ways, donate, charity, itemize, money, pay, deduction, taxfriendly


Two tax-friendly ways to donate money

If you want to give money to charities you believe in, you may want to consider two strategies that can help you boost your bottom line.

Instead of giving cash, try donating appreciated securities, such as stocks or mutual funds, according to certified financial planner Sophia Bera, founder of Gen Y Planning.

If you itemize your taxes, you can get a tax deduction for the amount that stock is worth, Bera said. The charity, in turn, does not have to pay the capital gains that you would have to pay if you sold the investment on your own.

More from Straight Talk:

The new tax code changes retirement saving

5 criteria to consider when selecting stocks

Watch out for these risks when investing in bitcoin

“It’s a benefit both for you and for the charity,” Bera said.

Just be aware that while you can still get a deduction for giving to charity under the new Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, it may be tougher to obtain.

That is because in order to get a charitable deduction, you need to itemize instead of taking the standard deduction. But the size of the standard deduction has almost doubled, which makes that a higher hurdle to clear.

You may also want to consider opening a donor-advised fund, Bera said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-25  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, standard, giving, consider, bera, tax, ways, donate, charity, itemize, money, pay, deduction, taxfriendly


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The auto industry’s VHS-or-Betamax moment

asked Kirk Steudle, director of Michigan’s Department of Transportation and a supporter of the DSRC standard. Toyota and Volkswagen have also committed to make DSRC systems standard equipment on new cars beginning next year. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said systems to prevent collisions at intersections alone could save some 1,300 lives a year. John Kenney, director of the Toyota InfoTechnology Center, said his company was ready to move ahead with the DSRC standard. The in


asked Kirk Steudle, director of Michigan’s Department of Transportation and a supporter of the DSRC standard. Toyota and Volkswagen have also committed to make DSRC systems standard equipment on new cars beginning next year. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said systems to prevent collisions at intersections alone could save some 1,300 lives a year. John Kenney, director of the Toyota InfoTechnology Center, said his company was ready to move ahead with the DSRC standard. The in
The auto industry’s VHS-or-Betamax moment Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-24  Authors: mark gardiner, automotive association ev via ap images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, systems, federal, vhsorbetamax, industrys, dsrc, moment, safety, traffic, transportation, technology, standard, cars, auto, vehicles


The auto industry's VHS-or-Betamax moment

The auto industry has a choice to make: Which language will cars speak when they talk to one another?

Until a couple of years ago, automakers agreed on one vehicle-to-vehicle communications platform, called dedicated short-range communications, or DSRC, based on the technology used for Wi-Fi. But some car companies have begun to favor a competing protocol, known as Cellular V2X, which is based on a next-generation version of the technology used by your mobile phone.

So far, the federal government has held back on enforcing a standard. A proposed rule mandating deployment of DSRC equipment in new vehicles has languished for nearly two years, and critics say the delay is making motorists less safe. But supporters of the competing standard say something better has come along.

“You’ve got public agencies who want to deploy, but we don’t have a standard, so what do I buy?” asked Kirk Steudle, director of Michigan’s Department of Transportation and a supporter of the DSRC standard. “Betamax, or a VHS?”

It is a crucial technological choice: Cars are increasingly connected, and the autonomous vehicles that will arrive in the future must have a way to communicate with each other and surrounding infrastructure. But even before self-driving cars hit the streets en masse, there are enormous benefits to be had. Federal transportation officials estimate that, once widely deployed, such communication systems will prevent or mitigate up to 80 percent of all non-impaired collisions and address thousands of fatal crashes per year in the United States.

The auto industry is divided over the standards.

General Motors has embraced DSRC, and it’s already a standard safety feature on Cadillac CTS sedans. Toyota and Volkswagen have also committed to make DSRC systems standard equipment on new cars beginning next year. On the other side are brands, including Ford, BMW and Mercedes-Benz, that have joined the chip maker Qualcomm, cellular providers and others to form the 5G Automotive Association, which is pushing the C-V2X standard.

Regardless of the standard that’s settled on, vehicles will be able to directly communicate with one another, allowing them to warn of collisions even when drivers cannot see each other. And such systems will allow valuable safety information to be shared from other sources: Instead of a sign warning that “bridge ices before road,” the bridge can warn drivers when ice has actually formed, and traffic lights will be able to manage traffic to minimize delays and clear the way for emergency vehicles.

But there are important differences.

