Chile President Pinera declares emergency as capital is rocked by riots

Pinera spoke to the nation in the early hours of Saturday, declaring an emergency lockdown as sirens filled the night air downtown, and police and firefighters rushed to contain the damage. Chile ‘s President Sebastian Pinera declared a state of emergency in the capital Santiago early on Saturday, as the city of 6 million descended into chaos amid riots that left a downtown building engulfed in flames and its metro system shuttered. Enel Chile, a subsidiary of Italian utility Enel, said vandals


Pinera spoke to the nation in the early hours of Saturday, declaring an emergency lockdown as sirens filled the night air downtown, and police and firefighters rushed to contain the damage.
Chile ‘s President Sebastian Pinera declared a state of emergency in the capital Santiago early on Saturday, as the city of 6 million descended into chaos amid riots that left a downtown building engulfed in flames and its metro system shuttered.
Enel Chile, a subsidiary of Italian utility Enel, said vandals
Chile President Pinera declares emergency as capital is rocked by riots Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-19
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, emergency, chile, declares, president, early, system, downtown, pinera, stations, rocked, suffering, students, television, metro, riots, capital, days


Chile President Pinera declares emergency as capital is rocked by riots

Pinera spoke to the nation in the early hours of Saturday, declaring an emergency lockdown as sirens filled the night air downtown, and police and firefighters rushed to contain the damage.

Black-hooded protesters enraged by recent fare hikes on public transportation lit fires at several metro stations, looted shops, burned a public bus and swung metal pipes at train station turnstiles during Friday’s afternoon commute, according to witnesses, social media and television footage.

Chile ‘s President Sebastian Pinera declared a state of emergency in the capital Santiago early on Saturday, as the city of 6 million descended into chaos amid riots that left a downtown building engulfed in flames and its metro system shuttered.

In the coming days, our government will call for a dialogue … to alleviate the suffering of those affected by the increase in fares.

The center-right Pinera said he would invoke a special state security law to prosecute the “criminals” responsible for the city-wide damage, while at the same time saying he sympathized with those impacted by the rate hikes.

“In the coming days, our government will call for a dialogue … to alleviate the suffering of those affected by the increase in fares,” Pinera said in the broadcast address.

Chile is one of Latin America’s wealthiest nations, but also, among its most unequal. Frustrations over the high cost of living in Santiago have become a political flashpoint, prompting calls for reforms on everything from the country’s tax and labor codes to its pension system.

Enel Chile, a subsidiary of Italian utility Enel, said vandals had set fire to the company’s high-rise corporate headquarters downtown. Local television footage showed flames climbing up the side of the building as fire crews struggled to break through growing crowds of protesters.

The company said in a statement posted on Twitter that workers had been evacuated safely from the site.

High school and university students began the protests after the government hiked fares on Oct. 6 to as much as $1.17 for a peak metro ride, blaming higher energy costs and a weaker peso.

The protests turned increasingly violent on Friday afternoon, however, and by early evening, officials had closed down all of the city’s 136 metro stations, which connect more than 87 miles of track.

The metro system will remain closed through the weekend, with officials saying “serious destruction” made it impossible to operate trains safely.

Demonstrators clanging pots and honking horns clashed with police armed with batons and tear gas all across the normally subdued city late into Friday evening.

Metro management said there had been more than 200 incidents on Santiago’s subway system in the previous 11 days, mostly involving school children and older students jumping barriers and forcing gates.

Earlier on Friday, after a meeting with the metro chief and interior minister, Transport Minister Gloria Hutt told reporters the fare hike would not be reversed. She said the government subsidizes almost half the operating costs of the metro, one of Latin America’s most modern.

