NBC’s 2020 streaming service won’t be very compelling for cord cutters — and that’s by design

The proof is in the details of NBC’s streaming service, coming next spring. And you’ll get a few originals for the streaming service, the quality of which is to be determined. NBC expects its revenue from cord cutters on its streaming service to be “completely immaterial,” according to a person familiar with the matter. Customers who cancel Comcast’s TV service for, say, YouTube TV will still get NBC’s streaming service for free. But at launch next year, the NBC streaming service won’t be a comp


The proof is in the details of NBC’s streaming service, coming next spring. And you’ll get a few originals for the streaming service, the quality of which is to be determined. NBC expects its revenue from cord cutters on its streaming service to be “completely immaterial,” according to a person familiar with the matter. Customers who cancel Comcast’s TV service for, say, YouTube TV will still get NBC’s streaming service for free. But at launch next year, the NBC streaming service won’t be a comp
NBC’s 2020 streaming service won’t be very compelling for cord cutters — and that’s by design Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wont, cord, disney, thats, live, nbcs, service, hulu, tv, 2020, compelling, nbc, paytv, streaming, design, customers, cutters


NBC's 2020 streaming service won't be very compelling for cord cutters — and that's by design

The streaming wars — the race to launch subscription video products — has been driven by an underlying concept: The traditional pay-TV bundle is dying as millions of U.S. households cut the cord each year and shift their video consumption to services like Netflix.

This has been a hard pill to swallow for legacy media companies, which derive billions of dollars from traditional pay TV. Yet, many of those media companies are coming to grips with reality and beginning to disrupt their own business models, headlined by Disney’s $6.99 Disney+ offering for this year.

That’s not the case for Comcast’s NBCUniversal (the parent company of CNBC and CNBC.com).

NBC doesn’t want you to cut the cord. Maybe this isn’t too surprising since its owner is the largest U.S. cable company. But it’s unusual because it directly contradicts the disruption narrative. Instead of submissively accepting that the pay-TV world is ending, NBC is taking a stand and fighting back.

The proof is in the details of NBC’s streaming service, coming next spring.

NBC’s ad-supported streaming service will be free to all customers who pay for traditional live television — whether through Comcast or any other provider, including virtual pay-TV bundles like Google’s YouTube TV or AT&T’s DirecTV Now, assuming partnership deals are struck, according to people familiar with the matter.

For those who have cut the cord, it will probably be about $10, said the people, who asked not to be named because the discussions on price are still ongoing.

CNBC has also learned that the free version of service for pay-TV subscribers will include live linear channels, same-season episodes and past-season episodes. Customers will be able to watch NBC programming anywhere, on any device, independent of their cable provider’s footprint. NBC will have nonexclusive access to all of the programming it sells to Hulu for the streaming service, as part of the deal with Disney the two companies announced on Tuesday.

But the $10 version for cord cutters won’t include live linear channels and won’t include same-season shows. You’ll get a bunch of reruns, most of which will also be available on Hulu if you already subscribe to that service. And you’ll get a few originals for the streaming service, the quality of which is to be determined.

So what are you getting for your $10 a month? Not much at first. And that’s the point.

NBC expects its revenue from cord cutters on its streaming service to be “completely immaterial,” according to a person familiar with the matter. The company is actively trying to make its cord-cutting streaming service inferior to its pay-TV version. The service is primarily meant as a nice additional benefit for customers who already pay for cable or satellite TV.

NBC’s decision isn’t totally motivated by supporting Comcast’s cable TV business. Now that Disney has full operational control of Hulu, Disney can bundle Hulu (or Hulu with Live TV) with Disney+ to make a compelling streaming offering that should further accelerate cord cutting. NBC is OK with this. Customers who cancel Comcast’s TV service for, say, YouTube TV will still get NBC’s streaming service for free.

NBC will certainly monitor the take rate of its streaming service among non pay-TV subscribers if cord cutting dramatically accelerates. If necessary, it can move content on and off its service thanks to Tuesday’s deal with Hulu, as well as the impending expiration of streaming-rights deals for popular shows it owns, such as “The Office.” And three years from now, when its content deal with Hulu ends, there’s an easy path for NBC to make its streaming service more compelling by making all its content exclusive to it.

