Huge deals from the likes of Amazon help UK tech start-ups score record foreign investment

British technology start-ups have attracted more foreign investment since the start of the year than they did throughout all of 2018, according to fresh figures published Wednesday. U.S. and Asian venture capital investors poured $3.7 billion into U.K. tech companies in the first seven months of 2019, research from industry group Tech Nation and data firm Dealroom showed. Last year, U.K. start-ups raised $2.9 billion from American and Asian investors. Including domestic sources of cash, $6.7 bil


British technology start-ups have attracted more foreign investment since the start of the year than they did throughout all of 2018, according to fresh figures published Wednesday. U.S. and Asian venture capital investors poured $3.7 billion into U.K. tech companies in the first seven months of 2019, research from industry group Tech Nation and data firm Dealroom showed. Last year, U.K. start-ups raised $2.9 billion from American and Asian investors. Including domestic sources of cash, $6.7 bil
Huge deals from the likes of Amazon help UK tech start-ups score record foreign investment Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investment, asian, record, foreign, score, likes, help, million, startups, uk, venture, funding, tech, start, huge, billion, nation


Huge deals from the likes of Amazon help UK tech start-ups score record foreign investment

British technology start-ups have attracted more foreign investment since the start of the year than they did throughout all of 2018, according to fresh figures published Wednesday.

U.S. and Asian venture capital investors poured $3.7 billion into U.K. tech companies in the first seven months of 2019, research from industry group Tech Nation and data firm Dealroom showed. Last year, U.K. start-ups raised $2.9 billion from American and Asian investors.

The eye-watering sum was boosted by nine-figure deals from capital-rich companies like Amazon and SoftBank. In May, Amazon led a $575 million funding round for Deliveroo — although that was hit with a warning from the U.K. competition regulator — while SoftBank’s notable U.K. investments include $800 million for Greensill and $390 million for OakNorth.

Including domestic sources of cash, $6.7 billion has been invested into private British tech firms overall in 2019, Tech Nation said, adding that figure could rise to a record $11 billion by the end of the year. The organization said U.S. corporate venture capital funding for U.K. start-ups has risen by 3% in the last six years, while Asian corporate funding is up 20%.

“It’s evidence for us that there’s growing interest for emerging technologies that are gaining a lot of traction in the U.K. from foreign investors,” George Windsor, Tech Nation’s head of insights, told CNBC in a phone interview. “This shows us the U.K. is continuing to perform strongly on the global stage, and for us this is just the start.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investment, asian, record, foreign, score, likes, help, million, startups, uk, venture, funding, tech, start, huge, billion, nation


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This woman sold her app for $85 million — here’s the common mistake she sees in start-ups

Mette LykkeBuilding a high-value business takes patience and entrepreneurs shouldn’t believe that start-ups reach multi-million-dollar valuations overnight, a successful Danish businesswoman has warned. When it comes to growing a start-up, Mette Lykke, CEO of food waste organization Too Good To Go, speaks from experience. Endomondo was sold to the U.S. athleticwear brand in 2015 for $85 million, and Lykke stayed on as its CEO until 2017. “My first company was designed to make fitness fun, and no


Mette LykkeBuilding a high-value business takes patience and entrepreneurs shouldn’t believe that start-ups reach multi-million-dollar valuations overnight, a successful Danish businesswoman has warned. When it comes to growing a start-up, Mette Lykke, CEO of food waste organization Too Good To Go, speaks from experience. Endomondo was sold to the U.S. athleticwear brand in 2015 for $85 million, and Lykke stayed on as its CEO until 2017. “My first company was designed to make fitness fun, and no
This woman sold her app for $85 million — here’s the common mistake she sees in start-ups Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, really, sees, mistake, app, food, business, sold, common, waste, team, 85, company, woman, startups, works, purpose, heres, lykke, work, million


This woman sold her app for $85 million — here's the common mistake she sees in start-ups

Mette Lykke

Building a high-value business takes patience and entrepreneurs shouldn’t believe that start-ups reach multi-million-dollar valuations overnight, a successful Danish businesswoman has warned. When it comes to growing a start-up, Mette Lykke, CEO of food waste organization Too Good To Go, speaks from experience. She co-founded fitness app Endomondo in 2007, developing the company for almost a decade before it gained enough interest to be acquired by American firm Under Armour. Endomondo was sold to the U.S. athleticwear brand in 2015 for $85 million, and Lykke stayed on as its CEO until 2017.

