Kevin O’Leary: Stop saying this in your emails, nobody’s reading it

If you’re looking to grab the attention of “Shark Tank” star and investor Kevin O’Leary over email, here’s a pointer: Skip the “let’s do lunch” cliche because it won’t work. “I really hate it, and I get a lot of this, ‘Let’s do lunch,'” O’Leary tells CNBC Make It. “How about we don’t do lunch but you tell me what you really want in the first place.” What’s more, don’t even think about using a cute little emoji along with the message — that really makes O’Leary’s blood boil. Don’t miss:Kevin O’Le


If you’re looking to grab the attention of “Shark Tank” star and investor Kevin O’Leary over email, here’s a pointer: Skip the “let’s do lunch” cliche because it won’t work. “I really hate it, and I get a lot of this, ‘Let’s do lunch,'” O’Leary tells CNBC Make It. “How about we don’t do lunch but you tell me what you really want in the first place.” What’s more, don’t even think about using a cute little emoji along with the message — that really makes O’Leary’s blood boil. Don’t miss:Kevin O’Le
Kevin O’Leary: Stop saying this in your emails, nobody’s reading it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-21  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, message, email, kevin, wrote, advice, wont, tell, nobodys, emails, reading, saying, really, stop, lunch, oleary


Kevin O'Leary: Stop saying this in your emails, nobody's reading it

If you’re looking to grab the attention of “Shark Tank” star and investor Kevin O’Leary over email, here’s a pointer: Skip the “let’s do lunch” cliche because it won’t work.

“I really hate it, and I get a lot of this, ‘Let’s do lunch,'” O’Leary tells CNBC Make It. “How about we don’t do lunch but you tell me what you really want in the first place.”

What’s more, don’t even think about using a cute little emoji along with the message — that really makes O’Leary’s blood boil.

“Little smiley faces really piss me off,” O’Leary says.

Instead, if you want to grab his attention over email, or anyone of importance for that matter, he suggests following a couple of rules.

First, keep the message short. O’Leary says he never reads past the first paragraph.

“Make it one paragraph and tell me what you want,” he says, “I’m not going to waste my time unless I know what you want.”

In fact, it’s ideal to try to get your message across in two lines or less, he says.

And be as specific as possible.

“Tell me what you want and [have] a really catchy kind of subject line,” he says.

O’Leary says it’s critical for the next generation of entrepreneurs to learn how to effectively communicate if they want to succeed in today’s economy. Rambling in email, he says, won’t get you there, “nobody reads it [and] that’s the truth.”

As for cliches, O’Leary isn’t alone.

Gary Burnison, CEO of Korn Ferry, a global consulting firm, wrote an article for CNBC Make It in July, urging people to stop asking successful people, “Can I pick your brain?”

Burnison wrote that those five words make up “the most thoughtless, irritating and generic way to ask for advice — and any person who is a rock star in their industry has heard it more than a dozen times.”

Instead, he suggests following the advice of Harvard researchers, who recommend to be straightforward and say, “I’d love your advice.”

Burnison, along with O’Leary, both advise young people to come prepared with specifics on why they are seeking that person’s advice as well.

Like this story? Like CNBC Make It on Facebook.

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Kevin O’Leary: This is the age when you should have at least $100,000 saved

Kevin O’Leary says he spends $1,000 a day on food


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-21  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, message, email, kevin, wrote, advice, wont, tell, nobodys, emails, reading, saying, really, stop, lunch, oleary


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GOP Sen. Rick Scott: Americans should get tax cuts in return for tariffs paid on Chinese goods

Republican Sen. Rick Scott told CNBC on Monday the U.S. government should return money collected from China tariffs to Americans as tax relief. President Donald Trump, earlier this month announced an impeding 10% tariff on the remaining $300 billion of Chinese goods that had not been previously taxed. Back In May, Trump hiked tariffs to 25% from 10% on $200 billion in Chinese goods. “We have to help American companies … and get more American jobs and stop helping China,” Scott said. “I’m not s


Republican Sen. Rick Scott told CNBC on Monday the U.S. government should return money collected from China tariffs to Americans as tax relief. President Donald Trump, earlier this month announced an impeding 10% tariff on the remaining $300 billion of Chinese goods that had not been previously taxed. Back In May, Trump hiked tariffs to 25% from 10% on $200 billion in Chinese goods. “We have to help American companies … and get more American jobs and stop helping China,” Scott said. “I’m not s
GOP Sen. Rick Scott: Americans should get tax cuts in return for tariffs paid on Chinese goods Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, tariffs, american, sen, gop, scott, paid, trump, sure, tariff, stop, billion, return, trade, goods, rick, cuts


GOP Sen. Rick Scott: Americans should get tax cuts in return for tariffs paid on Chinese goods

Republican Sen. Rick Scott told CNBC on Monday the U.S. government should return money collected from China tariffs to Americans as tax relief.