But at launch next year, the NBC streaming service won’t be a compelling addition for cord cutters. And that’s the point.

Disclosure: Comcast owns NBCUniversal, the parent company of CNBC and CNBC.com.

WATCH: Comcast will sell its Hulu stake to Disney, giving Disney full control


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wont, cord, disney, thats, live, nbcs, service, hulu, tv, 2020, compelling, nbc, paytv, streaming, design, customers, cutters


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Here’s why Altice USA just dropped $200 million on streaming video start-up Cheddar

Cable and internet provider Altice USA has agreed to buy news streaming start-up Cheddar for $200 million, snapping up a growing video site with a focus on ad revenue. Cheddar founder and Chief Executive Jon Steinberg will stay on to lead Altice News, which includes Cheddar, News 12 and i24NEWS, an Israel-based 24-hour international news network. Altice USA CEO Dexter Goei told CNBC that Steinberg should be able to “turbocharge” Altice’s news offerings with a larger balance sheet at his disposal


Cable and internet provider Altice USA has agreed to buy news streaming start-up Cheddar for $200 million, snapping up a growing video site with a focus on ad revenue. Cheddar founder and Chief Executive Jon Steinberg will stay on to lead Altice News, which includes Cheddar, News 12 and i24NEWS, an Israel-based 24-hour international news network. Altice USA CEO Dexter Goei told CNBC that Steinberg should be able to “turbocharge” Altice’s news offerings with a larger balance sheet at his disposal
Here’s why Altice USA just dropped $200 million on streaming video start-up Cheddar Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, altice, 200, streaming, steinberg, million, heres, dropped, startup, includes, goei, video, usa, jon, media, cheddar, general, business


Here's why Altice USA just dropped $200 million on streaming video start-up Cheddar

Cable and internet provider Altice USA has agreed to buy news streaming start-up Cheddar for $200 million, snapping up a growing video site with a focus on ad revenue.

Cheddar founder and Chief Executive Jon Steinberg will stay on to lead Altice News, which includes Cheddar, News 12 and i24NEWS, an Israel-based 24-hour international news network. Altice USA CEO Dexter Goei told CNBC that Steinberg should be able to “turbocharge” Altice’s news offerings with a larger balance sheet at his disposal, and help Altice bolster its advertising business.

“Cheddar gives us a full suite of news, business and general news to advertise across multiple different markets,” Goei said. “But beyond the product, it’s about bringing on board a management team led by Jon Steinberg that knows how to create good news content and get distributed as broadly as possible.”

Steinberg started Cheddar in 2016 as a live-streaming business channel geared to a millennial audience, and has since expanded into general news. Goei said that Steinberg will continue moving the company into new areas. The Wall Street Journal was the first to report on the acquisition.

The deal comes as other digital media companies struggle to sustain their growth with Google and Facebook gobbling up the majority of online ad dollars. BuzzFeed and Vice Media recently announced dramatic layoffs, as did Verizon Media Group, which includes HuffPo, Yahoo and TechCrunch.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, altice, 200, streaming, steinberg, million, heres, dropped, startup, includes, goei, video, usa, jon, media, cheddar, general, business


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Watch CNBC’s full interview with Quibi CEO Meg Whitman

Watch CNBC’s full interview with Quibi CEO Meg Whitman20 Hours AgoQuibi CEO Meg Whitman, formerly CEO at HP and eBay, joins “Squawk Alley” to discuss the streaming platform and the state of today’s content creation.


Watch CNBC’s full interview with Quibi CEO Meg Whitman20 Hours AgoQuibi CEO Meg Whitman, formerly CEO at HP and eBay, joins “Squawk Alley” to discuss the streaming platform and the state of today’s content creation.
Watch CNBC’s full interview with Quibi CEO Meg Whitman Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, quibi, ceo, todays, squawk, whitman, streaming, interview, meg, cnbcs, state, watch, whitman20