“This is not a discussion that should have risen to the level of violence that we’ve seen,” she said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-19
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, emergency, chile, declares, president, early, system, downtown, pinera, stations, rocked, suffering, students, television, metro, riots, capital, days


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To get in to a top college, your character matters, too

Steve Shepard | Getty ImagesMost people consider getting in to college a numbers game. However, in the wake of last year’s college admissions scandal, which underscored how much pressure parents and students feel to be accepted into elite universities, admissions directors are quietly turning their attention to something besides test scores. Today, “almost every institution is looking more carefully at character,” said Eric Greenberg, president of Greenberg Educational Group, a New York-based co


Steve Shepard | Getty ImagesMost people consider getting in to college a numbers game. However, in the wake of last year’s college admissions scandal, which underscored how much pressure parents and students feel to be accepted into elite universities, admissions directors are quietly turning their attention to something besides test scores. Today, “almost every institution is looking more carefully at character,” said Eric Greenberg, president of Greenberg Educational Group, a New York-based co
To get in to a top college, your character matters, too Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rate, looking, president, greenberg, applicants, low, college, students, matters, university, admissions, character


To get in to a top college, your character matters, too

Steve Shepard | Getty Images

Most people consider getting in to college a numbers game. However, in the wake of last year’s college admissions scandal, which underscored how much pressure parents and students feel to be accepted into elite universities, admissions directors are quietly turning their attention to something besides test scores. Today, “almost every institution is looking more carefully at character,” said Eric Greenberg, president of Greenberg Educational Group, a New York-based consulting firm with clients throughout the U.S. “Authenticity and honesty are at a premium,” he said. Seeing applicants who are “excited and deeply engaged has made the difference,” said Jon Daly, the admissions director at Thomas Aquinas College in Santa Paula, California, which requires several essays and letters of recommendations as part of its application process.

Almost every institution is looking more carefully at character. Eric Greenberg president of Greenberg Educational Group

Of course, non-academic factors have been used in an ad hoc way for years, according to Robert Massa, a former admissions dean at Drew University, Johns Hopkins and Dickinson College. “It’s going to become even more important in the years ahead,” he said, especially at the most selective institutions as more and more students apply. Last spring, Princeton University offered admission to just 5.8% of its 32,804 applicants, Yale hit an admissions rate low of 5.9% and, at Harvard, the admission rate hit a record low 4.5% of applicants securing spots in the Class of 2023.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rate, looking, president, greenberg, applicants, low, college, students, matters, university, admissions, character


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Students who don’t fill out FAFSA are missing out on their share of billions in financial aid

As of Oct. 1, college-bound students can apply for their share of $150 billion in federal student aid including grants, loans and work-study. To apply, they need to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or the FAFSA. NerdWallet estimates that students who are Pell Grant-eligible missed out on $2.6 billion in free FAFSA college aid in 2018 simply because they did not submit the FAFSA. Most students complete the FAFSA online, but students who choose to complete the application on


As of Oct. 1, college-bound students can apply for their share of $150 billion in federal student aid including grants, loans and work-study. To apply, they need to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or the FAFSA. NerdWallet estimates that students who are Pell Grant-eligible missed out on $2.6 billion in free FAFSA college aid in 2018 simply because they did not submit the FAFSA. Most students complete the FAFSA online, but students who choose to complete the application on
Students who don’t fill out FAFSA are missing out on their share of billions in financial aid Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billions, aid, students, dont, didnt, tax, federal, sallie, need, share, complete, fafsa, missing, financial


Students who don't fill out FAFSA are missing out on their share of billions in financial aid

As of Oct. 1, college-bound students can apply for their share of $150 billion in federal student aid including grants, loans and work-study. To apply, they need to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or the FAFSA. FAFSA funds are distributed on a first-come, first-served basis. Sallie Mae recently polled 2,000 undergraduate students and parents and asked if they submitted the FAFSA. According to Sallie Mae’s analysis, during the 2018 – 2019 school year, only 25% of undergraduate students completed the FAFSA the first month it was open, and just 77% of undergraduate students completed it at all. By not filling out FAFSA, American college students are missing out. Federal grants do not need to be repaid, federal student loans have low interest rates and work-study programs can be a convenient way to simultaneously fund an education and build a resume. Because FAFSA funds are distributed as applications come in, families who plan ahead can gain an upper hand. Sallie Mae reported that 80% of students from families that make between $35,000 and $100,000 filled out the FAFSA, but 75% of students from families making less did so. NerdWallet estimates that students who are Pell Grant-eligible missed out on $2.6 billion in free FAFSA college aid in 2018 simply because they did not submit the FAFSA. In Sallie Mae’s poll, the company asked the students and parents about their reasons for not submitting the FAFSA. Here’s what they said:

They thought they were too rich

Among the almost quarter of college students who did not apply, nearly 40% said their reason was because they didn’t think they would qualify. But there is no income cut-off to apply for federal student aid. Charlie Javice, founder & CEO of Frank, an online FAFSA platform, told CNBC Make It. “It’s really important as FAFSA season comes up that people don’t forget that there is no such thing as being too rich to file FAFSA.” Javice said families that make more than $250,000 do not typically qualify for grants or subsidized loans but pointed out that a vast majority of Americans make less than $250,000. Being too rich “only applies to less than 5% of the U.S. population. Everyone should be doing it.”

