Elizabeth Warren has introduced a bill that would expand food stamps for low-income college students

The mention of “food” and “college students” together might conjure up images of bustling dining halls and late-night snacks. Temple University’s Hope Center for College, Community and Justice surveyed nearly 86,000 college students from 123 schools and found that nearly half are “food insecure.” By adding students who receive Pell Grants and independent students to this list of SNAP eligible students, Warren and Lawson’s bill could expand access to a huge swath of U.S. college students. The Dep


The mention of “food” and “college students” together might conjure up images of bustling dining halls and late-night snacks. Temple University’s Hope Center for College, Community and Justice surveyed nearly 86,000 college students from 123 schools and found that nearly half are “food insecure.” By adding students who receive Pell Grants and independent students to this list of SNAP eligible students, Warren and Lawson’s bill could expand access to a huge swath of U.S. college students. The Dep
Elizabeth Warren has introduced a bill that would expand food stamps for low-income college students Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, qualify, students, education, college, food, pell, warren, elizabeth, stamps, lowincome, bill, introduced, expand, student, snap, receive


Elizabeth Warren has introduced a bill that would expand food stamps for low-income college students

The legislation would also lower SNAP’s current work requirement for college students to 10 hours per-week and require the Department of Education to inform low-income students about their potential SNAP eligibility.

On Wednesday, Senator Elizabeth Warren and Congressman Al Lawson introduced The College Student Hunger Act of 2019 , which would expand SNAP benefits (or “food stamps”) to include Pell Grant-eligible students and “independent students,” such as those who are in foster care, who are veterans or who are homeless.

The mention of “food” and “college students” together might conjure up images of bustling dining halls and late-night snacks.

“As more and more students struggle to pay for college, 30% may be going hungry,” Warren tweeted. “Students shouldn’t have to choose between paying tuition and eating.”

Lawson echoed Warren in a statement. “The significant increase in college tuition over the last decade has forced students to make a choice between buying food or paying for books and housing expenditures. This bill will help to relieve some of that financial burden for them.”

Temple University’s Hope Center for College, Community and Justice surveyed nearly 86,000 college students from 123 schools and found that nearly half are “food insecure.”

The survey found that 45% of respondents often or sometimes worry that they do not have money to buy food, worry that their food will run out before they have the money to buy more or that they can’t afford balanced meals. A 2018 U.S Government Accountability Office report found that there are roughly 2 million college students in the U.S. who qualify for SNAP benefits but do not receive them.

Currently, SNAP eligibility varies from state to state, but most non-disabled college students between the ages of 18 and 49 do not qualify unless they meet requirements beyond traditional measures like income. For instance, some low-income students who have a disability or who are caregivers to a dependent household member can qualify for SNAP.

By adding students who receive Pell Grants and independent students to this list of SNAP eligible students, Warren and Lawson’s bill could expand access to a huge swath of U.S. college students. The Department of Education reports that 32% of undergraduate college students receive Pell Grants, and roughly half of all undergraduate college students are considered independent, meaning they do not receive financial support from their parents.

And a college student’s struggle to afford food can have a significant impact on their education. Today, just 60% of first-time full-time students earn a bachelor’s degree in six years, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. “We can see very strong relationships between these issues and the chance that a student will get good grades so they keep their financial aid, to make it to the next semester, to make it to graduation,” Sara Goldrick-Rab, professor at Temple University, and founder of the Hope Center, told CNBC Make It.

She also says that students who experience food and housing insecurity during college are less likely to excel after graduation, and therefore less likely to keep up with their student loan payments. “If you’ve been food insecure and or homeless for a period of college, the chances that you’re okay and you’re going to be a good employee are much smaller.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: abigail hess
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The 10 private US colleges that pay off the most

This means for some students, attending a private college can be surprisingly affordable. We found that many private colleges and universities can provide students significant value at manageable costs. The net cost for a student from a family that earns between $48,001 and $75,000 is $4,061 per year. Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 10 U.S. private colleges that pay off the most:1. Pomona CollegePomona College Ted Soqui | Corbis | Getty ImagesPomona College is one of five private, no


This means for some students, attending a private college can be surprisingly affordable. We found that many private colleges and universities can provide students significant value at manageable costs. The net cost for a student from a family that earns between $48,001 and $75,000 is $4,061 per year. Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 10 U.S. private colleges that pay off the most:1. Pomona CollegePomona College Ted Soqui | Corbis | Getty ImagesPomona College is one of five private, no
The 10 private US colleges that pay off the most Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, university, colleges, net, cost, salary, experience, alumni, pay, average, private, college, students


The 10 private US colleges that pay off the most

Research consistently demonstrates that college graduates earn more than their peers without degrees, but rising college costs can also scare students into thinking that school may be out of reach for them. According to the College Board’s 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report, during the 2018 – 2019 school year, the tuition at private nonprofit four-year schools was $35,830 on average. But in reality, many students end up paying far less. These college “sticker prices” include tuition, fees, room and board, but they do not account for scholarships, grants and tax benefits. This means for some students, attending a private college can be surprisingly affordable. In fact, the average net price of tuition and fees in 2019 is $14,610 at private nonprofit four-year schools, and students at these schools typically receive an average $21,220 in grant aid and tax benefits. CNBC Make It set out to capture the information students would need to balance these considerations. The result is our first list of the U.S. colleges that pay off the most, a ranking that spotlights 50 schools that provide students the highest average salaries for their education dollars. We found that many private colleges and universities can provide students significant value at manageable costs.

Click to expand To develop this list, we identified the true net cost of each college for the typical American student — including tuition, fees, books, supplies and other expenses — after subtracting scholarships and grants. Using data from Tuition Tracker, a tool created by education-focused nonprofit news organization The Hechinger Report, we looked at the net cost for students from families making between $48,001 and $75,000. We chose to focus on this bracket because it includes the median U.S. household income, $61,372. Then, using data from PayScale’s College Salary Report, we divided net cost by graduates’ expected annual earnings, which was calculated based on the median salary of graduates with less than five years of experience as well as those with 10 or more years of experience. The ranking gives greater weight to workers’ earnings in the years immediately after college, when individuals are the most impacted by college costs and student debt. (You can read our full methodology here.) Stanford University takes first place on the list. The net cost for a student from a family that earns between $48,001 and $75,000 is $4,061 per year. According to Stanford, the average scholarship and grant total for students from families making less than $65,000 a year is $74,095 per year. Students from families making between $65,000 and $95,000 receive $65,050 on average in scholarships and grant aid. Plus, Stanford graduates with more than 10 years of experience report average salaries of $143,100. But getting into a school like Stanford isn’t easy. The acceptance rate for the Stanford class of 2022 was just 4.4%, and other high-ranking private universities reported similarly low acceptance rates. Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 10 U.S. private colleges that pay off the most:

1. Stanford University

Stanford University David Butow | Getty Images

Stanford University, often referred to as a “West Coast Ivy,” is located near Silicon Valley in Stanford, California. The highly selective school is known for its strong science, technology and engineering programs as well as its successful athletics programs. Stanford enrolls approximately 7,083 undergraduate students. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $4,061

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $76,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $143,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $109,800

2. Princeton University

Princeton University Photo: Princeton University, Office of Communications.