Watch CNBC's full interview with Quibi CEO Meg Whitman

Watch CNBC’s full interview with Quibi CEO Meg Whitman

20 Hours Ago

Quibi CEO Meg Whitman, formerly CEO at HP and eBay, joins “Squawk Alley” to discuss the streaming platform and the state of today’s content creation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, quibi, ceo, todays, squawk, whitman, streaming, interview, meg, cnbcs, state, watch, whitman20


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Comcast earnings beat estimates but sales fall short, high speed internet revenue up 10%

This quarter, Comcast lost 121,000 video customers compared with 96,000 during the same period last year. Comcast reported pro forma first-quarter revenue for Sky of $4.8 billion, driven mainly by higher content revenue. Here’s how Comcast’s other divisions did for the first quarter:Cable communications accounted for $14.3 billion in total revenue. Broadcast television, excluding the Olympics and Super Bowl, accounted for $2.5 billion in total revenue. Filmed entertainment brought in $1.8 billio


This quarter, Comcast lost 121,000 video customers compared with 96,000 during the same period last year. Comcast reported pro forma first-quarter revenue for Sky of $4.8 billion, driven mainly by higher content revenue. Here’s how Comcast’s other divisions did for the first quarter:Cable communications accounted for $14.3 billion in total revenue. Broadcast television, excluding the Olympics and Super Bowl, accounted for $2.5 billion in total revenue. Filmed entertainment brought in $1.8 billio
Comcast earnings beat estimates but sales fall short, high speed internet revenue up 10% Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: lauren feiner, sopa images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, short, fall, billion, internet, olympics, expected, sales, speed, revenue, estimates, total, super, streaming, high, comcast, quarter, earnings


Comcast earnings beat estimates but sales fall short, high speed internet revenue up 10%

Comcast on Thursday reported first-quarter earnings that surpassed expectations, but revenue fell short. Closely watched data on new high-speed internet customers beat projections.

The stock fell more than 1% in premarket trading, setting it up to shave more than $2 billion from its market cap, bringing it to around $187 billion.

Here are the numbers Comcast reported:

Earnings per share: 76 cents, adjusted vs. 68 cents expected in a Refinitiv survey of analysts

Revenue: $26.86 billion vs. $27.2 billion expected in the survey

High-speed internet customers: 375,000 vs. 353,000 net adds expected, according to a FactSet consensus estimate

Comcast said its revenue miss was due in part to the difficulty in comparing this quarter with the first quarter of 2018, which included NBC’s coverage of the Winter Olympics and Super Bowl. Comcast had beaten estimates on the top and bottom lines for the last two quarters and has seen its stock rise 25% over the past 12 months.

“I think across the board, when you adjust out for the Super Bowl and the Olympics, [it’s] pretty much exactly what we expected on the revenue side, at least internally,” Comcast CEO Brian Roberts said in an interview on CNBC’s “Squawk Box” following the report.

Comcast said this quarter reflected its best quarterly EBITDA cable growth in over 10 years with a 9.8% increase to $5.7 billion. The increase reflects higher revenue despite a 0.8% increase in operating expenses.

With analysts anticipating a decline in Comcast’s video segment, the company has laid out plans to branch out further into streaming. This quarter, Comcast lost 121,000 video customers compared with 96,000 during the same period last year.

Comcast-owned NBCUniversal, the parent company of CNBC, announced earlier this year that it will debut its free, ad-supported streaming service in the first quarter of 2020. The service will be available to any traditional pay-TV subscriber by logging in through a cable or satellite provider. Everyone else can sign up for about $12 per month, a person familiar with the company’s plans told CNBC shortly after the announcement. NBCUniversal’s service will be up against established streaming services like Netflix and Amazon’s Prime Video, as well as newer players coming later this year from Disney, Apple and AT&T’s WarnerMedia.

Roberts said the uptick in new streaming services could actually be a boon for the business.

“The more people want to stream, the more you want the best broadband,” Roberts said. “Hence, you’re seeing the kind of results we saw today in the first quarter, which is why broadband’s been strong not just this quarter, but all of last year and we hope throughout the remainder of this year.”

Comcast reported revenue of $8.3 billion for NBCUniversal, a 12.5% decrease from the previous year, which had included $1.6 billion in incremental revenue based on the Olympics and Super Bowl.