They missed the deadline

The second most common reason students gave for not completing the FAFSA was because they missed the deadline, with 15% of those who did not complete the form giving this excuse. Each year, there is a nine-month period during which students can submit applications for both the current year and the future year. To avoid confusion, students should be sure to apply for aid for their upcoming school year as soon as possible. Most students complete the FAFSA online, but students who choose to complete the application on paper should submit their documents so that a federal processor reviews them by June 30. According to Edvisors, if a FAFSA is received after the June 30 deadline, it will not be processed. For those looking to avoid this challenge, here are the deadlines: Students attending college from July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2020 can file the 2019 – 2020 FAFSA between Oct. 1, 2018, and June 30, 2020, using their 2017 tax information.

Students attending college from July 1, 2020 to June 30, 2021 can file the 2020 – 2021 FAFSA between Oct. 1, 2019, and June 30, 2021, using their 2018 tax information. Students should also make sure they are aware of the deadlines for applying for financial aid from their schools, states and local governments. The Department of Education and Edvisors provide resources for students to check their local deadlines.

jacoblund | Getty Images

It’s complicated

Of those who didn’t complete the FAFSA, 8% said it was because the application was too complicated, 9% said they didn’t have time and another 10% said they didn’t have the necessary information they needed to complete the form. In order to complete the FAFSA, students will need their tax returns, information about their family’s bank accounts and assets, and the names of the schools they are interested in attending. Over the past decade, the Department of Education has taken steps to make the form simpler and more intuitive, including redesigning the application website adding automatic error notifications if a field has been filled incorrectly. As of 2019, the FAFSA can even be completed on your phone. To test these improvements, I filled out the revamped FAFSA form myself. It took about five and a half minutes. The IRS data retrieval tool makes it easy for students to automatically transfer their tax return information, so I didn’t need to go searching for my returns. The banking information required was limited, so I didn’t need to go searching through bank statements. “I think [the Department of Education] has definitely made some strides,” Sallie Mae spokesperson Rick Castellano told CNBC Make It. “The IRS data retrieval tool is a game-changer, and the ability to use your prior year tax return is huge.” Castellano said that though it can take closer to 30 minutes for some students to complete the FAFSA, “it’s well worth it, given what you’re getting in line for.”

They didn’t know


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billions, aid, students, dont, didnt, tax, federal, sallie, need, share, complete, fafsa, missing, financial


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WeWork will close its private school in 2020 as it looks to cut costs

WeWork is shutting down early education school WeGrow later this year, in what represents the latest cost-cutting measure by the struggling office-sharing company. A WeWork spokesperson told CNBC that WeGrow will continue to operate through the remainder of the 2019-20 school year. The elementary school is located in New York’s Chelsea neighborhood and charges as much as $42,000 per year in tuition. “WeWork and the families of WeGrow students are engaging in discussions with interested parties r


WeWork is shutting down early education school WeGrow later this year, in what represents the latest cost-cutting measure by the struggling office-sharing company. A WeWork spokesperson told CNBC that WeGrow will continue to operate through the remainder of the 2019-20 school year. The elementary school is located in New York’s Chelsea neighborhood and charges as much as $42,000 per year in tuition. “WeWork and the families of WeGrow students are engaging in discussions with interested parties r
WeWork will close its private school in 2020 as it looks to cut costs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, operate, spokesperson, families, looks, efforts, close, 2020, ipo, school, private, wegrow, costs, students, cut, wework, company


WeWork will close its private school in 2020 as it looks to cut costs

WeWork is shutting down early education school WeGrow later this year, in what represents the latest cost-cutting measure by the struggling office-sharing company.

The news was first reported by The Huffington Post.

