Era of mega-funded, money-losing unicorn start-ups is coming to an end

As we begin accepting nominations for CNBC’s eighth annual Disruptor 50 list, we’re looking at how this year’s batch of companies will reflect the latest tech trends. That means, as investors and executives scrutinize those results, the era of mega-funded private companies waiting to go public could be coming to an end. Take Uber, the biggest IPO of last year: It raised $14 billion before it went public and then $8 billion in its IPO. Since it went public in May, the stock is down 17%. Lyft, the


As we begin accepting nominations for CNBC’s eighth annual Disruptor 50 list, we’re looking at how this year’s batch of companies will reflect the latest tech trends.
That means, as investors and executives scrutinize those results, the era of mega-funded private companies waiting to go public could be coming to an end.
Take Uber, the biggest IPO of last year: It raised $14 billion before it went public and then $8 billion in its IPO.
Since it went public in May, the stock is down 17%.
Lyft, the
Era of mega-funded, money-losing unicorn start-ups is coming to an end Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: julia boorstin, fcltglobal ceo sarah williamson, managing director bhakti mirchandani
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coming, moneylosing, startups, list, disruptor, raised, companies, megafunded, went, ipo, stock, era, unicorn, public, end, billion


Era of mega-funded, money-losing unicorn start-ups is coming to an end

As we begin accepting nominations for CNBC’s eighth annual Disruptor 50 list, we’re looking at how this year’s batch of companies will reflect the latest tech trends.

Last year was a big one for companies valued at $1 billion or more — the so-called “unicorns.” There were 36 on the 2019 Disruptor 50 list, and of the 80 companies that went public last year, 28 of them were worth $1 billion or more at the time of their IPO.

But the performance of last year’s biggest debuts, such as Uber and Lyft, has shown that raising billions of dollars pre-IPO has not translated to public market success. That means, as investors and executives scrutinize those results, the era of mega-funded private companies waiting to go public could be coming to an end.

Benchmark Capital’s Bill Gurley, a longtime venture investor, recently tweeted his unicorn doomsday prediction.

Take Uber, the biggest IPO of last year: It raised $14 billion before it went public and then $8 billion in its IPO. Since it went public in May, the stock is down 17%. Lyft, the second-biggest IPO last year, raised $5 billion before its IPO and another $2.3 billion in its public offering. Its stock is down 34% since it started trading at the end of March.

In contrast, one of the lowest-valued companies on last year’s Disruptor 50 list, Progyny, with a $123 million market cap, pre-IPO, raised just $93 million before it went public. Since it started trading, its stock has doubled.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: julia boorstin, fcltglobal ceo sarah williamson, managing director bhakti mirchandani
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coming, moneylosing, startups, list, disruptor, raised, companies, megafunded, went, ipo, stock, era, unicorn, public, end, billion


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Founder of 2 billion-dollar start-ups uses this ritual to make ‘critical decisions’

Billionaire Jack Ma has said that getting sleep is the best way for him to make decisions in the face of a problem. In a 2016 letter to shareholders, Bezos wrote that he makes “high-quality, high-velocity decisions,” meaning he makes choices quickly to avoid stagnation. But this founder of two billion-dollar start-ups has a different approach when it comes to big decisions. As of March 2018, Warby Parker was valued at $1.75 billion, after raising $300 million in funding, the New York Times repor


Billionaire Jack Ma has said that getting sleep is the best way for him to make decisions in the face of a problem.
In a 2016 letter to shareholders, Bezos wrote that he makes “high-quality, high-velocity decisions,” meaning he makes choices quickly to avoid stagnation.
But this founder of two billion-dollar start-ups has a different approach when it comes to big decisions.
As of March 2018, Warby Parker was valued at $1.75 billion, after raising $300 million in funding, the New York Times repor
Founder of 2 billion-dollar start-ups uses this ritual to make ‘critical decisions’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ritual, billiondollar, walk, work, think, warby, sleep, decisions, times, uses, critical, york, raider, way, startups, founder


Founder of 2 billion-dollar start-ups uses this ritual to make 'critical decisions'

Billionaire Jack Ma has said that getting sleep is the best way for him to make decisions in the face of a problem. “If I don’t sleep well, the problem will still be there,” he said at the 2019 World Economic Forum in Davos. “If I sleep, I have a better chance to fight it.”

