Tencent is betting there’s a future for retro games in the cloud

London-based firm Antstream says it wants to bring a streaming experience to retro gaming enthusiasts. The company has developed a cloud gaming service that gives players access to a library of over 2,000 classic video games. But with Antstream’s streaming service, users are instead able to play games that are run from remote servers. Asia expansion aheadWhile it’s less well known in the West, Tencent is arguably the world’s largest gaming company. It’s the parent company of “League of Legends”


London-based firm Antstream says it wants to bring a streaming experience to retro gaming enthusiasts. The company has developed a cloud gaming service that gives players access to a library of over 2,000 classic video games. But with Antstream’s streaming service, users are instead able to play games that are run from remote servers. Asia expansion aheadWhile it’s less well known in the West, Tencent is arguably the world’s largest gaming company. It’s the parent company of “League of Legends”
Tencent is betting there’s a future for retro games in the cloud Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-22  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, future, games, streaming, betting, antstream, startup, cottam, gaming, service, cloud, tencent, company, retro, firm, theres


Tencent is betting there's a future for retro games in the cloud

U.K. start-up Antstream wants to bring a streaming experience to retro gaming enthusiasts. Antstream

While tech giants like Microsoft and Google are building cloud gaming platforms for the latest blockbuster titles, one start-up is taking a different approach. London-based firm Antstream says it wants to bring a streaming experience to retro gaming enthusiasts. The company has developed a cloud gaming service that gives players access to a library of over 2,000 classic video games. It’s a model that CEO Steve Cottam sees going global. And to bolster that ambition, the company has raised its first significant round of funding, led by the Chinese tech giant Tencent and backed by British venture firm Hambro Perks. For Antstream, the project is about resurrecting an experience long buried in old devices like the Commodore 64 and the Amiga. Cottam told CNBC in an interview that the idea for the company stemmed from what he’s been seeing elsewhere in the entertainment industry. “You’ve got Spotify and Apple for your music, while in movies you’ve got Netflix and Amazon, ” he said. “It’s so easy to find that content, but games just got lost because of all these different formats, and they didn’t work on modern devices.” Usually people have to invest in decades-old cartridges and dated machines or find a decent console emulator to be able to play classic games. But with Antstream’s streaming service, users are instead able to play games that are run from remote servers.

“Having Tencent coming on board was a massive validation of what we’ve done,” Cottam said. “It gives us the opportunity to grow and to take this business onto the global stage.” Antstream didn’t disclose how much cash it’s received in this round, but said it represents a “significant stake” in the company. With its app now live in Europe, the start-up will use the fresh money to market the product and expand to the U.S. later this year.

Asia expansion ahead

While it’s less well known in the West, Tencent is arguably the world’s largest gaming company. It’s the parent company of “League of Legends” developer Riot Games and mobile gaming firm Supercell, and holds a minority stake in “Fortnite” maker Epic Games. The firm has even been testing its own game streaming service, called Start. With Tencent’s help, Cottam sees Antstream eventually launching in Asia, a massive market for gaming. But there’s no set date on when that will happen just yet. “When we want to roll this out in Asia, there is no better partner to work with,” he said. “They have such a strong foothold in that market.” While the firm’s boss didn’t pinpoint any particular countries, he mentioned visiting Japan, where “you still have these massive arcades which are full of people going in and playing these classic games.” The country is also home to some of the most well-known gaming brands, including Nintendo and Sega. A subscription to Antstream costs £9.99 per month — or £7.99 if customers opt for an annual membership — and that price will be the same in dollars, Cottam said. By contrast, Google’s Stadia cloud gaming platform costs $9.99 a month, but gamers have to fork out another $69 for a controller and extra costs for additional games.

Antstream’s platform lets players access a library of over 2,000 retro games. Antstream

Antstream says its games can be played on computers, tablets and smartphones, as well as Microsoft’s Xbox One console and Amazon’s Fire TV. Players can also hook their device up to an Xbox controller to play the games.

