A rising number of US companies are flagging wildfire risk as suppression costs climb

California’s biggest utilities aren’t the only U.S. companies grappling with the increased force and frequency of wildfires. While many S&P 500 firms have included “fire” in the risk factor section of their 10-Ks, this analysis specifically accounts for “wildfire.” Perhaps unsurprisingly, real estate companies make up the largest share — 10 of 37 — that have flagged wildfire risk in 10-K filings this year. S&P 500 companies noting “wildfire” as a risk in their annual 10-K filingsA number of thes


California’s biggest utilities aren’t the only U.S. companies grappling with the increased force and frequency of wildfires.
While many S&P 500 firms have included “fire” in the risk factor section of their 10-Ks, this analysis specifically accounts for “wildfire.”
Perhaps unsurprisingly, real estate companies make up the largest share — 10 of 37 — that have flagged wildfire risk in 10-K filings this year.
S&P 500 companies noting “wildfire” as a risk in their annual 10-K filingsA number of thes
A rising number of US companies are flagging wildfire risk as suppression costs climb Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-10  Authors: jr reed, adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 10k, number, risk, wildfire, power, wildfires, state, past, increased, costs, pge, companies, climb, rising, suppression, flagging


A rising number of US companies are flagging wildfire risk as suppression costs climb

California’s biggest utilities aren’t the only U.S. companies grappling with the increased force and frequency of wildfires.

The number of S&P 500 firms flagging “wildfire” as a potential risk factor in annual reports has increased dramatically over the past decade — from 9 in all of 2010 to 37 so far in 2019. In just the past year, at least 14 companies in the S&P 500, including Marriott and Monster Beverage, have added wildfires to their basket of concerns in 10-K filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. While many S&P 500 firms have included “fire” in the risk factor section of their 10-Ks, this analysis specifically accounts for “wildfire.”

California-based utilities PG&E and Edison International have drawn much of the spotlight since 2017 and, more recently, as the two companies prophylactically shut off power to vast portions of their service areas in October. But, in just the past couple of years, businesses across an armada of industries have started to sound the alarm.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, real estate companies make up the largest share — 10 of 37 — that have flagged wildfire risk in 10-K filings this year. But concerns are spread across sectors from banking to biotech to semiconductors.

Those proliferating worries are reflected in the data. Ten of the 20 most destructive U.S. wildfires since 1923 have ignited in the last five years.

S&P 500 companies noting “wildfire” as a risk in their annual 10-K filings

A number of these companies have added wildfires to a burgeoning list of natural disaster threats, which include earthquakes and tornadoes. Orville, Ohio-based consumer giant J.M. Smucker, for instance, had flagged the risk of tornadoes to its production facilities in Kansas and Alabama in 2018. But, this year, the consumer giant added a new line on California wildfire.

Other firms have been more explicit in their warnings.

In its latest 10-K filing, Houston, Texas-based power infrastructure company Quanta Services warned investors that its current insurance coverage might not sufficiently account for wildfire risk.

“Should our insurers determine to exclude coverage for wildfires in the future, due to the increased risk of such events in certain geographies or otherwise, we could be exposed to significant liabilities and a potential disruption of our operations,” Quanta Services executives said. “If our risk exposure increases as a result of adverse changes in our insurance coverage, we could be subject to increased claims and liabilities that could negatively affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Redwood City, California-based data center firm Equinix, meanwhile, has directly cited PG&E as it works to confront the surging wildfire threat. In January, PG&E filed for bankruptcy protection, saying it’s facing more than $30 billion in liabilities after it was determined that its power lines sparked last year’s devastating Camp Fire. The fire, the deadliest in California’s history, killed 86 people and left 30,000 homeless. The power company was also deemed responsible for 12 of the fires that tore through Northern California in October 2017, according to state officials.

While PG&E has said it will honor $42 billion in existing power agreements as a part of its plan to restructure and ultimately emerge from bankruptcy, escalating wildfire threats introduce further uncertainty for businesses across a swath of industries that rely on the utility. On Thursday, PG&E reported $1.6 billion in losses last quarter as it faces increased pressure from state and local officials.

“If PG&E seeks and is allowed to reject power agreements, it is difficult to predict the consequences of any such action for us,” Equinix executives said in their latest 10-K filing. “But they could potentially include procuring electricity from more expensive sources, reducing the availability and reliability of electricity supplied to our facilities and relying on a larger percentage of electricity generated by fossil fuels, any of which could reduce supplies of electricity available to our operations or increase our costs of electricity.”