Princeton University was founded in 1746, making it the fourth-oldest college in the United States. Undergraduate Princeton students study one of 37 concentrations and must be proficient in at least one language other than English. Known for its strong engineering program, approximately 25% of undergraduates at the Ivy League school study in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $4,557

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $72,700

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $141,300

Salary average, early and mid career: $107,000

3. University of Chicago

The University of Chicago Bob Krist | Getty Images

The University of Chicago is a private, nonprofit university in Chicago’s Hyde Park neighborhood. The school is known for its strong STEM programs, but the curriculum also requires students to complete courses in three areas: humanities, civilization studies and the arts; natural sciences; and social sciences. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $4,536

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $61,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $117,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $89,550

4. California Institute of Technology

California Institute of Technology Danita Delimont | Getty Images

California Institute of Technology, known as CalTech, is a private, nonprofit engineering university located in Pasadena, California. The CalTech curriculum emphasizes STEM education and all students are required to take math, physics, chemistry, biology and scientific communication courses. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,781

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $83,400

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $143,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $113,250

5. Harvard University

Harvard University DenisTangneyJr | iStock | Getty Images

Founded in 1636, Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is the oldest college in the United States. Harvard is known for its historic legacy, famous alumni and generous financial aid, which the university is able to provide in part because of an endowment worth approximately $39.2 billion. Harvard students select “concentrations” instead of majors and one of the most popular is economics. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,577

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $72,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $142,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $107,600

6. Yale University

Yale University Yana Paskova / Stringer (Getty Images)

Located in New Haven, Connecticut, Yale is a private, Ivy League university. Founded in 1701, Yale is the third-oldest college in the United States. Yale teaches a liberal arts curriculum and requires students take classes in humanities and arts; sciences and social sciences; foreign languages; quantitative reasoning; and writing. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,551

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $68,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $135,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $101,850

7. Columbia University

Columbia University Getty Images

Columbia University is a private Ivy League university in New York City. Founded in 1754, Columbia is the fifth-oldest college in the United States. Columbia students can choose from 80 areas of study but must take six required classes, such as Contemporary Civilization and Frontiers of Science, and must fulfill several requirements including taking a foreign language. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,592

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $69,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $127,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $98,350

8. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MIT Kevin Fleming | Corbis Documentary | Getty Images

Massachusetts Institute of Technology is a STEM-focused private, nonprofit university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Instead of majors, MIT students choose a “course” to specialize in. Electrical engineering, mechanical engineering and computer science are among the most popular courses at MIT. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,633

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $83,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $150,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $117,000

9. Pomona College

Pomona College Ted Soqui | Corbis | Getty Images

Pomona College is one of five private, nonprofit, liberal arts colleges in Claremont, California. The curriculum at the highly selective school is broad and requires students take at least one course in each of six areas: criticism, analysis and contextual study of works of the human imagination; social institutions and human behavior; history, values, ethics and cultural studies; physical and biological sciences; mathematical reasoning; and creation and performance of works of art and literature. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,975

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $60,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $119,900

Salary average, early and mid career: $90,200

10. Duke University


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: abigail hess
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Applying for college can be expensive. Here’s how to save

As college costs rise, some students apply to a laundry list of schools to increase their odds of getting into one they can afford. The average college application costs around $50, according to SavingForCollege.com. A third of students apply to six or more colleges, and 15% apply to 10 or more. That will not only help keep costs under control but also force students to whittle down their list of schools. “Students should craft their college lists carefully, identifying a small set of colleges w


As college costs rise, some students apply to a laundry list of schools to increase their odds of getting into one they can afford. The average college application costs around $50, according to SavingForCollege.com. A third of students apply to six or more colleges, and 15% apply to 10 or more. That will not only help keep costs under control but also force students to whittle down their list of schools. “Students should craft their college lists carefully, identifying a small set of colleges w
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: annie nova, jessica dickler
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Applying for college can be expensive. Here's how to save

As college costs rise, some students apply to a laundry list of schools to increase their odds of getting into one they can afford. Yet doing so can leave families with another large tab.

“Application fees quickly add up to thousands of dollars if you apply to dozens of colleges,” said Mark Kantrowitz, publisher of SavingforCollege.com.

The average college application costs around $50, according to SavingForCollege.com. At some colleges you can expect to pay much more — Stanford University’s application fee, for example, is $90.

A third of students apply to six or more colleges, and 15% apply to 10 or more.

Families should decide on a budget for college applications — say, $250, says Kantrowitz. That will not only help keep costs under control but also force students to whittle down their list of schools. “Students should craft their college lists carefully, identifying a small set of colleges where they have a good chance of being admitted,” he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: annie nova, jessica dickler
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The top 50 US colleges that pay off the most

And less than half, 41%, of first-time, full-time college students earn their bachelor’s degree in four years. The result is our first list of the U.S. colleges that pay off the most, a ranking that spotlights 50 schools that provide students the highest average salaries for their tuition dollars. According to The Hechinger Report, the net cost for a student from a family that earns between $48,001 and $75,000 is $4,061 per year. Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 50 U.S. colleges that


And less than half, 41%, of first-time, full-time college students earn their bachelor’s degree in four years. The result is our first list of the U.S. colleges that pay off the most, a ranking that spotlights 50 schools that provide students the highest average salaries for their tuition dollars. According to The Hechinger Report, the net cost for a student from a family that earns between $48,001 and $75,000 is $4,061 per year. Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 50 U.S. colleges that
The top 50 US colleges that pay off the most Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: abigail hess
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The top 50 US colleges that pay off the most

Each year, high school students across the U.S. march through campuses on guided tours, pore over course catalogs, and frantically check mailboxes and inboxes for letters granting them admission to the next phase of life: college. Most are facing significant financial questions. Research consistently demonstrates that college graduates earn more than their peers without degrees. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Americans with a bachelor’s degree have median weekly earnings of $1,173, compared with just $712 a week for those who have a high school diploma. Still, experts urge high school students to think carefully before taking on significant amounts of debt to finance a college degree. College costs can be difficult to estimate, and even for college applicants with the foresight to research things like debt balances at graduation and average alumni salaries, outcomes can be challenging to quantify. Sticker prices published by universities do not include grants, scholarships or loans. Financial aid awards can change from year to year. Housing, travel, books and other personal expenses can add up quickly. And less than half, 41%, of first-time, full-time college students earn their bachelor’s degree in four years. Many of them end up paying for more than four years of college, driving up the cost of attendance significantly. CNBC Make It set out to capture the information students would need to balance these considerations. The result is our first list of the U.S. colleges that pay off the most, a ranking that spotlights 50 schools that provide students the highest average salaries for their tuition dollars.