Nostalgia trip


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-22  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, future, games, streaming, betting, antstream, startup, cottam, gaming, service, cloud, tencent, company, retro, firm, theres


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Britain’s two biggest broadcasters are teaming up on a Netflix rival

Soumya Sriraman, president of Britbox United States and Canada, speaks on stage at the 2019 Winter Television Critics Association Press Tour. Called BritBox, the planned streaming platform is a partnership between the U.K.’s two largest broadcasters, and will see them take on Netflix and its dominance in online entertainment. A subscription to BritBox will let people watch TV shows in high definition across multiple screens and devices, ITV said. Netflix’s basic plan in the U.K. also costs £5.99


Soumya Sriraman, president of Britbox United States and Canada, speaks on stage at the 2019 Winter Television Critics Association Press Tour. Called BritBox, the planned streaming platform is a partnership between the U.K.’s two largest broadcasters, and will see them take on Netflix and its dominance in online entertainment. A subscription to BritBox will let people watch TV shows in high definition across multiple screens and devices, ITV said. Netflix’s basic plan in the U.K. also costs £5.99
Britain’s two biggest broadcasters are teaming up on a Netflix rival Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, watch, platform, britains, teaming, uk, shows, streaming, netflix, broadcasters, itv, britbox, rival, month, let, biggest


Britain's two biggest broadcasters are teaming up on a Netflix rival

Soumya Sriraman, president of Britbox United States and Canada, speaks on stage at the 2019 Winter Television Critics Association Press Tour.

British broadcaster ITV announced Friday that its upcoming streaming service with the BBC will launch at the end of the year and cost just £5.99 ($7.50) a month.

Called BritBox, the planned streaming platform is a partnership between the U.K.’s two largest broadcasters, and will see them take on Netflix and its dominance in online entertainment. ITV shares popped 2% on the news.

The platform will offer shows including ITV’s “Love Island” and “Cleaning Up” as well as old shows like the BBC’s “Gavin & Stacey” and “The Office.” It will also commission a range of original series exclusive to BritBox.

The venture will be 90%-owned by ITV, while the BBC will have the option to increase its holdings over time to 25%.

A subscription to BritBox will let people watch TV shows in high definition across multiple screens and devices, ITV said. Netflix’s basic plan in the U.K. also costs £5.99, but that doesn’t let users watch on more than one screen simultaneously.

That means it’s technically cheaper than Netflix, which sells its standard multi-screen offering in the U.K. for £8.99 per month. It also undercuts Amazon Prime, which currently costs £7.99 a month.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, watch, platform, britains, teaming, uk, shows, streaming, netflix, broadcasters, itv, britbox, rival, month, let, biggest


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Netflix raised several red flags in its earnings that mean it might be time to take profits: Analyst

Netflix’s quarterly earnings report raised “several red flags” that will likely keep the stock range-bound over the next few quarters, a tech analyst told CNBC on Thursday. Netflix’s original content slate and looming competition from new streaming platforms could cause investors to pause, he said. It expects the third quarter will be strong as consumers rush to watch the third season of hit show “Stranger Things.” It also faces the threat of new streaming content from competitors such as Disney


Netflix’s quarterly earnings report raised “several red flags” that will likely keep the stock range-bound over the next few quarters, a tech analyst told CNBC on Thursday. Netflix’s original content slate and looming competition from new streaming platforms could cause investors to pause, he said. It expects the third quarter will be strong as consumers rush to watch the third season of hit show “Stranger Things.” It also faces the threat of new streaming content from competitors such as Disney
Netflix raised several red flags in its earnings that mean it might be time to take profits: Analyst Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, loss, netflix, content, earnings, flags, report, red, raised, analyst, consumers, subscribers, mean, streaming, profits, competition, strong


Netflix raised several red flags in its earnings that mean it might be time to take profits: Analyst

Netflix’s quarterly earnings report raised “several red flags” that will likely keep the stock range-bound over the next few quarters, a tech analyst told CNBC on Thursday.

Victor Anthony, managing director and internet analyst at Aegis Capital, said that the loss of paid domestic subscribers due in part to the streaming giant’s “aggressive” regional price increases was a concern. Netflix’s original content slate and looming competition from new streaming platforms could cause investors to pause, he said.

“What happens when competition does become a factor?” Anthony said in an interview with “Closing Bell. ” “That could be a meaningful challenge for Netflix and their ability to grow [subscribers.]”

Anthony said it might be time for investors to consider taking profits in Netflix.

Shares of Netflix closed down more than 10% on Thursday, a day after its second-quarter earnings report showed a loss in U.S. subscribers and a large miss on international adds. The company blamed price increases, a weak slate of original content and a “pull-forward effect” from a particularly strong first quarter.

It expects the third quarter will be strong as consumers rush to watch the third season of hit show “Stranger Things.”

The report comes at an uncertain time for Netflix. It will lose two of it’s most most-watched shows, “The Office” and “Friends.” It also faces the threat of new streaming content from competitors such as Disney.