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According to Lykke, who began her career as a management consultant, a business can only experience vast growth rates if the people at its reins exercise what she calls “patient impatience.” “Every day you have to push (yourself) and you have to be willing to do that for quite a while,” she said. “I think a lot of stories about start-ups give the impression that two guys start a company in a basement and boom, two years later they change the world. That’s just not how it works – it takes years, so working hard every day is crucial.”

Be clear on your purpose

For the past two years, Lykke has been the CEO of Too Good To Go — an organization that works with restaurants and food retailers to tackle waste by selling food at a discounted price. The app has 11 million users and works with 22,000 stores across 11 countries. Her involvement with the company began around 9 months after the service was launched, when a friend who knew its founders showed her the app. “I thought it was such a cool concept,” she told CNBC. “I got invited to invest and then was asked to help the founders run the business.” She said her core driving force when it came to work was being part of a company that had a strong purpose and could make a real impact. “I work a lot and put everything into it, so I want to do something that really matters,” she explained. “My first company was designed to make fitness fun, and now I have an even stronger purpose in tackling food waste. I just hadn’t realized the scale of this problem, but it had always been natural to me not to throw away food.” Entrepreneurs looking to grow a company needed to follow her lead and work on something that they felt was meaningful, Lykke added. “Make sure you’re really, really passionate about what you do — that’s fundamental,” she said. “There are going to be days and nights where, if you don’t have that passion, it’s going to be too difficult.”

As well as being passionate about their business, start-up founders needed to build a team who believed in the purpose of the company. “Being clear about the company’s vision is important, (but) the people you find for your team need to believe what you believe — it’s important to establish that team really early on,” Lykke told CNBC. She noted that having a strong ethical purpose was also a big competitive advantage, helping to attract both talented employees and investors.

Seek advice — and share it too


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, really, sees, mistake, app, food, business, sold, common, waste, team, 85, company, woman, startups, works, purpose, heres, lykke, work, million


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Chipotle is testing a replacement for its queso

These start-ups are trying to predict how climate change will…Investors are turning to a new breed of high-tech start-ups that can measure the risk climate change poses to real estate — from an hour to decades into the future. Rising Risksread more


These start-ups are trying to predict how climate change will…Investors are turning to a new breed of high-tech start-ups that can measure the risk climate change poses to real estate — from an hour to decades into the future. Rising Risksread more
Chipotle is testing a replacement for its queso Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-08  Authors: amelia lucas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, predict, change, startups, risk, risksread, trying, real, willinvestors, climate, turning, queso, replacement, testing, chipotle


Chipotle is testing a replacement for its queso

These start-ups are trying to predict how climate change will…

Investors are turning to a new breed of high-tech start-ups that can measure the risk climate change poses to real estate — from an hour to decades into the future.

Rising Risks

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-08  Authors: amelia lucas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, predict, change, startups, risk, risksread, trying, real, willinvestors, climate, turning, queso, replacement, testing, chipotle


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Payments giant Stripe adds to global expansion spree with first office in Latin America

Multi-billion dollar payments start-up Stripe is expanding its quickly growing global footprint with a flagship office in Latin America. The platform has helped facilitate the rise of mobile and e-commerce with partners like Shopify, and has become an attractive bet for venture capital as consumers overwhelmingly shop online. In March, venture capital behemoth SoftBank announced a $5 billion fund to invest in technology start-ups across the region. Stripe said it plans to work with newer start-u


Multi-billion dollar payments start-up Stripe is expanding its quickly growing global footprint with a flagship office in Latin America. The platform has helped facilitate the rise of mobile and e-commerce with partners like Shopify, and has become an attractive bet for venture capital as consumers overwhelmingly shop online. In March, venture capital behemoth SoftBank announced a $5 billion fund to invest in technology start-ups across the region. Stripe said it plans to work with newer start-u
Payments giant Stripe adds to global expansion spree with first office in Latin America Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: kate rooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, startup, ceo, america, venture, global, expansion, payments, latin, internet, giant, office, businesses, spree, startups, capital, adds, stripe


Payments giant Stripe adds to global expansion spree with first office in Latin America

Multi-billion dollar payments start-up Stripe is expanding its quickly growing global footprint with a flagship office in Latin America.