Click to expand We started by identifying the true net cost of each college for the typical American student — including tuition, fees, books, supplies and other expenses — after subtracting scholarships and grants. Using data from Tuition Tracker, a tool created by education-focused nonprofit news organization The Hechinger Report, we looked at the net cost for students from families making between $48,001 and $75,000, an income range established by the Department of Education. We chose to focus on this bracket because it includes the median U.S. household income, $61,372. The Hechinger Report calculates net cost by subtracting federal, state, local and institutional grants and scholarships from the sticker price for first-time, full-time (and, at public universities, in-state) undergraduates based on data provided by the U.S. Department of Education. Then, using data from PayScale’s College Salary Report, we divided net cost by graduates’ expected annual earnings, which was calculated based on the median salary of graduates with less than five years of experience as well as those with 10 or more years of experience. The ranking gives greater weight to workers’ earnings in the years immediately after college, when individuals are the most impacted by college costs and student debt. (You can read our full methodology here.) We excluded tuition-free institutions from the list, including military schools like West Point and U.S. Naval Academy, because the cost of post-college military service introduces an additional factor that’s challenging to measure against other schools. Stanford University takes first place on the list. According to The Hechinger Report, the net cost for a student from a family that earns between $48,001 and $75,000 is $4,061 per year. Stanford graduates with more than 10 years of experience report average salaries of $143,100. According to PayScale, 51% of Stanford students major in a science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) field, a factor that contributes to high average salaries among graduates. And Stanford is known for providing robust financial aid. The average scholarship and grant total for students from families making less than $65,000 a year is $74,095 per year. Students from families making between $65,000 and $95,000 receive $65,050 on average in scholarships and grant aid. While Princeton, Harvard and Yale get top marks, a wide range of schools from across the U.S. are represented here. State schools like the University of Washington-Seattle, small liberal arts colleges like Pomona College and STEM-focused schools like MIT also appear on this list, indicating that you don’t have to attend the Ivy League to get a great return on your college investment. Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 50 U.S. colleges that pay off the most:

The top 25 private universities

1. Stanford University

Stanford University David Butow | Getty Images

Stanford University, often referred to as a “West Coast Ivy,” is located near Silicon Valley in Stanford, California. The highly selective school is known for its strong science, technology and engineering programs as well as its successful athletics programs. Stanford enrolls approximately 7,083 undergraduate students. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $4,061

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $76,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $143,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $109,800

2. Princeton University

Princeton University Photo: Princeton University, Office of Communications.

Princeton University was founded in 1746, making it the fourth-oldest college in the United States. Undergraduate Princeton students study one of 37 concentrations and must be proficient in at least one language other than English. Known for its strong engineering program, approximately 25% of undergraduates at the Ivy League school study in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $4,557

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $72,700

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $141,300

Salary average, early and mid career: $107,000

3. University of Chicago

The University of Chicago Bob Krist | Getty Images

The University of Chicago is a private, nonprofit university in Chicago’s Hyde Park neighborhood. The school is known for its strong STEM programs, but the curriculum also requires students to complete courses in three areas: humanities, civilization studies and the arts; natural sciences; and social sciences. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $4,536

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $61,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $117,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $89,550

4. California Institute of Technology

California Institute of Technology Danita Delimont | Getty Images

California Institute of Technology, known as CalTech, is a private, nonprofit engineering university located in Pasadena, California. The CalTech curriculum emphasizes STEM education and all students are required to take math, physics, chemistry, biology and scientific communication courses. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,781

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $83,400

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $143,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $113,250

5. Harvard University

Harvard University DenisTangneyJr | iStock | Getty Images

Founded in 1636, Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is the oldest college in the United States. Harvard is known for its historic legacy, famous alumni and generous financial aid, which the university is able to provide in part because of an endowment worth approximately $39.2 billion. Harvard students select “concentrations” instead of majors and one of the most popular is economics. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,577

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $72,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $142,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $107,600

6. Yale University

Yale University Yana Paskova / Stringer (Getty Images)

Located in New Haven, Connecticut, Yale is a private, Ivy League university. Founded in 1701, Yale is the third-oldest college in the United States. Yale teaches a liberal arts curriculum and requires students take classes in humanities and arts; sciences and social sciences; foreign languages; quantitative reasoning; and writing. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,551

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $68,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $135,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $101,850

7. Columbia University

Columbia University Getty Images

Columbia University is a private Ivy League university in New York City. Founded in 1754, Columbia is the fifth-oldest college in the United States. Columbia students can choose from 80 areas of study but must take six required classes, such as Contemporary Civilization and Frontiers of Science, and must fulfill several requirements including taking a foreign language. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,592

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $69,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $127,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $98,350

8. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MIT Kevin Fleming | Corbis Documentary | Getty Images

Massachusetts Institute of Technology is a STEM-focused private, nonprofit university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Instead of majors, MIT students choose a “course” to specialize in. Electrical engineering, mechanical engineering and computer science are among the most popular courses at MIT. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,633

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $83,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $150,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $117,000

9. Pomona College

Pomona College Ted Soqui | Corbis | Getty Images

Pomona College is one of five private, nonprofit, liberal arts colleges in Claremont, California. The curriculum at the highly selective school is broad and requires students take at least one course in each of six areas: criticism, analysis and contextual study of works of the human imagination; social institutions and human behavior; history, values, ethics and cultural studies; physical and biological sciences; mathematical reasoning; and creation and performance of works of art and literature. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,975

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $60,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $119,900

Salary average, early and mid career: $90,200

10. Duke University

Duke University Lance King | Getty Images

Located in Durham, North Carolina, Duke University is a private university. The southern school, known for its strong athletic program, offers 4,000 courses each semester. The most popular major among Duke undergrads is computer science and 83% of students study more than just one major. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $7,880

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $68,700

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $133,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $100,900

11. Washington and Lee University

Washington and Lee Doug Plummer | Washington and Lee University

Washington and Lee is a private liberal arts university located in Lexington, Virginia. The small southern university is composed of two undergraduate schools: the Williams School of Commerce, Economics and Politics — which offers degrees in business administration, business administration and accounting, public accounting, economics and politics — as well as a liberal arts school referred to as “the College” that offers 40 different majors. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,962