Comcast’s report included performance for British broadcaster Sky for the second time following its acquisition last year. Comcast reported pro forma first-quarter revenue for Sky of $4.8 billion, driven mainly by higher content revenue. Sky added 112,000 customer relationships for the quarter, which Comcast said reflected growth in all of its markets.

Here’s how Comcast’s other divisions did for the first quarter:

Cable communications accounted for $14.3 billion in total revenue.

Cable networks, excluding the Olympics, accounted for $2.9 billion in total revenue.

Broadcast television, excluding the Olympics and Super Bowl, accounted for $2.5 billion in total revenue.

Filmed entertainment brought in $1.8 billion in total revenue.

Theme Parks brought in $1.3 billion in revenue.

Disclosure: Comcast is the owner of NBCUniversal, parent company of CNBC and CNBC.com.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

Watch: Netflix’s long-term play would be to get Comcast out of this relationship: Senior analyst


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: lauren feiner, sopa images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, short, fall, billion, internet, olympics, expected, sales, speed, revenue, estimates, total, super, streaming, high, comcast, quarter, earnings


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Comcast earnings beat estimates but sales fall short, high speed internet revenue up 10%

This quarter, Comcast lost 121,000 video customers compared with 96,000 during the same period last year. Comcast reported pro forma first-quarter revenue for Sky of $4.8 billion, driven mainly by higher content revenue. Here’s how Comcast’s other divisions did for the first quarter:Cable communications accounted for $14.3 billion in total revenue. Broadcast television, excluding the Olympics and Super Bowl, accounted for $2.5 billion in total revenue. Filmed entertainment brought in $1.8 billio


This quarter, Comcast lost 121,000 video customers compared with 96,000 during the same period last year. Comcast reported pro forma first-quarter revenue for Sky of $4.8 billion, driven mainly by higher content revenue. Here’s how Comcast’s other divisions did for the first quarter:Cable communications accounted for $14.3 billion in total revenue. Broadcast television, excluding the Olympics and Super Bowl, accounted for $2.5 billion in total revenue. Filmed entertainment brought in $1.8 billio
Comcast earnings beat estimates but sales fall short, high speed internet revenue up 10% Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: lauren feiner, sopa images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, total, revenue, super, sales, short, estimates, high, fall, olympics, speed, company, internet, expected, comcast, billion, earnings, streaming, quarter


Comcast earnings beat estimates but sales fall short, high speed internet revenue up 10%

Comcast on Thursday reported first-quarter earnings that surpassed expectations, but revenue fell short. Closely watched data on new high-speed internet customers beat projections.

The stock fell about 1% after the release, but went up 2% during the earnings call when the company discussed better-than-expected guidance for its cable communications business.

The stock continued to climb, up more than 3% Thursday. The rally added over $6 billion to its market cap to bring it around $196 billion.

Here are the numbers Comcast reported:

Earnings per share: 76 cents, adjusted vs. 68 cents expected in a Refinitiv survey of analysts

Revenue: $26.86 billion vs. $27.2 billion expected in the survey

High-speed internet customers: 375,000 vs. 353,000 net adds expected, according to a FactSet consensus estimate

Comcast said it expects up to 100 basis points of year over year margin improvement for the full year, raising its original guidance of up to 50 basis points of improvement in 2019.

Comcast said its revenue miss was due in part to the difficulty in comparing this quarter with the first quarter of 2018, which included NBC’s coverage of the Winter Olympics and Super Bowl. Comcast had beaten estimates on the top and bottom lines for the last two quarters and has seen its stock rise 25% over the past 12 months.

“I think across the board, when you adjust out for the Super Bowl and the Olympics, [it’s] pretty much exactly what we expected on the revenue side, at least internally,” Comcast CEO Brian Roberts said in an interview on CNBC’s “Squawk Box” following the report.

Comcast said this quarter reflected its best quarterly EBITDA cable growth in over 10 years with a 9.8% increase to $5.7 billion. The increase reflects higher revenue despite a 0.8% increase in operating expenses.

With analysts anticipating a decline in Comcast’s video segment, the company has laid out plans to branch out further into streaming. This quarter, Comcast lost 121,000 video customers compared with 96,000 during the same period last year.