A WeWork spokesperson told CNBC that WeGrow will continue to operate through the remainder of the 2019-20 school year. The elementary school is located in New York’s Chelsea neighborhood and charges as much as $42,000 per year in tuition.

“As part of the company’s efforts to focus on its core business, WeWork has informed the families of WeGrow students that we will not operate WeGrow after this school year,” the spokesperson said in a statement. “WeWork and the families of WeGrow students are engaging in discussions with interested parties regarding plans for WeGrow for the following school year.”

The move follows additional efforts by WeWork’s new co-CEOs, Artie Minson and Sebastian Gunningham, to trim the fat at the company. Since Adam Neumann exited the company in September, the company has put three companies up for sale, including event organizing platform Meetup, office management company Managed by Q and marketing company Conductor, according to The Information.

According to a separate report in The Information, WeWork could further reduce costs by slashing up to one-third of the company’s workers, or roughly 5,000 employees.

Late last month, WeWork withdrew its IPO filing amid sharp criticism from investors, mounting losses and a dwindling IPO valuation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, operate, spokesperson, families, looks, efforts, close, 2020, ipo, school, private, wegrow, costs, students, cut, wework, company


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Millennials who buy less and save more are happier

Millennials who implement “proactive financial strategies” tend to be happier and more satisfied with their lives, according to the new research. “People who save money report better overall well-being, including less psychological distress,” Sabrina Helm, study author and associate professor tells CNBC Make It. “And people who buy less and consume less show less depressive symptoms, so there’s a positive mental health effect.” Although many people have been socialized to see products as solutio


Millennials who implement “proactive financial strategies” tend to be happier and more satisfied with their lives, according to the new research. “People who save money report better overall well-being, including less psychological distress,” Sabrina Helm, study author and associate professor tells CNBC Make It. “And people who buy less and consume less show less depressive symptoms, so there’s a positive mental health effect.” Although many people have been socialized to see products as solutio
Millennials who buy less and save more are happier Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, study, millennials, health, save, researchers, tend, students, helm, happier, mental, lives, buy


Millennials who buy less and save more are happier

Following a budget, saving money and shopping less have benefits “beyond the realm of personal finance,” according to a new study out of the University of Arizona.

Millennials who implement “proactive financial strategies” tend to be happier and more satisfied with their lives, according to the new research.

For the study, researchers collected data from 968 young adults (born between the years 1981 and 1996) starting when they were freshmen in college (ages 18-21). They followed up with the same students when they were seniors, and then two years later (ages 23-26).

The study participants answered questions about materialism, their own personal finance tactics such as budgeting and any pro-environmental habits they followed. (The researchers chose to look at eco-friendly habits because they provide further insight into how the students “cope with limited resources.”)

Students were also surveyed about their mental health, including their how satisfied they were with their lives and how they’d rank their personal well-being.

“People who save money report better overall well-being, including less psychological distress,” Sabrina Helm, study author and associate professor tells CNBC Make It. “And people who buy less and consume less show less depressive symptoms, so there’s a positive mental health effect.”

Not surprisingly, the money-saving strategies improved people’s financial satisfaction too.

“It gives you peace of mind,” Dr. Helm says. “If you’re able to put something aside for worse days, and if you manage to live within your means, it has clear positive effects on mental health.” This finding is especially significant for students, “who very often have a hard time financially,” she adds.

Certain sustainability efforts also have a similar impact on people’s health and happiness.

For example, researchers found that the students who consumed less to help the environment were happier than those who simply bought more “green” products. Although many people have been socialized to see products as solutions, simply reducing the number of things you use or buy might be the better strategy for your mental health, Dr. Helm explains.

“It’s normal to get a product to help us cope with all sorts of things in our lives,” Dr. Helm says, “but that contributes to climate change.”

Luckily, there are concrete tips people can use to “step back from the consumerist approach” and feel happier with their lives, Dr. Helm says. For example, she suggests keeping a weekly purchase diary and creating a shopping list to avoid spending on impulse.

“If we can manage to take a more critical or mindful stance toward our everyday consumption behaviors, that’d be extremely important,” Dr. Helm adds.

People in other age groups can benefit from scaling back, not just young people in college. A 2014 study found that adults who are less materialistic tend to be happier (on the flip side, people who are happier also tend to be less materialistic).