Jeff Bezos, Amazon founder and CEO, moves at a faster pace. In a 2016 letter to shareholders, Bezos wrote that he makes “high-quality, high-velocity decisions,” meaning he makes choices quickly to avoid stagnation. This approach has allowed him to keep a beginner’s mindset, he said.

But this founder of two billion-dollar start-ups has a different approach when it comes to big decisions. Jeff Raider, the co-founder and co-CEO of Harry’s and co-founder of Warby Parker, likes to walk when he needs to think or get some head space.

“For me, it’s sacred time when I can reflect, clear my head or formulate an opinion on a critical decision,” Raider tells CNBC Make It. “On most days, I’m in back to back meetings, and my walk is one of the only times when I can take a step back and think creatively about what’s best for Harry’s.”

Science is on Raider’s side: Studies suggest that walking can improve your cognitive functioning, and boost creativity. Everyone from Sen. Elizabeth Warren to Gwyneth Paltrow swears by the habit for the physical and mental benefits.

In Raider’s case he walks his commute to his office in New York City, which takes about 20 minutes. “But I usually extend it a little bit by grabbing a cup of coffee on the way,” he says.

While many people listen to music or podcasts on their commute, Raider intentionally does not. “Instead, I either use the time to think through the day ahead, what are the most important things I need to focus on and who on our team I want to be sure to spend time with,” he says.

Sometimes Raider will have people join him, so his first meeting of the day can be a “walk and talk.” (This is something that Steve Jobs, the late Apple founder, would do when he needed to brainstorm or discuss a serious topic.)

“Either way, I’m using the time to hash out a problem or open myself up to guidance,” Raider says.

In 2010, when Raider was still in business school at Wharton, he founded the direct-to-consumer eyeglasses company, Warby Parker, with his classmates Neil Blumenthal, Dave Gilboa and Andy Hunt. Then in 2013, he co-founded the shaving brand Harry’s with Andy Katz-Mayfield.

As of March 2018, Warby Parker was valued at $1.75 billion, after raising $300 million in funding, the New York Times reported. And in May 2019, Edgewell Personal Care (which owns Schick) bought Harry’s for $1.37 billion.

As the co-founder of two unicorn start-ups, “you’ve got to be all in, and you’ve got to love it,” Raider told the New York Times in November 2018. Finding small ways to prioritize work-life balance is very important to Raider, who has three young children.

“Life is the thing I get to schedule. Work is something I fit around life,” Raider said at a talk in 2019 as part of the More Than Ever tour.

For example, Raider has a “no before yes” policy for scheduling plans after work hours. “It’s simple: say no more often than saying yes,” he wrote in a 2017 article for LinkedIn. “And when you can, say no. I’ve found that you can always go back to someone and say, ‘That event you mentioned; is it okay if I swing by after all?’ much more comfortably than bailing on something at the last minute.”

Raider also tries to walk home in time to read a book and listen to a song with his kids before they go to bed. If someone needs his attention at work, he’ll ask them if he can call them in an hour.

These strategies work well for Raider’s position and lifestyle. Of course, “being a founder gives me flexibility other parents might not have,” he wrote.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ritual, billiondollar, walk, work, think, warby, sleep, decisions, times, uses, critical, york, raider, way, startups, founder


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Advertisers beg Google not to kill Chrome cookies without a plan B, warning it could hurt start-ups

Major trade groups representing marketers and advertising agencies are criticizing Google’s announcement this week that it will end third-party cookie support in its Chrome browser within two years. Cookies are small pieces of code that websites deliver to a visitor’s browser and that stick around as the person visits other sites. They can be used to track users across multiple sites and can be used to target ads and see how they perform. Google said it will effectively kill off third-party cook


Major trade groups representing marketers and advertising agencies are criticizing Google’s announcement this week that it will end third-party cookie support in its Chrome browser within two years.
Cookies are small pieces of code that websites deliver to a visitor’s browser and that stick around as the person visits other sites.
They can be used to track users across multiple sites and can be used to target ads and see how they perform.
Google said it will effectively kill off third-party cook
Advertisers beg Google not to kill Chrome cookies without a plan B, warning it could hurt start-ups Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, represents, hurt, beg, warning, plan, cookies, chrome, groups, thirdparty, startups, kill, browser, used, sites, advertising, google, users


Advertisers beg Google not to kill Chrome cookies without a plan B, warning it could hurt start-ups

Major trade groups representing marketers and advertising agencies are criticizing Google’s announcement this week that it will end third-party cookie support in its Chrome browser within two years.

