Online brand Recess just opened its first store to sell CBD drinks

Recess is just the latest internet-born retailer to begin opening brick-and-mortar stores so customers can experience the brand, and buy its products, in real life. Recess hopes to tap into the seemingly booming market for CBD, short for cannabidiol. With its first store opening in New York on Wednesday, Recess is just getting started, he said. As they began opening stores, some others followed. With a check in the box in New York, Recess plans to head to Los Angeles for its second store.


Recess is just the latest internet-born retailer to begin opening brick-and-mortar stores so customers can experience the brand, and buy its products, in real life. Recess hopes to tap into the seemingly booming market for CBD, short for cannabidiol. With its first store opening in New York on Wednesday, Recess is just getting started, he said. As they began opening stores, some others followed. With a check in the box in New York, Recess plans to head to Los Angeles for its second store.
Online brand Recess just opened its first store to sell CBD drinks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-13  Authors: lauren thomas, source, noah kalina
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, witte, recess, products, started, brand, stores, opening, drinks, sell, opened, online, cbd, store, company


Online brand Recess just opened its first store to sell CBD drinks

Recess is just the latest internet-born retailer to begin opening brick-and-mortar stores so customers can experience the brand, and buy its products, in real life.

The company, which markets itself as a wellness brand, sells sparkling beverages infused with hemp extract and L-theanine, in flavors such as blackberry chai, that promise to keep buyers “calm, cool and collected.” The drink has been described as the “LaCroix of cannabis.”

Recess hopes to tap into the seemingly booming market for CBD, short for cannabidiol. It’s a compound found in the cannabis plant that promises to deliver the calming benefits of marijuana without the high that comes from THC. Most CBD is now federally legal thanks to the farm bill President Donald Trump signed in December. CBD is showing up in products from coffee and cocktails to skincare.

Founder and CEO Ben Witte tells CNBC the company shouldn’t be written off as just a beverage business, as it plans to expand with other products. With its first store opening in New York on Wednesday, Recess is just getting started, he said. And though the company initially signed a lease for only a few months there, Witte said Recess will likely extend its stay. “It’s a little bit of an experiment.”

The “digital to bricks” movement is “just getting started,” said Michael J. O’Neill, executive managing director of retail services at commercial real estate firm Cushman & Wakefield.

“I don’t know if we are in the first inning but certainly in the early stages,” O’Neill said. “Warby [Parker] and Bonobos were two pioneers in this category. As they began opening stores, some others followed. … And now there is data to better serve this belief” that stores can play a huge role in customer acquisition.

With a check in the box in New York, Recess plans to head to Los Angeles for its second store. And Witte said the company is considering rolling out vending machines with its drinks across the country.

“In the future, we will also go much deeper into content,” Witte said. “Think of us as more of a media company.” He said the goal of Recess is to give adults outlets to be more productive and less anxious, something he said he noticed many people struggle with, as he did when he was creating the business.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-13  Authors: lauren thomas, source, noah kalina
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, witte, recess, products, started, brand, stores, opening, drinks, sell, opened, online, cbd, store, company


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Apple is getting so serious about health, it’s started hosting heart-health events at Apple Stores

It started with a panel on the topic of heart health and ended with an walk around the block to demonstrate the activity features on the Apple Watch. Apple has not previously hosted any dedicated health events at its Apple Stores, but it has scheduled three this month, including in Chicago and New York. Also on the topic of the Apple Heart Study, Harrington made a few interesting points on what he hopes to find. Apple’s Desai added that the study is also looking at behavior, and not just populat


It started with a panel on the topic of heart health and ended with an walk around the block to demonstrate the activity features on the Apple Watch. Apple has not previously hosted any dedicated health events at its Apple Stores, but it has scheduled three this month, including in Chicago and New York. Also on the topic of the Apple Heart Study, Harrington made a few interesting points on what he hopes to find. Apple’s Desai added that the study is also looking at behavior, and not just populat
Apple is getting so serious about health, it’s started hosting heart-health events at Apple Stores Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-12  Authors: christina farr, andrew evers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fitness, watch, stores, hosting, serious, getting, events, health, heart, tim, event, started, population, study, harrington, apple, hearthealth


Apple is getting so serious about health, it's started hosting heart-health events at Apple Stores

Apple hosted its first health-focused event at its Union Square store in San Francisco on Monday evening. It started with a panel on the topic of heart health and ended with an walk around the block to demonstrate the activity features on the Apple Watch.