Anthont said it’s possible these new platforms could be “complementary” to Netflix but it’s still unknown.

“Can consumers pay for multiple different streaming options? … we haven’t really tested that in the market yet,” he said.

Michael Graham, senior internet analyst at Canaccord Genuity, said he isn’t as concerned about new competition, telling CNBC that Netflix could do very well “in that content battle.”

“There’s no single show on Netflix that accounts for 2 or 3% of its streaming hours, so it’s hard for me to see a scenario where consumers are sort of anticipating the loss of ‘Friends,'” he said in the same “Closing Bell” segment.

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, loss, netflix, content, earnings, flags, report, red, raised, analyst, consumers, subscribers, mean, streaming, profits, competition, strong


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Netflix is set to report earnings after the bell

Netflix is expected to release its earnings report for its second quarter of 2019 after the bell on Wednesday. Already, Netflix is preparing to part ways with two of its most-watched shows, “The Office” and “Friends,” according to analytics firm Jumpshot. CNBC previously reported that Netflix was willing to pay up to $90 million a year for the rights. Netflix previously spent $80 million to keep “Friends” just through the end of this year, according to Vulture. Netflix previously said 2019 would


Netflix is expected to release its earnings report for its second quarter of 2019 after the bell on Wednesday. Already, Netflix is preparing to part ways with two of its most-watched shows, “The Office” and “Friends,” according to analytics firm Jumpshot. CNBC previously reported that Netflix was willing to pay up to $90 million a year for the rights. Netflix previously spent $80 million to keep “Friends” just through the end of this year, according to Vulture. Netflix previously said 2019 would
Netflix is set to report earnings after the bell Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, previously, forecast, earnings, expected, friends, million, set, billion, bell, streaming, refinitiv, netflix, report


Netflix is set to report earnings after the bell

Reed Hastings attends Reed Hastings panel during Netflix ‘See What’s Next’ event at Villa Miani on April 18, 2018 in Rome, Italy.

Netflix is expected to release its earnings report for its second quarter of 2019 after the bell on Wednesday.

Here are the key numbers:

Earnings per share: 56 cents expected, per Refinitiv consensus estimate

56 cents expected, per Refinitiv consensus estimate Revenue: $4.93 billion expected, per Refinitiv

$4.93 billion expected, per Refinitiv Domestic paid subscriber additions: 352,000, forecast by FactSet

352,000, forecast by FactSet International paid subscriber additions: 4.81 million, forecast by FactSet

The report is a chance for Netflix to prove how it plans to compete against legacy media companies that are now expanding into streaming. As Disney, AT&T’s WarnerMedia, and Comcast’s NBCUniversal all plan to launch direct-to-consumer streaming services by the first quarter of 2020, Netflix stands to lose both content and customers. Already, Netflix is preparing to part ways with two of its most-watched shows, “The Office” and “Friends,” according to analytics firm Jumpshot.

NBC announced in June that it plans to remove “The Office” from Netflix in 2021 and move it to its own streaming service. CNBC previously reported that Netflix was willing to pay up to $90 million a year for the rights. In the end, NBC beat the offer and agreed to pay $100 million.

Earlier this month, WarnerMedia announced its new streaming service, HBO Max, will include exclusive rights to stream “Friends” when it launches publicly in the spring of 2020. Netflix previously spent $80 million to keep “Friends” just through the end of this year, according to Vulture.

The threat of new streaming services has highlighted the importance of creating proprietary content for Netflix. The company has been on a spending tear, fueling its cash burn by twice offering $2 billion in debt since October. Netflix previously said 2019 would be its peak year for cash burn. It later revised that statement to say its cash flow would be consistent with the negative $3 billion of the prior year.

Netflix has raised its prices to help offset its costs, but has resisted pressure to bring in advertising. While industry executives anticipate Netflix will someday have ads, a recent study found that 23% of respondents would definitely or probably drop their subscription if it began running ads at its current price or a dollar cheaper.