But Equinix isn’t alone, and executives at a slew of companies — ranging from Comcast to Ulta Beauty to Corona brewer Constellation Brands — are closely monitoring probes into the spate of wildfires that have ravaged California since mid-October. At one point, 16 were burning across the state. As of Friday, all but one were fully contained, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. Local and state officials lifted all mandatory evacuation orders this past week but investigations are ongoing.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-10  Authors: jr reed, adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 10k, number, risk, wildfire, power, wildfires, state, past, increased, costs, pge, companies, climb, rising, suppression, flagging


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How Facebook stumbled to the edge of a government breakup

The agency, which was already looking at Facebook due to the Cambridge Analytica scandal, had Facebook in its investigative crosshairs, the report said. July 24, 2019 — FTC fines Facebook $5 billionThe FTC announced Facebook had agreed to pay a record $5 billion penalty as a result of the agency’s probe following the Cambridge Analytica scandal. Sept. 6, 2019 — State attorneys general open antitrust probeEight state attorneys general announced they had begun investigating Facebook for antitrust


The agency, which was already looking at Facebook due to the Cambridge Analytica scandal, had Facebook in its investigative crosshairs, the report said.
July 24, 2019 — FTC fines Facebook $5 billionThe FTC announced Facebook had agreed to pay a record $5 billion penalty as a result of the agency’s probe following the Cambridge Analytica scandal.
Sept. 6, 2019 — State attorneys general open antitrust probeEight state attorneys general announced they had begun investigating Facebook for antitrust
How Facebook stumbled to the edge of a government breakup Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-09  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 2019, general, ftc, facebooks, breakup, stumbled, facebook, zuckerberg, company, data, state, cambridge, edge


How Facebook stumbled to the edge of a government breakup

After a three-year string of scandals, Facebook finds itself staring down four separate antitrust investigations, a former co-founder who wants the company split apart and a front-runner presidential candidate who has made the breakup of the company a key part of her campaign.

It’s a far cry from a few short years ago, when people viewed Facebook and its CEO Mark Zuckerberg as prime examples of tech innovation and an inspiration for other business and tech leaders.

Here’s a look back at the events of the last three years that could force Zuckerberg to go to the mat to fight a breakup.

Nov. 10, 2016 — Zuckerberg rejects idea of Facebook’s fake news problem

Following the 2016 U.S. presidential election, a number of journalists criticized Facebook for how it handled false and misleading news stories and propaganda in the run-up to the election.

In Zuckerberg’s first public appearance after the election, interviewer David Kirkpatrick asked him about the issue. He dismissed it outright.

“Personally I think the idea that fake news on Facebook, which is a very small amount of the content, influenced the election in any way — I think is a pretty crazy idea,” Zuckerberg said.

This was the moment when sentiment toward the company began to sour.

April 27, 2017 — Facebook confirms election interference

Facebook confirmed its critics’ fears when it issued a case study of the 2016 election. Though the paper was vague in detail and made no reference to Russian interference, it confirmed that groups had attempted to use its social network to sway the outcome of the 2016 election. This reduced trust in Facebook and highlighted the company’s outsize influence on its users.

March 17, 2018 — Cambridge Analytica

Facebook’s fake news problem was a black eye for the company, but it was nothing compared to the Cambridge Analytica scandal that broke in March 2018.

The Guardian and the New York Times reported that political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica had improperly accessed the data of 50 million Facebook users, and had used that data to target voters on Facebook to get them to support Trump in the 2016 presidential campaign. The number was later revised to 87 million Facebook profiles.

Although the details were not that damning — it’s not clear whether Cambridge’s tactics actually worked — they bolstered the public impression that Facebook had undue influence over elections.

Facebook’s public response made matters worse. The company tried to get ahead of the reports by publishing a Friday night blog post on March 16, saying it was suspending Cambridge Analytica for improperly accessing user data. After the reports went live on Saturday, the company remained silent for five days without addressing the public.

March 20, 2018 — FTC opens investigation

U.S. regulators wasted no time looking into how Facebook allowed Cambridge Analytica to harvest user data. The Federal Trade Commission launched an investigation into the matter days later, according to the Washington Post.

April 10, 2018 — Zuckerberg testifies

As a result of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, Zuckerberg was called to Washington to testify before lawmakers.

Members of Congress grilled him on several matters, but it was Sen. Lindsey Graham who asked Zuckerberg to name Facebook’s competiton. Zuckerberg began to detail how Facebook competes in a number of areas with multitudes of apps.

Unsatisfied with the answer, Graham asked “You don’t think you have a monopoly?”

“It certainly doesn’t feel like that to me,” Zuckerberg responded.

Dec. 5, 2018 — U.K. Parliament releases internal Facebook documents showing aggressive tactics

The U.K. Parliament published 250 pages of internal Facebook documents in December 2018 that provided a number of insights into the company’s strategy against competitors throughout its history. The documents were obtained as part of a lawsuit against Facebook by Six4Three, a company that had developed software on Facebook and later alleged anti-competitive practices by the social network.

Among those documents was an exchange in which Zuckerberg personally instructed one of his employees to cut off the ability for users of Twitter’s Vine social video app to connect it with Facebook as a way to easily find friends on the new service.

March 8, 2019 — Warren calls for Facebook breakup

Facebook was pulled into the middle of the 2020 U.S. presidential election when Democractic candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren published a blog post calling for the breakup of several Big Tech companies on grounds of antitrust and unfair competition.