Stripe, which has become one of the most sought after payment start-ups in Silicon Valley, announced Tuesday it was opening an office in Mexico City to attract engineering talent and capitalize on the mobile-payment and e-commerce growth in the region.

The San Francisco-based start-up, whose rivals include Jack Dorsey’s Square and Netherlands-based Adyen, makes software that allows businesses to accept payments over the internet. The platform has helped facilitate the rise of mobile and e-commerce with partners like Shopify, and has become an attractive bet for venture capital as consumers overwhelmingly shop online. Stripe’s valuation has surged to $22.5 billion thanks to investments from Tiger Global, Andreessen Horowitz, Peter Thiel, Elon Musk, Google’s venture arm Capital G, Sequoia Capital and Kleiner Perkins, among others, according to Pitchbook.

Stripe’s Chief Business Officer Billy Alvarado, who is originally from Honduras, pointed to steady internet and mobile payment penetration in South and Latin America.

“Our goal is to make sure that the internet works the way it was intended to — it should be global, and it should be borderless,” Alvarado told CNBC in a phone interview. “There’s a very rich ecosystem for us in Latin America.”

Stripe is hardly the only one seeing opportunity in Latin America. In March, venture capital behemoth SoftBank announced a $5 billion fund to invest in technology start-ups across the region. The so-called SoftBank Innovation Fund is being run by former Sprint CEO and Bolivian native Marcelo Claure.

Stripe already operates in 34 countries and has engineering hubs in San Francisco, Seattle, Dublin and Singapore. It has been on a tear this year with expansions into Estonia, Poland, Greece, Lithuania, Latvia and Malaysia. Stripe said it plans to work with newer start-ups in South and Latin America, as well as incumbent partners like Visa, Mastercard, American Express and CitiBank.

The start-up was founded in 2010 by Irish brothers Patrick and John Collison, who came up with the idea for Stripe while attending MIT and Harvard. CEO Patrick Collison announced on Twitter earlier this year that former Google Cloud CEO Diane Greene was joining the board.

Stripe’s expansion has been partially anchored in company research that showed consumers and businesses leaning into global commerce. According to a company report, 70% of online businesses sell internationally. This was orders of magnitude higher than in the overall economy, where the percentage is in the single digits.

There are speed bumps to globalization though. Free trade and open borders are being questioned by more nationalistic politicians in Europe and the United States, and an escalating trade war between the U.S. and China.

“We really want to lean into global commerce, and this is central to building an internet platform for economic progress,” Alvarado said. “There’s no question that there are strong headwinds.”

— CNBC’s Salvador Rodriguez contributed reporting.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: kate rooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, startup, ceo, america, venture, global, expansion, payments, latin, internet, giant, office, businesses, spree, startups, capital, adds, stripe


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Craig Newmark and Women Who Tech’s Allyson Kapin share 3 ways men can help advance women in tech

Craigslist founder Craig Newmark and Women Who Tech founder Allyson Kapin want to improve these statistics. They’ve started the Women Startup Challenge in an effort to close the funding gap that female entrepreneurs face. “Three years ago, I talked to Craig about this idea for the Women’s Startup Challenge,” Kapin tells CNBC Make It. They gave three recommendations:Left to right: Women Who Tech director Justyn Hintze, Women Who Tech founder Allyson Kapin, PathSpot founder Christine Schindler and


Craigslist founder Craig Newmark and Women Who Tech founder Allyson Kapin want to improve these statistics. They’ve started the Women Startup Challenge in an effort to close the funding gap that female entrepreneurs face. “Three years ago, I talked to Craig about this idea for the Women’s Startup Challenge,” Kapin tells CNBC Make It. They gave three recommendations:Left to right: Women Who Tech director Justyn Hintze, Women Who Tech founder Allyson Kapin, PathSpot founder Christine Schindler and
Craig Newmark and Women Who Tech’s Allyson Kapin share 3 ways men can help advance women in tech Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, challenge, kapin, startup, men, help, women, ways, techs, founder, craig, share, tech, newmark, startups


Craig Newmark and Women Who Tech's Allyson Kapin share 3 ways men can help advance women in tech

Founder of craigslist Craig Newmark attends The Rush Philanthropic Arts Foundation’s Annual Rush HeARTS Education Luncheon on March 11, 2016 in New York City.