This change will disrupt part of the web’s economic infrastructure and “may choke off the economic oxygen from advertising that startups and emerging companies need to survive,” the advertiser groups said in a statement.

The statement was attributed to Dan Jaffe, group EVP of government relations at the Association of National Advertisers, which represents companies including Procter & Gamble, Coca-Cola, Microsoft and Apple, and to Dick O’Brien, EVP of government relations at the American Association of Advertising Agencies, which represents major ad agencies.

Cookies are small pieces of code that websites deliver to a visitor’s browser and that stick around as the person visits other sites. They can be used to track users across multiple sites and can be used to target ads and see how they perform.

Google said it will effectively kill off third-party cookies on Chrome once it has figured out how to address the “needs of users, publishers, and advertisers” and it has developed tools to “mitigate workarounds.” Chrome is the most popular web browser in the world, with about 69% global market share as of September 2019, according to Statista.

The company said it’s working on initiatives that would let online advertising continue in a more privacy-conscious way, but it’s unclear exactly what that means.

Jaffe and O’Brien wrote that the advertiser groups intend to work with industry players, policymakers and Google itself to ensure “effective and competitive alternatives” before Google ends third-party cookie support.

“In the interim, we strongly urge Google to publicly and quickly commit to not imposing this moratorium on third party cookies until effective and meaningful alternatives are available,” they wrote.

These groups have also been among groups opposing California’s new privacy law. The groups cited concerns about negative consequences that proposed regulations could create for consumers and businesses.

Follow @CNBCtech on Twitter for the latest tech and advertising industry news.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, represents, hurt, beg, warning, plan, cookies, chrome, groups, thirdparty, startups, kill, browser, used, sites, advertising, google, users


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UK tech investment grew faster than the US and China in 2019, study says

Investment in the U.K.’s technology sector grew at a faster pace than in the U.S. and China last year, according to new research released Wednesday. Venture capital funding for British start-ups grew 44% to a record $13.2 billion in 2019, a report prepared for the government by industry group Tech Nation and research firm Dealroom said. The stats showed that nearly half of the total amount invested in U.K. tech came from U.S. and Asian investors. Health firm Benevolent AI raised $90 million and


Investment in the U.K.’s technology sector grew at a faster pace than in the U.S. and China last year, according to new research released Wednesday.
Venture capital funding for British start-ups grew 44% to a record $13.2 billion in 2019, a report prepared for the government by industry group Tech Nation and research firm Dealroom said.
The stats showed that nearly half of the total amount invested in U.K. tech came from U.S. and Asian investors.
Health firm Benevolent AI raised $90 million and
UK tech investment grew faster than the US and China in 2019, study says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billion, faster, startups, tech, grew, 2019, firm, total, million, china, study, investment, raised


UK tech investment grew faster than the US and China in 2019, study says

Investment in the U.K.’s technology sector grew at a faster pace than in the U.S. and China last year, according to new research released Wednesday.

Venture capital funding for British start-ups grew 44% to a record $13.2 billion in 2019, a report prepared for the government by industry group Tech Nation and research firm Dealroom said.

By contrast, Dealroom’s figures show that investment in U.S. and Chinese tech firms actually slowed from January to December, with the U.S. seeing a 20% decline and China a steeper fall of 65%. The U.S. and China still came out on top in terms of total deal value, however, attracting $116 billion and $33.5 billion respectively.

The stats showed that nearly half of the total amount invested in U.K. tech came from U.S. and Asian investors. Last year, foreign investors flocked to the U.K. and Europe in search of cheaper valuations amid growing interest in burgeoning areas like fintech. Start-ups like challenger bank Monzo and online payments firm Klarna attracted huge nine-figure deals led by U.S. investors.