Specifically, Warren accused Facebook of using its acquisition of Instagram and WhatsApp to limit competition, and she said that if she were elected, she would appoint regulators to unwind those “anti-competitive mergers.”

March 30, 2019 — Zuckerberg asks for regulation

With more politicians expressing concerns over Facebook’s power, Zuckerberg tried to get ahead of calls for a breakup with an op-ed in the Washington Post where he admitted the tech industry needs more regulation, and asked for clear guidance.

“From what I’ve learned, I believe we need new regulation in four areas: harmful content, election integrity, privacy and data portability,” he wrote, outlining specific ideas for each.

May 9, 2019 — Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes calls for breakup

Calls to break up the company gained another prominent proponent in May when Facebook Co-founder Chris Hughes published a lengthy New York Times opinion piece, saying Facebook now holds more power over speech than a private-sector entity should.

“The most problematic aspect of Facebook’s power is Mark’s unilateral control over speech,” Hughes wrote. “There is no precedent for his ability to monitor, organize and even censor the conversations of two billion people.”

June 3, 2019 — FTC opens antitrust probe

The FTC was the first agency to kick off an antitrust-focused investigation into Facebook, according to the Wall Street Journal. The agency, which was already looking at Facebook due to the Cambridge Analytica scandal, had Facebook in its investigative crosshairs, the report said.

June 26, 2019 — Zuckerberg argues against Facebook breakup

Zuckerberg directly addressed the growing calls for a Facebook breakup during a public appearance at the Aspen Ideas Festival, arguing that the company’s size is what allows it to tackle problems like fake news.

“The question that I think we have to grapple with is that breaking up these companies wouldn’t make any of those problems better,” Zuckerberg said.

“The amount that we’re investing in safety and security is greater than the whole revenue of our company was earlier this decade when we went public, so it just would not have been possible to do the things we’re doing at a smaller scale.”

July 24, 2019 — FTC fines Facebook $5 billion

The FTC announced Facebook had agreed to pay a record $5 billion penalty as a result of the agency’s probe following the Cambridge Analytica scandal. The fine was the largest ever imposed on a company for violating consumer privacy, the FTC said in its announcement.

In addition to the fine, Facebook agreed to adopt a new privacy program that would require Zuckerberg and compliance officers to submit quarterly certifications to the FTC assuring the company is in compliance.

“Any false certification will subject them to individual civil and criminal penalties,” the FTC said.

Sept. 6, 2019 — State attorneys general open antitrust probe

Eight state attorneys general announced they had begun investigating Facebook for antitrust reasons. The coalition included Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Tennessee and Washington, D.C.

“We will use every investigative tool at our disposal to determine whether Facebook’s actions may have endangered consumer data, reduced the quality of consumers’ choices, or increased the price of advertising,” investigation lead Letitia James, the New York attorney general, said in a statement.

Sept 19, 2019 — Zuckerberg goes to Washington

In a rare move, Zuckerberg pays a visit to Washington, D.C., where he has private meetings with President Trump and lawmakers, including some who have proposed regulation that could affect the company. It’s quite a change from 2017, when he didn’t even show up to the first congressional hearings about foreign powers using Facebook to try and influence the 2016 presidential election.

Sept. 25, 2019 — DOJ reportedly opens antitrust probe

Following the FTC and state attorneys general, the U.S. Justice Department opened an antitrust investigation on Facebook in October, according to a Reuters report.

Oct. 1, 2019 — In leaked recording, Zuckerberg says he’ll “go to the mat” to fight breakup

Zuckerberg told Facebook employees that he expects Facebook will have a legal challenge if Warren is elected president, according to recordings of internal company meetings in July that were published by The Verge.

In the recordings, Zuckerberg said he bets Facebook would win the legal challenge, but he would not like a legal fight with the U.S. government.

“We care about our country and want to work with our government and do good things,” Zuckerberg said. “But look, at the end of the day, if someone’s going to try to threaten something that existential, you go to the mat and you fight.”

Oct. 22, 2019 — State attorneys general probe expands

The coalition of state attorneys general investigating Facebook announced it had expanded to include a total of 47 states and U.S. territories.

“As we continue our investigation, we will use every investigative tool at our disposal to determine whether Facebook’s actions stifled competition and put users at risk,” James said in a statement.

Oct. 30, 2019 — Zuckerberg makes case against Instagram divestiture

Speaking with analysts during Facebook’s third-quarter earnings report, Zuckerberg was asked about how the increased regulatory scrutiny could impact the company. Zuckerberg’s answer focused on Facebook’s 2012 $1 billion acquisition of Instagram, saying that the photo-sharing app would not be what it is today without Facebook’s help.

“A lot of the antitrust questions that are out there that are going to be about our acquisition of Instagram, right?” he said. “There’s going to be a lot of scrutiny of that acquisition in particular.”

Nov. 6, 2019 — California discloses Facebook probe

The most notable absentee in the coalition of 47 state attorneys general probing Facebook was the company’s home state of California.

That may be because the state had quietly opened its own investigation into the company in 2018.