In 2018, female-founded startups received just 2.2% of all venture capital funding for the second year in a row. Startups founded by women of color received less than 1%. Craigslist founder Craig Newmark and Women Who Tech founder Allyson Kapin want to improve these statistics. They’ve started the Women Startup Challenge in an effort to close the funding gap that female entrepreneurs face. In May, they held their eighth startup challenge in New York. Ten women-led startups pitched their business to tech executives and investors, with the winner receiving $50,000. In October, they will host their ninth startup challenge in Paris, France. “Three years ago, I talked to Craig about this idea for the Women’s Startup Challenge,” Kapin tells CNBC Make It. “Craig was one of the very first people to support us and say, ‘Great, let me know how I can help.'” We spoke with Newmark and Kapin about how men can help even the playing field in tech. They gave three recommendations:

Left to right: Women Who Tech director Justyn Hintze, Women Who Tech founder Allyson Kapin, PathSpot founder Christine Schindler and Good Call co-founder Stephanie Yim. Photo Credit: Women Who Tech

1. Put your money where your mouth is

A self-described “old school, 1950s-style nerd,” Newmark says he can “be pretty clueless” when it comes to some topics. But as a business leader who believes in fairness, he says he feels he has a duty to take action on inequality in the tech industry. “I’ve been lucky enough to do well in business,” says the billionaire entrepreneur, who is also the founder of Craig Newmark Philanthropies. “I should put my money where my mouth is, and that means a number of things, including investing in women in tech.” Kapin says that since venture capital is also male-dominated, it’s imperative that more men step up and do the same. “We’ve been hearing so much about diversity pledges and about how the data isn’t moving in terms of funding women-led startups,” she says. “But so few are coming to the table to actually put their money where their mouth is.”

2. Introduce women to your VC networks

Right now, less than 10% of decision-makers at VC firms are women, according to TechCrunch. In the U.S., 74% of VC firms have zero female investors. For many women in tech, breaking into these spaces can be an overwhelming challenge. Kapin and Newmark agree that in order to move the needle, men must get comfortable with introducing women to the power players in their circle. “It can often feel like you’re [fighting] an uphill battle,” Kapin says. “One of the best ways to be an ally to women founders is to introduce them to your network of investors, as investors rely on warm leads from their personal networks.”

3. Promote the ideas and accomplishments of women

Newmark says that that one key way men can be better allies to women in tech, or in any industry, is to “make sure [they’re] lifting up women’s voices.” For example, he says, “when a woman makes a good point in a meeting, acknowledge it and give her credit.” He says this can help build “a culture of support.” Additionally, Kapin says men shouldn’t be afraid to talk openly about the challenges women face getting ahead, and they need to encourage the men around them to do the same. “Yes, some of these conversations can be hard and even uncomfortable,” she says, “but they need to be had if we are ever going to bring about change.” Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube! Don’t miss: 7 women make Glassdoor’s 2019 list of America’s 100 best CEOs


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, challenge, kapin, startup, men, help, women, ways, techs, founder, craig, share, tech, newmark, startups


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Dell and Microsoft pour millions into A.I. start-ups that are reshaping the workforce

Among them is Microsoft’s M12 venture fund and Dell Technologies Capital. “Our goal is to get a window on innovation,” says Scott Darling, president of Dell Technologies Capital, who notes that Michael Dell reviews every single deal the fund invests in. In Dell Technologies’ case it has invested more than $600 million in about 100 investments over the last six years. Here’s why Nagraj Kashyap, corporate vice president and global head of Microsoft’s M12, a venture fund focusing on enterprise soft


Among them is Microsoft’s M12 venture fund and Dell Technologies Capital. “Our goal is to get a window on innovation,” says Scott Darling, president of Dell Technologies Capital, who notes that Michael Dell reviews every single deal the fund invests in. In Dell Technologies’ case it has invested more than $600 million in about 100 investments over the last six years. Here’s why Nagraj Kashyap, corporate vice president and global head of Microsoft’s M12, a venture fund focusing on enterprise soft
Dell and Microsoft pour millions into A.I. start-ups that are reshaping the workforce Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: lori ioannou, valentina sanchez, laura wronski, senior research scientist, surveymonkey, jon cohen, chief research officer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ai, dell, millions, microsoft, corporate, startups, startup, data, software, venture, pour, reshaping, companies, technologies, workforce