Disclosure: Comcast owns NBCUniversal, the parent company of CNBC and NBC.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

WATCH: Netflix’s DVD business is still alive and profitable — here’s what it looks like


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, previously, forecast, earnings, expected, friends, million, set, billion, bell, streaming, refinitiv, netflix, report


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Gene Munster: Netflix’s best days are behind it

Loup Ventures founding partner Gene Munster said CNBC’s “Fast Money” on Wednesday that Netflix’s disappointing second quarter results are a turning point for the company, saying the best days for the streaming giant “are in fact behind it.” The miss came both internationally and domestically, with the company losing more than 100,000 subscribers in the United States. Netflix plunged more than 10% in after-hours trading followings its second quarter earnings report. The streaming video company re


Loup Ventures founding partner Gene Munster said CNBC’s “Fast Money” on Wednesday that Netflix’s disappointing second quarter results are a turning point for the company, saying the best days for the streaming giant “are in fact behind it.” The miss came both internationally and domestically, with the company losing more than 100,000 subscribers in the United States. Netflix plunged more than 10% in after-hours trading followings its second quarter earnings report. The streaming video company re
Gene Munster: Netflix’s best days are behind it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: jesse pound, alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gene, subscribers, competition, best, think, company, share, netflixs, days, quarter, united, earnings, streaming, munster


Gene Munster: Netflix's best days are behind it

Loup Ventures founding partner Gene Munster said CNBC’s “Fast Money” on Wednesday that Netflix’s disappointing second quarter results are a turning point for the company, saying the best days for the streaming giant “are in fact behind it.”

The company reported growth of just 2.7 million global subscribers for the quarter, well below analyst estimates of more than 5 million, according to FactSet. The miss came both internationally and domestically, with the company losing more than 100,000 subscribers in the United States.

“This is negative, and I think we’re going to look back at this quarter as one of the pivotal moments in the Netflix story,” Munster said.

Netflix plunged more than 10% in after-hours trading followings its second quarter earnings report. The streaming video company reported 60 cents of earnings per share on $4.92 billion in revenue. Wall Street expected earnings of 56 cents per share on $4.93 billion in revenue, according to Refinitiv.

“The key insight here is that the content lineup that they had in the June quarter just simply didn’t get the job done. We can talk about what’s coming in terms of competition, but ultimately that is the tip of the spear of this story,” Munster said.

Netflix raised its subscription prices in several markets this year and is facing increased competition in the United States. Disney, NBCUniversal, Apple and Warner Media all have plans to launch their own streaming services.

The increased competition means that some of Netflix’s most popular shows, such as “Friends” and “The Office,” will soon no longer be available on the service.

“As much as I love the company, I just think its best days, unfortunately, are in fact behind it,” Munster said.

Disclosure: Comcast owns NBCUniversal, the parent company of CNBC.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: jesse pound, alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gene, subscribers, competition, best, think, company, share, netflixs, days, quarter, united, earnings, streaming, munster


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Netflix says it can spend more on its own shows now that it’s not paying for ‘The Office’ and ‘Friends’

Yes, Netflix is losing “The Office” and “Friends” in the next two years. On Wednesday, Netflix released its second quarter earnings report, noting that losing these costly programs will free up the company’s budget and allow it to spend more on its own original content. According to Streaming Observer, Netflix users watch about 164 million hours of content on the streaming service each day, or about 5 billion each month. To put that into context, that’s about 60 billion hours of content in a yea


Yes, Netflix is losing “The Office” and “Friends” in the next two years. On Wednesday, Netflix released its second quarter earnings report, noting that losing these costly programs will free up the company’s budget and allow it to spend more on its own original content. According to Streaming Observer, Netflix users watch about 164 million hours of content on the streaming service each day, or about 5 billion each month. To put that into context, that’s about 60 billion hours of content in a yea
Netflix says it can spend more on its own shows now that it’s not paying for ‘The Office’ and ‘Friends’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shows, office, content, million, service, netflix, paying, friends, hours, billion, spend, original, streaming, watched


Netflix says it can spend more on its own shows now that it's not paying for 'The Office' and 'Friends'

Yes, Netflix is losing “The Office” and “Friends” in the next two years. But that may not be a bad thing for the streaming company.

On Wednesday, Netflix released its second quarter earnings report, noting that losing these costly programs will free up the company’s budget and allow it to spend more on its own original content.

“Much of our domestic, and eventually global, Disney catalog, as well as ‘Friends,’ ‘The Office,’ and some other licensed content will wind down over the coming years, freeing up budget for more original content, ” the company wrote in a statement Wednesday.

As Netflix’s competitors gear up to launch their own streaming services, Netflix could feel the pressure. The loss of content and rising competition are major factors in Netflix’s decision to bolster its lineup of shows that can’t be seen on any other platform.

The company paid $100 million to stream “Friends” and was willing to pay up to $90 million to hold onto the rights for “The Office.” Not to mention, it was spending about $150 million for content from Disney.