But fintech wasn’t the only sector seeing significant growth. Emerging industries like artificial intelligence, so-called “deep tech” and clean energy also saw huge inflows. Health firm Benevolent AI raised $90 million and virtual reality company Melody raised $60 million, while in energy Ovo raised $260 million from investors.

“The U.K. and Europe quite frankly have over the last 20 years mainly seen on the sidelines of the global tech economy,” Saul Klein, co-founder of early stage venture fund LocalGlobe, told CNBC in an interview. “It’s taken about 20 years to get here and the data now supports that the U.K. is a major global tech player.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billion, faster, startups, tech, grew, 2019, firm, total, million, china, study, investment, raised


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Clobotics: Taking on smart wind and smart retail

Clobotics: Taking on smart wind and smart retailClaire Chen of Clobotics explains her company’s use of drone power and machine vision to conduct equipment quality checks and stock taking. She also talks about its competitiveness among other artificial intelligence startups.


Clobotics: Taking on smart wind and smart retailClaire Chen of Clobotics explains her company’s use of drone power and machine vision to conduct equipment quality checks and stock taking.
She also talks about its competitiveness among other artificial intelligence startups.
Clobotics: Taking on smart wind and smart retail Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talks, startups, retail, quality, wind, vision, retailclaire, clobotics, smart, taking, stock


Clobotics: Taking on smart wind and smart retail

Clobotics: Taking on smart wind and smart retail

Claire Chen of Clobotics explains her company’s use of drone power and machine vision to conduct equipment quality checks and stock taking. She also talks about its competitiveness among other artificial intelligence startups.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talks, startups, retail, quality, wind, vision, retailclaire, clobotics, smart, taking, stock


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Comcast launches accelerator for sports start-ups that could give it a leg up on new technology

Signage is displayed in the window of a Comcast Corp. Xfinity store in King Of Prussia, Pennsylvania. Comcast said Tuesday it is launching a new accelerator for start-ups that could help it leverage a multibillion dollar market opportunity in sports. Partnering with Boomtown, an accelerator operator based in Colorado, Comcast will select 10 start-ups that identify as best matches for its sports tech categories, which include fantasy and sports betting, esports, and fan/player engagement. In retu


Signage is displayed in the window of a Comcast Corp. Xfinity store in King Of Prussia, Pennsylvania.
Comcast said Tuesday it is launching a new accelerator for start-ups that could help it leverage a multibillion dollar market opportunity in sports.
Partnering with Boomtown, an accelerator operator based in Colorado, Comcast will select 10 start-ups that identify as best matches for its sports tech categories, which include fantasy and sports betting, esports, and fan/player engagement.
In retu
Comcast launches accelerator for sports start-ups that could give it a leg up on new technology Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: jabari young
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, opportunity, launches, sportstech, resources, receive, technology, startups, company, capital, accelerator, leg, comcast


Comcast launches accelerator for sports start-ups that could give it a leg up on new technology

Signage is displayed in the window of a Comcast Corp. Xfinity store in King Of Prussia, Pennsylvania.

Comcast said Tuesday it is launching a new accelerator for start-ups that could help it leverage a multibillion dollar market opportunity in sports.

The cable giant said Tuesday its rationale for the venture, called SportsTech, includes the opportunity to acquire or test new technology and to get an early look at new sports-tech trends. The company sees growth in areas like legalized sports betting and smart stadiums, which are expected to reach $287 billion by 2021 and $12.5 billion by 2023, respectively.

“The demand for sports technology across the globe has never been greater, yet most sports startups don’t have access to the resources they need to succeed nor an ability to develop relationships with the right people inside the industry,” Jenna Kurath, Comcast Cable’s vice president of start-up partner development, said in a statement.

Partnering with Boomtown, an accelerator operator based in Colorado, Comcast will select 10 start-ups that identify as best matches for its sports tech categories, which include fantasy and sports betting, esports, and fan/player engagement. Companies that are selected will receive $50,000 of investment capital and $1.7 million total in perks. They will also attend a 12-week course at Comcast Cable’s Central Division headquarters in Atlanta.

In return, the start-ups will provide a minimum of 6% equity for the capital and resources they receive through SportsTech to Comcast and Boomtown.