Dell and Microsoft pour millions into A.I. start-ups that are reshaping the workforce

Dell Technologies’ founder and CEO Michael Dell Drew Angerer | Getty Images

As unions, corporations and governments debate what effect artificial intelligence, machine learning and automation will have on the future of the workforce, venture capital investors are identifying the most interesting start-up investments that may help steer this historic paradigm shift. Among them is Microsoft’s M12 venture fund and Dell Technologies Capital. Both aim to advance human progress and focus on start-ups they can mentor with their companies’ own technical expertise and market know-how. “Our goal is to get a window on innovation,” says Scott Darling, president of Dell Technologies Capital, who notes that Michael Dell reviews every single deal the fund invests in. “We need to plug into the external entrepreneurial ecosystem. This is so important, since the pace of technology is stunning.” As Darling explains, the ROI on successful start-ups is so large that the dollars flowing into these ventures by investors has boomed. That’s because the market for these technology products is typically huge. In Dell Technologies’ case it has invested more than $600 million in about 100 investments over the last six years. Of these, there have been 40 exits and five IPOs, with a combined market value of over $50 billion, including Docusign, Cylance, MongoDB and Zscaler. More from At Work:

Perhaps money can buy you happiness — at least at work

A third of US workers seriously considered quitting their job in the last 3 months. Here’s why Nagraj Kashyap, corporate vice president and global head of Microsoft’s M12, a venture fund focusing on enterprise software, AI, cybersecurity and cloud computing, agrees. “Innovation isn’t limited to our corporate boundaries. It is an exciting time to see how AI is transforming the workplace. Already we see it becoming more distributed, more flexible and diverse.” The success quotient for these corporate funds and the companies they invest in has been high for a key reason. Dell and Microsoft invest in companies they can help make commercially viable and often plug them into their product development, sales and distribution networks. This helps start-ups gain product adoption— and a first-mover advantage. For example, Microsoft has partnered with corporate education start-up GO1.com after its venture arm, M12, led a Series B round investment of $30 million last June. The Australian start-up that emerged from the Y Combinator accelerator is the Netflix of training. GO1.com offers a SaaS subscription service that plugs into any software platform, allowing HR departments to tap 50,000 training courses — everything from compliance and leadership training to IT skills — in multiple languages for their workforces. GO1.com is growing its service 300% annually, according to co-founder and chief operating officer Chris Eigeland. Its product has been integrated into the Microsoft Teams chat software, along with Microsoft Dynamics 365 enterprise resource planning and CRM software. This has helped the four-year-old start-up garner 1.5 million learners and more than 1,500 customers worldwide. “The biggest challenge employers face today is in reskilling and finding the right piece of training to suit their particular needs,” says Eigeland. “Advances in technology, a more transient workforce and a focus on specialization by profession are the trends we are seeing.”

Coping with change at warp speed

Matthew Carroll, CEO of Immuta, a data governance start-up in Maryland that attracted funding from Dell Technologies in its $20 million Series B financing last year, also believes that employees are being swept up in a whirlwind of change. The company that is run by former U.S. National Security Agency techies has developed a method to govern how data is used by machine-learning algorithms without breaching privacy laws. “Very soon in the future, I believe every employee will have automation tools and they will be data analysts doing their jobs every day,” he says. Right now the speed at which companies are adopting AI, machine learning and data analytics is posing a serious risk. “Companies need to ensure data is being used appropriately and privacy is being respected without breaking any government regulations,” he says. “Machine learning is booming, and we still don’t know the long-term consequences of it yet.”

Nagraj Kashyap, corporate vice president and global head of M12 Nate Gowdy/Microsoft

The companies that do this best will be able to attract the best talent. “Millennials are going to want to work for employers that use data responsibly. This will be a big issue for employees,” says Carroll, who contends that as a former intelligence operative, he looks at the world through a safety lens. “We think of our product as a control layer that determines who [man or machine] should see or use company data,” he says. Immuta’s SaaS enterprise platform connects to any data source in the cloud or on premises through any tool so data scientists don’t have to write code or copy the data. It lets legal teams build rules and controls onto the data so they maintain regulatory compliance. Carroll sees a $30 billion market for automating data governance as machine learning goes mainstream in corporate America. According to Gartner, global business value derived from AI will reach a staggering $3.9 trillion by 2022. Yet legacy forms of data management for AI are counterproductive and not advanced enough. That is why Dell is looking at potentially licensing the software and then bundling it with its own product offerings to sell to OEMs.