“Anything we raise in tariffs, we should give back to the rank and public in tax reductions,” the Florida senator said in a “Squawk Box ” interview, acknowledging there’s been some “short-term pain.”

“We have to help American farmers open up more markets around the world,” said Scott, who did not elaborate on what such relief might look like.

Data from U.S. Customs and Border Protection, which collects taxes on imports, showed the U.S. had assessed $23.7 billion in tariffs from early 2018 through May 1. According to a Reuters report, total tariff revenue rose 73% in the first half of 2019 from a year earlier.

The trade dispute between the world’s two largest economies has been escalating in recent months, with investors fearing that it could slow global and U.S. economic growth. In fact, Goldman Sachs lowered its fourth-quarter U.S. growth forecast by 0.2% to 1.8%, with the cumulative drag on gross domestic product of 0.6%.

President Donald Trump, earlier this month announced an impeding 10% tariff on the remaining $300 billion of Chinese goods that had not been previously taxed. Back In May, Trump hiked tariffs to 25% from 10% on $200 billion in Chinese goods.

“We have to help American companies … and get more American jobs and stop helping China,” Scott said. “Stop acting like they are a partner,” adding he doesn’t see how a trade deal can be reached.

“I’m not sure what else we can do, other than stand up for American interests and American values,” he wondered. “I’m not sure what the president can do otherwise than the tariffs he is doing.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, tariffs, american, sen, gop, scott, paid, trump, sure, tariff, stop, billion, return, trade, goods, rick, cuts


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Peter Navarro says US will take strong action against China if it devalues yuan to ‘neutralize tariffs’

White House trade advisor Peter Navarro said China plans to devalue its currency — and if it does, the U.S. will respond forcefully. “Clearly, they are manipulating their currency from a trade point of view,” Navarro told CNBC’s “Closing Bell ” on Friday. Earlier this week, China allowed its currency to drop against the dollar to a key level unseen since 2008. Navarro said China was taking actions to deal with the effects of tariffs. “China has devalued its currency by over 10% with the express


White House trade advisor Peter Navarro said China plans to devalue its currency — and if it does, the U.S. will respond forcefully. “Clearly, they are manipulating their currency from a trade point of view,” Navarro told CNBC’s “Closing Bell ” on Friday. Earlier this week, China allowed its currency to drop against the dollar to a key level unseen since 2008. Navarro said China was taking actions to deal with the effects of tariffs. “China has devalued its currency by over 10% with the express
Peter Navarro says US will take strong action against China if it devalues yuan to ‘neutralize tariffs’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: kate rooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, week, devalues, white, yuan, action, china, tariffs, currency, strong, trade, tariffschina, trump, navarro, neutralize, peter, stop


Peter Navarro says US will take strong action against China if it devalues yuan to 'neutralize tariffs'

White House trade advisor Peter Navarro said China plans to devalue its currency — and if it does, the U.S. will respond forcefully.

“Clearly, they are manipulating their currency from a trade point of view,” Navarro told CNBC’s “Closing Bell ” on Friday. “They’re going to, and we’re going to take strong action against them.”

Earlier this week, China allowed its currency to drop against the dollar to a key level unseen since 2008. The Trump administration later labeled Beijing a “currency manipulator. ” Navarro said China was taking actions to deal with the effects of tariffs.

“China has devalued its currency by over 10% with the express purpose of neutralizing tariffs, full stop,” Navarro said.

Last week, President Donald Trump abruptly ended a cease-fire with China by announcing 10% tariffs on $300 billion worth of Chinese goods, claiming China failed to buy U.S. farm goods as it promised. The trade war continued to boil over this week as China announced it would stop buying American agricultural products in retaliation for Trump’s surprise tariffs threat.

Navarro said that every American farmer will be “made whole” and “will not be hurt by China.” He also insisted that China, not U.S. consumers, will suffer financially because of tariffs.

“China will bear virtually the entire burden of that through the currency manipulation and by slashing prices,” he said. “China is the one that suffers far more harm than what might be inflicted on us.”

Over the next couple of months, Navarro said White House officials plan to have Chinese negotiators back to the U.S. for trade talks.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: kate rooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, week, devalues, white, yuan, action, china, tariffs, currency, strong, trade, tariffschina, trump, navarro, neutralize, peter, stop


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Cape Cod’s looking into technology to stop the shark attacks, but some officials say that could backfire

Last August William Lytton was bitten on the leg by a white shark while swimming in 8 to 10 feet of water in Truro. Severe Bleeding First Aid kits have been installed along the six Atlantic-facing beaches of lower Cape Cod in case of an attack. This came after five people were killed there by great whites in a span of 18 months between 2012 and 2013. Before then, she said, Australians thought differently about the great whites, but “things have definitely escalated in the last five years.” A sec