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $63,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $130,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $96,800

12. Vanderbilt University

Vanderbilt University Vanderbilt | Collegiate Images | Getty Images

Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, is a private, nonprofit university. Undergraduate Vanderbilt students can earn bachelor’s degrees from the College of Arts and Science, the Blair School of Music, the School of Engineering and the Peabody College of Education and Human Development. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,451

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $63,800

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $118,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $91,100

13. Dartmouth College

Dartmouth College Cheryl Senter/Bloomberg | Getty Images

Dartmouth College is a private, nonprofit, Ivy League university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, that enrolls approximately 4,400 undergraduate students and is known for its graduate programs, such as the Tuck School of Business. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,048

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $68,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $137,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $103,200

14. Olin College of Engineering

Olin College Lane Turner/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Founded in 1997, the Olin College of Engineering is a private, nonprofit, engineering college in Needham, Massachusetts. Located near Babson College and Wellesley College, Olin is known for its project-based engineering curriculum. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,706

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $81,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $134,200

Salary average, early and mid career: $108,050

15. Rice University

Rice University Craig Hartley | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Rice University is a private, nonprofit university located in Houston. Undergraduate students at Rice can study more than 50 different majors in the George R. Brown School of Engineering, the Shepherd School of Music, the School of Architecture, the School of Humanities, the School of Social Sciences and the Wiess School of Natural Sciences. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,080

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $69,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $133,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $101,400

16. Williams College

Williams College John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

This highly respected private, nonprofit, liberal arts college is based in Williamstown, Massachusetts. All Williams students take at least two writing-intensive courses as well several courses in the arts and humanities, social sciences, and science and mathematics. Williams enrolls approximately 2,020 undergraduate students. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,448

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $64,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $135,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $99,750

17. University of Pennsylvania

University of Pennsylvania Margie Politzer | Lonely Planet Images | Getty Images

The University of Pennsylvania is a private university known for its business program. Undergraduate students at this Ivy League school can choose from more than 90 majors across four schools: the College for Arts and Sciences, the School of Engineering and Applied Science, the School of Nursing and the Wharton Business School. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,322

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $70,100

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $135,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $102,950

18. Bowdoin College

Bowdoin College Derek Davis | Portland Press Herald | Getty Images

Bowdoin College is a private, nonprofit, liberal arts college located in Brunswick, Maine. Students at the small school must take at least one course in five areas: mathematical, computational or statistical reasoning; inquiry in the natural sciences; exploring social differences; international perspectives; and visual and performing arts. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $11,057

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $59,700

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $116,000

Salary average, early and mid career: $87,850

19. Webb Institute

Webb Institute Source: Webb Institute

Webb Institute in Glen Cove, New York, is a small, private, nonprofit college that educates students in naval architecture and marine engineering. During the 2018-2019 school year, the Webb Institute enrolled just 104 students. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,682

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $79,100

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $134,700

Salary average, early and mid career: $106,900

20. Brown University

Brown University Yiming Chen | Getty Images

Brown University is an Ivy League university located in Providence, Rhode Island. Brown is known for its flexible “open curriculum ” that only requires that students complete at least 30 courses in eight semesters, complete at least one major and “demonstrate excellent skill in written English.” Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,697

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $65,400

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $131,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $98,500

21. Haverford College

Haverford College Source: Michael Branscom

Haverford College is a private liberal arts college in Haverford, Pennsylvania. Haverford’s liberal arts curriculum requires that students study in areas such as meaning, interpretation and creative expression or analysis and the social world: individuals, institutions and cultures. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,110

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $56,100

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $131,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $93,750

22. Swarthmore College

Swarthmore College aimintang | Getty Images

Swarthmore College is a private liberal arts college located in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania. Founded in 1864 by Quakers, Swarthmore is part of a tri-college consortium with Bryn Mawr and Haverford College and also offers cross-registration with the University of Pennsylvania. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,638

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $63,800

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $129,200

Salary average, early and mid career: $96,500

23. The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art

Cooper Union Campus Source: Mario Morgado | Courtesy of The Cooper Union

The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art Engineering, also referred to as “The Cooper Union,” is a private college located in New York City comprised of three schools specializing in architecture, art and engineering. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,743

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $65,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $128,300

Salary average, early and mid career: $97,100

24. Bates College

Bates College Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Located in Lewiston, Maine, Bates College is a private liberal arts college. Bates has a unique academic calendar that features two semesters and one “short term,” a five-week period that allows students to focus on one single class. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,108

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $120,300

Salary average, early and mid career: $88,900

25. Wesleyan University

Wesleyan University Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Located in Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan University is a private, liberal arts school that enrolls roughly 3,000 undergraduate students. Wesleyan’s flexible curriculum requires that students study each of four “competencies” — mapping (navigating complex environments), expressing (writing and communication), mining (empirical analysis and interpretation) and engaging (negotiating cultural contexts). Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $11,996

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $59,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $114,700

Salary average, early and mid career: $87,000

The top 25 public universities

1. University of Washington, Seattle

University of Washington Nikko Hellstern | Getty Images

The University of Washington, Seattle, is the flagship school of the University of Washington school system. The large public university offers more than 180 majors and is known for its computer science program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,984

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $59,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $111,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $85,850

2. University of Washington, Bothell

University of Washington Bothell Photo: Joe Mabel | Wikipedia CC

Also a member of the University of Washington school system, the University of Washington, Bothell, is a public university that offers roughly 55 degree programs and enrolls just 5,411 undergraduate students. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,767

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $58,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $104,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $81,150

3. Massachusetts Maritime Academy

A Google Earth view of the Massachusetts Maritime Academy. Source: Google Earth

Massachusetts Maritime Academy is a public college located in Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, that offers bachelor’s and master’s of science degrees in marine engineering fields. Many MMA students choose to volunteer for military service, though it is not a requirement. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,235

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $67,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $114,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $90,900

4. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

University of Michigan tiny-al | Getty Images

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, is the flagship campus of the University of Michigan school system. The public university offers 263 degree programs, enrolls 29,026 undergraduate students and is known for its athletics program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,106

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $62,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $107,900

Salary average, early and mid career: $84,950

5. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

Georgia Tech

Georgia Institute of Technology, often referred to as “Georgia Tech,” is a public university located in Atlanta. The school offers technology-focused education to more than 25,000 undergraduate and graduate students across six colleges and 28 schools focusing on business, computing, design, engineering, the liberal arts and sciences. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,284