Don’t miss:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, study, millennials, health, save, researchers, tend, students, helm, happier, mental, lives, buy


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Florida is scooping up huge amounts of data on schoolchildren, including security camera footage and discipline records, and researchers are worried

Ora Tanner discusses research on the data collection and collation of information about schoolchildren in Florida at an October 1 Aspen Institute event. Researchers from the Aspen Institute are raising concerns about a Florida initiative meant to collect and collate huge amounts of data on schoolchildren in the state, according to a report released Thursday. Florida schools are now required to collect, store and crunch data on students in the name of predicting school shootings. The Florida Scho


Ora Tanner discusses research on the data collection and collation of information about schoolchildren in Florida at an October 1 Aspen Institute event. Researchers from the Aspen Institute are raising concerns about a Florida initiative meant to collect and collate huge amounts of data on schoolchildren in the state, according to a report released Thursday. Florida schools are now required to collect, store and crunch data on students in the name of predicting school shootings. The Florida Scho
Florida is scooping up huge amounts of data on schoolchildren, including security camera footage and discipline records, and researchers are worried Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, florida, schools, school, institute, researchers, initiative, huge, worried, footage, scooping, records, security, information, data, schoolchildren, research, students, including


Florida is scooping up huge amounts of data on schoolchildren, including security camera footage and discipline records, and researchers are worried

Ora Tanner discusses research on the data collection and collation of information about schoolchildren in Florida at an October 1 Aspen Institute event.

Researchers from the Aspen Institute are raising concerns about a Florida initiative meant to collect and collate huge amounts of data on schoolchildren in the state, according to a report released Thursday.

Florida schools are now required to collect, store and crunch data on students in the name of predicting school shootings. The Florida Schools Safety Portal, or FSSP, executive order was issued by Gov. Ron DeSantis earlier this year in response to the 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.

The initiative comes at a time when large social media companies and app developers have encountered withering criticism and regulatory scrutiny over their collection of children’s data and possible violations of students’ privacy in using that data improperly.

“No evidence-based research has demonstrated that a data-driven surveillance system such as the FSSP will be effective in preventing school violence. In addition, no information is publicly available about how the database was designed, developed, or tested,” according to preliminary findings by researchers.

The Florida Department of Education did not immediately respond to requests for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, florida, schools, school, institute, researchers, initiative, huge, worried, footage, scooping, records, security, information, data, schoolchildren, research, students, including


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The lesson from Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that inspired these students to build a multimillion start-up

Siu Rui Quek had always been entrepreneurial. But it was a lesson learned in his early twenties from enterprising icons Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that set him on course for the big times. I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way. Carousell’s co-founders from left to right, Marcus Tan, Siu Rui Quek and Lucas Ngoo. You’ve just got to love what you do and be obsessed about that problem you’re solving Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell


Siu Rui Quek had always been entrepreneurial. But it was a lesson learned in his early twenties from enterprising icons Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that set him on course for the big times. I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way. Carousell’s co-founders from left to right, Marcus Tan, Siu Rui Quek and Lucas Ngoo. You’ve just got to love what you do and be obsessed about that problem you’re solving Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell
The lesson from Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that inspired these students to build a multimillion start-up Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, students, mentor, jack, zuckerberg, inspired, multimillion, siu, startup, technology, know, dorsey, mark, lesson, rui, build, big, online, quek


The lesson from Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that inspired these students to build a multimillion start-up

Siu Rui Quek had always been entrepreneurial. As a teen, he would fuel his passion for technology and earn extra cash buying and selling gadgets online. But it was a lesson learned in his early twenties from enterprising icons Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that set him on course for the big times. That lesson? Know your mission. Quek is co-founder and CEO of $550 million online consumer marketplace Carousell. He started the business with his college friends Marcus Tan and Lucas Ngoo back in 2012 after they were inspired by talks from the top tech talents during an internship in Silicon Valley. And, even today, he says those presentations played a vital role in shaping Carousell’s success.

I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way. Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell

“The one thing that we really learned and took away,” Quek told CNBC Make It, “is to be absolutely mission-oriented and mission-first.” “This idea of being mission-first just helps people transcend personal egos (and) helps create collaboration,” he said. To be sure, the founders did not mentor Quek and his friends directly. “I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way — I know him but he doesn’t know me,” Quek said.