Apple has not previously hosted any dedicated health events at its Apple Stores, but it has scheduled three this month, including in Chicago and New York. The events are in support of Heart Month, as heart health is a big area of focus for the Apple Watch, which includes an optical sensor to measure the user’s heart rate and (in the new version) an electrocardiogram to measure the heart’s rhythm.

These events are yet another signal that the company is positioning health care is key to its future. Its executives have said as much, with the Tim Cook noting to CNBC’s Jim Cramer that health will be the company’s “greatest contribution to mankind.” As it scales back in other departments, like self-driving cars, the company is growing its team and making some big investments in health.

The company’s CEO Tim Cook even tweeted about the event on Tuesday:

At the event, Apple Health’s Sumbul Desai spoke alongside the celebrity fitness trainer Jeanette Jenkins and the American Heart Association’s president-elect Robert Harrington. Apple’s Julz Arny, who works on special projects for fitness at Apple, moderated the session.

Here were a few of the highlights:

Apple vice president Sumbul Desai shared a few of her reasons for joining Apple from Stanford, where she worked as a physician and digital health executive director: “I went to medical school to have an impact and now I have the opportunity to be able to do that at scale,” she said.

Desai, alongside Harrington from the American Heart Association, revealed they plan to release the results of the Apple Heart Study at the American College of Cardiology meetings on March 16. The study, which enrolled more than 400,000 people, is designed to research whether the Apple Watch can pick up a heart rhythmic disorder called atrial fibrillation.

Also on the topic of the Apple Heart Study, Harrington made a few interesting points on what he hopes to find. He noted that the medical field still doesn’t know the incidence of atrial fibrillation, a condition that puts people at risk for strokes, in a population. It’s uncommon for such a large population of people to be studied, as most clinical research is limited to a few thousand people.

Apple’s Desai added that the study is also looking at behavior, and not just population health trends. She noted that the findings might also reveal how doctors manage this new information, gleaned via an Apple Watch, and how consumers are responding to it.

Both the Apple employees talked about how they’ll take time to read the health-related letters that Apple users send in to the company’s CEO Tim Cook. “It drives the work we do at Apple,”

As the event broke up, everyone walked around the block with Jenkins, the famous fitness trainer. A few people cheered when they closed their rings, and then dispersed.

WATCH: How to use the Apple Watch’s new ECG feature


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-12  Authors: christina farr, andrew evers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fitness, watch, stores, hosting, serious, getting, events, health, heart, tim, event, started, population, study, harrington, apple, hearthealth


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Thailand property: Chinese buying interest has surged in recent years

Chinese investors have continued pouring their money into Thailand’s property sector even as the kingdom barrels toward an uncertain national election. Thailand will hold general elections on March 24, but Juwai CEO Carrie Law said the company hasn’t seen “a link between the Thai election and Chinese property buying.” Even though that recent coup was the second in less than a decade, the political upheaval did little to cool Thailand’s huge property increases. Chinese buyers make up 70 percent o


Chinese investors have continued pouring their money into Thailand’s property sector even as the kingdom barrels toward an uncertain national election. Thailand will hold general elections on March 24, but Juwai CEO Carrie Law said the company hasn’t seen “a link between the Thai election and Chinese property buying.” Even though that recent coup was the second in less than a decade, the political upheaval did little to cool Thailand’s huge property increases. Chinese buyers make up 70 percent o
Thailand property: Chinese buying interest has surged in recent years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-11  Authors: huileng tan, prachanart viriyaraks, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, property, interest, surged, buyers, international, thailands, thailand, buying, spot, chinese, told, started, growth, recent


Thailand property: Chinese buying interest has surged in recent years

Chinese investors have continued pouring their money into Thailand’s property sector even as the kingdom barrels toward an uncertain national election.