California State Attorney General Xavier Becerra made the disclosure after the state filed court documents seeking the San Francisco County Superior Court to require Facebook to comply with its requests for additional documents related to the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

Becerra accused Facebook of dragging its feet by failing to comply with subpoenas, and said that the company had not searched emails of Zuckerberg and COO Sheryl Sandberg that might relate to its investigation.

Nov. 6, 2019 — NBC publishes trove of internal Facebook documents

NBC published a trove of 7,000 documents related to the Six4Three lawsuit against the social network.

The documents include 4,000 internal Facebook communications that discuss a number of topics, including how the company picked and choose which companies received preferential access to user data and which were kicked off altogether.

An employee described Zuckerberg as a “master of leverage” in one document. An employee in another document described the company’s decision to give data access to companies based on how threatening they are to Facebook “sort of unethical.”

WATCH: Here’s how to see which apps have access to your Facebook data — and cut them off


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-09  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 2019, general, ftc, facebooks, breakup, stumbled, facebook, zuckerberg, company, data, state, cambridge, edge


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Facebook, Alphabet are the most likely tech giants to face antitrust action next year, Cowen says

Facebook CEO and founder Mark Zuckerberg testifies during a US House Committee on Energy and Commerce hearing about Facebook on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, April 11, 2018. While Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Google-parent Alphabet face significant antitrust risk before and after the 2020 election, the latter two are the most exposed to accusations of innovation-stifling and anti-competitive practices, according to Cowen. The alliance of nearly all state attorneys general to investigate both Go


Facebook CEO and founder Mark Zuckerberg testifies during a US House Committee on Energy and Commerce hearing about Facebook on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, April 11, 2018.
While Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Google-parent Alphabet face significant antitrust risk before and after the 2020 election, the latter two are the most exposed to accusations of innovation-stifling and anti-competitive practices, according to Cowen.
The alliance of nearly all state attorneys general to investigate both Go
Facebook, Alphabet are the most likely tech giants to face antitrust action next year, Cowen says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chance, facebook, google, election, tech, giants, face, likely, alphabet, action, antitrust, cowen, state, doj, general


Facebook, Alphabet are the most likely tech giants to face antitrust action next year, Cowen says

Facebook CEO and founder Mark Zuckerberg testifies during a US House Committee on Energy and Commerce hearing about Facebook on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, April 11, 2018.

While Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Google-parent Alphabet face significant antitrust risk before and after the 2020 election, the latter two are the most exposed to accusations of innovation-stifling and anti-competitive practices, according to Cowen.

The alliance of nearly all state attorneys general to investigate both Google and Facebook — on top of Federal Trade Commission or Department of Justice action — is perhaps the most underappreciated threat, stated the note.

“Given the states’ historical lack of antitrust action, their Google and Facebook investigations could be viewed as political grandstanding. We think that would be a mistake,” the team wrote in a note to clients published Friday.

“Based on meetings we’ve held – plus the unprecedented state-only lawsuit against T-Mobile/Sprint (which no one, including us, saw coming) – we believe state AGs are now willing to take antitrust enforcement actions independent of DOJ and the FTC,” they added.

Before the 2020 election, Cowen thinks there is a 75% chance Google will face antitrust action by either the DOJ or the state attorneys general and a 60% chance Facebook does.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chance, facebook, google, election, tech, giants, face, likely, alphabet, action, antitrust, cowen, state, doj, general


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Facebook, Alphabet are the most likely tech giants to face antitrust action next year, Cowen says

Facebook CEO and founder Mark Zuckerberg testifies during a US House Committee on Energy and Commerce hearing about Facebook on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, April 11, 2018. While Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Google-parent Alphabet face significant antitrust risk before and after the 2020 election, the latter two are the most exposed to accusations of innovation-stifling and anti-competitive practices, according to Cowen. The alliance of nearly all state attorneys general to investigate both Go


Facebook CEO and founder Mark Zuckerberg testifies during a US House Committee on Energy and Commerce hearing about Facebook on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, April 11, 2018.
While Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Google-parent Alphabet face significant antitrust risk before and after the 2020 election, the latter two are the most exposed to accusations of innovation-stifling and anti-competitive practices, according to Cowen.
The alliance of nearly all state attorneys general to investigate both Go
Facebook, Alphabet are the most likely tech giants to face antitrust action next year, Cowen says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chance, facebook, google, election, tech, giants, face, likely, alphabet, action, antitrust, cowen, state, doj, general


Facebook, Alphabet are the most likely tech giants to face antitrust action next year, Cowen says

Facebook CEO and founder Mark Zuckerberg testifies during a US House Committee on Energy and Commerce hearing about Facebook on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, April 11, 2018.

While Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Google-parent Alphabet face significant antitrust risk before and after the 2020 election, the latter two are the most exposed to accusations of innovation-stifling and anti-competitive practices, according to Cowen.

The alliance of nearly all state attorneys general to investigate both Google and Facebook — on top of Federal Trade Commission or Department of Justice action — is perhaps the most underappreciated threat, stated the note.