Last August William Lytton was bitten on the leg by a white shark while swimming in 8 to 10 feet of water in Truro. Severe Bleeding First Aid kits have been installed along the six Atlantic-facing beaches of lower Cape Cod in case of an attack. This came after five people were killed there by great whites in a span of 18 months between 2012 and 2013. Before then, she said, Australians thought differently about the great whites, but “things have definitely escalated in the last five years.” A sec
Cape Cod’s looking into technology to stop the shark attacks, but some officials say that could backfire Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-04  Authors: barbara booth, lori ioannou, magdalena petrova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, great, white, say, swimmers, backfire, cape, seals, shark, looking, sharks, cod, officials, cods, technology, stop, whites, attacks


Cape Cod's looking into technology to stop the shark attacks, but some officials say that could backfire

Atlantic White Shark Conservancy

On Tuesday the South African government announced it will be installing the world’s first shark-repellent electromagnetic cable to protect swimmers along the end of the Busselton Jetty, a shark attack hot spot and one of Western Australia’s most famous landmarks. The 150-meter-long pulsing cable, expected to be installed by late December, will be fixed to the seafloor, with vertical risers supporting electrodes that emit a low-frequency pulsed electronic signal that proved 100% effective in turning away at least 50 sharks during its four-week trial at a Cape Town beach in South Africa. The state government will contribute $50,000 toward the shark cable, while the South African government will pay for 90% of the installation at Busselton. The South African Sharks Board chose Western Australia ahead of other locations because of its recent history of shark attacks, with 20 unprovoked incidents last year alone. This puts Western Australia second behind the U.S. — at 32 confirmed cases and one fatality — for the number of recorded shark attacks in 2018. Yet while tech alternatives seem promising, local officials — especially in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, where the waters have become a feeding ground for these fearsome predators — believe it could provide swimmers with a “false sense of security.”

Desperately seeking solutions

Sightings of great whites off the shores of Cape Cod are a daily occurrence: Since June 1 the Atlantic White Shark Conservancy’s sharktivity app indicates there have been more than 160. “When we are lucky enough to actually get eyes on a shark, it really is no surprise,” said Nate Sears, natural resources manager for the town of Orleans, an area whose beaches have already been closed 12 times since mid-June due to confirmed shark sightings. These encounters have not been without incident. Last August William Lytton was bitten on the leg by a white shark while swimming in 8 to 10 feet of water in Truro. The 61-year-old Scarsdale, New York, neurologist instinctively punched the shark in the gills to fend him off. Weeks later a 26-year-old Revere, Massachusetts, man was killed boogie-boarding off Newcomb Hollow Beach in Wellfleet. In 2017 a paddleboarder was about 30 yards offshore of Marconi Beach in Wellfleet when a shark took a bite out of his paddle board. The encounter took place in about 3 feet of water.

This photo of a paddle boarder, unaware that a great white shark was swimming beside him, was taken by a spotter plane just north of Nauset Beach on July 29, 2018. Cody DeGroff

Now officials in Cape Cod are desperately searching for solutions — and getting a huge response from tech companies and savvy entrepreneurs pitching ideas on everything from high-powered speakers with sirens and voice capability that would warn swimmers to “Evacuate the water,” to acoustical barriers that would chase away the gray seals (which the sharks come to feed on), to orca vocalizers and electronic zappers. The Barnstable County Board of Regional Commissioners says they are inundated with high-tech solutions. In February a shark working group comprised of representatives from Chatham to Provincetown, the Cape’s six Atlantic-facing towns; the National Park Service; scientific stakeholders; and the offices of state Sen. Julian Cyr, D-Truro, and state Rep. Sarah Peake, D-Provincetown, hired the Woods Hole Group — an international environmental services and products organization headquartered in Falmouth, Massachusetts. The objective: to produce a nearly $50,000 study of alternatives to protect the public from sharks. The report is expected to be delivered sometime in September. Yet unless these alternatives can be proved 100% effective, some local officials are not convinced that tech is the answer. In fact, according to Sears, implementing technology could create a “false sense of security for the public.” “Once you deploy something like this and you don’t have any incidence — say, for a period of time — the general public’s going to feel that technology may have been responsible for that, and it’s really hard to gauge whether that’s accurate or not,” he said. “Truly, the only way you minimize the chances of interactions continuing to happen is for the public to change their behavior.” Policing the beach remains a priority. “We keep people at knee- to waist-deep water, we don’t let them off the sandbars if water clarity isn’t optimum, and there’s times we don’t even let people in the water if the tide’s really high and there is a deepwater trough right adjacent to the shoreline,” Sears said. The towns also are continuing to push a public awareness campaign, using signage to warn beachgoers to be “shark smart” and installing severe bleeding first-aid kits at beaches to get help to victims immediately should the unthinkable happen. The towns also run Stop the Bleed training programs, which almost always have a waitlist.

Severe Bleeding First Aid kits have been installed along the six Atlantic-facing beaches of lower Cape Cod in case of an attack.