DSRC has been around much longer, and most car companies have developed and tested systems based on the standard. The Federal Communications Commission ruled that a chunk of the wireless radio spectrum would be restricted to the DSRC standard beginning in 2003, and in 2016 the Obama administration proposed a rule that would mandate phase-in of DSRC in new cars and light trucks starting in 2021. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said systems to prevent collisions at intersections alone could save some 1,300 lives a year.

John Kenney, director of the Toyota InfoTechnology Center, said his company was ready to move ahead with the DSRC standard. “G.M. is online, too,” he said. “Now, there’s a potential risk that maybe it’s not going to be DSRC. That just impedes deployment.”

Supporters of the C-V2X standard contend that DSRC is nearly two decades old, from a time when companies didn’t imagine streaming video to children in the back seat of a crossover, or updating vehicle operating systems from the cloud. C-V2X’s advocates say it would allow for more features, be more flexible and could use cellular infrastructure.

“People assume that just because something is here now and they’ve been working on it for 15 or 20 years, it will be here 15 years from now,” said Jovan Zagajac, technology manager in Ford’s Connected Vehicle and Services group and a member of the 5G group’s board. “Well, the world has changed.”

BMW’s engineers, for example, see safety advantages if cars can communicate directly with personal devices like mobile phones.

“This will make it much easier to retrofit vehicles and also give the benefits of C-V2X to other vulnerable road users, such as cyclists and pedestrians,” said Joachim Goethel, the leader of BMW’s 5G connectivity initiatives.

The division runs deep. This month, the Eno Center for Transportation, a nonprofit established by William Phelps Eno, the road safety pioneer whose work led to New York City’s first traffic plan in 1909, published dueling opinion pieces on the standards. One was from a Toyota official supporting DSRC and the other from a Daimler official favoring C-V2X.

Despite the Obama-era proposal, which would require all new vehicles to include DSRC by 2023, the federal government hasn’t moved to enforce a standard.

Heidi King, deputy administrator at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, said the Department of Transportation was “technology neutral” on communication protocols.

“While our past research has centered around DSRC — because that was the only technology available — we are also exploring other technologies, including Cellular V2X,” she said in an email.

The federal government also has authority over a crucial element of any system: the radio frequency on which it operates. Two members of the Federal Communications Commission recently informed Toyota that the agency was looking at “newer technology” — such as C-V2X — for the 5.9-gigahertz band that has been allocated to DSRC.

“By taking a modern look at the possibilities for wireless services in the 5.9 GHz band, we can support automobile safety, increase spectrum for Wi-Fi and grow the wireless economy,” they wrote in a letter to the carmaker.

The mention of “the wireless economy” hints at another crucial difference between the standards: DSRC has little possibility for monetization, while a cellular system offers the possibility of revenue streams through additional data services. The 5G Automotive Association suggests that next-generation infotainment services used by C-V2X — such as movie streaming or conference calls — would improve the passenger experience.

Car and equipment makers have conducted trials of C-V2X, but even its proponents acknowledge that it will take time to roll out, while DSRC is market ready. It’s not just automakers that now have to wrestle with the choice: State transportation departments and many local authorities have been installing DSRC-compatible roadside infrastructure for almost a decade.

In January, 12 state and regional transportation officials, including Mr. Steudle of Michigan, formed the Coalition for Safety Sooner to advocate the protection of the 5.9 GHz band for DSRC and the acceleration of efforts to deploy it.

The group pressed its case in a letter to Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao; Ajit Pai, the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission; and Mick Mulvaney, the director of the Office of Management and Budget. The signatories had already installed or committed to install more than 1,000 DSRC-equipped intersections and roadside units, and outfitted thousands of their own vehicles with the technology.

“Waiting for the next technology solution to be developed, tested and proven misses a huge opportunity to potentially save tens of thousands of lives throughout the United States each year,” they wrote.

A recent study published by the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute calculated the cost of waiting to deploy vehicle-to-vehicle systems. A three-year delay will allow the sale of millions of new cars and light trucks without them, and those vehicles will remain on the road for an average of 15 years. During that time, they would have millions of avoidable collisions, according to the study, which was written by James Sayer, the institute’s director, and two other researchers.

The institute helped with one of the first and largest tests of DSRC technology in Ann Arbor, Mich., involving some 3,000 vehicles. Based in part on that experience, Michigan officials require DSRC-compatible hardware in every new traffic signal in the state.