The accelerator will be the third of its kind for Comcast, who started LIFT Labs in Philadelphia and The Farm, which is also in Atlanta and run by Boomtown. Comcast has six other partners on SportsTech, including NASCAR, USA Swimming and U.S. Ski & Snowboard.

Start-ups can submit applications for the program until May 15, with officials estimating the selection process will take two months before courses begin in August.

Disclosure: Comcast owns NBCUniversal, the parent company of CNBC and NBC Sports.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: jabari young
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, opportunity, launches, sportstech, resources, receive, technology, startups, company, capital, accelerator, leg, comcast


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Start-ups join Google, SpaceX and OneWeb to bring new technologies to space

Since 2009, said Chad Anderson, CEO of Space Angels, investors have poured nearly $24 billion into 509 companies. The largest amount of venture capital still goes into the most fundamental task: putting satellites into orbit. LeoLabs’ Kiwi Space Radar was set up in Central Otago, New Zealand, in 2019. To date, LeoLabs has raised $17 million from venture funds, including Marc Bell Capital Partners, Seraphim Capital and Space Angels. “The security of any communications is essential,” says Chune Ya


Since 2009, said Chad Anderson, CEO of Space Angels, investors have poured nearly $24 billion into 509 companies.
The largest amount of venture capital still goes into the most fundamental task: putting satellites into orbit.
LeoLabs’ Kiwi Space Radar was set up in Central Otago, New Zealand, in 2019.
To date, LeoLabs has raised $17 million from venture funds, including Marc Bell Capital Partners, Seraphim Capital and Space Angels.
“The security of any communications is essential,” says Chune Ya
Start-ups join Google, SpaceX and OneWeb to bring new technologies to space Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: joel dreyfuss
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technologies, google, join, capital, venture, companies, radar, oneweb, launch, ceo, startups, satellites, spacex, space, anderson, orbit, bring


Start-ups join Google, SpaceX and OneWeb to bring new technologies to space

Space X CEO Elon Musk Photo by Kevork Djansezian

For a long time, American space exploration was a closed circle: There was just one customer, the U.S. government (NASA) and a handful of giant defense contractors. Then in 2008 Elon Musk’s SpaceX put the first privately-financed rocket into orbit, Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin promised private flights, and space was suddenly a lively market with companies vying to put satellites and humans into orbit. A decade later hundreds of start-ups have flocked to the space sector, bringing sophisticated technologies that include artificial intelligence, quantum computing, phased array radar, space-based solar power, “tiny” satellites and services that could not be imagined just a few years ago. Space Angels, an early stage investor that also tracks investments in the sector, reported that venture capitalists invested $5 billion into space technologies in the first three quarters of 2019, putting the year on track to be the biggest year yet, with Blue Origin pulling in $1.4 billion from Bezos. Since 2009, said Chad Anderson, CEO of Space Angels, investors have poured nearly $24 billion into 509 companies. Anderson said that SpaceX triggered the transformation not just by offering competition to NASA but publishing its prices for a launch. Before that revelation, space was really an opaque market, making it difficult for potential competitors to price their products. “It’s been a really big decade for commercial space,” said Anderson. The largest amount of venture capital still goes into the most fundamental task: putting satellites into orbit. Anderson says 89 companies have received funding for so-called small-lift launch vehicles. These are companies promising to put payloads of up to 2,000 kilos (4,400 lbs) into low Earth orbit. Their focus is a new generation of small satellites such as those used by OneWeb and SpaceX’s StarLink, which promise broadband internet access in even the most remote parts of the world by deploying “constellations” of hundreds or even thousands of tiny satellites.

Satellites have become so mainstream you can now buy a standard 4-in. by 4-in. “cubesat” kit online. All this activity could mean 20,000 to 40,000 satellites joining the 1,000 now in orbit over the next few years. “It’s quickly becoming congested,” Anderson said of the market for small-lift launch. Of the venture-backed rocket companies, SpaceX and Rocket Lab, with launch sites in New Zealand and Virginia, are making regular launches, although Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic is scheduled to begin flying its manned shuttle this year. The sky is also getting crowded. Aside from the thousands of new satellites scheduled for launch, there is already a lot of clutter in space — as many as 250,000 pieces of junk and debris circle the Earth. Up to now the U.S. Air Force has taken the lead role in tracking debris and warning satellite operators about possible collisions. But the military’s tracking radar, with some components dating back to the cold war, can only detect pieces 10 cm (4 in.) across or larger. LeoLabs, a start-up based in Menlo Park, California, has developed an advanced radar system that can detect objects in orbit as small as 2 cm (less than an inch) long.