That underscores the Southeast Asian nation’s enduring popularity with the Chinese — tourists from Asia’s top economy have for years seen Thailand as a top spot for holidays. According to recent data from online Chinese real estate portal Juwai.com, Thailand was its most popular country when it comes to inquiries from potential real estate buyers in 2018 — climbing up from the sixth spot in 2016.

Thailand will hold general elections on March 24, but Juwai CEO Carrie Law said the company hasn’t seen “a link between the Thai election and Chinese property buying.”

“While the election is momentous for Thailand, most of the buyers we work with are unconcerned about the outcome,” she told CNBC.

Thailand’s economy has been powering ahead since its 2014 coup, reaching 3.9 percent GDP growth in 2017. That was its best in five years, but that growth is expected to slow a bit this year due to weaker global growth, the World Bank projected.

Even though that recent coup was the second in less than a decade, the political upheaval did little to cool Thailand’s huge property increases.

In fact, Sansiri — one of Thailand’s biggest developers — set up its international business unit in 2014 after seeing growing interest from foreign buyers, said Nanmanas Jiwattanakul, the company’s assistant executive vice president of international business development.

Chinese buyers make up 70 percent of Sansiri’s international sales, she said.

The development — not spurred by any marketing efforts — prompted the developer to set up showrooms in Thailand and overseas catering to such investors, she told CNBC.

“We started to drive (international sales) and also because we started seeing a number of foreign buyers in Thailand,” said Nanmanas.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-11  Authors: huileng tan, prachanart viriyaraks, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, property, interest, surged, buyers, international, thailands, thailand, buying, spot, chinese, told, started, growth, recent


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Grammy-nominated rapper Travis Scott wants to study architecture at Harvard

In December, Scott gave a talk at Harvard: a “Master Class on Creativity.” Travis Scott was born Jacques Webster and grew up in the suburbs of Houston. “I lied to my mom,” Scott told Complex. In New York, Scott told Complex he crashed at a friend’s house, “sleeping on the floor, and grinding,” making music. Scott crashed on another friend’s couch and started uploading his music on the internet.


In December, Scott gave a talk at Harvard: a “Master Class on Creativity.” Travis Scott was born Jacques Webster and grew up in the suburbs of Houston. “I lied to my mom,” Scott told Complex. In New York, Scott told Complex he crashed at a friend’s house, “sleeping on the floor, and grinding,” making music. Scott crashed on another friend’s couch and started uploading his music on the internet.
Grammy-nominated rapper Travis Scott wants to study architecture at Harvard Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-10  Authors: sarah berger, alexander tamargo, getty images, taylor hill, filmmagic
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, music, travis, wants, harvard, study, life, school, grammynominated, love, scott, parents, architecture, money, started, rapper, need


Grammy-nominated rapper Travis Scott wants to study architecture at Harvard

In December, Scott gave a talk at Harvard: a “Master Class on Creativity.” Creativity and inspiration come from “one’s life experiences,” he reportedly told students, so you have to live life to the fullest and be “fearless and not afraid to take risks,” attendee Atri Raychowdhury told Complex.

It’s how Scott seems to live his life.

Travis Scott was born Jacques Webster and grew up in the suburbs of Houston.

“I was a thespian, bruh,” he told Rolling Stone. “I was in this play “Kiss Me, Kate” – you heard of that? I did “Oliver!” I love that type of s—. I love drama.”

Scott took drum and piano lessons, and he was smart, graduating high school early at 17. But still, he hated school, and dropped out of the University of Texas when he was a sophomore. Scott said he found every day of college depressing because he wanted to make music and rap, to tell his life story, he told Complex.