“Generally, most white shark bite victims survive because of first aid initiated by bystanders. We have a lot of remote beaches in Orleans, and it’s unlikely that if someone is suffering from massive hemorrhaging associated with a white shark that our first responders will be able to get there in time,” Sears said.

Pushing for change

Amanda Wilson, the general manager of Australia-based Ocean Guardian, the company whose patented Shark Shield technology is powering the cable that will be installed in the Busselton Jetty, says the culture in Australia has changed from one that “deals with the sharks” to one that needs to be proactive in protecting swimmers. This came after five people were killed there by great whites in a span of 18 months between 2012 and 2013. Before then, she said, Australians thought differently about the great whites, but “things have definitely escalated in the last five years.” Wilson met with the Woods Hole Group in June to introduce the company’s patented Shark Shield technology and discuss how it can offer protection to swimmers on Cape Cod. She explained that sharks have short-range electrical receptors in their snouts that are used to find food. Their Shark Shield technology creates a powerful three-dimensional electrical field that causes spasms in these sensitive receptors and turns the sharks away. Ocean Guardian has developed a number of handheld and belt-mounted devices that send out these tiny electrical currents and can be attached to surfboards, kayaks and fishing boats. Wilson claims that studies have proved their devices to be 99.9% effective in protecting against great whites. In 2018, after the fatality in Wellfleet, several surf shops on Cape Cod began stocking the devices, and surfers, kayakers and swimmers are snatching them up.

The Ocean Guardian Freedom + Surf Mini device attaches to a surfboard to ward off sharks. Its Shark Shield technology produces a powerful three-dimensional electrical field that causes safe but unbearable spasms in the sensitive receptors of a shark’s snout, making them turn away. Ocean Guardian Powered by Shark Shield Technology

“Our sales have increased 100% over last year,” said Wilson, adding that the Freedom7, which sells for $499, is its most popular product. Other solutions being reviewed by the Woods Hole Group include one by Cape Cod residents Kevin McCarthy and Willy Planinshek, co-founders of Deep Blue LLC, although theirs is still in the concept stage. In late May the two men proposed their Marine Acoustic Deterrent Systems to the Barnstable Board of County Commissioners. Also known as MADS, the system would use sound waves to divert seals and sharks away from the Cape’s offshore swimming areas. The idea, McCarthy said, is to ping the seals with a sound frequency from an anchored buoy that would irritate the seal’s inner ears, sending them swimming off in a different direction. A second deterrent would feature an orca vocalization chamber to alert great whites that their predator is nearby. “The thought is that if the gray seals aren’t there, you are removing the food source and the white sharks wouldn’t come in,” said McCarthy. But he contended that “the towns were completely unreceptive to the idea. The pushback has been huge — from the environmental community, saying that we shouldn’t do anything at all to the gray seals or the white sharks, to the towns expressing concern about liability.”

This is a very dynamic place. … We are fully exposed to the wrath of the North Atlantic, and the conditions that we see throughout the year will challenge even the most robust technologies. Nathan Sears manager, natural resources for the town of Orleans


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-04  Authors: barbara booth, lori ioannou, magdalena petrova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, great, white, say, swimmers, backfire, cape, seals, shark, looking, sharks, cod, officials, cods, technology, stop, whites, attacks


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Royal Caribbean cancels Puerto Rico stop amid scandal protests

Cruise ship anchored off the shore of Grand Cayman Island, Royal Caribbean cruise liner Mariner of the SeaA Royal Caribbean cruise ship skipped its stop in Puerto Rico on Tuesday due to mass protests on the island sparked by a political scandal. “In light of current unrest in San Juan, Puerto Rico, we have cancelled today’s call to San Juan,” Owen Torres, communications manager for Royal Caribbean said in a statement to NBC News on Tuesday. Empress of the Seas was rerouted to the British Virgin


Cruise ship anchored off the shore of Grand Cayman Island, Royal Caribbean cruise liner Mariner of the SeaA Royal Caribbean cruise ship skipped its stop in Puerto Rico on Tuesday due to mass protests on the island sparked by a political scandal. “In light of current unrest in San Juan, Puerto Rico, we have cancelled today’s call to San Juan,” Owen Torres, communications manager for Royal Caribbean said in a statement to NBC News on Tuesday. Empress of the Seas was rerouted to the British Virgin
Royal Caribbean cancels Puerto Rico stop amid scandal protests Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: ben kesslen, dawn giel
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chats, san, ship, scandal, caribbean, stop, amid, puerto, protests, cruise, island, royal, cancels, rico, juan


Royal Caribbean cancels Puerto Rico stop amid scandal protests

Cruise ship anchored off the shore of Grand Cayman Island, Royal Caribbean cruise liner Mariner of the Sea

A Royal Caribbean cruise ship skipped its stop in Puerto Rico on Tuesday due to mass protests on the island sparked by a political scandal.