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $70,800

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $131,900

Salary average, early and mid career: $101,350

6. Purdue University, West Lafayette

Purdue University Michael Hickey/Getty Images

Purdue University’s campus in West Lafayette, Indiana, is the flagship campus of the Purdue University system. The public university enrolls 32,672 undergraduate students. Known for its strong engineering program, 28% of undergraduate students at Purdue study in the College of Engineering. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,828

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $60,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $105,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $83,000

7. College of William and Mary

College of William and Mary Will Pryce/Construction Photography/Avalon/Getty Images

Founded in 1693, the College of William and Mary is the second-oldest college in the country. The public university, which is located in Williamsburg, Virginia, is often referred to as a “Public Ivy.” The school offers a joint degree program with University of St. Andrews in Scotland. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $11,320

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,100

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $113,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $85,350

8. Michigan Technological University

Michigan Technical University Jcvertin | Wikipedia CC

Michigan Technological University is a public university located in Houghton, Michigan. The technology-focused school is made up of seven colleges and schools including a College of Computing, a College of Engineering and a School of Business and Economics. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,080

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $64,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $110,200

Salary average, early and mid career: $87,400

9. University of California, Los Angeles

UCLA Al Seib | Los Angeles Times | Getty Images

One of the most selective schools in the University of California school system, the University of California, Los Angeles, is known for its strong athletics department. The most popular majors at UCLA are biology, business economics, political science, psychology and psychobiology. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,416

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $60,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $118,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $89,250

10. Baruch College

CUNY Bernard M Baruch College Ben Hider/Getty Images

Baruch College is one of 13 four-year colleges in The City University of New York school system. The public university is known for its business program and enrolls approximately 15,024 undergraduate students. The most popular majors at Baruch include accounting, finance and marketing. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $11,473

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,100

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $107,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $82,350

11. University of California, San Diego

University Of California, San Diego Education Images | Getty Images

University of California, San Diego, is part of the University of California school system and is located in La Jolla, California. The public university enrolls approximately 30,285 undergraduate students and is known both for its fine arts program and its engineering program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,367

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $61,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $126,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $94,050

12. University of California, Riverside

UC Riverside Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Part of the University of California system, University of California, Riverside, is a public university that offers more than 80 undergraduate majors across five schools. Located east of Los Angeles, UCR enrolls roughly 20,581 undergraduate students. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $11,685

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $54,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $109,300

Salary average, early and mid career: $81,650

13. New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology

The campus of New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, or more commonly known as New Mexico Tech in Socorro, New Mexico. Source: Atomic Energy505 | Wikimedia Commons

New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology is a public university that offers associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees primarily in science and engineering. NMT is located in Socorro, New Mexico, approximately 75 miles south of Albuquerque and is known for its chemical engineering, mechanical engineering and computer science programs. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,756

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $62,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $121,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $92,00

14. Missouri University of Science and Technology

Curtis Laws Wilson Library, Missouri S&T, Rolla, Missouri. Source: Steveewatkins | WikiMedia Commons

STEM-focused Missouri University of Science and Technology, often called Missouri S&T, is a public land grant university based in Rolla, Missouri. The school’s mission is to integrate “education, research and application to create and convey knowledge that serves our state and helps solve the world’s great challenges.” Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $14,066

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $66,700

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $116,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $91,550

15. University of California, Irvine

School of Biological Sciences, University of California at Irvine Source: WikiMedia Commons

University of California, Irvine, is one of 10 campuses in the University of California school system. In 2018, the public university enrolled approximately 29,736 undergraduate students. UCI is known for its engineering and criminal justice programs. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,820

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,700

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $121,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $89,750

16. Montana Tech

Source: Montan Tech

Originally named the Montana State School of Mines, today Montana Tech is part of the University of Montana system with an emphasis on STEM. The public university is located in Butte, Montana, and is known for its engineering and nursing programs. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,133

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $61,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $107,200

Salary average, early and mid career: $84,550

17. California State University Maritime Academy (tie)

The TS Golden Bear training ship at the California State University Maritime Academy. Photo: Coldasshonky | Wikipedia CC

California State University Maritime Academy, known as “Cal Maritime,” is one of 23 schools in the California State University system. Located in Vallejo, California, the university is the only degree-granting maritime academy on the West Coast and aims to prepare students for careers fields like engineering, transportation, international relations, business and global logistics. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $15,515

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $67,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $129,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $98,300

17. University of Virginia, Charlottesville (tie)

University of Virginia Source: Dan Addison | UVA University Communications

The University of Virginia, is a public university located in Charlottesville, Virginia. Founded by Thomas Jefferson, the public university enrolls approximately 16,777 undergraduate students and is known for its law and business schools as well as for its strong athletics program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $14,374

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $62,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $119,900

Salary average, early and mid career: $91,100

19. University of California, Santa Barbara

UC Santa Barbara Patricia Marroquin | Getty Images

The University of California, Santa Barbara, is a public university within the University of California school system. During the 2018-2019 school year, UCSB enrolled 25,976 undergraduate students. UCSB is known for its engineering, education and environmental studies programs. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $14,176

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $121,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $89,400

20. California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

California State Polytechnic University – Pomona Source: California State Polytechnic University-Pomona

California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, known as Cal Poly Pomona, is a public polytechnic university located in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Cal Poly Pomona enrolls approximately 24,314 undergraduate students and is known for its business and engineering programs. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,335

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $56,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $111,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $83,800

21. University of California, Davis

University of California, Davis Billy Hustace | Getty Images

University of California, Davis, known for its food and agriculture program, is a part of the University of California school system. The public university enrolls approximately 30,718 undergraduate students. The three most popular majors at UC Davis are psychology, managerial economics and economics. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $14,186

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $59,400

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $113,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $86,600

22. North Carolina State University, Raleigh

North Carolina State University DenisTangneyJr | Getty Images

NC State University in Raleigh, North Carolina, is a public university that enrolls roughly 35,479 students. The public university is known for its veterinary medicine program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,244

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $55,800

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $104,700

Salary average, early and mid career: $80,250

23. SUNY Maritime College

SUNY Maritime College Jim Henderson | Wikimedia Commons

Part of the State University of New York system, SUNY Maritime College is located in the Bronx, New York. The public university enrolls roughly 1,635 undergraduate students and offers bachelor’s of engineering, bachelor’s of science, master’s of science and associate’s of applied science degrees. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $18,019

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $73,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $140,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $106,700

24. University of Delaware, Newark

University of Delaware gregobagel | Getty Images

Located in Newark, Delaware, the University of Delaware is a public university. The school enrolls approximately 18,221 undergraduate students and is known for its chemical engineering program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,909

