Suzy Welch: A simple quiz can help you determine if your ego is hurting your success at work

To sum up this dilemma, bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch quotes her husband, former GE CEO Jack Welch: “Success makes some people grow, and it makes some people swell.” To help you determine which category you fall into, Welch developed the following quiz:1. How annoying”Self-confident people love being around those who expand their thinking and up the performance bar for everyone,” says Welch. Though this type of personal analysis can be challenging, Welch emphasize


To sum up this dilemma, bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch quotes her husband, former GE CEO Jack Welch: “Success makes some people grow, and it makes some people swell.” To help you determine which category you fall into, Welch developed the following quiz:1. How annoying”Self-confident people love being around those who expand their thinking and up the performance bar for everyone,” says Welch. Though this type of personal analysis can be challenging, Welch emphasize
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: courtney connley
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Suzy Welch: A simple quiz can help you determine if your ego is hurting your success at work

Meanwhile, Welch says, “people who swell — all they are is arrogant, which gets old fast, and thus, is usually a one-way ticket to self-destruction.”

“Stars, you must make sure you’re in the former category,” she tells CNBC Make It . “People who grow exude a healthy self-confidence. They’re learners, builders and team players, and because of that, their career tends to keep soaring.”

But others respond differently to a taste of success. They act exclusively in their own interest, talk over people, and curtail others’ advancement. To sum up this dilemma, bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch quotes her husband, former GE CEO Jack Welch: “Success makes some people grow, and it makes some people swell.”

Maybe you’ve seen this unfold in your workplace. Some people, given more responsibility, rise to the challenge. They build new skills, take on bigger projects, and stretch themselves to meet the demands of their new role.

To help you determine which category you fall into, Welch developed the following quiz:

1. Do you spend more time thinking about…

A. Your next promotion

B. The career growth of the people who work with you

“Answer A,” says Welch, “is for arrogant in this case, because arrogant people are so me, me, me.” On the other hand, she says, “self-confident people are you, you, you, which, for every reason under the sun, including trust and loyalty, is better, better, better.”

2. In meetings do you usually…

A. Urge subordinates or colleagues to jump in and answer questions

B. Jump in and answer every question yourself

If you’re someone who loves the sound of your own voice, Welch says, “that’s a surefire red flag that you are too focused on yourself.”

3. If someone on your team is smarter than you are, do you think…

A. How great!

B. How annoying

“Self-confident people love being around those who expand their thinking and up the performance bar for everyone,” says Welch. Meanwhile, arrogant people “don’t think anyone is smarter than they are, and it bugs them that other people do.”

As a result, she says, “instead of listening to their intelligent teammates, they try to shut them down or shove them out,” which is, ultimately, “team killing and self-defeating.”

Though this type of personal analysis can be challenging, Welch emphasizes that it’s essential to your future professional success. And arrogance, she says, isn’t actually all that difficult to unlearn.

After all, “it’s all in your head.”

Suzy Welch is the co-founder of the Jack Welch Management Institute and a noted business journalist, TV commentator and public speaker. Think you need Suzy to fix your career? Email her at gettowork@cnbc.com.

Video by Helen Zhao

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More from Suzy Welch:

There’s a specific type of employee that always gets the promotion—here’s why

Why working from home can be terrible for your career

3 signs it’s time to quit a bad boss


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: courtney connley
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Here’s how to know if you’re confident or arrogant at work

7 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. CNBC contributor Suzy Welch explains why it’s integral to your success that you approach your career with confidence instead of arrogance. She put together a quiz so you can find out which camp you belong in.


7 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. CNBC contributor Suzy Welch explains why it’s integral to your success that you approach your career with confidence instead of arrogance. She put together a quiz so you can find out which camp you belong in.
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Here's how to know if you're confident or arrogant at work

7 Hours Ago

To view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again.

CNBC contributor Suzy Welch explains why it’s integral to your success that you approach your career with confidence instead of arrogance. She put together a quiz so you can find out which camp you belong in.