“We don’t have material viewing concentration as even our largest titles (that are watched by millions of members) account for only a low single digit percentage of streaming hours,” the company said. “From what we’ve seen in the past when we drop strong catalog content (Starz and Epix with Sony, Disney, and Paramount films, or 2nd run series from Fox, for example) our members shift over to enjoying our other great content. ”

“The Office” has been a staple on Netflix, and was far and away the most streamed show on the service in 2018, according to data from Nielsen. Viewers streamed more than 52 million minutes of the show that year – 20 million more than the second-most watched show, “Friends.”

According to Streaming Observer, Netflix users watch about 164 million hours of content on the streaming service each day, or about 5 billion each month. To put that into context, that’s about 60 billion hours of content in a year.

So, even though “The Office” was the most watched show, it accounted for far less than a percent of the total hours customers spent watching Netflix in 2018.

Netflix has been prolific in adding new original content to its streaming service, it far and away exceeds what its competitors release each year. In 2019, Netflix was rewarded with 117 Emmy Award nominations for its original content including “When They See Us,” “Nailed It,” “Dead to Me” and “Russian Doll.”

Netflix has been burning through cash over the last decade to add more. Guillermo del Toro ( “Shape of Water”), Ryan Murphy (“Glee”) and Shonda Rhimes (“Grey’s Anatomy”), among others, have been hired to create unique content only available on the streaming service. In some cases, these contracts span several years and are said to be worth hundreds of millions of dollars.

Last year, Netflix shelled out more than $12 billion to purchase, license and produce content. This year, that figure will rise to $15 billion. It will spend $2.9 billion more on marketing.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shows, office, content, million, service, netflix, paying, friends, hours, billion, spend, original, streaming, watched


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Netflix CEO says the ‘streaming wars’ are good for business

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings doesn’t seem too worried about the influx of competitors into the streaming industry. A phenomenon that has been dubbed “the streaming wars” is a hot topic in the entertainment world. As Disney, NBC and WarnerMedia, among others, gear up to launch their own standalone streaming services, analysts have questioned if Netflix will take a hit. Hastings said Wednesday these streaming wars are a good thing. “The advantage of having something be catchy like ‘the streaming wars


Netflix CEO Reed Hastings doesn’t seem too worried about the influx of competitors into the streaming industry. A phenomenon that has been dubbed “the streaming wars” is a hot topic in the entertainment world. As Disney, NBC and WarnerMedia, among others, gear up to launch their own standalone streaming services, analysts have questioned if Netflix will take a hit. Hastings said Wednesday these streaming wars are a good thing. “The advantage of having something be catchy like ‘the streaming wars
Netflix CEO says the ‘streaming wars’ are good for business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, content, tv, net, company, business, million, netflix, good, wars, hastings, streaming, companys


Netflix CEO says the 'streaming wars' are good for business

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings doesn’t seem too worried about the influx of competitors into the streaming industry.

A phenomenon that has been dubbed “the streaming wars” is a hot topic in the entertainment world. As Disney, NBC and WarnerMedia, among others, gear up to launch their own standalone streaming services, analysts have questioned if Netflix will take a hit.

Hastings said Wednesday these streaming wars are a good thing.

“The advantage of having something be catchy like ‘the streaming wars’ is that it draws more attention, and because of that, consumers shift more quickly from linear TV to streaming TV,” Hastings said during the company’s earnings call Wednesday.

After the company’s second quarter earning report Wednesday, shares of the company fell more than 10% as Netflix revealed global net adds of 2.7 million, well below its guidance of 5 million. Still, Netflix forecast 7 million global paid net adds for the next quarter.

The company blamed price hikes and a lackluster slate of new content for the lower-than-expected subscriber growth. However, Netflix has said that the third quarter’s content, including the recently released third season of “Stranger Things,” will help turn the tide.

Netflix has acknowledged it will soon lose two of its most-watched shows, “The Office” and “Friends,” but that not having these costly programs will free up the company’s budget and allow it to spend more on its own original content.

“I think everybody gets that people will subscribe to multiple [platforms],” Hastings said. “I’d wager that most Netflix employees are HBO subscribers. We love the content they do and that spurs us on to want to be even better.”

“Competition grows the industry,” he said.