Mr. Steudle, the Michigan transportation director, said the federal government ought to get involved.

“They should take a direction, as opposed to saying they’re agnostic to technology,” he said. “That’s how we got into this mess we have today.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-24  Authors: mark gardiner, automotive association ev via ap images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, systems, federal, vhsorbetamax, industrys, dsrc, moment, safety, traffic, transportation, technology, standard, cars, auto, vehicles


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China is the ‘bigger risk’ in trade war, not Trump: CEO

Beijing could be the wildcard in trade negotiations with Washington, according to Europe’s second-largest fund manager. “The bigger risk of a trade war lies in the Chinese side rather than the U.S. side,” said Martin Gilbert, co-chief executive of global investment firm Standard Life Aberdeen. But “whether China will do that, I think is the bigger risk,” he continued. Trump’s negotiating tactics stem from his ‘Art of the Deal’ philosophy, “which is ask for five billion when you want one billion,


Beijing could be the wildcard in trade negotiations with Washington, according to Europe’s second-largest fund manager. “The bigger risk of a trade war lies in the Chinese side rather than the U.S. side,” said Martin Gilbert, co-chief executive of global investment firm Standard Life Aberdeen. But “whether China will do that, I think is the bigger risk,” he continued. Trump’s negotiating tactics stem from his ‘Art of the Deal’ philosophy, “which is ask for five billion when you want one billion,
China is the ‘bigger risk’ in trade war, not Trump: CEO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-17  Authors: nyshka chandran
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, life, risk, war, gilbert, billion, management, washington, think, bigger, chinese, ceo, trade, standard, trump


China is the 'bigger risk' in trade war, not Trump: CEO

Beijing could be the wildcard in trade negotiations with Washington, according to Europe’s second-largest fund manager.

“The bigger risk of a trade war lies in the Chinese side rather than the U.S. side,” said Martin Gilbert, co-chief executive of global investment firm Standard Life Aberdeen.

President Donald Trump is used to making compromises in deal-making, Gilbert told CNBC’s Nancy Hungerford on the sidelines of the Singapore Summit over the weekend. But “whether China will do that, I think is the bigger risk,” he continued.

Trump has made clear that he has no intention of backing down on retaliatory tariffs that threaten to disrupt global supply chains, even as Washington and Beijing prepare to meet later this month to resolve their differences.

The White House is reportedly planning a fresh round of duties on up to $200 billion of Chinese goods. If that takes place, Chinese President Xi Jinping’s administration may not want to participate in bilateral talks, The Wall Street Journal announced on Sunday.

Trump’s negotiating tactics stem from his ‘Art of the Deal’ philosophy, “which is ask for five billion when you want one billion,” Gilbert stated. “I think he’ll always settle for less than he is asking for,” Gilbert continued, adding that he expected the two parties to eventually reach a compromise.

Standard Life Aberdeen, which operates in China, was created following last year’s merger between Standard Life and Aberdeen Asset Management. It reported $790 billion in assets under management and administration in the first six months of the year.

When asked how his company stood in relation to China’s asset players, Gilbert noted the latter group enjoyed a “huge advantage” over their foreign counterparts.

“China’s very clever at getting you in and probably making sure you don’t make too much money,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-17  Authors: nyshka chandran
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, life, risk, war, gilbert, billion, management, washington, think, bigger, chinese, ceo, trade, standard, trump


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Market regulation has become more ‘national’: StanChart

Market regulation has become more ‘national’: StanChart4:04 AM ET Mon, 17 Sept 2018Bill Winters, group CEO at Standard Chartered Bank, says both capital and liquidity have become “fragmented” since the global financial crisis of 2008.


Market regulation has become more ‘national’: StanChart4:04 AM ET Mon, 17 Sept 2018Bill Winters, group CEO at Standard Chartered Bank, says both capital and liquidity have become “fragmented” since the global financial crisis of 2008.
Market regulation has become more ‘national’: StanChart Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, market, standard, national, stanchart404, regulation, sept, liquidity, group, stanchart, global, winters


Market regulation has become more 'national': StanChart

Market regulation has become more ‘national’: StanChart

4:04 AM ET Mon, 17 Sept 2018

Bill Winters, group CEO at Standard Chartered Bank, says both capital and liquidity have become “fragmented” since the global financial crisis of 2008.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, market, standard, national, stanchart404, regulation, sept, liquidity, group, stanchart, global, winters


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