Comcast-owned NBCUniversal, the parent company of CNBC, announced earlier this year that it will debut its free, ad-supported streaming service in the first quarter of 2020. The service will be available to any traditional pay-TV subscriber by logging in through a cable or satellite provider. Everyone else can sign up for about $12 per month, a person familiar with the company’s plans told CNBC shortly after the announcement. NBCUniversal’s service will be up against established streaming services like Netflix and Amazon’s Prime Video, as well as newer players coming later this year from Disney, Apple and AT&T’s WarnerMedia.

Roberts said the uptick in new streaming services could actually be a boon for the business.

“The more people want to stream, the more you want the best broadband,” Roberts said. “Hence, you’re seeing the kind of results we saw today in the first quarter, which is why broadband’s been strong not just this quarter, but all of last year and we hope throughout the remainder of this year.”

Comcast reported revenue of $8.3 billion for NBCUniversal, a 12.5% decrease from the previous year, which had included $1.6 billion in incremental revenue based on the Olympics and Super Bowl.

Comcast’s report included performance for British broadcaster Sky for the second time following its acquisition last year. Comcast reported pro forma first-quarter revenue for Sky of $4.8 billion, driven mainly by higher content revenue. Sky added 112,000 customer relationships for the quarter, which Comcast said reflected growth in all of its markets.

On a call with analysts following the report, Roberts said the company is “exploring launching a global NBC-Sky news channel later this year.”

Here’s how Comcast’s other divisions did for the first quarter:

Cable communications accounted for $14.3 billion in total revenue.

Cable networks, excluding the Olympics, accounted for $2.9 billion in total revenue.

Broadcast television, excluding the Olympics and Super Bowl, accounted for $2.5 billion in total revenue.

Filmed entertainment brought in $1.8 billion in total revenue.

Theme Parks brought in $1.3 billion in revenue.

Disclosure: Comcast is the owner of NBCUniversal, parent company of CNBC and CNBC.com.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

Watch: Netflix’s long-term play would be to get Comcast out of this relationship: Senior analyst


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: lauren feiner, sopa images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, total, revenue, super, sales, short, estimates, high, fall, olympics, speed, company, internet, expected, comcast, billion, earnings, streaming, quarter


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Comcast is in talks to sell its 30% stake in Hulu to Disney

Disney and Comcast are holding talks about working out a deal for Comcast’s 30% stake, according to people familiar with the matter. Hulu last week bought back a 9.5% stake in itself from Time-Warner owner AT&T, in a deal that values Hulu at $15 billion. That 9.5% stake will be split between Disney and Comcast, unless Disney consolidates the entire company. But just as Comcast came off the sidelines, 21st Century Fox agreed to sell its 30% stake in Hulu to Disney. Instead of being an equal owner


Disney and Comcast are holding talks about working out a deal for Comcast’s 30% stake, according to people familiar with the matter. Hulu last week bought back a 9.5% stake in itself from Time-Warner owner AT&T, in a deal that values Hulu at $15 billion. That 9.5% stake will be split between Disney and Comcast, unless Disney consolidates the entire company. But just as Comcast came off the sidelines, 21st Century Fox agreed to sell its 30% stake in Hulu to Disney. Instead of being an equal owner
Comcast is in talks to sell its 30% stake in Hulu to Disney Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: alex sherman, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sell, stake, companys, streaming, owner, 30, hulu, deal, talks, comcast, disney, nbc


Comcast is in talks to sell its 30% stake in Hulu to Disney

Comcast has had a frustrating run as a partial owner of video streaming platform Hulu, but that doesn’t make the decision to sell its minority stake in the company any easier.

Disney and Comcast are holding talks about working out a deal for Comcast’s 30% stake, according to people familiar with the matter. Comcast is now weighing the pros and cons of doing a deal now rather than later, said these people, who asked not to be named because the discussions are private. It’s still unclear if a deal will transpire.

The two companies are the last remaining owners of a company that was originally founded as a joint venture between several media giants. Hulu last week bought back a 9.5% stake in itself from Time-Warner owner AT&T, in a deal that values Hulu at $15 billion. That 9.5% stake will be split between Disney and Comcast, unless Disney consolidates the entire company.