Disclosure: Comcast is the parent company of NBCUniversal and CNBC.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, content, tv, net, company, business, million, netflix, good, wars, hastings, streaming, companys


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Disney and Charter are talking about carriage fees, and the outcome could affect how much you pay for cable in the streaming era

But this particular Disney deal has widespread implications for how future TV carriage deals will be crafted. The outcome could lead to more contentious battles between TV providers and content creators, and perhaps stem the tide of rising cable TV bills. But the advent of direct-to-consumer streaming products could lead to blowout public fights over the declining value of linear TV networks. ESPN is the most important cable network in the cable bundle. There’s no impetus for Disney to change th


But this particular Disney deal has widespread implications for how future TV carriage deals will be crafted. The outcome could lead to more contentious battles between TV providers and content creators, and perhaps stem the tide of rising cable TV bills. But the advent of direct-to-consumer streaming products could lead to blowout public fights over the declining value of linear TV networks. ESPN is the most important cable network in the cable bundle. There’s no impetus for Disney to change th
Disney and Charter are talking about carriage fees, and the outcome could affect how much you pay for cable in the streaming era Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fees, cable, content, era, pay, disney, paytv, espn, network, talking, tv, networks, charter, streaming, carriage, outcome, valuable


Disney and Charter are talking about carriage fees, and the outcome could affect how much you pay for cable in the streaming era

The Walt Disney Company CEO, Robert Iger arrives for the World premiere of Marvel Studios’ ‘Avengers: Endgame’ at the Los Angeles Convention Center on April 22, 2019 in Los Angeles. VALERIE MACON | AFP | Getty Images

Disney is set to renew its multiyear carriage agreement with Charter, the second-largest U.S. pay TV provider, at the beginning of August, according to people familiar with the matter. So far, there are no signs the two sides will have a testy public renegotiation. That is par for the course for Disney, which usually hammers out a deal without fanfare. After all, pay-TV providers have never had the stomach to black out ESPN, Disney’s most valuable cable channel and by far the most expensive network in the pay-TV bundle. But this particular Disney deal has widespread implications for how future TV carriage deals will be crafted. The outcome could lead to more contentious battles between TV providers and content creators, and perhaps stem the tide of rising cable TV bills. That’s because Disney is about to transition to a new era of direct-to-consumer streaming. AT&T’s WarnerMedia and Comcast’s NBC Universal, the next largest media companies, will follow in its footsteps in early 2020. In the past, carriage disagreements almost always stemmed over the same thing: the network that makes or licenses the content wants the pay-TV operator — your cable or satellite company — to pay more money for that programming. The fee negotiations sometimes result in networks being blacked out on a pay-TV service for a period of time. Viacom has had a few extended carriage conflicts in recent years. Univision recently settled one with Dish. Jeremy Lin’s insane three-week stretch of National Basketball Association games while on the New York Knicks helped convince Time Warner Cable to reach a deal with MSG Network a few years ago. The distributor and the content company usually reach an agreement, because the traditional pay-TV ecosystem has long been symbiotic — operators need material for customers to watch, and the programmers need people to see their programs. But the advent of direct-to-consumer streaming products could lead to blowout public fights over the declining value of linear TV networks. Content providers who have long pushed for higher carriage fees could face severe pushback from pay-TV providers who say that linear networks aren’t as valuable because so much content is available online — not only at Netflix and Amazon, but now within the content companies’ own streaming products. Moreover, if customers do flee the pay-TV bundle for streaming services, pay-TV providers may want to cut content spending even more to keep costs down.

Saving the bundle

In November, Disney will start selling Disney+, a family-friend entertainment product, for $6.99 a month. This will include Disney movies and TV shows from Disney, Pixar, Marvel Studios, Lucasfilm, National Geographic and 20th Century Fox. Disney is also planning on bundling Disney+ with Hulu and ESPN+, its direct-to-consumer streaming service focused on sports, to make the suite of products more appealing to consumers. no current season As Disney makes its content available outside of the pay-TV ecosystem, the value of its pay-TV channels should decrease. In other words, if the only way your child can watch “The Lion Guard” is on the Disney Channel, which requires a pay-TV subscription, the Disney Channel is a valuable asset to the pay-TV bundle. But if your child can now get that show on Disney+, which doesn’t require a pay-TV subscription, the value of the Disney Channel should decrease. The more stuff that’s available outside the network, the less that network is worth. Disney is trying to store some of the value of Disney Channel by prohibiting current seasons of all Disney Channel shows from being available on Disney+, according to a person familiar with the matter.