“Given the states’ historical lack of antitrust action, their Google and Facebook investigations could be viewed as political grandstanding. We think that would be a mistake,” the team wrote in a note to clients published Friday.

“Based on meetings we’ve held – plus the unprecedented state-only lawsuit against T-Mobile/Sprint (which no one, including us, saw coming) – we believe state AGs are now willing to take antitrust enforcement actions independent of DOJ and the FTC,” they added.

Before the 2020 election, Cowen thinks there is a 75% chance Google will face antitrust action by either the DOJ or the state attorneys general and a 60% chance Facebook does.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chance, facebook, google, election, tech, giants, face, likely, alphabet, action, antitrust, cowen, state, doj, general


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Wrestling referee warned Rep. Jim Jordan about Ohio State doctor’s sex misconduct, new lawsuit says

Jordan and Hellickson responded, “Yeah, that’s Strauss,” according to the lawsuit filed Thursday in federal court in Columbus, Ohio. Multiple former wrestlers who were coached by Jordan during their time at Ohio State University have previously accused him of turning a blind eye to the abuse. After verbally confronting Strauss, Doe exited the shower, and told Jordan and Hellickson about what had happened, saying that Strauss was “whacking off in the shower.” “John Doe 30 told that person that he


Jordan and Hellickson responded, “Yeah, that’s Strauss,” according to the lawsuit filed Thursday in federal court in Columbus, Ohio.
Multiple former wrestlers who were coached by Jordan during their time at Ohio State University have previously accused him of turning a blind eye to the abuse.
After verbally confronting Strauss, Doe exited the shower, and told Jordan and Hellickson about what had happened, saying that Strauss was “whacking off in the shower.”
“John Doe 30 told that person that he
Wrestling referee warned Rep. Jim Jordan about Ohio State doctor’s sex misconduct, new lawsuit says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: yelena dzhanova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, state, told, wrestling, shower, jordan, strauss, ohio, misconduct, warned, rep, university, doe, sex, coach, house, lawsuit, referee


Wrestling referee warned Rep. Jim Jordan about Ohio State doctor's sex misconduct, new lawsuit says

Rep.Jim Jordan (R-OH) speaks to reporters during a break in a closed-door deposition as part of the impeachment inquiry into U.S. President Donald Trump led by the House Intelligence, House Foreign Affairs and House Oversight and Reform Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington, November 6, 2019.

A college wrestling referee claimed in a new lawsuit that he told Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, two decades ago that an Ohio State University team doctor who has been accused of sexually assaulting students had masturbated in the shower in front of him.

But Jordan, who at the time was an assistant Ohio State wrestling coach – and then OSU head coach Russ Hellickson who was also told about the incident – just shrugged off the shocking claim about Dr. Richard Strauss, the suit says.

Jordan and Hellickson responded, “Yeah, that’s Strauss,” according to the lawsuit filed Thursday in federal court in Columbus, Ohio.

The allegation that Jordan knew of Strauss’ misdeeds comes on the heels of House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s announcement on Friday that the powerful congressman has been assigned to the House Intelligence Committee, which is conducting an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.

The referee, identified in court papers as “John Doe 42” is the second person who says in legal filings that he told Jordan about being sexually approached or molested by Strauss, who since has died.

Multiple former wrestlers who were coached by Jordan during their time at Ohio State University have previously accused him of turning a blind eye to the abuse.

Jordan’s spokesman did not immediately respond to a request for comment, but Jordan has repeatedly denied knowing of the alleged abuse by Strauss.

“It’s not true,” the congressman told Politico in July last year.

“I never knew about any type of abuse. If I did, I would have done something about it. And look, if there are people who are abused, then that’s terrible and we want justice to happen.”

Hellickson, 71, the other coach who Doe accused of knowing about the abuse, did not comment on the allegations.

An investigation found that Strauss, who was the athletic team doctor at Ohio State University from 1978 to 1998, had sexually abused at least 177 male students over decades, with the earliest known abuse dating back to 1979. The university said he committed at least 1,429 sexual assaults and 47 rapes while employed by the school, according to the university’s 2019 crime report.

According to the latest lawsuit, John Doe 42 was with Strauss in an otherwise empty school locker room after a wrestling match that he refereed in 1994 or 1995.

John Doe 42 decided to shower at the far end, and Strauss chose the shower closest to him, despite having multiple open showers to choose from. Doe said he noticed Strauss’ body was touching his and found Strauss masturbating and staring at him, according to the court filing.

After verbally confronting Strauss, Doe exited the shower, and told Jordan and Hellickson about what had happened, saying that Strauss was “whacking off in the shower.”

Jordan and Hellickson replied, “Yeah, that’s Strauss.”

A second referee known as John Doe 30 said in the same court filing that he was also sexually abused by Strauss in 1990 or 1991, after he asked an unidentified wrestling coach if he could see a trainer to have his back wrapped to prevent injury before a wrestling match he was scheduled to referee.