He survived, at first, by scamming his parents into thinking he was still in school.

“I lied to my mom,” Scott told Complex. “I was like, ‘Yo, I need mad money for books. I need a new computer.’ And somehow they got me the money and I spent [it] on like living. Bought me a plane ticket next day, dipped out to New York.”

In New York, Scott told Complex he crashed at a friend’s house, “sleeping on the floor, and grinding,” making music. He was there about three or four months, but then moved to Los Angeles, where he found himself broke after his parents found out about his lies.

“My parents cut me off because I dropped out of college,” Scott says. “I was lying to my parents like, ‘Man, I’m in school.’ They came to visit me, I wasn’t there. I was like in a whole other state.”

Scott crashed on another friend’s couch and started uploading his music on the internet. Bloggers started to take notice of Scott’s talent. When rapper T.I. found out about Scott and contacted him, he finally had a foot in the door.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-10  Authors: sarah berger, alexander tamargo, getty images, taylor hill, filmmagic
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, music, travis, wants, harvard, study, life, school, grammynominated, love, scott, parents, architecture, money, started, rapper, need


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We need to stop coddling our girls if we want them to be leaders, warns Girls Who Code founder

Saujani has been a longtime advocate for creating opportunities for girls and women. Shortly after losing the race, she started in 2012 the nonprofit Girls Who Code, which teaches girls as young as third grade about computer coding, in an effort to close the gender gap in technology. “Today, 40 percent of America’s breadwinners are women,” Saujani said. We need our girls, our young women, to be braver than they’ve ever been.” So, let your girls get messy and take chances, she said.


Saujani has been a longtime advocate for creating opportunities for girls and women. Shortly after losing the race, she started in 2012 the nonprofit Girls Who Code, which teaches girls as young as third grade about computer coding, in an effort to close the gender gap in technology. “Today, 40 percent of America’s breadwinners are women,” Saujani said. We need our girls, our young women, to be braver than they’ve ever been.” So, let your girls get messy and take chances, she said.
We need to stop coddling our girls if we want them to be leaders, warns Girls Who Code founder Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-08  Authors: michelle fox, jose luis pelaez inc, digitalvision, getty images, -reshma saujan, girls who code founder
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coddling, saujani, let, women, leaders, fortune, leadership, stop, girls, young, 2017, started, warns, opportunities, need, code, founder


We need to stop coddling our girls if we want them to be leaders, warns Girls Who Code founder

Saujani has been a longtime advocate for creating opportunities for girls and women. She started her career as an attorney and an activist. In 2010, she was the first Indian American woman to run for U.S. Congress. Shortly after losing the race, she started in 2012 the nonprofit Girls Who Code, which teaches girls as young as third grade about computer coding, in an effort to close the gender gap in technology.

In her most recent project, a book called “Brave, Not Perfect,” Saujani spoke with hundreds of women across the United States and came to a stunning realization: In this quest for perfection, women are passing up opportunities that they think are too risky or too hard.

“We let our good ideas die on the vine. And we see other people pursing the things that we thought we should do and we are left with regret and envy,” she explained. “It was also creating a leadership gap.”

Women are still highly underrepresented in leadership roles in corporate America. They made up only 6.4 percent of CEOs at Fortune 500 companies in 2017, according to Pew Research Center. Sadly that was a record high. Their ranks in 2018 shrunk to 4.8 percent.

Source: Fortune 500 and Catalyst

The numbers are better when it comes to management positions, but women are still lagging. While they were nearly half of the labor force in 2017, only 39.8 percent of them were managers in 2017, according a study by Catalyst.

“Today, 40 percent of America’s breadwinners are women,” Saujani said. “Automation is changing everything about way that we live and work. We need our girls, our young women, to be braver than they’ve ever been.”