“On Hulu, the relationship with NBC, it’s very much in everybody’s interest to maintain,” Comcast CEO Brian Roberts said Thursday during an interview on CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” “And we have no new news today on it, other than it’s really valuable. And we’re really glad we own a large piece of it.”

For years, Comcast was barred from having a say in Hulu’s direction — part of a consent decree Comcast agreed to when it acquired NBCUniversal in 2011. (NBCUniversal is the parent company of CNBC.)

Seven years later, Comcast’s ownership in Hulu switched from passive to active, when the consent decree expired in 2018. That gave Roberts and NBC CEO Steve Burke some say in the company’s future.

But just as Comcast came off the sidelines, 21st Century Fox agreed to sell its 30% stake in Hulu to Disney. That deal, which closed last month, effectively silenced Comcast once again. Instead of being an equal owner with Fox and Disney, Comcast now owns a minority stake to Disney’s 60%.

“Fifty years from now will we be in Hulu? No, I don’t think we will,” Burke told Variety in January. “But I don’t think we’ll sell in five minutes.”

As of today, NBC provides about 17% of Hulu’s content. NBC has no plans to remove content from Hulu, which will continue to serve as NBC’s vessel for same-season shows even after the launch of the company’s new streaming service in 2020, according to people familiar with the matter. (NBC’s streaming service will showcase the company’s library of TV shows and movies.)

There are compelling reasons for Comcast to hold and to sell. Here’s what Comcast is debating, according to people familiar with the company’s thinking.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: alex sherman, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sell, stake, companys, streaming, owner, 30, hulu, deal, talks, comcast, disney, nbc


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Netflix movies can still win Oscars as academy leaves key eligibility rule unchanged

Movies from streaming platforms like Netflix and Amazon Prime will still be eligible for Academy Awards, the film body’s board said. The Academy of Motion Picture and Arts and Sciences voted to leave a key rule on eligibility unchanged. The rule allows any film to be considered for an Oscar, so long as they have a minimum seven-day theatrical run in a Los Angeles theatre. Motion pictures can appear on a streaming service on or after the day of their theatrical run and still be eligible for an aw


Movies from streaming platforms like Netflix and Amazon Prime will still be eligible for Academy Awards, the film body’s board said. The Academy of Motion Picture and Arts and Sciences voted to leave a key rule on eligibility unchanged. The rule allows any film to be considered for an Oscar, so long as they have a minimum seven-day theatrical run in a Los Angeles theatre. Motion pictures can appear on a streaming service on or after the day of their theatrical run and still be eligible for an aw
Netflix movies can still win Oscars as academy leaves key eligibility rule unchanged Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: ryan browne, mark ralston, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unchanged, key, eligibility, film, theatrical, eligible, win, motion, discussions, academy, run, leaves, movies, netflix, streaming, pictures, oscars, rule


Netflix movies can still win Oscars as academy leaves key eligibility rule unchanged

Movies from streaming platforms like Netflix and Amazon Prime will still be eligible for Academy Awards, the film body’s board said.

The Academy of Motion Picture and Arts and Sciences voted to leave a key rule on eligibility unchanged. The rule allows any film to be considered for an Oscar, so long as they have a minimum seven-day theatrical run in a Los Angeles theatre.

Motion pictures can appear on a streaming service on or after the day of their theatrical run and still be eligible for an award.

“We support the theatrical experience as integral to the art of motion pictures, and this weighed heavily in our discussions,” the academy’s President John Bailey said in a statement late Tuesday.

“Our rules currently require theatrical exhibition, and also allow for a broad selection of films to be submitted for Oscars consideration. We plan to further study the profound changes occurring in our industry and continue discussions with our members about these issues.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: ryan browne, mark ralston, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unchanged, key, eligibility, film, theatrical, eligible, win, motion, discussions, academy, run, leaves, movies, netflix, streaming, pictures, oscars, rule


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Netflix movies can still win Oscars as academy leaves key eligibility rule unchanged

Movies from streaming platforms like Netflix and Amazon Prime will still be eligible for Academy Awards, the film body’s board said. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted to leave a key rule on eligibility unchanged. The rule allows any film to be considered for an Oscar, so long as they have a minimum seven-day theatrical run in a Los Angeles theatre. Motion pictures can appear on a streaming service on or after the day of their theatrical run and still be eligible for an award.