The ship that had departed Miami on Saturday steered away from Puerto Rico after thousands of protesters marched in San Juan on Monday calling for the governor’s resignation as police in riot gear threw tear gas on the demonstrators.

“In light of current unrest in San Juan, Puerto Rico, we have cancelled today’s call to San Juan,” Owen Torres, communications manager for Royal Caribbean said in a statement to NBC News on Tuesday.

The cruise line also wrote a letter to its more than 1,800 passengers on Empress of the Seas explaining why the ship turned away from Puerto Rico.

“You may have been looking out your window or surveying your surroundings on the pool deck and noticed we were almost in San Juan this afternoon and then turned around,” the cruise line wrote. “There was a protest involving a large crowd that escalated and as you may have heard from our Captain, we decided to cancel our visit.”

Empress of the Seas was rerouted to the British Virgin Islands, and guests will receive refunds for prepaid activities in Puerto Rico.

Other cruise lines, Carnival and Celebrity Cruises, are both monitoring the situation. Neither has ships scheduled to visit the island until Sunday.

“We are monitoring the situation and will let our guests know if there are any changes. So far, all visits to San Juan remain as scheduled,” a spokesperson for Carnival Cruises said in a statement.

The protesters in San Juan are calling for Gov. Ricardo Rosselló to resign amid a series of scandals, including the leak Saturday of private chats between the governor and some officials and close associates.

At least 889 pages of the private chats, which included profanity-laced, misogynistic and homophobic comments were released by Puerto Rico’s top investigative journalism outlet, the Center for Investigative Journalism, after excerpts were first reported days before. NBC News has independently verified the chats.

Rosselló has repeatedly said he has no plans to resign.

In addition to the leaked chats, Puerto Rico’s former secretary of education and five other people were arrested last week on charges of steering federal money to unqualified, politically connected contractors.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: ben kesslen, dawn giel
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chats, san, ship, scandal, caribbean, stop, amid, puerto, protests, cruise, island, royal, cancels, rico, juan


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British government won’t try to stop Facebook’s new Libra digital coin, says UK finance minister

Regulators, not lawmakers, should decide whether Facebook needs a banking license to launch the new digital currency Libra, according to Philip Hammond, Britain’s outgoing finance minister. Hammond also told CNBC on Monday that the British government will “engage” with Libra and won’t try to stop it. This week in the U.S., Senate and House committees are due to examine Facebook’s proposed Libra currency and how it might impact consumers, investors and the U.S. financial system. The social networ


Regulators, not lawmakers, should decide whether Facebook needs a banking license to launch the new digital currency Libra, according to Philip Hammond, Britain’s outgoing finance minister. Hammond also told CNBC on Monday that the British government will “engage” with Libra and won’t try to stop it. This week in the U.S., Senate and House committees are due to examine Facebook’s proposed Libra currency and how it might impact consumers, investors and the U.S. financial system. The social networ
British government won’t try to stop Facebook’s new Libra digital coin, says UK finance minister Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, finance, banking, libra, minister, world, stop, uk, coin, viewed, digital, currency, wont, facebooks, facebook, week, try


British government won't try to stop Facebook's new Libra digital coin, says UK finance minister

Regulators, not lawmakers, should decide whether Facebook needs a banking license to launch the new digital currency Libra, according to Philip Hammond, Britain’s outgoing finance minister.

Hammond also told CNBC on Monday that the British government will “engage” with Libra and won’t try to stop it.

This week in the U.S., Senate and House committees are due to examine Facebook’s proposed Libra currency and how it might impact consumers, investors and the U.S. financial system.

The social network’s digital token is being launched as a solution for the number of people in the world currently operating without access to banking services. It is also viewed as a potential moneymaker for Facebook that would likely compete with the multibillion-dollar remittance market.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, finance, banking, libra, minister, world, stop, uk, coin, viewed, digital, currency, wont, facebooks, facebook, week, try


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Starbucks will stop selling newspapers in its cafes

Starbucks will stop selling newspapers at its cafes Sept. 1. Starbucks will still carry those products, but the removal of their shelves mean fewer packaged coffee beans and snacks will be sold. The New York Post first reported the coffee chain’s plans to stop selling newspapers at its roughly 8,600 company-owned stores in the U.S.”We are always looking at what we offer our customers in our stores and making adjustments to our portfolio based on changing customer behavior,” Starbucks spokeswoman


Starbucks will stop selling newspapers at its cafes Sept. 1. Starbucks will still carry those products, but the removal of their shelves mean fewer packaged coffee beans and snacks will be sold. The New York Post first reported the coffee chain’s plans to stop selling newspapers at its roughly 8,600 company-owned stores in the U.S.”We are always looking at what we offer our customers in our stores and making adjustments to our portfolio based on changing customer behavior,” Starbucks spokeswoman
Starbucks will stop selling newspapers in its cafes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: amelia lucas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, snacks, starbucks, times, selling, newspapers, stop, weekday, cafes, stores, coffee, york


Starbucks will stop selling newspapers in its cafes

Starbucks will stop selling newspapers at its cafes Sept. 1.