And that means starting young. So, let your girls get messy and take chances, she said. It will help them become leaders later in life.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-08  Authors: michelle fox, jose luis pelaez inc, digitalvision, getty images, -reshma saujan, girls who code founder
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coddling, saujani, let, women, leaders, fortune, leadership, stop, girls, young, 2017, started, warns, opportunities, need, code, founder


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US trade deficit narrows much more than expected in a win for Trump

The U.S trade deficit with its global partners fell in November for the first time after five straight months of increases as the shortfall with China and several other countries declined. Economists surveyed by Dow Jones had been looking for a deficit of $54.3 billion. In all, the year-to-date goods and services deficit increased by $51.9 billion, a 10.4 percent rise from the same period in 2017. On a broader level, the drop in the trade deficit will serve as a boost to fourth-quarter GDP, whic


The U.S trade deficit with its global partners fell in November for the first time after five straight months of increases as the shortfall with China and several other countries declined. Economists surveyed by Dow Jones had been looking for a deficit of $54.3 billion. In all, the year-to-date goods and services deficit increased by $51.9 billion, a 10.4 percent rise from the same period in 2017. On a broader level, the drop in the trade deficit will serve as a boost to fourth-quarter GDP, whic
US trade deficit narrows much more than expected in a win for Trump Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, imports, trade, expected, win, started, gap, period, narrows, deficit, exports, global, talks, trump, billion


US trade deficit narrows much more than expected in a win for Trump

The U.S trade deficit with its global partners fell in November for the first time after five straight months of increases as the shortfall with China and several other countries declined.

Tightening the balance between imports and exports has been a major goal of the Trump administration, which last year started levying tariffs in an effort to close the gap.

A release from the government Wednesday showed the gap had closed in November, the most recent month for which data was available, to $49.3 billion from $55.7 billion in October, representing an 11.5 percent decline. Economists surveyed by Dow Jones had been looking for a deficit of $54.3 billion.

The decline was largely due to a slide in imports, which fell 2.9 percent to $259.2 billion. Exports edged lower to $209.9 billion, a 0.6 percent drop.

In all, the year-to-date goods and services deficit increased by $51.9 billion, a 10.4 percent rise from the same period in 2017. Exports rose $157.1 billion or 7.3 percent, while imports gained $208.9 billion or 7.9 percent.

On a broader level, the drop in the trade deficit will serve as a boost to fourth-quarter GDP, which is expected to show a 2.5 percent increase, according to CNBC’s Rapid Update tracker as well as the Atlanta Fed’s GDPNow measure.

How the trade tensions play out over a longer period, though, is unknown as the U.S-China talks continue ahead of a March 2 deadline for imposition of another round of tariffs.

“America’s trade fight with the world has finally started to slow global trade and only time will tell whether this is a good thing for the economy in the long run,” Chris Rupkey, chief financial economist at MUFG, said in anote.

Among individual countries, the gap with China closed $2.8 billion to $35.4 billion.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told CNBC in an interview Wednesday that trade talks have been “very productive.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, imports, trade, expected, win, started, gap, period, narrows, deficit, exports, global, talks, trump, billion


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You could win this $1.3 million lake house in Canada for just $20, but there’s a catch

But thanks to one woman’s innovative idea, if you can write a letter and have around $20 US, you can enter to win a 5,000-square-foot lakefront house in Canada that has been listed for $1.7 million Canadian, or about $1.27 million US. Wagner told CNN it was depressing to watch her beloved house sit on the market for months, so she decided to try something creative. Drawing inspiration from a 2015 contest to win a historic inn in Maine, Wagner decided to hold a contest of hew own, with her lake h


But thanks to one woman’s innovative idea, if you can write a letter and have around $20 US, you can enter to win a 5,000-square-foot lakefront house in Canada that has been listed for $1.7 million Canadian, or about $1.27 million US. Wagner told CNN it was depressing to watch her beloved house sit on the market for months, so she decided to try something creative. Drawing inspiration from a 2015 contest to win a historic inn in Maine, Wagner decided to hold a contest of hew own, with her lake h
You could win this $1.3 million lake house in Canada for just $20, but there’s a catch Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-05  Authors: sarah berger, source, alla wagner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 20, million, theres, wagner, market, win, canada, contest, canadian, 13, started, lake, dream, write, house, catch


You could win this $1.3 million lake house in Canada for just $20, but there's a catch

For many people, owning a million-dollar home is just a dream. But thanks to one woman’s innovative idea, if you can write a letter and have around $20 US, you can enter to win a 5,000-square-foot lakefront house in Canada that has been listed for $1.7 million Canadian, or about $1.27 million US.