“John Doe 30 was disturbed by Dr. Strauss’s behavior and called OSU’s Athletic Department to report the incident a few days later. He was connected to an OSU Athletics Department employee,” the suit says.

“John Doe 30 told that person that he was fondled while getting an ACE bandage wrapped during the wrestling meet. He also gave the OSU employee his name and phone number. The employee said, ‘OK, we’ll take care of it,’ according to the suit. “John Doe 30 was never contacted by anyone at OSU regarding his report.”

Jordan was employed as an assistant coach for the wrestling team between 1986 and 1994, which overlaps with the time frame of this incident.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: yelena dzhanova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, state, told, wrestling, shower, jordan, strauss, ohio, misconduct, warned, rep, university, doe, sex, coach, house, lawsuit, referee


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Investing isn’t binary, don’t time the market: Bryn Talkington

Investing isn’t binary, don’t time the market: Bryn TalkingtonBryn Talkington, Requisite Capital Management, and Michael Farr, Farr, Miller and Washington CEO, join “Fast Money Halftime Report” to discuss the state of the markets.


Investing isn’t binary, don’t time the market: Bryn TalkingtonBryn Talkington, Requisite Capital Management, and Michael Farr, Farr, Miller and Washington CEO, join “Fast Money Halftime Report” to discuss the state of the markets.
Investing isn’t binary, don’t time the market: Bryn Talkington Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, washington, michael, binary, bryn, investing, state, miller, talkingtonbryn, isnt, farr, dont, market, report, money, talkington, requisite


Investing isn't binary, don't time the market: Bryn Talkington

Investing isn’t binary, don’t time the market: Bryn Talkington

Bryn Talkington, Requisite Capital Management, and Michael Farr, Farr, Miller and Washington CEO, join “Fast Money Halftime Report” to discuss the state of the markets.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, washington, michael, binary, bryn, investing, state, miller, talkingtonbryn, isnt, farr, dont, market, report, money, talkington, requisite


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Mike Bloomberg’s gun-control group just vastly outspent the NRA to help Democrats win in Virginia

Ritzau Scanpix/Martin Sylvest via REUTERS ATTENTIA gun-control lobbying group funded largely by billionaire Michael Bloomberg just helped Democrats take over the state government in Virginia – right in the National Rifle Association’s backyard. In Tuesday’s elections, the Democrats tipped the Virginia House and Senate in their favor, giving them full control of the state government for the first time since 1994. Bloomberg helped found Everytown for Gun Safety in 2014 to “end gun violence and cou


Ritzau Scanpix/Martin Sylvest via REUTERS ATTENTIA gun-control lobbying group funded largely by billionaire Michael Bloomberg just helped Democrats take over the state government in Virginia – right in the National Rifle Association’s backyard.
In Tuesday’s elections, the Democrats tipped the Virginia House and Senate in their favor, giving them full control of the state government for the first time since 1994.
Bloomberg helped found Everytown for Gun Safety in 2014 to “end gun violence and cou
Mike Bloomberg’s gun-control group just vastly outspent the NRA to help Democrats win in Virginia Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: lauren hirsch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, outspent, bloomberg, vastly, democrats, gun, million, group, voters, state, guncontrol, virginia, help, senate, nra, win, election, mike


Mike Bloomberg's gun-control group just vastly outspent the NRA to help Democrats win in Virginia

Former New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg arrives at Gala Dinner on the occasion of the World Mayors Summit in Christiansborg in Copenhagen, Denmark October 10, 2019. Ritzau Scanpix/Martin Sylvest via REUTERS ATTENTI

A gun-control lobbying group funded largely by billionaire Michael Bloomberg just helped Democrats take over the state government in Virginia – right in the National Rifle Association’s backyard.

In Tuesday’s elections, the Democrats tipped the Virginia House and Senate in their favor, giving them full control of the state government for the first time since 1994. The election had stronger-than-usual turnout in the suburbs, according to media reports.

While the results could be a good omen for Democrats’ chances in 2020, it may also be a tipping point in the money battle over gun rights. Everytown for Gun Safety, the gun-control advocacy group that the former New York mayor helps fund, spent $2.5 million this year to influence voters in Virginia versus approximately $300,000 by the NRA, which has its headquarters in Fairfax, Virginia.

“In the past, the NRA has had its way with lawmakers because it was considered powerful and wealthy, and that has dynamic changed drastically — even within the last year,” said Shannon Watts, founder of Moms Demand Action, which is part of Everytown.

The NRA did not immediately respond to request for comment.

Other issues, such as minimum wage and health care, were also a focus for voters in the election. But gun control was in the spotlight. Three in 4 voters rated gun policy, including mandatory background checks, a “very important” issue, according to a Washington Post-Schar School poll. A mass shooting in Virginia Beach left a dozen dead earlier this year, while massacres in Ohio, Texas and California also emboldened groups calling for tougher gun laws.