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $56,700

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $105,700

Salary average, early and mid career: $81,200

25. University of California, Berkeley

University of California, Berkeley Rick Gerharter | Getty Images

University of California, Berkeley, is the flagship school of the University of California system. Located in Berkeley, California, near San Francisco, the university enrolls some 30,853 undergraduate students. The school is home to the Haas School of Business. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $17,413

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $68,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $132,300

Salary average, early and mid career: $100,300 Beyond school selection, there are several steps students can take to maximize the value of their time in college while minimizing the costs. Consider pursuing a degree in a high-paying field. Earning a degree in a STEM field can help students at any college prepare themselves for in-demand high-paying jobs. Students can keep costs low by keeping on pace with their requirements and graduating on time. Additional semesters of college can be expensive and in some cases, scholarship and grant aid does not apply for semesters beyond the standard four years. But the most significant step students can take to ensure their college degree pays off is, simply, to complete their college degree. Just 60% of college students complete their bachelor’s in six years and many drop out altogether, and one of the worst outcomes for students is taking on loans for a degree they do not complete. The economic benefits of earning a bachelor’s degree are still significant, and if students study hard and play their cards right, college can pay off big time. Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube! Don’t miss: Clayton Christensen Institute co-founder: This equation reveals how much you should borrow for college


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cost, university, salary, experience, income, pay, students, average, college, 50, alumni, colleges, net


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Warren Buffett to MBA students: This is what ‘sets apart a big winner from the rest of the pack’

One lesson the Berkshire Hathaway CEO loves to teach is the importance of developing good personal qualities at young age. “There’s nothing wrong with getting the highest grades in the class, but that isn’t going to be the quality that sets apart a big winner from the rest of the pack,” said Buffett. And here comes the hooker: In addition to this person, Buffett told the students they had to sell short another one of their classmates and pay 10% of what they do. There’s nothing wrong with gettin


One lesson the Berkshire Hathaway CEO loves to teach is the importance of developing good personal qualities at young age. “There’s nothing wrong with getting the highest grades in the class, but that isn’t going to be the quality that sets apart a big winner from the rest of the pack,” said Buffett. And here comes the hooker: In addition to this person, Buffett told the students they had to sell short another one of their classmates and pay 10% of what they do. There’s nothing wrong with gettin
Warren Buffett to MBA students: This is what ‘sets apart a big winner from the rest of the pack’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: tom popomaronis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, big, qualities, integrity, students, mba, good, winner, apart, warren, rest, business, pack, things, buffett, person, sets


Warren Buffett to MBA students: This is what 'sets apart a big winner from the rest of the pack'

Philanthropist Warren Buffett is joined onstage by 24 other philanthropist and influential business people featured on the Forbes list of 100 Greatest Business Minds during the Forbes Media Centennial Celebration at Pier 60 on September 19, 2017

At 88, Warren Buffett has a lot of wisdom — and sharing them with students is one of the many wonderful things he’s known for. One lesson the Berkshire Hathaway CEO loves to teach is the importance of developing good personal qualities at young age. Establishing good habits — even the little ones, like saying “please” and “thank you” — is a major key to success, he told Yahoo Finance’s editor-in-chief last year.

A high IQ won’t make you stand out

Buffett elaborated on the topic in a talk to MBA students from the University of Florida in 1998. The legendary investor started his speech with a little game: “Think for a moment that I granted you a right — you can buy 10% of one of your classmate’s earnings for the rest of their lifetime.” The decision should be based on merit, Buffett advised, so it’d be unwise to pick the person with the highest IQ, the richest parents or the most energy. “There’s nothing wrong with getting the highest grades in the class, but that isn’t going to be the quality that sets apart a big winner from the rest of the pack,” said Buffett. He continued: “You’d probably pick the person who has leadership qualities, who is able to get others to carry out their interests. That would be the person who is generous, honest and gave credit to other people for their own ideas.” And here comes the hooker: In addition to this person, Buffett told the students they had to sell short another one of their classmates and pay 10% of what they do. “You wouldn’t pick the person with the lowest IQ,” he said. “You’d think about the person who turned you off, the person who is egotistical, who is greedy, who cuts corners, who is slightly dishonest.” If you see any of those qualities in yourself, you can get rid of them. “It’s simply a question of which you decide,” he said.

There’s nothing wrong with getting the highest grades in the class, but that isn’t going to be the quality that sets apart a big winner from the rest of the pack. Warren Buffett CEO, Berkshire Hathaway

“If you write the good qualities down and make them habitual, you will be the one you want to buy 10% of when you’re all through, ” said Buffett. “The beauty of this is that you already own 100% of yourself, and you’re stuck with it. So you might as well be that person, that somebody else.” Buffett said he sees people his age — or even 20 years younger — with “self-destructive behavior patterns,” and they’re entrapped by them. Essentially, integrity — honesty, virtue and morality — can make or break you in the professional world. And if you choose not to make it a priority, you risk getting stuck with a reputation for deceit.

What Buffett looks for in a good hire

All of this goes back to what Buffett himself looks for when deciding who to hire or invest in. His decision isn’t based on business metrics, test scores or degrees. Instead, it’s all about one’s personal qualities. “There was a guy, Pete Kiewit in Omaha, who used to say he looked for three things in hiring people: Integrity, intelligence and energy,” Buffett said. “If they didn’t have the first, the other two would kill them, because if they don’t have integrity, you want them dumb and lazy.” It makes sense — if you can’t trust someone to act with integrity in a situation that demands it, then should they really be allowed anywhere near you or your brand? The answers seems like a resounding “no,” but it also raises another, more difficult question: How do you know who to trust? At Berkshire Hathaway’s annual meeting in 2007, an attendee asked Buffett that exact question. The billionaire dipped into his store of wisdom and offered this sage perspective: “People give themselves away fairly often. When someone comes to me with a business, the very things they talk about, what they regard as important — there are a lot of clues that come as to subsequent behavior.”