Movies from streaming platforms like Netflix and Amazon Prime will still be eligible for Academy Awards, the film body’s board said. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted to leave a key rule on eligibility unchanged. The rule allows any film to be considered for an Oscar, so long as they have a minimum seven-day theatrical run in a Los Angeles theatre. Motion pictures can appear on a streaming service on or after the day of their theatrical run and still be eligible for an award.
Netflix movies can still win Oscars as academy leaves key eligibility rule unchanged Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: ryan browne, mark ralston, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, run, eligibility, eligible, win, rule, key, unchanged, film, discussions, leaves, streaming, motion, oscars, pictures, movies, theatrical, netflix, academy


Netflix movies can still win Oscars as academy leaves key eligibility rule unchanged

Movies from streaming platforms like Netflix and Amazon Prime will still be eligible for Academy Awards, the film body’s board said.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted to leave a key rule on eligibility unchanged. The rule allows any film to be considered for an Oscar, so long as they have a minimum seven-day theatrical run in a Los Angeles theatre.

Motion pictures can appear on a streaming service on or after the day of their theatrical run and still be eligible for an award.

“We support the theatrical experience as integral to the art of motion pictures, and this weighed heavily in our discussions,” the academy’s President John Bailey said in a statement late Tuesday.

“Our rules currently require theatrical exhibition, and also allow for a broad selection of films to be submitted for Oscars consideration. We plan to further study the profound changes occurring in our industry and continue discussions with our members about these issues.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: ryan browne, mark ralston, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, run, eligibility, eligible, win, rule, key, unchanged, film, discussions, leaves, streaming, motion, oscars, pictures, movies, theatrical, netflix, academy


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Steven Spielberg says his battle with Netflix wasn’t as bad as people made it seem

The anticlimactic vote seemed to close a chapter on a reported feud between the tech giant and legendary Hollywood director Steven Spielberg. But a New York Times report suggests Spielberg’s antipathy for streaming services like Netflix was overblown. “I want people to find their entertainment in any form or fashion that suits them,” Spielberg told the Times in an emailed statement. The sources told the Times that Spielberg is actually more frustrated with theater owners who have refused to comp


The anticlimactic vote seemed to close a chapter on a reported feud between the tech giant and legendary Hollywood director Steven Spielberg. But a New York Times report suggests Spielberg’s antipathy for streaming services like Netflix was overblown. “I want people to find their entertainment in any form or fashion that suits them,” Spielberg told the Times in an emailed statement. The sources told the Times that Spielberg is actually more frustrated with theater owners who have refused to comp
Steven Spielberg says his battle with Netflix wasn’t as bad as people made it seem Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: lauren feiner, matt winkelmeyer, getty images entertainment, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, film, theaters, times, netflix, steven, experience, academy, rule, wasnt, spielberg, york, bad, battle, streaming


Steven Spielberg says his battle with Netflix wasn't as bad as people made it seem

Netflix and other streaming platforms solidified their stature in the film industry Tuesday when the Academy of Motion Picture and Arts and Sciences voted to maintain their eligibility for the Academy Awards. The Academy voted to keep a rule that allows any film that has at least a seven-day theatrical run in a Los Angeles theater to be considered for an Oscar.

The anticlimactic vote seemed to close a chapter on a reported feud between the tech giant and legendary Hollywood director Steven Spielberg. But a New York Times report suggests Spielberg’s antipathy for streaming services like Netflix was overblown.

“I want people to find their entertainment in any form or fashion that suits them,” Spielberg told the Times in an emailed statement. “Big screen, small screen — what really matters to me is a great story and everyone should have access to great stories.

“However, I feel people need to have the opportunity to leave the safe and familiar of their lives and go to a place where they can sit in the company of others and have a shared experience — cry together, laugh together, be afraid together — so that when it’s over they might feel a little less like strangers. I want to see the survival of movie theaters. I want the theatrical experience to remain relevant in our culture.”