Bloomberg helped found Everytown for Gun Safety in 2014 to “end gun violence and counter the Washington gun lobby.” The group put its focus beyond Congress, to bring attention to state elections and corporate boards, “fields of play formerly occupied almost solely by the gun lobby.” Bloomberg has pledged to spend at least $50 million to support the cause. The group now has 350,000 financial backers, though Bloomberg remains a major contributor.

The group’s influence has seeped into corporate boardrooms, too. The Virginia election came after a number of executives came out in favor of gun reform, amid Everytown’s advocacy and a steady stream of mass shootings.

Walmart in September said it will discontinue all sales of handgun ammunition and sales of short-barrel rifle ammunition that can be used with military-style weapons, following two “horrific” shootings at Walmart stores this summer.

The same month, chief executives of 145 companies signed a letter urging the U.S. Senate to pass a bill mandating background checks. The list included leaders of companies like Levi Strauss, Gap and Beyond Meat.

H.R. 8, a bipartisan proposal, passed the Democratic-controlled House in February passed the Democratic-controlled House in February. The bill has yet to come to a vote in the GOP-controlled Senate. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has said he will not put any bill up for a vote unless he is sure that President Donald Trump would sign it.

The list of 145 executives did not include some of the country’s largest or most powerful institutions such as J.P. Morgan Chase, Bank of America and Apple. It also did not included some of the largest companies headquartered in Virginia, such as Dollar Tree, General Dynamics, Capital One Financial and Northrop Grumman.

Bloomberg tweeted Tuesday night to celebrate the election results, calling out the influence of another group he helps fund, Beyond Carbon, a $500 million group that advocates for energy reform.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: lauren hirsch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, outspent, bloomberg, vastly, democrats, gun, million, group, voters, state, guncontrol, virginia, help, senate, nra, win, election, mike


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California AG reveals Facebook probe, says company has been dragging its feet

New court documents filed Wednesday give the first look into the state of California’s 18-month-long investigation into Facebook’s privacy dealings. In those documents, California State Attorney General Xavier Becerra says Facebook has been “dragging its feet” by failing to comply with subpoenas for more information related to the state’s ongoing privacy investigation into the company and Cambridge Analytica. It represents the first time the state has acknowledged the probe into Facebook, which


New court documents filed Wednesday give the first look into the state of California’s 18-month-long investigation into Facebook’s privacy dealings.
In those documents, California State Attorney General Xavier Becerra says Facebook has been “dragging its feet” by failing to comply with subpoenas for more information related to the state’s ongoing privacy investigation into the company and Cambridge Analytica.
It represents the first time the state has acknowledged the probe into Facebook, which
California AG reveals Facebook probe, says company has been dragging its feet Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investigation, company, scandal, reveals, probe, privacy, facebooks, dragging, facebook, california, related, documents, state, cambridge, feet


California AG reveals Facebook probe, says company has been dragging its feet

New court documents filed Wednesday give the first look into the state of California’s 18-month-long investigation into Facebook’s privacy dealings.

In those documents, California State Attorney General Xavier Becerra says Facebook has been “dragging its feet” by failing to comply with subpoenas for more information related to the state’s ongoing privacy investigation into the company and Cambridge Analytica.

It represents the first time the state has acknowledged the probe into Facebook, which was first opened in 2018. Investigators don’t typically disclose active probes, “unless there’s a legal action that makes it public,” Becerra said at a press conference announcing the filing.

“This is one of those times,” Becerra said. “If Facebook had complied with our legitimate investigative requests, we would not be making these announcements today, but our work must move forward.”

In a statement to CNBC, Will Castleberry, Facebook’s VP of state and local policy said the company has “cooperated extensively” with the investigation, but did not address the state AG’s filing that said it hasn’t complied with subpoenas.

“We have cooperated extensively with the State of California’s investigation,” Castleberry said in the statement. “To date we have provided thousands of pages of written responses and hundreds of thousands of documents.”

Becerra is now asking the San Francisco County Superior Court to require Facebook to comply with its requests for additional documents related to the Cambridge Analytica scandal. The information they’re seeking to obtain includes communications among executives, documentation of any changes made to Facebook’s privacy settings, as well as any documents detailing Facebook’s privacy program.

The AG asked Facebook to provide documentation of any communication related various news stories related to the Cambridge Analytica scandal, including reports from The Guardian, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post.

The AG says that Facebook has “refused to conduct a complete search for responsive documents” and has not searched emails of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and COO Sheryl Sandberg that might relate to its investigation. Facebook was similarly uncooperative throughout the Federal Trade Commission’s previous probe into the company’s privacy practices, the filing states.

The probe has expanded to look at third parties’ access to user data, which was supplied by Facebook, including “which apps Facebook granted access to user data despite users restricting access to their information.”