Don’t be someone who turns people off


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: tom popomaronis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, big, qualities, integrity, students, mba, good, winner, apart, warren, rest, business, pack, things, buffett, person, sets


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Clayton Christensen Institute co-founder: This equation reveals how much you should borrow for college

“If you’re in that realm, you’re going to have problems in the long-run.” It’s a smart way to avoid taking on more debt than graduates will be able to handle paying back in the future. But Michael Horn, economist and co-founder of the Clayton Christensen Institute, tells CNBC Make It that there’s a simple way students can predict roughly how much they can afford to borrow for college. “If you’re taking out $80,000 in debt to go to law school for example, and you’re going to a top law school, tha


“If you’re in that realm, you’re going to have problems in the long-run.” It’s a smart way to avoid taking on more debt than graduates will be able to handle paying back in the future. But Michael Horn, economist and co-founder of the Clayton Christensen Institute, tells CNBC Make It that there’s a simple way students can predict roughly how much they can afford to borrow for college. “If you’re taking out $80,000 in debt to go to law school for example, and you’re going to a top law school, tha
Clayton Christensen Institute co-founder: This equation reveals how much you should borrow for college Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taking, institute, work, equation, students, clayton, school, student, christensen, college, borrow, youre, going, cofounder, schools, reveals, debt


Clayton Christensen Institute co-founder: This equation reveals how much you should borrow for college

“You really want to be mindful that you’re not crossing that threshold of payments that are just going to crush your income because they’re taking up, say, 20, 30% of your monthly paycheck,” he says. “If you’re in that realm, you’re going to have problems in the long-run.”

It’s a smart way to avoid taking on more debt than graduates will be able to handle paying back in the future.

“As students look at the equation for how much they should borrow when they go to college, they ought to be thinking of the total debt that they take on as not being more than 10 to 15% of what their earnings are going to be when they leave college,” says Horn.

But Michael Horn, economist and co-founder of the Clayton Christensen Institute, tells CNBC Make It that there’s a simple way students can predict roughly how much they can afford to borrow for college.

The cost of attending college today is a daunting prospect. According to the College Board’s 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report , from 1988 to 2018, sticker prices tripled at public four-year schools and doubled at public two-year and private non-profit four-year schools, and many students use some kind of student loan to finance their degrees.

Students should think about what they want to study, research how much graduates at a given school in that major make, and not take on more than 10 to 15% of that amount in debt.

For example, according to PayScale, the average salary for an individual with a Bachelor of Engineering degree from New York University is about $91,296 per year. That means a student could plan to take on up to $13,694 (roughly 15% of their projected future salary) in loans to finance this degree.

However, the average salary for a worker with a Bachelor of Social Work degree from New York University is about $50,008 per year, so based on Horn’s recommendation, students should only take on about $7,501 in loans. Additionally, many social work opportunities require students to earn additional accreditation such as a master’s degree, and students should consider these costs as well.

Of course, this math is dependent on a student having a clear understanding of what they plan to pursue after college, something that can be challenging for many young people. Other factors students need to consider include a school’s reputation for graduating successful alumni, as well as its rate of on-time graduations.

“If you’re taking out $80,000 in debt to go to law school for example, and you’re going to a top law school, that’s probably a reasonable investment,” says Horn. “If you’re going to a bottom-third law school, a question you ought to be asking yourself is, ‘Is this worth it?’

“The most crippling debt is when you don’t complete. If [students] don’t complete, it can be crippling because they’re not going to have the wage bump from getting that college credential and so you’re going to be earning roughly as much as someone with a high school diploma is, but you have taken out $10,000 in debt.”

Horn emphasizes that debt totals have a significant impact on the financial lives of borrowers.

“Paying not just the debt back but also the interest on top of it, that can be really punishing to make the books work as you’re trying to think through raising a family, owning a home maybe in the future and other life decisions.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taking, institute, work, equation, students, clayton, school, student, christensen, college, borrow, youre, going, cofounder, schools, reveals, debt


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Apple lowers prices on the MacBook Air and MacBook Pro and adds new features

Apple on Tuesday announced updates to the MacBook Air and 13-inch MacBook Pro. It also includes the updated keyboard design that Apple first launched in updated MacBook Pros back in May. Apple’s Touch Bar and Touch ID are now also offered in all 13-inch MacBook Pro models, including the entry-level option. Apple is also now offering up to 2TB of storage in the 13-inch MacBook Pro. The new MacBook Air and new 13-inch MacBook Pro are available from Apple online or in stores today.


Apple on Tuesday announced updates to the MacBook Air and 13-inch MacBook Pro. It also includes the updated keyboard design that Apple first launched in updated MacBook Pros back in May. Apple’s Touch Bar and Touch ID are now also offered in all 13-inch MacBook Pro models, including the entry-level option. Apple is also now offering up to 2TB of storage in the 13-inch MacBook Pro. The new MacBook Air and new 13-inch MacBook Pro are available from Apple online or in stores today.
Apple lowers prices on the MacBook Air and MacBook Pro and adds new features Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, updated, 13inch, students, adds, apple, pro, air, includes, features, screen, keyboard, lowers, macbook, prices


Apple lowers prices on the MacBook Air and MacBook Pro and adds new features

Apple on Tuesday announced updates to the MacBook Air and 13-inch MacBook Pro.

The MacBook Air price is being lowered to $1,099, but it will be offered to college students for $999.

It will be sold in the same configurations as before, starting with 128GB of storage, but Apple updated the screen with new TrueTone technology. That means it sets the colors on the screen to match the lighting of the room for a more comfortable viewing experience. It also includes the updated keyboard design that Apple first launched in updated MacBook Pros back in May. It should help to prevent some of the sticky key problems experienced in Apple’s MacBooks. But this is not the full keyboard refresh that’s rumored to ship with an entirely new keyboard configuration.

The new 13-inch Retina MacBook Pro starts at $1,299 (or $1,199 for college students.) and includes a quad-core processor in the entry-level model for the first time and improved graphics performance. Like the refresh in May, the entry-level models now also come with new keyboard materials to help prevent sticking keys.

Apple’s Touch Bar and Touch ID are now also offered in all 13-inch MacBook Pro models, including the entry-level option. It includes the Apple T2 security chip for added security, support for “Hey Siri” without having to click the menu to launch the assistant. The Retina screen also includes new True Tone technology and Apple improved the speakers with wide stereo sound and directional beam forming which reduces background noise for calls. Apple is also now offering up to 2TB of storage in the 13-inch MacBook Pro.