The A.I. boom sweeping the industry

Using AI to empower an organization and boost efficiency is another area that start-up’s like Noodle.ai are targeting. The San Francisco-based start-up provides AI-as-a-service, explains Noodle.ai CEO Stephen Pratt. The company, which attracted $35 million in a venture capital round led by Dell Technologies Capital and TPG Growth last year, builds a customized in-house platform for clients called the Beast, which serves as the Office 365 of AI applications for general business purposes. It improves inventory and energy management, manufacturing and the supply chain. Noodle.ai engineers and data scientists build three-component machine-learning systems that consist of a sensory engine that finds patterns in data, a prediction engine that calculates what’s likely to happen in a business, and a recommendation engine that surfaces actions to meet objectives. Results selected from the recommendation engine are fed back into the system, starting the cycle over.

The start-up’s clients include XoJet, one of the world’s largest private aviation platforms; and American steel producer Big River Steel. In XoJet’s case, Noodle.ai produced a learning algorithm that takes into account thousands of variables to determine the right prices for airfare, which boosted the company’s profitability by 5%. And for Big River Steel in Arkansas, it used more than 30,000 sensors and AI to predict how much electricity would be consumed by the mill’s machines so it could sell excess energy back to the electric company.

AI will dramatically change the workplace over the next 5 to 10 years. It is those companies keeping on top of the pace of innovation that will thrive. Nagraj Kashyap corporate vice president and global head of M12,


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: lori ioannou, valentina sanchez, laura wronski, senior research scientist, surveymonkey, jon cohen, chief research officer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ai, dell, millions, microsoft, corporate, startups, startup, data, software, venture, pour, reshaping, companies, technologies, workforce


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This year’s red hot IPO market has seen more women CEOs than usual take companies public

In the first half of the year, 13 women CEOs have taken companies public. That proportion is triple the level of female CEOs in the Russell 3000, meaning that if the trend holds, it could help boost the percentage of women running public companies in America. Women CEOs are less likely to take companies public, in part, because they’re less likely to receive venture capital. Often times — although not always — founders of startups become CEOs that one day take their companies public. “Female CEO


In the first half of the year, 13 women CEOs have taken companies public. That proportion is triple the level of female CEOs in the Russell 3000, meaning that if the trend holds, it could help boost the percentage of women running public companies in America. Women CEOs are less likely to take companies public, in part, because they’re less likely to receive venture capital. Often times — although not always — founders of startups become CEOs that one day take their companies public. “Female CEO
This year’s red hot IPO market has seen more women CEOs than usual take companies public Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: leslie picker christopher hayes, leslie picker, christopher hayes
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, women, julie, seen, realreal, ceos, startups, public, capital, female, red, usual, hot, ipo, market


This year's red hot IPO market has seen more women CEOs than usual take companies public

Julie Wainwright (C), CEO of The RealReal Inc. takes part in the company’s IPO at the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York, June 28, 2019.

The boom in initial public offerings this year has also been a boon for women chief executive officers.

In the first half of the year, 13 women CEOs have taken companies public. They include Julie Wainwright of the RealReal, Jennifer Tejada of PagerDuty, and Jenny Zhiya Qian of Luckin Coffee.

Women chief executives represent 15 percent of the total CEOs that underwent IPOs in 2019 — according to data compiled by CNBC — the highest proportion for any year going back to at least 2014.

That proportion is triple the level of female CEOs in the Russell 3000, meaning that if the trend holds, it could help boost the percentage of women running public companies in America.

”It undeniably took extra courage to invest in these talented-though-female leaders a few years back,” said Lise Buyer, founder of Class V Group, a firm that advises companies on IPOs. ”In 2019, institutional investors have clearly demonstrated their enthusiasm for businesses with attractive growth prospects regardless of whether their CEO is Jim or Julie or Jennifer or John.”