In 2018, prosecutors from the Northern District of California, the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Bureau of Investigation began probing Facebook following the Cambridge Analytica scandal. The scandal erupted after it was revealed that 87 million users’ data was improperly harvested and shared with the Trump-affiliated campaign research firm.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investigation, company, scandal, reveals, probe, privacy, facebooks, dragging, facebook, california, related, documents, state, cambridge, feet


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California has been investigating Facebook for 18 months

California has been investigating Facebook for 18 monthsNew court documents filed Wednesday give the first look into the state of California’s 18-month-long investigation into Facebook’s privacy dealings. In those documents, California State Attorney General Xavier Becerra says Facebook has failed to comply with its subpoenas for more information in the state’s ongoing privacy investigation. CNBC’s Julia Boorstin reports.


California has been investigating Facebook for 18 monthsNew court documents filed Wednesday give the first look into the state of California’s 18-month-long investigation into Facebook’s privacy dealings.
In those documents, California State Attorney General Xavier Becerra says Facebook has failed to comply with its subpoenas for more information in the state’s ongoing privacy investigation.
CNBC’s Julia Boorstin reports.
California has been investigating Facebook for 18 months Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, subpoenas, reports, investigation, investigating, xavier, months, states, california, facebook, documents, state, privacy


California has been investigating Facebook for 18 months

California has been investigating Facebook for 18 months

New court documents filed Wednesday give the first look into the state of California’s 18-month-long investigation into Facebook’s privacy dealings. In those documents, California State Attorney General Xavier Becerra says Facebook has failed to comply with its subpoenas for more information in the state’s ongoing privacy investigation. CNBC’s Julia Boorstin reports.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, subpoenas, reports, investigation, investigating, xavier, months, states, california, facebook, documents, state, privacy


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You’re spending your free time wrong — here’s what to do to be happier and more successful

Research supports this idea: Studies have shown that spending money on experiences is more rewarding than buying material goods, for example. And a 2016 survey found that 72% of millennials prefer spending their money on activities rather than items. Wallman defines leisure time as any time when you’re not occupied with work or chores, paid or unpaid. (This tracks with the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ 2018 American Time Use Survey, which found that men and women spend 5.7 and 4.9 hours of time re


Research supports this idea: Studies have shown that spending money on experiences is more rewarding than buying material goods, for example.
And a 2016 survey found that 72% of millennials prefer spending their money on activities rather than items.
Wallman defines leisure time as any time when you’re not occupied with work or chores, paid or unpaid.
(This tracks with the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ 2018 American Time Use Survey, which found that men and women spend 5.7 and 4.9 hours of time re
You’re spending your free time wrong — here’s what to do to be happier and more successful Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, free, experiences, spending, money, youre, wallman, happier, wrong, successful, activities, leisure, happiness, heres, state


You're spending your free time wrong — here's what to do to be happier and more successful

The most important currency in life isn’t money, it’s time, according to health and wellness expert Deepak Chopra. Building what Chopra calls “time affluence,” or structuring your day so that you have lots of free time, will increase your life satisfaction and well-being, he wrote for CNBC Make It in 2018.

Research supports this idea: Studies have shown that spending money on experiences is more rewarding than buying material goods, for example. And a 2016 survey found that 72% of millennials prefer spending their money on activities rather than items.

The problem is, many of us are spending our free time in ways that aren’t really making us happy, says James Wallman, trend forecaster and author of “Time and How To Spend It.”

And that’s important because happiness is directly linked to our professional success, says Wallman.

Research shows “happiness leads to success, not the other way around,” he says. “So if we want to be successful, we need to aim for happiness and resilience,” Wallman says.

For his book, Wallman interviewed researchers, cultural anthropologists and experts in the field of happiness and consumer behavior to figure out how people should be spending their time. What did he find?

“Leisure doesn’t improve quality of life unless one knows how to use it effectively,” Wallman tells CNBC Make It.

Wallman defines leisure time as any time when you’re not occupied with work or chores, paid or unpaid. “It’s the time equivalent of ‘disposable income,'” he says.

Wallman estimates that American adults have about 36 to 40 hours of “free” time in a week. (This tracks with the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ 2018 American Time Use Survey, which found that men and women spend 5.7 and 4.9 hours of time respectively on leisure activities each day. They define “leisure” as activities outside of work, household chores, school and religious activities. For example, watching TV took up half of all leisure time, on average.)

So what’s the best way to optimize your free time? While there’s no perfect activity that’s best for everyone, Wallman says some experiences are “junk experiences” and others are like “superfoods.”

The “superfood” activities put you into a state of “flow,” he says, which is “a state of optimal experience arising from intense involvement in an activity that is enjoyable,” according to the American Psychological Association (APA). Finding activities that lead to a state of flow is key if you’re looking to increase creativity and happiness.

Experts believe you can achieve flow when your skills are being utilized, you feel motivated and you aren’t self-conscious but rather have a sense of “total control,” according to the APA. Wallman says that any pleasurable activity that truly challenges us has the potential to lead to the elusive flow-state that so many people are after.

“Flow [is] about being in the present zone [and] really enjoying yourself,” Wallman says.

Here are seven things Wallman says you should think about when you’re deciding which types of experiences to invest your time and energy in:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, free, experiences, spending, money, youre, wallman, happier, wrong, successful, activities, leisure, happiness, heres, state


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