The new MacBook Air and new 13-inch MacBook Pro are available from Apple online or in stores today. Students who buy a Mac, an iPad Pro or an iPad Air will also receive a free pair of Beats Studio 3 wireless headphones, which normally cost $349.95.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, updated, 13inch, students, adds, apple, pro, air, includes, features, screen, keyboard, lowers, macbook, prices


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Nearly half of students at five top MBA programs borrow at least $100,000 to finance their degree

Bloomberg Businessweek surveyed more than 10,000 2018 graduates of MBA programs from 126 schools about the amount of debt they piled on earning their degrees. The survey found that almost half of students at leading business schools around the world borrowed at least $100,000 to finance their MBA. U.S. News says that, “among the 10 highest-ranked public B-schools, the average in-state tuition for full-time MBA students was slightly more than $42,000 per year.” 2 Stanford University, the average


Bloomberg Businessweek surveyed more than 10,000 2018 graduates of MBA programs from 126 schools about the amount of debt they piled on earning their degrees. The survey found that almost half of students at leading business schools around the world borrowed at least $100,000 to finance their MBA. U.S. News says that, “among the 10 highest-ranked public B-schools, the average in-state tuition for full-time MBA students was slightly more than $42,000 per year.” 2 Stanford University, the average
Nearly half of students at five top MBA programs borrow at least $100,000 to finance their degree Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, school, half, finance, survey, nearly, programs, 100000, graduates, borrow, business, degree, university, mba, schools, students, stanford


Nearly half of students at five top MBA programs borrow at least $100,000 to finance their degree

A degree from a top business school has long been seen as a direct path to a job at a top company, but new data demonstrates just how much it costs to pursue that route. Bloomberg Businessweek surveyed more than 10,000 2018 graduates of MBA programs from 126 schools about the amount of debt they piled on earning their degrees. The survey found that almost half of students at leading business schools around the world borrowed at least $100,000 to finance their MBA. According to the survey, at minimum 40% of MBA graduates from U.S. News & World Report’s top-ranking business programs — those at Duke, Dartmouth, University of Michigan, Cornell and University of Chicago — reported incurring at least $100,000 in debt. That percentage drops a bit at nine other top MBA programs – including those at MIT, University of Pennsylvania, NYU and Northwestern University – where around a third of recent graduates borrowed at least $100,000 to finance their degrees.

University of Michigan students are seen in the Stephen M. Ross School of Business in Ann Arbor Rebecca Cook | Reuters

Conventional wisdom has held that the price tag on an MBA, however high, tends to be worth it. According to U.S. News & World Report, tuition for traditional full-time (two year) MBA students surpassed $50,000 per year at the top 15 ranked MBA programs in the 2019 Best Business Schools rankings – with some schools exceeding $70,000 annually. Prices at public schools, particularly for in-state students, tend to be lower. U.S. News says that, “among the 10 highest-ranked public B-schools, the average in-state tuition for full-time MBA students was slightly more than $42,000 per year.” But Bloomberg’s survey results illustrate just how steep the debt eager entrepreneurs and executives undertake to advance their careers. Graduates of the 26 schools where at least 20% of students report having had to borrow six-figure sums disclose median starting pay ranging from $80,000 to $140,000. “The survey data puts into stark relief just how much of a return some students need to justify their debt-financed investment,” Bloomberg reports. Students see a clear connection between the cost of their degree and the benefit. Mike Sanchez, a 32-year-old investment banker at Citigroup and 2018 graduate of University of Chicago Booth School of Business, told Bloomberg that he didn’t consider the $110,000 in student loans he took out to finance the program a hindrance. Booth reports its median starting salary for last year’s graduates was $130,000. Based on a 2018 report by QS Quacquarelli Symonds, a higher education data and research company, U.S. News reported that, “within 10 years of earning an MBA degree, the average MBA grad from either a U.S. or international business school had an estimated decade-long return on investment of $390,751, even after subtracting the tuition and opportunity costs of attending an MBA program.” At top business schools, like No. 2 Stanford University, the average decade-long ROI of an MBA degree exceeds $1 million.

Graduating Stanford University students are shown before the start of the 123rd Stanford commencement ceremony, June 15, 2014, in Stanford, Calif. Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, school, half, finance, survey, nearly, programs, 100000, graduates, borrow, business, degree, university, mba, schools, students, stanford


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Many high school students don’t understand how the college financial aid process works

Students’ knowledge of the financial aid process is “shockingly low.” That’s the takeaway from a new study by ACT, which in April 2018 surveyed about 1,200 high school students who were registered to take the standardized test. Yet most students don’t understand the basic workings of financial aid, which includes grants, scholarships, work study and loans. More than 70% of students didn’t know that loans from the government for undergraduate students are subsidized, meaning interest doesn’t accr


Students’ knowledge of the financial aid process is “shockingly low.” That’s the takeaway from a new study by ACT, which in April 2018 surveyed about 1,200 high school students who were registered to take the standardized test. Yet most students don’t understand the basic workings of financial aid, which includes grants, scholarships, work study and loans. More than 70% of students didn’t know that loans from the government for undergraduate students are subsidized, meaning interest doesn’t accr
Many high school students don’t understand how the college financial aid process works Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, student, loans, college, study, financial, process, didnt, center, high, aid, economic, dont, know, students, understand, school, works


Many high school students don't understand how the college financial aid process works

Students’ knowledge of the financial aid process is “shockingly low.”

That’s the takeaway from a new study by ACT, which in April 2018 surveyed about 1,200 high school students who were registered to take the standardized test.

Regardless of economic background, most families pointed to price as a very important consideration in choosing a college. Yet most students don’t understand the basic workings of financial aid, which includes grants, scholarships, work study and loans.

More than 70% of students didn’t know that loans from the government for undergraduate students are subsidized, meaning interest doesn’t accrue on them while the student is enrolled in college.

Most students also didn’t know that student loans can be repaid on an “income-driven ” plan, in which their monthly payments are capped at a percentage of their income.

Another recent study by the National Center for Education Statistics found that just 11% of ninth graders can correctly estimate the tuition and fees for one year at a public four-year college in their state. Around 57% overestimated the costs, and 32% underestimated them.

“The findings highlight an urgent need for more financial literacy-specific interventions, especially in light of the economic stakes at hand,” said Jim Larimore, chief officer for ACT’s Center for Equity in Learning.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, student, loans, college, study, financial, process, didnt, center, high, aid, economic, dont, know, students, understand, school, works


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Michigan Rep. Amash says he’s quitting Republican Party

Kamala Harris says busing should be considered, not mandatedSen. Kamala Harris said that busing students should be considered by school districts trying to desegregate their locations — not the federal mandate she appeared to support… Politicsread more


Kamala Harris says busing should be considered, not mandatedSen. Kamala Harris said that busing students should be considered by school districts trying to desegregate their locations — not the federal mandate she appeared to support… Politicsread more
Michigan Rep. Amash says he’s quitting Republican Party Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-04  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mandatedsen, kamala, students, party, michigan, harris, supportpoliticsread, amash, trying, considered, school, hes, mandate, busing, rep, republican, quitting


Michigan Rep. Amash says he's quitting Republican Party

Kamala Harris says busing should be considered, not mandated

Sen. Kamala Harris said that busing students should be considered by school districts trying to desegregate their locations — not the federal mandate she appeared to support…

Politics

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-04  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mandatedsen, kamala, students, party, michigan, harris, supportpoliticsread, amash, trying, considered, school, hes, mandate, busing, rep, republican, quitting


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