LeoLabs’ Kiwi Space Radar was set up in Central Otago, New Zealand, in 2019. It is the first in the world to track space debris smaller than 10 cm. LeoLabs

A tiny object traveling at several thousand miles an hour can cause severe damage to a satellite. LeoLabs enables customers to track their small satellites more easily and to safely move them to a new position. “That will take a lot of the collision risks off the table,” says founder and CEO Dan Ceperley. His company has built phased array radars that steer the radar beam electronically — faster than a traditional dish antenna — in three locations: Alaska, Texas and New Zealand. To date, LeoLabs has raised $17 million from venture funds, including Marc Bell Capital Partners, Seraphim Capital and Space Angels. Many of the 1,000 satellites now in orbit are engaged in observing Earth. They monitor the weather, humidity and temperature, among dozens of other phenomena, and capture millions of images. SkyWatch, based in Waterloo, Ontario, recently closed a $10 million round of funding led by San Francisco’s Bullpen Capital to develop its service to make satellite data easily available to companies. SkyWatch would handle licensing and payment for data through subscription fees, and companies could use its software to build their own apps for tasks such as tracking crops or assessing damage from natural disasters. SkyWatch CEO James Slifierz compares his timing to the aftermath of the creation of the global positioning system infrastructure. Once GPS was in place, civilian applications followed. The growing flow of data from satellites has raised concerns about data security. SpeQtral, based in Singapore, plans to build encryption keys based on the laws of quantum physics to protect space-to-Earth communications. “The security of any communications is essential,” says Chune Yang Lum, CEO of SpeQtral, which has raised a $1.9 million seed round led by Space Capital, the venture arm of Space Angels. Quantum encryption has been touted as practically unbreakable.

An illustration of the SPS-ALPHA (Solar Power Satellite by means of Arbitrarily Large Phased Array) transmitting energy to Australia. This approach, in concept phase, includes a series of enormous platforms positioned in space in high Earth orbit to continuously collect and convert solar energy into electricity. SPS-ALPHA concept and illustration, courtesy John C. Mankins


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: joel dreyfuss
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technologies, google, join, capital, venture, companies, radar, oneweb, launch, ceo, startups, satellites, spacex, space, anderson, orbit, bring


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She founded a $1 billion start-up by 30. Now she’s taking on the tech giants

She founded a $1 billion start-up by 30. Now she’s taking on the tech giantsMelanie Perkins’ $3.2 billion design platform, Canva, is one of the world’s most valuable female-led start-ups. CNBC Make It’s Karen Gilchrist met with the 32-year-old Australian entrepreneur in Sydney to find out how she’s now taking on tech giants Microsoft and Adobe.


She founded a $1 billion start-up by 30.
Now she’s taking on the tech giantsMelanie Perkins’ $3.2 billion design platform, Canva, is one of the world’s most valuable female-led start-ups.
CNBC Make It’s Karen Gilchrist met with the 32-year-old Australian entrepreneur in Sydney to find out how she’s now taking on tech giants Microsoft and Adobe.
She founded a $1 billion start-up by 30. Now she’s taking on the tech giants Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, startups, taking, tech, platform, worlds, giants, valuable, shes, founded, billion, startup, sydney


She founded a $1 billion start-up by 30. Now she's taking on the tech giants

She founded a $1 billion start-up by 30. Now she’s taking on the tech giants

Melanie Perkins’ $3.2 billion design platform, Canva, is one of the world’s most valuable female-led start-ups. CNBC Make It’s Karen Gilchrist met with the 32-year-old Australian entrepreneur in Sydney to find out how she’s now taking on tech giants Microsoft and Adobe.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, startups, taking, tech, platform, worlds, giants, valuable, shes, founded, billion, startup, sydney


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Indonesia plans fixed fees for e-wallet transactions