The three-bedroom home in Millarville, Alberta, Canada, belongs to Alla Wagner, who has lived there since 2011, but now needs to move for health reasons. Wagner told CNN it was depressing to watch her beloved house sit on the market for months, so she decided to try something creative.

Drawing inspiration from a 2015 contest to win a historic inn in Maine, Wagner decided to hold a contest of hew own, with her lake house as the prize.

Wagner launched her “Write a Letter, Win a House” competition on Facebook in January. To enter, you must submit a one-page, 350-word maximum answer to the question, “Why would moving to this lakefront dream home change your life?” There is an entry fee of $25 Canadian, or $19.04 US.

“Once [the] contest started and [I] started reading letters it is more and more about doing something that is beyond market control and be able to choose who gets to live in what was built as my dream home,” Wagner, who says she is in her 50s, tells CNBC Make It.

There is a big catch, however. For anyone to win, Wagner must receive contest entry fees totaling a minimum of $1.7 million Canadian. So far, Wagner says she has received over 15,000 messages, but has not sorted them all to see how many are legitimate entries. If Wagner does not get the requisite money, she can cancel the contest and refunds will be issued, according to the contest website.

It’s unclear how much the house would appraise for, but it was custom-designed and has three bedrooms, three full baths and two half baths, a wine cellar and panoramic views of the nearby mountains and pond, according to CNN, and the winner can expect to pay $600 in monthly taxes on the house.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-05  Authors: sarah berger, source, alla wagner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 20, million, theres, wagner, market, win, canada, contest, canadian, 13, started, lake, dream, write, house, catch


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This former Apple engineer has analyzed the microbes in his body 600 times — here’s what he learned

Most of us would find it off-putting to imagine that there are many trillions of bacteria, viruses and fungi living in our body, invisible to the naked eye. But Richard Sprague, a Seattle-based software engineer, has dedicated years of his life — and tested himself hundreds of times — to unravel their mysteries. Sprague started his career at Apple in the 1990s, where he worked as a software engineer on an early version of what is now Apple TV. He left to form a media start-up, which was later a


Most of us would find it off-putting to imagine that there are many trillions of bacteria, viruses and fungi living in our body, invisible to the naked eye. But Richard Sprague, a Seattle-based software engineer, has dedicated years of his life — and tested himself hundreds of times — to unravel their mysteries. Sprague started his career at Apple in the 1990s, where he worked as a software engineer on an early version of what is now Apple TV. He left to form a media start-up, which was later a
This former Apple engineer has analyzed the microbes in his body 600 times — here’s what he learned Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-31  Authors: christina farr, richard sprague, andrew evers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, started, learned, body, microbes, microbiome, sprague, world, 600, worked, engineer, apple, heres, software, times, early, eisen, analyzed


This former Apple engineer has analyzed the microbes in his body 600 times — here's what he learned

Most of us would find it off-putting to imagine that there are many trillions of bacteria, viruses and fungi living in our body, invisible to the naked eye. But Richard Sprague, a Seattle-based software engineer, has dedicated years of his life — and tested himself hundreds of times — to unravel their mysteries.

Sprague started his career at Apple in the 1990s, where he worked as a software engineer on an early version of what is now Apple TV. He left to form a media start-up, which was later acquired by Microsoft, where he remained for more than a decade.

At that point, Sprague started thinking about the next consumer technology breakthrough, which he could get in on early. And that led him to a surprising space: biology.