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Yields jump on stronger-than-expected inflation data, weak Treasury auction

Microsoft says its Teams app is bigger than Slack and growing… The success of Teams, at least in relation to Slack, is an example of how Microsoft can make hits out of young products just by distributing it to its large collection of…Technologyread more


Microsoft says its Teams app is bigger than Slack and growing… The success of Teams, at least in relation to Slack, is an example of how Microsoft can make hits out of young products just by distributing it to its large collection of…Technologyread more
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: fred imbert sam meredith, fred imbert, sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weak, strongerthanexpected, treasury, young, oftechnologyread, microsoft, auction, yields, large, relation, products, slack, teams, success, jump, inflation, data, hits


Yields jump on stronger-than-expected inflation data, weak Treasury auction

Microsoft says its Teams app is bigger than Slack and growing…

The success of Teams, at least in relation to Slack, is an example of how Microsoft can make hits out of young products just by distributing it to its large collection of…

Technology

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: fred imbert sam meredith, fred imbert, sam meredith
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Buyer interest in UK house market grows for first time since 2016

Microsoft says its Teams app is bigger than Slack and growing… The success of Teams, at least in relation to Slack, is an example of how Microsoft can make hits out of young products just by distributing it to its large collection of…Technologyread more


Microsoft says its Teams app is bigger than Slack and growing… The success of Teams, at least in relation to Slack, is an example of how Microsoft can make hits out of young products just by distributing it to its large collection of…Technologyread more
Buyer interest in UK house market grows for first time since 2016 Cached Page below :
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Buyer interest in UK house market grows for first time since 2016

Microsoft says its Teams app is bigger than Slack and growing…

The success of Teams, at least in relation to Slack, is an example of how Microsoft can make hits out of young products just by distributing it to its large collection of…

Technology

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: david reid
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3 principles of success Ross Perot lived by

But at least one thing is evident: As businessman Perot was successful. Perot founded his first company, Electronic Data Systems, at age 32 in 1962 with just $1,000 in savings. He became a billionaire at 58 when General Motors bought a controlling interest in his company in 1984 for $2.4 billion. After Perot sold Electronic Data Systems, he established Perot Systems in 1998 and became an angel investor for NeXT, a computer company founded by Steve Jobs after he left Apple. According to his 1996


But at least one thing is evident: As businessman Perot was successful. Perot founded his first company, Electronic Data Systems, at age 32 in 1962 with just $1,000 in savings. He became a billionaire at 58 when General Motors bought a controlling interest in his company in 1984 for $2.4 billion. After Perot sold Electronic Data Systems, he established Perot Systems in 1998 and became an angel investor for NeXT, a computer company founded by Steve Jobs after he left Apple. According to his 1996
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: jade scipioni
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3 principles of success Ross Perot lived by

Billionaire and two-time presidential candidate Ross Perot, who died on Tuesday at the age of 89, has been called everything from the epitome of the “entrepreneurial spirit and the American creed,” by former President George W. Bush, to “frightening” and “short-tempered” by fellow politicians during his presidential runs in ’90s.

On Tuesday, one referred to him as “a stick of dynamite in the pond of U.S. politics back in 1992,” while The New York Times called him “brash,” and a “wiry Texas gadfly.” And a friend of Perot’s simply referred to him as “a Boy Scout who knows how to street fight,” according to the Dallas News.

But at least one thing is evident: As businessman Perot was successful.

Perot founded his first company, Electronic Data Systems, at age 32 in 1962 with just $1,000 in savings. He became a billionaire at 58 when General Motors bought a controlling interest in his company in 1984 for $2.4 billion. After Perot sold Electronic Data Systems, he established Perot Systems in 1998 and became an angel investor for NeXT, a computer company founded by Steve Jobs after he left Apple. Over the years, Perot grew his net worth to more than $4 billion, according to Forbes, making him the 167th richest person in the U.S. at the time of his death.