In addition to removing newspaper stands that carry copies of The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and USA Today, the company plans to remove shelving fixtures that display whole bean coffee and grab-and-go snacks. Starbucks will still carry those products, but the removal of their shelves mean fewer packaged coffee beans and snacks will be sold.

The New York Post first reported the coffee chain’s plans to stop selling newspapers at its roughly 8,600 company-owned stores in the U.S.

“We are always looking at what we offer our customers in our stores and making adjustments to our portfolio based on changing customer behavior,” Starbucks spokeswoman Sanja Gould said in a statement.

As the media landscape changes, more customers are reading their news online. The Pew Research Center estimates that weekday circulation of print newspapers fell 12% last year, while weekday digital circulation jumped 6%. Both the Times and the Journal reported that their own digital readership increased by more than 20% in 2018.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: amelia lucas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, snacks, starbucks, times, selling, newspapers, stop, weekday, cafes, stores, coffee, york


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Stop asking, ‘Can I pick your brain?’ Harvard researchers say this is how successful people ask for advice

Offering advice is a sign of good leadership, and asking for advice is a sign of intelligence. Identify the type of advice you’re seekingImmediately after your opening line, address the topic of your problem in the form a question. In order to craft a question with great precision, ask yourself: What type of advice am I seeking? “Though friendship, accessibility and non-threatening personalities all impart high levels of comfort and trust, they might have no relation to the quality or thoughtful


Offering advice is a sign of good leadership, and asking for advice is a sign of intelligence. Identify the type of advice you’re seekingImmediately after your opening line, address the topic of your problem in the form a question. In order to craft a question with great precision, ask yourself: What type of advice am I seeking? “Though friendship, accessibility and non-threatening personalities all impart high levels of comfort and trust, they might have no relation to the quality or thoughtful
Stop asking, ‘Can I pick your brain?’ Harvard researchers say this is how successful people ask for advice Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: gary burnison
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, guidance, researchers, brain, problem, youre, type, question, stop, outcomes, advice, pick, harvard, margolis, say, successful, asking, conversation, ask


Stop asking, 'Can I pick your brain?' Harvard researchers say this is how successful people ask for advice

“Can I pick your brain?” Five words that make up the most thoughtless, irritating and generic way to ask for advice — and any person who is a rock star in their industry has heard it more than a dozen times. The phrase, while well-intentioned, is overused, vague and way too open-ended. When conversations start this way, there’s no telling where it’ll go or how long it’ll take. Don’t get me wrong: I’m all for giving — and receiving — advice. Offering advice is a sign of good leadership, and asking for advice is a sign of intelligence. If the exchange goes well, both parties benefit. “The whole interaction is a subtle and intricate art. It requires emotional intelligence, self-awareness, restraint, diplomacy and patience,” Harvard Business School professors Joshua D. Margolis and David A. Garvin wrote in a 2015 Harvard Business Review article. But the process can derail in many ways. It can quickly lead to “frustration, decision gridlock, subpar solutions, frayed relationships and thwarted personal development,” according to Margolis and Garvin. To avoid those consequences, here’s some guidance on how to ask for advice without annoying the other person:

Start with a positive tone

The way you initiate the conversation is everything. Instead of starting with, “Can I pick your brain,” shift the language to a more positive tone. When in doubt, I recommend: “I’d love your advice.” No-frills, friendly and simple.

Identify the type of advice you’re seeking

Immediately after your opening line, address the topic of your problem in the form a question. In order to craft a question with great precision, ask yourself: What type of advice am I seeking? What does my problem involve? What are my desired outcomes? Below are the four general types of advice, according to Garvin and Margolis’ research: Type of advice: Discrete

What it involves: Exploring options for a single decision

Desired outcomes: Recommendations in favor of or against specific options

Example question: “Where should we build the new factory — in China, Brazil or Eastern Europe?” Type of advice: Counsel

What it involves: Providing guidance on how to approach a complex or unfamiliar situation

Desired outcomes: A framework or process for navigating the situation

Example question: “How should I handle my domineering supervisor?” Type of advice: Coaching

What it involves: Enhancing skills, self-awareness and self-management

Desired outcomes: Task proficiency; personal and professional development

Example question: “How can I work more collaboratively with my peers?” Type of advice: Mentoring

What it involves: Providing opportunities, guidance and protection to aid career success

Desire outcomes: A relationship dedicated to building and sustaining professional and personal effectiveness and to career advancement

Example question: “How can I get more exposure for my project?” Just the other day, someone approached me for guidance, and her execution was perfect: “I’d love your advice. My company is asking me to relocate. There are several factors to consider and I’m not sure if I should do it. Do you have 45 minutes to chat?” Forty-five minutes is a lot, I know, but I appreciated the fact that she acknowledged it would be a longer conversation. I happily blocked off some time on my calendar and we ended up talking for an hour.