Carousell’s co-founders from left to right, Marcus Tan, Siu Rui Quek and Lucas Ngoo. Carousell

But, by watching their presentations and studying their style, Quek said he and his co-founders were inspired to think about the big picture and how they could use technology to solve big issues. “I think the one commonality all of them had was just this whole fascination for using technology to solve problems and make a big impact,” said Quek. For Carousell, that meant building a platform to simplify buying and selling online, which, Quek said, plays into the company’s wider mission to “inspire every person in the world to start selling.”

You’ve just got to love what you do and be obsessed about that problem you’re solving Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, students, mentor, jack, zuckerberg, inspired, multimillion, siu, startup, technology, know, dorsey, mark, lesson, rui, build, big, online, quek


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Scams, cons and schemes: Money mistakes that international students in the UK must avoid

Alys Tomlinson | Cultura | Getty ImagesAccording to one survey, international students at U.K. universities spend an average £816 ($1,003) per month in living costs, risking falling further into debt. CNBC finds out how some students coming to Britain are being set up for for scams and hears advice on how to avoid them. Students coming from outside the EU who need a visa are required to provide evidence they cover the cost of studying in the UK, for instance. The general student Tier 4 visa cost


Alys Tomlinson | Cultura | Getty ImagesAccording to one survey, international students at U.K. universities spend an average £816 ($1,003) per month in living costs, risking falling further into debt. CNBC finds out how some students coming to Britain are being set up for for scams and hears advice on how to avoid them. Students coming from outside the EU who need a visa are required to provide evidence they cover the cost of studying in the UK, for instance. The general student Tier 4 visa cost
Scams, cons and schemes: Money mistakes that international students in the UK must avoid Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, costs, living, student, avoid, fees, visa, mistakes, scams, coming, international, month, students, cons, schemes


Scams, cons and schemes: Money mistakes that international students in the UK must avoid

Alys Tomlinson | Cultura | Getty Images

According to one survey, international students at U.K. universities spend an average £816 ($1,003) per month in living costs, risking falling further into debt. Rent made up the biggest chunk of spending, costing an average £484 per month. This was followed by £104 needed for groceries while takeaways or eating out accounted for £40 of monthly costs. Going out or socializing averaged just £37 per month. Money advice website Save the Student also included British scholars in their wider survey of around 4,000 people, finding students fall short on living costs by an average of £267 every month. In short, the U.K. is expensive and the last thing a student needs is to waste precious cash. CNBC finds out how some students coming to Britain are being set up for for scams and hears advice on how to avoid them.

Beware of visa scammers

One unnecessary cost can occur even before students arrive in the country as they try to make sure all the paperwork is in place. “I think the biggest challenge for students coming to the UK is that they can feel quite panicked, that they have to do something by a certain deadline,” says Anne Marie Graham, chief executive at the UK Council for International Student Affairs. Students coming from outside the EU who need a visa are required to provide evidence they cover the cost of studying in the UK, for instance. The general student Tier 4 visa costs £348 ($428). “One thing I would strongly want to flag is really think very carefully about who is asking you for your money and if they are asking you for a large sum of money,” Graham adds. Tom Clementson, a consumer director at secure payment service Shieldpay, suggests watching out for scammers posing as the Home Office threatening legal action and deportation if students fail to share personal details or pay visa fees. “If a call or email seems unusual don’t panic, end the communication and speak to your university who will help you check what’s genuine and what’s not,” he told CNBC via email.

Seek funding but watch the small print

Save the Student’s research found half (51%) of international students were unaware of the funding available to them before starting at university. Students coming to the U.K. from within the EU are still eligible for a loan from the UK government to cover tuition fees, which are capped at £9,250 and living costs, for an undergraduate degree. But Undergraduates from outside the EU do not qualify for a UK government loan, with fees ranging between £10,500 and £33,500 a year. Exchange programs, private company sponsorship and scholarships are some of the alternative funding options to look out for, as highlighted on the Save the Student website. However, Clementson warns that students must watch out for phishing emails from scammers attempting to steal fees by claiming they will help pay tuition fees or offering an additional bursary.