Netflix made its award-winning film “Roma” available to theaters leading up to the event, but still rubbed some theater-owners the wrong way by refusing to honor the traditional exclusive 90-day window before releasing the film on its own service.

While Spielberg says he is concerned for the future of movie theaters and the experience of watching films, the Times reported that the director feels that his view of streaming platforms has been misrepresented, according to people close to him. The sources told the Times that Spielberg is actually more frustrated with theater owners who have refused to compromise on the 90-day exclusivity rule to play films like Netflix’s “Roma.”

AMC Theatres and Regal Cinemas shut “Roma” out of its showing for best picture contenders leading up to the Academy Awards even after Spielberg asked them to play the film despite it already being available on Netflix, according to the Times.

Spielberg’s production company Amblin Partners and the talent agency representing him did not immediately respond to requests for comment from CNBC. Netflix also did not immediately return a request for comment.

Read the full report at The New York Times.

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Watch: Oscar host receives letter from DOJ warning about proposed rule change


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: lauren feiner, matt winkelmeyer, getty images entertainment, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, film, theaters, times, netflix, steven, experience, academy, rule, wasnt, spielberg, york, bad, battle, streaming


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Netflix, streaming services win Oscars cinema rule battle

In a win for Netflix, Amazon and other internet streaming services, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has voted not to change its rules for winning an Oscar, Hollywood’s top prize. Some theater owners say short runs at a theater means more people will stay home to watch movies. In February, Netflix won three Oscars for “Roma,” which streamed three weeks after a limited theatrical debut. Netflix tweeted that it “loved cinema” but also supported access for people who cannot afford, o


In a win for Netflix, Amazon and other internet streaming services, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has voted not to change its rules for winning an Oscar, Hollywood’s top prize. Some theater owners say short runs at a theater means more people will stay home to watch movies. In February, Netflix won three Oscars for “Roma,” which streamed three weeks after a limited theatrical debut. Netflix tweeted that it “loved cinema” but also supported access for people who cannot afford, o
Netflix, streaming services win Oscars cinema rule battle Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: mario anzuoni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, movie, rules, services, theater, theatrical, win, motion, cinema, say, netflix, streaming, battle, movies, oscars, rule, small, marcus


Netflix, streaming services win Oscars cinema rule battle

In a win for Netflix, Amazon and other internet streaming services, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has voted not to change its rules for winning an Oscar, Hollywood’s top prize.

The decision follows a battle over how long a movie must play on the big screens in theaters before being launched on the internet, DVD, or other mediums that put it on the small screen.

The Academy’s Board of Governors said on Tuesday that the existing rules, which say a movie has to run in a theater for only seven days in Los Angeles to qualify, had won.

“We support the theatrical experience as integral to the art of motion pictures, and this weighed heavily in our discussions,” Academy President John Bailey said in a release.

Some theater owners say short runs at a theater means more people will stay home to watch movies.

And movie producers including Steven Spielberg have said movies that are shown primarily on the small screen should only compete for television awards, such as the Emmys.

In February, Netflix won three Oscars for “Roma,” which streamed three weeks after a limited theatrical debut.

Netflix tweeted that it “loved cinema” but also supported access for people who cannot afford, or do not live close to, theaters.

Shorter windows would keep some customers at home, Greg Marcus, chief executive of The Marcus Corporation, owner of the fourth-largest U.S. theater chain, earlier told Reuters.

“If you damage the business and take away 10 percent of our customers, we won’t be able to reinvest in the theatrical experience,” Marcus said. “That would ultimately hurt content providers.”

Others said consumers are happy with the current system.

Ticket sales in 2018 reached a record $41 billion globally and $12 billion in the United States and Canada, even as Netflix released about 90 movies for streaming.

“We’re not talking about something that’s broken,” Vue International cinemas CEO Tim Richards said in an earlier interview with Reuters.

The Academy’s Bailey said the rule could be revisited next year.

“We plan to further study the profound changes occurring in our industry and continue discussions with our members about these issues,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: mario anzuoni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, movie, rules, services, theater, theatrical, win, motion, cinema, say, netflix, streaming, battle, movies, oscars, rule, small, marcus


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