Come prepared with specific details

As you move further into the conversation, it’s important to clearly define the problem. Otherwise, you’re doing what I like to call a “bait-and-switch.” (This is another reason why you should never ask to pick someone’s brain; it makes the other person assume that the exchange will only take a few minutes. But more often than not, it ends up being a deep dive.) According to Margolis and Garvin, when you don’t come prepared with specific details about your problem, you’re more likely to end up “telling a lengthy, blow-by-blow story” that might cause the advice giver to tune out, lose focus or misidentify the core problem that needs solving. Simply put, don’t come into the conversation empty-handed. Put realistic guardrails on the conversation and include any essential background information that your advisor might not be familiar with. Providing specific details also keeps the conversation pleasant and interesting.

Ask the right person

Several field studies have discovered that advice seekers are more likely to ask for guidance from people they feel comfortable with, like a close friend or family member. “Though friendship, accessibility and non-threatening personalities all impart high levels of comfort and trust, they might have no relation to the quality or thoughtfulness of the advice,” Margolis and Garvin wrote. This is especially true if you’re seeking career-related advice. Think creatively about the expertise you need. Who will bring in the most valuable insight? Who has the most knowledge that’s relevant to your problem? For example, if you’re asking a seasoned CEO for advice involving your personal life, don’t expect to have lunch with Yoda. Your advisor is offering up valuable time to listen and provide professional feedback, not to hear you vent for an hour.

Don’t ask everyone

Things can backfire quickly if you run around asking a bunch of people for advice. Clearly, you won’t be able to follow everyone’s advice. “Research shows that those whose advice you don’t take may have a worse view of you afterward. They may even see you as less competent or avoid you, ” according to Hayley Blunden, a PhD student at Harvard Business School and co-author of the 2018 study, “The Interpersonal Costs of Ignoring Advice.” For example, a marketing executive who is widely respected is pleased when you ask her what to do about a particular situation, but is then less pleased when she finds out you didn’t do it. Remember, you’re not running a Gallup poll (but if you really are, then just say so).

Don’t assume you already know the answers

Garvin and Margolis pointed out that people often have a hard time “assessing their own competence and place too much faith in their intuition.” As a result, they end up asking for advice simply to gain validation or praise. Those who have a tendency to do this often believe they’ve already solved the problem, but just want confirmation or recognition from their bosses or peers. “It’s a dangerous game to play because they risk alienating their advisers when it becomes evident — and it will — that they’re requesting guidance just for show or to avoid additional work,” the professors noted.

Be grateful


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: gary burnison
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, guidance, researchers, brain, problem, youre, type, question, stop, outcomes, advice, pick, harvard, margolis, say, successful, asking, conversation, ask


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Antitrust threats didn’t stop investors from plowing money into Big Tech in the first half of 2019

So far, 2019 has been a year of growth for the nation’s largest tech companies while U.S. lawmakers and regulators question how big is too big. Microsoft, currently the largest public tech company in the U.S. with a market cap topping $1 trillion, has also grown its shares more than 31% since the beginning of 2019. Netflix shares jumped more than 37% while Apple and Amazon both saw their stock prices rise more than 25%. Snap, which is much smaller than the other tech giants at a $19.2 billion ma


So far, 2019 has been a year of growth for the nation’s largest tech companies while U.S. lawmakers and regulators question how big is too big. Microsoft, currently the largest public tech company in the U.S. with a market cap topping $1 trillion, has also grown its shares more than 31% since the beginning of 2019. Netflix shares jumped more than 37% while Apple and Amazon both saw their stock prices rise more than 25%. Snap, which is much smaller than the other tech giants at a $19.2 billion ma
Antitrust threats didn’t stop investors from plowing money into Big Tech in the first half of 2019 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grown, plowing, money, market, tech, stop, saw, shares, billion, investors, month, antitrust, big, cap, stock, didnt, regulators, half, threats


Antitrust threats didn't stop investors from plowing money into Big Tech in the first half of 2019

So far, 2019 has been a year of growth for the nation’s largest tech companies while U.S. lawmakers and regulators question how big is too big.

Four of the five FAANG stocks — Facebook, Amazon, Apple and Netflix— have grown their market value at least 25% over the past six months. Microsoft, currently the largest public tech company in the U.S. with a market cap topping $1 trillion, has also grown its shares more than 31% since the beginning of 2019.

Only Google parent company Alphabet saw more modest growth of 3.6% since the beginning of the year.

Of the group, Facebook saw the biggest rally in its stock price, jumping more than 47% since the beginning of the year to reach a market cap of $550.9 billion. Netflix shares jumped more than 37% while Apple and Amazon both saw their stock prices rise more than 25%.