Watch for “rogue landlords”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, costs, living, student, avoid, fees, visa, mistakes, scams, coming, international, month, students, cons, schemes


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Anatomy students in Australia are using virtual and augmented reality to learn about the body

In the latest sign that digital innovations are changing the way we learn, anatomy students at a university in Australia are using augmented and virtual reality. According to Aaron McDonald, La Trobe’s head of the anatomy discipline, augmented reality (AR) offered students 24-hour access to three-dimensional anatomy images through their phones, computers or iPad. On campus, headsets are used to provide access to virtual reality technology. “Augmented reality allows students to visualize and mani


In the latest sign that digital innovations are changing the way we learn, anatomy students at a university in Australia are using augmented and virtual reality. According to Aaron McDonald, La Trobe’s head of the anatomy discipline, augmented reality (AR) offered students 24-hour access to three-dimensional anatomy images through their phones, computers or iPad. On campus, headsets are used to provide access to virtual reality technology. “Augmented reality allows students to visualize and mani
Anatomy students in Australia are using virtual and augmented reality to learn about the body Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, students, courses, body, augmented, using, technology, virtual, digital, used, australia, titles, reality, anatomy, learn, university


Anatomy students in Australia are using virtual and augmented reality to learn about the body

In the latest sign that digital innovations are changing the way we learn, anatomy students at a university in Australia are using augmented and virtual reality.

The pilot of the technology is being used to help boost spatial awareness, accessibility and explorative learning, La Trobe University said in an announcement Monday.

According to Aaron McDonald, La Trobe’s head of the anatomy discipline, augmented reality (AR) offered students 24-hour access to three-dimensional anatomy images through their phones, computers or iPad. On campus, headsets are used to provide access to virtual reality technology.

“Augmented reality allows students to visualize and manipulate anatomical structures and develop a deep understanding,” McDonald said. “You can superimpose anatomical structures over a peer who can perform movements along with the app, to better understand muscle function,” he added. “It is a great resource for both team work and self-directed learning.”

The university said that, in terms of cost, the use of AR technology amounted to 10 Australian dollars ($6.74) per student compared to over 100 Australian dollars for just one textbook.

Technology is driving change across the education sector, with computers and tablets now a common site in classrooms and libraries around the world. The last few years have also seen the development of digital based learning platforms including massive open online courses, or MOOCS.

Providers such as edX — which was founded by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2012 — offer free online courses from renowned institutions such as Columbia University and Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. The platform provides more than 2,400 courses and its users come from all over the world.

In July this year education publisher Pearson announced that all new releases of its 1,500 active U.S. titles would be “digital first.” The company said the titles would be updated on a continuous basis “driven by developments in the field of study, new technologies, such as artificial intelligence, data analytics, and Pearson’s own efficacy research.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, students, courses, body, augmented, using, technology, virtual, digital, used, australia, titles, reality, anatomy, learn, university


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Dave Ramsey tells students: Skip the ‘dream’ college and go to school where you can afford

Go to a community collegeContrary to popular perception, going to community college is not a “dumb move,” Ramsey said. In Tennessee, residents can attend the first two years of community college for free. “We’ve got to start hyping up community colleges and stop saying as a culture that community colleges are horrible,” ONeal said. Baruch College is a public college located in New York City. The average yearly cost at a public college is $10,800, and goes up to $12,210 at the average private col


Go to a community collegeContrary to popular perception, going to community college is not a “dumb move,” Ramsey said. In Tennessee, residents can attend the first two years of community college for free. “We’ve got to start hyping up community colleges and stop saying as a culture that community colleges are horrible,” ONeal said. Baruch College is a public college located in New York City. The average yearly cost at a public college is $10,800, and goes up to $12,210 at the average private col
Dave Ramsey tells students: Skip the ‘dream’ college and go to school where you can afford Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dont, average, ramsey, school, public, university, community, skip, colleges, dave, students, dream, tells, afford, college


Dave Ramsey tells students: Skip the 'dream' college and go to school where you can afford

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK – FEBRUARY 19: Personal finance guru Dave Ramsey speaks to a crowd of thousands at his event ‘Dave Ramsey’s Total Money Makeover LIVE’ at Cox Convention Center on February 19, 2011 in Oklahoma City, OK. (Photo by Jackson Laizure/Getty Images)