According to his 1996 memoir, “My Life & the Principles for Success,” these are three tenants Perot lived by that helped him achieve success.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: jade scipioni
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At 63, Bill Gates says he now asks himself these 3 questions that he wouldn’t have in his 20s

For Bill Gates, it’s an “end-of-year assessment” of his personal and work life — a tradition that he says dates back to his childhood. “Some people think it is corny, but I like it,” the Microsoft co-founder wrote in a 2018 blog post. Gates also noted how different his assessment looks today, at age 63, than it did in his 20s. Of course, Gates still assesses the quality of his work, but he also asks himself a whole set of other questions about his life. If you don’t have your own metric of succe


For Bill Gates, it’s an “end-of-year assessment” of his personal and work life — a tradition that he says dates back to his childhood. “Some people think it is corny, but I like it,” the Microsoft co-founder wrote in a 2018 blog post. Gates also noted how different his assessment looks today, at age 63, than it did in his 20s. Of course, Gates still assesses the quality of his work, but he also asks himself a whole set of other questions about his life. If you don’t have your own metric of succe
At 63, Bill Gates says he now asks himself these 3 questions that he wouldn’t have in his 20s Cached Page below :
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At 63, Bill Gates says he now asks himself these 3 questions that he wouldn't have in his 20s

We all have our own ways of measuring success in life, and they may shift as we grow older. For Bill Gates, it’s an “end-of-year assessment” of his personal and work life — a tradition that he says dates back to his childhood. “Some people think it is corny, but I like it,” the Microsoft co-founder wrote in a 2018 blog post. Gates also noted how different his assessment looks today, at age 63, than it did in his 20s. “Back then, an end-of-year assessment would amount to just one question: Is Microsoft software making the personal-computing dream come true?” he wrote. Of course, Gates still assesses the quality of his work, but he also asks himself a whole set of other questions about his life. “These would have been laughable to me when I was 25, but as I get older, they are much more meaningful.” Our year is more than halfway over, folks. Perhaps you’ve accomplished more than you expected to. Or maybe you feel you haven’t done enough, and would like to push yourself some more. No matter what your journey has been like, now is the perfect time to pause and reflect on how 2019 has shaped you so far. If you don’t have your own metric of success, it’s worth starting with the three questions Gates asked himself at the end of 2018:

1. ‘Did I devote enough time to my family?’

Money can buy you many things, but it can’t buy you an extra minute in the day. Even with a busy schedule, Gates makes time for his family. In an interview with The Cut, Gates’ wife Melinda revealed that she and her husband share a favorite pastime: Binge-watching PBS’ “Victoria” together. “If we’re in separate locales, we’ll agree to both watch the same episode at the same time so we’re caught up with each other,” she said. And earlier this year, Melinda told Business Insider’s editor-in-chief that back when her husband was CEO of Microsoft, he spent a few mornings each week driving their oldest daughter, Jennifer, to school. “Bill and the kids cherished those moments in the car,” she said. “Listening to music together, the conversations over many years that they had — it’s a side of him that they might not have seen otherwise. It would’ve been a missed opportunity.”

2. ‘Did I learn enough new things?’

Gates might have dropped out of Harvard in 1975, but he has still maintained an incredible appetite for learning. In an interview with The New York Times, Gates said that he reads up to 50 books each year: “It’s one of the chief ways that I learn, and has been since I was a kid.” He continued, “These days, I also like to visit interesting places, meet with scientists and watch a lot of lectures online. But reading is still the main way that I both learn new things and test my understanding.”

These [questions] would have been laughable to me when I was 25, but as I get older, they are much more meaningful. Bill Gates

Lifelong learning is essential for continuous growth, success and happiness — and there has never been a better time to practice it. As Gates wrote in a 2017 article for TIME, “When I wanted to learn something outside of school as a kid, cracking open my World Book encyclopedia was the best I could do. Today, all you have to do is go online.”

3. ‘Did I develop new friendships and deepen old ones?’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-06  Authors: marcel schwantes
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How billionaire Ray Dalio used ‘mantra’ meditation to come back from financial ruin

At the age of 12, billionaire Ray Dalio bought his first stock for less than $5 a share with money he made while caddying in Queens, New York. Now more than 57 years later, Dalio has a net worth of $16.9 billion. “I was so broke, I had borrow $4,000 from my dad to help pay for family bills,” Dalio says. Weeks later, the Fed made rate cuts, propelling the markets even more, causing Dalio to lose everything. “As a result of being wrong, I lost money for me, I lost money for my clients, I had to le