Women CEOs are less likely to take companies public, in part, because they’re less likely to receive venture capital. Last year, companies founded solely by women garnered 2.3 percent of the total capital invested in venture-backed startups, according to PitchBook data. Often times — although not always — founders of startups become CEOs that one day take their companies public.

At least in the past, studies have also shown a gender bias during the IPO process that favors male executives.

One study conducted by the University of Utah five years ago found that women CEOs are disadvantaged by the process due to the judgment of professional investors, who are typically men.

“Despite identical personal qualifications and firm financials, firms led by female CEOs may be hamstrung in terms of their ability to take a company public,” the study said. “Female CEOs are evaluated more negatively and suffer less potential for growth capital during a liquidity event.”

Still, over the last year, there’s been a larger movement toward backing women entrepreneurs, and sizable startups like Rent The Runway and Glossier have female CEOs that may one day choose to embark on initial public offerings of their own.

IPOs are doing great this year with the Renaissance IPO ETF, which measures recent stocks that have recently gone public, up 37% this year, compared to a 19% return for the S&P 500. RealReal is the latest example, up more than 27% since its debut a week ago.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: leslie picker christopher hayes, leslie picker, christopher hayes
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, women, julie, seen, realreal, ceos, startups, public, capital, female, red, usual, hot, ipo, market


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Start-up founders should avoid making these four basic mistakes, investor says

In an interview with CNBC, Grimeland outlined the four most common mistakes start-ups make, claiming that avoiding just one of them would reduce a start-up’s odds of failing by about 30%. Undivided attention”Most mistakes start-up founders make are around basic things that if you knew in the beginning you’d just avoid,” Grimeland told CNBC. He told CNBC that entrepreneurs could only build a great business if it was the focus of their working life. Solve a problem”Unfortunately, there are some gr


In an interview with CNBC, Grimeland outlined the four most common mistakes start-ups make, claiming that avoiding just one of them would reduce a start-up’s odds of failing by about 30%. Undivided attention”Most mistakes start-up founders make are around basic things that if you knew in the beginning you’d just avoid,” Grimeland told CNBC. He told CNBC that entrepreneurs could only build a great business if it was the focus of their working life. Solve a problem”Unfortunately, there are some gr
Start-up founders should avoid making these four basic mistakes, investor says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mistakes, investor, making, going, team, grimeland, told, business, founders, basic, startups, right, avoid, startup


Start-up founders should avoid making these four basic mistakes, investor says

Photographer is my life | Moment | Getty Images

Last month, start-up generator and early stage venture capital firm Antler launched in New York, its seventh global location. It’s aiming to launch 160 new companies in the U.S. within the next three years – and needs people to head up those firms. The company selects candidates to lead new tech businesses, helps them build a strong founding team and business model, and then invests in the startup to help it grow. Among its portfolio of start-ups are southeast Asian cooking app YoRipe and Cognicept, a platform designed to handle errors made by robots. Magnus Grimeland, Antler’s founder and CEO, believes that if new businesses are led by a passionate founder with the right skillset, the chances of success would be higher. In an interview with CNBC, Grimeland outlined the four most common mistakes start-ups make, claiming that avoiding just one of them would reduce a start-up’s odds of failing by about 30%.

Undivided attention

“Most mistakes start-up founders make are around basic things that if you knew in the beginning you’d just avoid,” Grimeland told CNBC. “The number one reason start-ups fail is because people are not committed enough. Running a business isn’t a part-time job – we want people to think: ‘I’m going to do whatever it takes to make this a success.'” He told CNBC that entrepreneurs could only build a great business if it was the focus of their working life. “Anyone who isn’t willing to put five to 10 years into building their company up (won’t succeed),” Grimeland said. “If you took away start-ups with leaders who aren’t focused, the fail rate would go way down.”

Get the right people on board

According to Grimeland, many of the start-up failures he’s witnessed have been sparked by incompatible leadership teams. “They didn’t have the right team building the business,” he said. “And that can be because the founders start disagreeing or because they’re too alike.” Business founders needed to find the right balance between having a team whose vision aligned with their own and getting people onboard who could fill the gaps in their own experience and skillset. “You need to put a serious amount of effort into deciding who you’re going to build your company with,” Grimeland advised.