The rupiah breached the psychologically important level of 9,000 against the dollar, at it fell to its lowest level since November 2002. AFP PHOTO/ ADEK BERRY (Photo credit should read ADEK BERRY/AFP via Getty Images)Indonesia plans to impose fixed fees on some e-wallet transactions, five people familiar with the matter said, in a move that could choke a key revenue stream and raise costs for payment startups backed by the likes of Alibaba’s Ant Financial. Leading the pack of e-wallet firms in t


The rupiah breached the psychologically important level of 9,000 against the dollar, at it fell to its lowest level since November 2002.
AFP PHOTO/ ADEK BERRY (Photo credit should read ADEK BERRY/AFP via Getty Images)Indonesia plans to impose fixed fees on some e-wallet transactions, five people familiar with the matter said, in a move that could choke a key revenue stream and raise costs for payment startups backed by the likes of Alibaba’s Ant Financial.
Leading the pack of e-wallet firms in t
Indonesia plans fixed fees for e-wallet transactions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fixed, vendors, fees, startup, ewallet, firms, startups, dollar, plans, payments, transactions, smaller, indonesia


Indonesia plans fixed fees for e-wallet transactions

An Indonesian bank employee checks Indonesian Rupiah in Jakarta, 11 May 2004. The rupiah breached the psychologically important level of 9,000 against the dollar, at it fell to its lowest level since November 2002. Finance Minister Budiono sought to allay market concerns over the rupiahs recent sharp fall, saying that the local unit’s drop can be attributed to external factors as the US dollar has risen against other regional currencies. AFP PHOTO/ ADEK BERRY (Photo credit should read ADEK BERRY/AFP via Getty Images)

Indonesia plans to impose fixed fees on some e-wallet transactions, five people familiar with the matter said, in a move that could choke a key revenue stream and raise costs for payment startups backed by the likes of Alibaba’s Ant Financial.

Providers of e-wallet services in Southeast Asia’s largest economy currently customize fees for vendors, charging a premium from big retailers and absorbing costs for smaller merchants in an effort to get them to use their platforms.

But has already held talks with the biggest digital-payment startups to make fees on QR code transactions uniform, the people said, building on its move in August to standardize electronic payments that use the matrix barcode.

Bank Indonesia did not respond to repeated messages and calls requesting comment.

Leading the pack of e-wallet firms in the country is home-grown ride-hailing startup Gojek, backed by firms including ‘s Google, and startup OVO, in which Gojek rival Grab has a stake. Ant Financial’s e-wallet DANA trails them, along with state-owned payments platform LinkAja.

The central bank wants to fix some e-wallet transaction fees at 0.7%, the people added, a move that could deter smaller merchants that now pay next to nothing from staying on the e-wallet network or force the latter to increase incentives.

Fixed fees on payments at bigger vendors, like , that are currently charged as much as 2%, would also dent revenue for the e-wallet firms, the people said.

The startups have already burned through millions of dollars in incentives to lure vendors in Indonesia, where a multi-billion dollar digital payments industry has flourished as over half its nearly 270 million population have no

bank accounts.

The country’s internet economy was $40 billion this year and is expected to grow more than threefold by 2025, according to a report by Google, Temasek and Bain & Co.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fixed, vendors, fees, startup, ewallet, firms, startups, dollar, plans, payments, transactions, smaller, indonesia


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Tech startups have created bug bounty programs to protect against data breaches

Tech startups have created bug bounty programs to protect against data breachesCNBC’s Kate Rooney talks about silicon valley companies using freelance hackers to help find potential loop holes before data breaches occur on “Squawk Alley.”


Tech startups have created bug bounty programs to protect against data breachesCNBC’s Kate Rooney talks about silicon valley companies using freelance hackers to help find potential loop holes before data breaches occur on “Squawk Alley.”
Tech startups have created bug bounty programs to protect against data breaches Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-26
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, squawk, using, programs, tech, valley, startups, talks, breaches, data, bounty, protect, rooney, silicon, bug, created


Tech startups have created bug bounty programs to protect against data breaches

Tech startups have created bug bounty programs to protect against data breaches

CNBC’s Kate Rooney talks about silicon valley companies using freelance hackers to help find potential loop holes before data breaches occur on “Squawk Alley.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-26
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, squawk, using, programs, tech, valley, startups, talks, breaches, data, bounty, protect, rooney, silicon, bug, created


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