ESPN vs. ESPN+

The Disney-Charter negotiations probably won’t get too contentious because more than any other programmer, Disney wants to protect the pay-TV ecosystem. ESPN is the most important cable network in the cable bundle. It earns more than $9 for its suite of networks for every single customer that signs up for pay-TV, regardless of who is actually watching the networks. A lot of people watch “Monday Night Football” — it was the most-watched series on cable in 2018 for the second straight year. Pay TV customers would revolt if ESPN weren’t included in a standard cable package. So far, ESPN+ has only been an add-on product to ESPN. It hasn’t touched the network’s most valuable sports assets, which include “Monday Night Football,” NBA games, prime time college football, several tennis and golf grand slams and so on. There’s no impetus for Disney to change this arrangement because ESPN has successfully kept raising its carriage fee, unlike, say, Viacom’s cable networks. Still, Disney will almost certainly push for more flexibility in its renewal deal with Charter. Disney will want the option to make certain sports or games available for ESPN+ if consumers drastically change their viewing habits in the next few years, or if Wall Street starts valuing legacy media companies based on streaming customer growth, as they do with Netflix. Moreover, Disney wants pay-TV providers to integrate ESPN+ into their user interfaces, just as Comcast has done for Amazon and Netflix content, according to a person familiar with the matter. Then, a pay-TV operator could sell ESPN and ESPN+ together for an additional fee, and a consumer could watch all ESPN+ content as a network, just like ESPN. At this point, Disney isn’t asking to remove valuable assets from ESPN and shift them to ESPN+, two of the people said. That’s key. Charter isn’t going to want to lock in a rate increase for ESPN if the linear network could lose its exclusivity value in the coming years as Disney makes some events available to ESPN+. But Disney will likely want the ability to place particular games on ESPN+ and add other sweeteners to entice more consumers to sign up for the digital service. And those games probably would have lived on ESPN or one of its companion networks. Spokespeople for Disney and Charter declined to comment on specifics of the carriage talks between the companies. Terms in carriage fees are often applicable across pay-TV platforms thanks to so-called “most favored nation ” clauses. So the word will get out in the media ecosystem how Disney has structured its deal, and it will be held as a standard when WarnerMedia’s and NBC Universal’s big contracts come up for renewal. And while Disney may not want to rock the pay-TV bundle, WarnerMedia doesn’t have nearly the same incentive, because it doesn’t own particularly valuable linear networks (TBS, TNT and CNN are its strongest). Then again, AT&T owns DirecTV and WarnerMedia, and Comcast owns NBC Universal. So both media companies may decide to hedge their asks for the benefit of their parent companies, keeping the bundle alive and (relatively) well.

Does video even matter?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fees, cable, content, era, pay, disney, paytv, espn, network, talking, tv, networks, charter, streaming, carriage, outcome, valuable


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Netflix has now lost two of its most popular shows as old media companies flex their muscle

Something strange is happening in the world of technology and media: Netflix is becoming the incumbent, and the upstart challengers are companies that have been around for nearly a century. But there’s little doubt that part of the motivation of legacy media companies embracing subscription streaming services is to capture some of Netflix’s valuation — or bring CEO Reed Hastings’ behemoth back down to earth. The WarnerMedia streaming service will have the exclusive rights to the hit sitcom Frien


Something strange is happening in the world of technology and media: Netflix is becoming the incumbent, and the upstart challengers are companies that have been around for nearly a century. But there’s little doubt that part of the motivation of legacy media companies embracing subscription streaming services is to capture some of Netflix’s valuation — or bring CEO Reed Hastings’ behemoth back down to earth. The WarnerMedia streaming service will have the exclusive rights to the hit sitcom Frien
Netflix has now lost two of its most popular shows as old media companies flex their muscle Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lost, shows, muscle, media, popular, rights, million, streaming, hbo, friends, warnermedia, netflix, service, old, companies, flex


Netflix has now lost two of its most popular shows as old media companies flex their muscle

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings is pictured on May 3, 2018 in Lille, northern France during the first edition of the TV Series Mania festival.

Something strange is happening in the world of technology and media: Netflix is becoming the incumbent, and the upstart challengers are companies that have been around for nearly a century.

Disney, AT&T’s WarnerMedia, and Comcast’s NBCUniversal are all launching direct-to-consumer streaming services by the first quarter of 2020. And they’re all coming after Netflix.

Sure, there will be enough consumer dollars to go around for Netflix to keep its massive subscriber base (155 million globally) growing. But there’s little doubt that part of the motivation of legacy media companies embracing subscription streaming services is to capture some of Netflix’s valuation — or bring CEO Reed Hastings’ behemoth back down to earth.