More specifically, he stumbled upon to an emerging field of research known as the “microbiome.” That can broadly be defined as “the entire community of microbes found in any specific place and time,” said Jonathan Eisen, a microbiologist and professor at the University of California, Davis in California.

In recent years, Eisen and his peers in the scientific world have had tools at their disposal to better understand the microbiome, and figure out how it relates to human health and well-being.

Sprague isn’t a scientist, but he’s found his own way to help.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-31  Authors: christina farr, richard sprague, andrew evers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, started, learned, body, microbes, microbiome, sprague, world, 600, worked, engineer, apple, heres, software, times, early, eisen, analyzed


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Kohl’s is putting a Weight Watchers studio in one of its stores as part of a wellness push

The retailer announced plans Tuesday to team with WW — the newly rebranded Weight Watchers International — to test a series of wellness initiatives. The plans included a WW studio in a Kohl’s store in Chicago. Kohl’s, though, isn’t afraid to make some bolder bets — with the goal of generating excitement around shopping at its stores. In working with WW, Kohl’s this year will test an 1,800-square-foot “community space” in a store in Chicago. Neither Gass nor Grossman wouldn’t comment on the possi


The retailer announced plans Tuesday to team with WW — the newly rebranded Weight Watchers International — to test a series of wellness initiatives. The plans included a WW studio in a Kohl’s store in Chicago. Kohl’s, though, isn’t afraid to make some bolder bets — with the goal of generating excitement around shopping at its stores. In working with WW, Kohl’s this year will test an 1,800-square-foot “community space” in a store in Chicago. Neither Gass nor Grossman wouldn’t comment on the possi
Kohl’s is putting a Weight Watchers studio in one of its stores as part of a wellness push Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: lauren thomas, nicole ohara
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weight, push, studio, health, company, working, putting, watchers, stores, ww, started, store, wellness, kohls


Kohl's is putting a Weight Watchers studio in one of its stores as part of a wellness push

Kohl’s is on a bit of a health kick.

The retailer announced plans Tuesday to team with WW — the newly rebranded Weight Watchers International — to test a series of wellness initiatives. The plans included a WW studio in a Kohl’s store in Chicago.

The tie-up is another way Kohl’s hopes to differentiate itself from its peers that are struggling to keep shoppers coming to their stores rather than shop online. Department store chains Macy’s and J.C. Penney have already started 2019 on a sour note, reporting disappointing holiday sales. The bankruptcies of Sears and Bon-Ton are also hanging over the industry.

Kohl’s, though, isn’t afraid to make some bolder bets — with the goal of generating excitement around shopping at its stores. The company signed a deal in 2017with Amazon in which it’s been accepting Amazon returns and selling some of the e-commerce giant’s Alexa-enabled devices at some of its stores. It’s also been looking for new uses to take up space at some of its bigger stores and has started to divide certain locations for tenants like Aldi to move next door. It has also hinted at working with fitness gyms.

“As a destination for active and wellness for the entire family, we continue to seek out new ideas that support our customers’ health goals,” Kohl’s CEO Michelle Gass said Tuesday in a statement.

In working with WW, Kohl’s this year will test an 1,800-square-foot “community space” in a store in Chicago. The company said it will host WW workshops there for local WW members, in addition to allowing Kohl’s employees and customers to use the area.

“We know the Kohl’s customer is also our customer,” WW CEO Mindy Grossman said about the collaboration.

In another alliance, Kohl’s will start selling certain WW kitchen products in stores and online in June. The retailer also said Tuesday its employees will receive access to subsidized WW memberships.

Neither Gass nor Grossman wouldn’t comment on the possibility of more WW studios coming to other Kohl’s stores.

Kohl’s has already been trying to establish itself as a destination for health and wellness gear. Last year, it started devoting more square footage in some stores for athletic apparel, saying that was helping lift sales. During its latest reported quarter, it said some of its top-selling brands included Under Armour and Nike. It also said FitBit devices were popular during the holidays.