Solve a problem

“Unfortunately, there are some great teams out there who are just working on the wrong business model,” Grimeland told CNBC. One of the top mistakes entrepreneurs make at the very outset is developing something that’s not solving a problem, he said. “Go and talk to the people who are going to be your customers,” he advised. “Something might be a problem to you, but if you’re the only one who wants it solved there’s going to be no one to sell your idea to.” Founders could often get caught up in developing new technology and distract themselves from their business model, Grimeland added, emphasizing that investing in the technology itself doesn’t solve a problem. He also flagged that business founders should monitor the market they want to enter to ensure they aren’t rolling out their product too early or too late.

Don’t give up


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mistakes, investor, making, going, team, grimeland, told, business, founders, basic, startups, right, avoid, startup


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Fintech start-ups are now more ready to work with banks, says ANZ exec

There are now more “adequately mature” financial technology start-ups that can help banks with corporate clients, according to an executive from Australian banking group ANZ. But recently, those start-ups have made some headway into the corporate banking space too. Banks, too, have to adapt “old ways of working” when collaborating with start-ups, said Iyer. He explained that certain processes may not be suitable when working with start-ups, such as the excessive use of hard-copy documents. Iyer


There are now more “adequately mature” financial technology start-ups that can help banks with corporate clients, according to an executive from Australian banking group ANZ. But recently, those start-ups have made some headway into the corporate banking space too. Banks, too, have to adapt “old ways of working” when collaborating with start-ups, said Iyer. He explained that certain processes may not be suitable when working with start-ups, such as the excessive use of hard-copy documents. Iyer
Fintech start-ups are now more ready to work with banks, says ANZ exec Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mature, anz, ready, technology, iyer, institutional, startups, work, banking, business, corporate, ways, banks, working, fintech, exec


Fintech start-ups are now more ready to work with banks, says ANZ exec

There are now more “adequately mature” financial technology start-ups that can help banks with corporate clients, according to an executive from Australian banking group ANZ.

Fintech firms have for years changed some of the ways that banks operate, particularly in serving consumers. But recently, those start-ups have made some headway into the corporate banking space too.

“A few years ago, when I started dealing with fintechs, it was quite hard to find adequately mature fintechs who have business options for corporate banking and institutional banking business which I’m a part of,” Sreeram Iyer, chief operating officer for institutional business at ANZ, told CNBC’s Matthew Taylor on Thursday.

“But now I see increasing maturity in their capability to scale up to work with big institutions like ours,” he said at a technology event in Singapore, Innovfest Unbound.

Banks, too, have to adapt “old ways of working” when collaborating with start-ups, said Iyer. He explained that certain processes may not be suitable when working with start-ups, such as the excessive use of hard-copy documents.

Iyer said ANZ has partnered with fintech start-ups to improve its businesses, and there are opportunities to do more using technology such as artificial intelligence and blockchain tech.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mature, anz, ready, technology, iyer, institutional, startups, work, banking, business, corporate, ways, banks, working, fintech, exec


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Delta warns of flight delays after technical problem snarls check-ins and boarding

I tried out 21 days as a vegetarian. Here’s what I learned about…Meatless alternatives are on the rise, fueled by startups and companies. CNBC’s Uptin Saiidi tried out 21 days as a vegetarian and explores whether this is a fad or the future…Food & Beverageread more


I tried out 21 days as a vegetarian. Here’s what I learned about…Meatless alternatives are on the rise, fueled by startups and companies. CNBC’s Uptin Saiidi tried out 21 days as a vegetarian and explores whether this is a fad or the future…Food & Beverageread more
Delta warns of flight delays after technical problem snarls check-ins and boarding Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warns, boarding, days, delta, checkins, tried, technical, rise, learned, saiidi, 21, flight, startups, snarls, uptin, vegetarian, heres, delays, problem


Delta warns of flight delays after technical problem snarls check-ins and boarding

I tried out 21 days as a vegetarian. Here’s what I learned about…

Meatless alternatives are on the rise, fueled by startups and companies. CNBC’s Uptin Saiidi tried out 21 days as a vegetarian and explores whether this is a fad or the future…

Food & Beverage

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warns, boarding, days, delta, checkins, tried, technical, rise, learned, saiidi, 21, flight, startups, snarls, uptin, vegetarian, heres, delays, problem


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