During that time, lawmakers and regulators in the U.S. and abroad have lobbed criticism at Big Tech. Skeptics, which include presidential contenders like Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, say the tech firms have grown too large and abuse what they call dominant market positions.

While the refrain “break up Big Tech” had been floated around even before Warren’s policy proposal, investors seemed to see it as a more concrete possibility earlier this month. Shares of Facebook, Alphabet, Amazon and Apple tumbled following reports that top U.S. antitrust regulators were divvying up oversight responsibility over the companies.

But even over the past month, all of those companies except Alphabet have grown their stock price, showing investors are still largely confident in the tech industry’s staying power. Facebook’s stock actually went up after hours in April when it said it expected a one time charge of up to $5 billion in connection with the Federal Trade Commission’s investigation into whether it violated a 2011 consent decree.

Other major tech stocks are also having a great start to the year.

Snap, which is much smaller than the other tech giants at a $19.2 billion market cap, has seen explosive growth this year. The stock is up nearly 160% in 2019. Earlier this month, BTIG analysts wrote that the company’s comeback has been flying under investors’ radar as it has introduced new products and monetization opportunities.

Tesla, on the other hand, has had a more turbulent start to the year as it has entered cost-cutting mode. The company, which has a market cap of $39.5 billion, has seen its shares fall more than 32% in 2019.

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WATCH: Why Facebook’s business model is only now coming under fire


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grown, plowing, money, market, tech, stop, saw, shares, billion, investors, month, antitrust, big, cap, stock, didnt, regulators, half, threats


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Mark Zuckerberg: We can’t stop Russian election interference by ourselves, US government must help

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Wednesday said the U.S.’s weak response to the 2016 Russian election interference has resulted in similar activity from more nation states like Iran. We’re open for business,'” Zuckerberg said at the Aspen Ideas Festival in Colorado. Following the 2016 election, the Obama Administration in December 2016 ejected 35 Russian intelligence operatives from the U.S. and imposed sanctions against Russian intelligence services in retaliation. President Donald Trump in July


Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Wednesday said the U.S.’s weak response to the 2016 Russian election interference has resulted in similar activity from more nation states like Iran. We’re open for business,'” Zuckerberg said at the Aspen Ideas Festival in Colorado. Following the 2016 election, the Obama Administration in December 2016 ejected 35 Russian intelligence operatives from the U.S. and imposed sanctions against Russian intelligence services in retaliation. President Donald Trump in July
Mark Zuckerberg: We can’t stop Russian election interference by ourselves, US government must help Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zuckerberg, 2016, russia, help, activity, stop, countries, interference, best, mark, facebook, company, cant, election, try, russian


Mark Zuckerberg: We can't stop Russian election interference by ourselves, US government must help

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Wednesday said the U.S.’s weak response to the 2016 Russian election interference has resulted in similar activity from more nation states like Iran.

“The signal that was sent to the world was that ‘O.K. We’re open for business,'” Zuckerberg said at the Aspen Ideas Festival in Colorado. “Countries can try to do this stuff and our companies will try their best to try to limit it, but fundamentally, there isn’t going to be a major recourse from the American government.”

Facebook prohibits the coordinated use of a network of accounts to spread misinformation on its services, or what the company refers to as “coordinated inauthentic behavior.”

On the eve of the 2018 U.S. midterm elections, Facebook removed more than a hundred Facebook and Instagram accounts connected to a Russian troll farm for this type of activity. The company took similar steps against groups from Russia, Iran, Macedonia and Kosovo in March.

Following the 2016 election, the Obama Administration in December 2016 ejected 35 Russian intelligence operatives from the U.S. and imposed sanctions against Russian intelligence services in retaliation. President Donald Trump in July 2018 met with Russian President Vladimir Putin, afterwards telling reporters, “He (Putin) says it’s not Russia. I’ll tell you this, I don’t see any reason why it would be.”

Here is Zuckerberg’s comment in full:

As a private company we don’t have the tools to make the Russian government stop. We can defend as best as we can, but our government is the one that has the tools to apply pressure to Russia, not us. One of the mistakes that I worry about is that after 2016 when the government didn’t take any kind of counteraction. The signal that was sent to the world was that “O.K. We’re open for business.” Countries can try to do this stuff and our companies will try their best to try to limit it, but fundamentally, there isn’t going to be a major recourse from the American government. Since then, we’ve seen increased activity from Iran and other countries, and we are very engaged in ramping up the defenses. The amount that we spend on safety and security now as a company is billions of dollars a year. It is greater than the whole revenue of our company was when we went public earlier this decade. We’ve ramped up massively on the security side, but there’s very little that we can do on our own to change the incentives for nation states to act. That’s something that is a little bit above our pay grade.

WATCH: Here’s how to see which apps have access to your Facebook data — and cut them off


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zuckerberg, 2016, russia, help, activity, stop, countries, interference, best, mark, facebook, company, cant, election, try, russian


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