Kohl’s reports fourth-quarter and full-year earnings on March 5. Its shares are up just about 4.5 percent this year, less than the S&P 500 Retail ETF XRT’s 5.5 percent rise.

WW, meanwhile, is set to report quarterly earnings on Feb. 26. The company known for its weight management programs has weathered threats over the decades from the likes of Jenny Craig, Nutrisystem and fad diets like Atkins. More recently, it’s faced pressure from free apps like MyFitnessPal. Following its recent rebranding, though, WW is now trying to become more of a lifestyle platform.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: lauren thomas, nicole ohara
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weight, push, studio, health, company, working, putting, watchers, stores, ww, started, store, wellness, kohls


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Just 9.1% of America’s construction workers are women—here’s what it’s like to be one of them

She says that as an executive in construction, it’s not uncommon for male colleagues to doubt her credibility. Gray started talking about the technical details for an upcoming project when a male consultant stopped her and asked, “Ma’am do you even know what the cut section of a building is?” Gray says she started laughing, because he was challenging her knowledge of one of the most basic aspects of construction. She notes the support she’s received from the national organization Professional Wo


She says that as an executive in construction, it’s not uncommon for male colleagues to doubt her credibility. Gray started talking about the technical details for an upcoming project when a male consultant stopped her and asked, “Ma’am do you even know what the cut section of a building is?” Gray says she started laughing, because he was challenging her knowledge of one of the most basic aspects of construction. She notes the support she’s received from the national organization Professional Wo
Just 9.1% of America’s construction workers are women—here’s what it’s like to be one of them Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-28  Authors: courtney connley, norm betts, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gray, shes, knowledge, americas, group, women, 91, womenheres, started, workers, industry, youre, organizations, construction


Just 9.1% of America's construction workers are women—here's what it's like to be one of them

“I’ve had opportunities where I’ve had to manage males, and you can sense them being uncomfortable with my authority or sense of knowledge,” she explains. “But my goal stays the same, and that is to train them, share that knowledge and help them be able to function in their position and overall on their team.”

Amanda Gray is a national architectural and commercial account manager for The Dow Chemical Company. She says that as an executive in construction, it’s not uncommon for male colleagues to doubt her credibility.

She recalls a time when she was leading a meeting, the only woman in a group of 14 people at a job site. Gray started talking about the technical details for an upcoming project when a male consultant stopped her and asked, “Ma’am do you even know what the cut section of a building is?”

Gray says she started laughing, because he was challenging her knowledge of one of the most basic aspects of construction. “Everyone around us started laughing as well,” she says. “The good thing is, you know, I had built credibility with these people in the past and someone stepped in and said, ‘I can’t believe you would ask her that question.'”

Though these attitudes about women in construction persist in some corners, Gray, Baptiste and Caroll all say that overall, the industry is becoming more diverse and more welcoming to women. In fact, Caroll says that in her experience in the field, she’s seen a 2:1 male-to-female ratio on some of the construction sites where she’s worked — a significant jump from previous years.

Baptiste says that for women who are interested in entering the field today, there are many organizations that can offer them assistance and mentorship. She notes the support she’s received from the national organization Professional Women in Construction. She says she’s been part of the group for several years, and it’s been an important source of industry contacts and potential clients.

“There are a lot of organizations like Professional Women in Construction that provide mentorship, networking and opportunities for growth and business development to women in the industry,” she says. She advises anyone interested in construction to find a local support group to join. “[These organizations] are not only for you if you’re an owner, but even if you’re just an intern in college, in high school or just starting out in the industry.”

“Women at Work” is a CNBC Make It series in which we explore the experiences of women working in majority-male occupations. Does that describe you? Contact courtney.connley@nbcuni.com to share your story.

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Don’t miss: Just 6 percent of America’s truck drivers are women—here’s what it’s like


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-28  Authors: courtney connley, norm betts, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gray, shes, knowledge, americas, group, women, 91, womenheres, started, workers, industry, youre, organizations, construction


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