About 40% of students say that when it comes to picking which college they will attend, the most determining factor is the “overall fit,” according to a recent survey by the Princeton Review. Only about 9% of students cited affordability as the most important element in choosing their school. That’s happening, in part, because parents, and society as a whole, are allowing students to “take a kid’s approach to an adult decision,” personal financial coach Anthony ONeal said during a Debt-Free Degree Town Hall event with personal finance expert and best-selling author Dave Ramsey. Students are focused on attending that all-important “dream school,” rather than seriously considering what student loan debt will do to their lives 20 or 30 years down the line. While finding a school that works for you is important, it’s perhaps not as important as finding a school you can afford. “We’re not against you going anywhere you want to go to school, as long as you pay for it — and don’t justify [your college pick] and rationalize it based on stupid stuff,” Ramsey said. “You don’t want to be stupid about education, it’s kind of oxymoronic,” Ramsey added with his famous brand of sarcasm. Ramsey cited an example of a recent caller from his radio program who wanted to go to University of Mississippi, known as Ole Miss. When Ramsey asked the high schooler why she wanted to go to that particular school, she responded that she liked the campus. “She’s going to be $40,000 in debt because the campus is pretty,” Ramsey scoffed. During the town hall, Ramsey and ONeal, author of the upcoming book “Debt-Free Degree,” said it is possible to go to college and get your undergraduate degree without taking out student loans. Here are four of the money-saving ways they recommend students and their families approach getting a degree.

A student graduates from Southern Maine Community College. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

1. Go to a community college

Contrary to popular perception, going to community college is not a “dumb move,” Ramsey said. These schools are not simply for students who didn’t get into a more prestigious university. About 8.7 million students are studying at public two-year colleges, or community colleges, according to the most recent figures from the National Center for Education Statistics. On average, tuition at these schools for the 2018-2019 school year was $3,660, but many students end up paying significantly less. In Tennessee, residents can attend the first two years of community college for free. “We’ve got to start hyping up community colleges and stop saying as a culture that community colleges are horrible,” ONeal said. However, that doesn’t mean all community colleges are worthwhile, Ramsey said. “There are two kinds of college professors: great and sucks,” he said. Similarly, there are two types of community colleges, some of which are substandard. That means you need to do your research, just as you would with any other university. Visit the school and talk with professors and former students. As long as the school can provide a solid education, don’t stress about its prestige. “Think about this: When you go in to get your taxes done and the guy or gal is a CPA, how many times do you ask them where they went to school?” Ramsey asks. Probably not often. “That’s the biggest lie we’ve ever believed: where you went to school has some correlation with your future success — it has almost zero,” he said. Employers just want to know that you received an adequate education and that you can do the job.

Baruch College is a public college located in New York City. Source: Baruch College

2. Go to a public, in-state school

If you don’t have the cash to go to school and you’re looking at debt, the biggest “mathematical change in the equation” you can make is the choice of college, Ramsey said. Many times, a public, in-state university is a more affordable option than going out of state or to a private college. The average cost of annual in-state tuition at public colleges is $9,970, while out-of-state tuition averages $25,620, according to finance research site ValuePenguin. Private colleges charge a yearly average tuition of $34,740, but many are much higher. “You can’t work enough while you’re in school to offset the difference between $10,000 and $50,000 a year,” Ramsey said. “Choose to go to the cheaper school where you can afford, it’s that simple.” When it comes to picking not only your school, but your major, evaluate what your chosen career will pay once you graduate. “Don’t spend $450,000 getting a degree in something that makes you $50,000 a year — you’ll be in debt the rest of your life,” Ramsey said.

A student studies for classes at the kitchen table. Source: Twenty20

3. Live at home

Room and board can really add up. The average yearly cost at a public college is $10,800, and goes up to $12,210 at the average private college, according to ValuePenguin. It may be more cost-effective to live at home and commute to campus if you can, even if that means sacrificing a bit of freedom. “If you can see the college years as a temporary season of necessary sacrifice for the victory of debt-free living, you’ll be able to get through anything,” Ramsey writes on his website. “Even a few extra years under the same roof!”

Chance The Rapper and scholarship recipient Alexia Feaster attend the Scholly Scholarship Summit. Jeff Schear | Getty Images Entertainment | Getty Images

4. Chase down scholarships


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dont, average, ramsey, school, public, university, community, skip, colleges, dave, students, dream, tells, afford, college


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