That’s why WarnerMedia announced Tuesday it is pulling Friends off Netflix when it debuts its service in 2020, which will be called HBO Max. The WarnerMedia streaming service will have the exclusive rights to the hit sitcom Friends. AT&T is paying $85 million per year for the U.S. rights for five years, according to a person familiar with the matter. Netflix was paying $80 million for global rights to the show and wasn’t in a position to re-bid, given WarnerMedia’s contractual options around streaming rights for the show, the person said. The Wall Street Journal first reported how much WarnerMedia would pay for Friends.

Netflix has been preparing to lose Friends, just as it realized it may lose The Office to NBC Universal’s streaming service, which will happen in 2021, and has been spending billions on new original content exclusive to the service to keep customers satisfied.

But losing both Friends and The Office is significant to the potential health of the streaming service moving forward. The two series are the two most watched shows on all of Netflix, according to research firm Jumpshot.

WarnerMedia CEO John Stankey’s goal is to get 70 million subscribers to sign up for HBO Max. That’s double the amount of U.S. subscribers for HBO. For years, Wall Street has valued Netflix on its subscriber growth rather than its profits. Legacy media companies have rued this dichotomy, frustrated that investors value old media differently than Netflix, which has grown from a startup to a company with a $175 billion enterprise value.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lost, shows, muscle, media, popular, rights, million, streaming, hbo, friends, warnermedia, netflix, service, old, companies, flex


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AT&T rolls out a new, super-charged streaming service with HBO shows, ‘Friends’ and more

AT&T’s WarnerMedia announced on Tuesday that its new streaming service will be called HBO Max. Netflix will also lose “The Office” in 2021, when NBC will offer it as part of its $10 per month streaming TV service. Other popular TV shows coming to HBO Max include “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air,” “Pretty Little Liars” and “Batwoman.” HBO Max will include original shows created specifically for the new streaming service, in addition to shows that will launch on HBO. NBC’s streaming service is launchi


AT&T’s WarnerMedia announced on Tuesday that its new streaming service will be called HBO Max. Netflix will also lose “The Office” in 2021, when NBC will offer it as part of its $10 per month streaming TV service. Other popular TV shows coming to HBO Max include “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air,” “Pretty Little Liars” and “Batwoman.” HBO Max will include original shows created specifically for the new streaming service, in addition to shows that will launch on HBO. NBC’s streaming service is launchi
AT&T rolls out a new, super-charged streaming service with HBO shows, ‘Friends’ and more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, max, rolls, shows, att, supercharged, include, launch, hbo, service, movies, friends, tv, content, streaming


AT&T rolls out a new, super-charged streaming service with HBO shows, 'Friends' and more

AT&T’s WarnerMedia announced on Tuesday that its new streaming service will be called HBO Max. As the name implies, it includes a lot more than just content from HBO.

HBO Max will include shows and movies from Warner Bros., New Line, DC Entertainment, CNN, TNT, TBS, truTV, The CW, Turner Classic Movies, Cartoon Network, Adult Swim, Crunchyroll, Rooster Teeth, Looney Tunes and other content providers. It also includes exclusive rights to stream all 236 episodes of the TV show “Friends.”

The service is expected to launch in beta later this year. AT&T has not said how much it will cost. HBO Max will launch publicly in the spring of 2020 and will include 10,000 hours of content, the company said.

Netflix recently spent $80 million to keep “Friends” through 2019, according to Vulture. Netflix will also lose “The Office” in 2021, when NBC will offer it as part of its $10 per month streaming TV service. Both shows are thought to be two of the most popular on Netflix, which means the company will have to continue funding new programming in order to find another new hit to keep subscribers engaged.

Other popular TV shows coming to HBO Max include “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air,” “Pretty Little Liars” and “Batwoman.” HBO Max will include original shows created specifically for the new streaming service, in addition to shows that will launch on HBO.

The service is just one of many new streaming products set to launch in the coming months, and consumers probably won’t be able to subscribe to all of them.

Disney’s $6.99 monthly plan, Disney+, will launch this November and will include 18 of Pixar’s 21 movies, Marvel films, 30 seasons of “The Simpsons,” Disney animated movies and the Star Wars franchise of films. NBC’s streaming service is launching next year. Apple+ will launch this fall.

WATCH: Record 19.3 million viewers watched HBO’s ‘Game of Thrones’ finale


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, max, rolls, shows, att, supercharged, include, launch, hbo, service, movies, friends, tv, content, streaming


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