At the age of 12, billionaire Ray Dalio bought his first stock for less than $5 a share with money he made while caddying in Queens, New York. Now more than 57 years later, Dalio has a net worth of $16.9 billion. “I was so broke, I had borrow $4,000 from my dad to help pay for family bills,” Dalio says. Weeks later, the Fed made rate cuts, propelling the markets even more, causing Dalio to lose everything. “As a result of being wrong, I lost money for me, I lost money for my clients, I had to le
How billionaire Ray Dalio used ‘mantra’ meditation to come back from financial ruin Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meditation, result, mantra, company, billionaire, markets, ruin, ray, financial, success, dalio, stock, come, economy, used, money, lost, later


How billionaire Ray Dalio used 'mantra' meditation to come back from financial ruin

At the age of 12, billionaire Ray Dalio bought his first stock for less than $5 a share with money he made while caddying in Queens, New York.

“I got lucky, because the company was about to go broke, but some other company acquired it and it tripled, and I thought the game was easy, and so that’s what I got hooked on,” Dalio says during an episode of the Business Insider podcast, “This is Success” Friday.

His $300 investment into Northeast Airlines turned into $900, which made him a profit of $600 before he headed into the 7th grade in 1962.

Now more than 57 years later, Dalio has a net worth of $16.9 billion. Not to mention, he is one of the most influential figures in the world of finance as founder world’s largest hedge fund — Bridgewater Associates, which has $160 billion in assets under management.

However, it wasn’t a straight shot to success for Dalio.

In 1982, seven years after launching Bridgewater out of his two-bedroom New York City apartment, he made a bad bet that wiped him out financially — and spiritually.

“I was so broke, I had borrow $4,000 from my dad to help pay for family bills,” Dalio says.

Dalio, then 33, was certain that the stock market and economy were about to go down (as a result of Mexico defaulting on its debt). Instead the U.S. economy and markets soared. Weeks later, the Fed made rate cuts, propelling the markets even more, causing Dalio to lose everything.

“As a result of being wrong, I lost money for me, I lost money for my clients, I had to let everybody in my company go,” he says.

And while he describes that time as “very painful,” he says the experience was the “best thing ” that ever happened to him because it forced him change his mindset.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: jade scipioni
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Debate fact check: Firm says Sen. Klobuchar overstates Trump’s lack of success lowering drug prices

Sen. Amy Klobuchar lambasted President Donald Trump’s record on lowering prescription drug prices during Wednesday’ night’s Democratic primary debate, but an analysis from RX Savings Solutions shows the presidential candidate overstated Trump’s lack of success. The Minnesota senator slammed Trump for failing to deliver on his promise to lower prescription drug prices, and for permitting what she called “giveaways” to pharmaceutical companies. However, the number of drug price increases of 10% or


Sen. Amy Klobuchar lambasted President Donald Trump’s record on lowering prescription drug prices during Wednesday’ night’s Democratic primary debate, but an analysis from RX Savings Solutions shows the presidential candidate overstated Trump’s lack of success. The Minnesota senator slammed Trump for failing to deliver on his promise to lower prescription drug prices, and for permitting what she called “giveaways” to pharmaceutical companies. However, the number of drug price increases of 10% or
Debate fact check: Firm says Sen. Klobuchar overstates Trump’s lack of success lowering drug prices Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
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Debate fact check: Firm says Sen. Klobuchar overstates Trump's lack of success lowering drug prices

Sen. Amy Klobuchar lambasted President Donald Trump’s record on lowering prescription drug prices during Wednesday’ night’s Democratic primary debate, but an analysis from RX Savings Solutions shows the presidential candidate overstated Trump’s lack of success.

The Minnesota senator slammed Trump for failing to deliver on his promise to lower prescription drug prices, and for permitting what she called “giveaways” to pharmaceutical companies.

“The president literally went on TV, on Fox, and said that people’s heads would spin when they see how much he would bring down pharmaceutical prices,” Klobuchar said from Miami, Florida. “Instead, 2,500 drugs have gone up in double-digits since he came into office. Instead, he gave $100 billion in giveaways to the pharma companies.”

However, the number of drug price increases of 10% or more since Trump entered office is actually closer to 1,596, according to Michael Rea, a clinical pharmacist and founder of Rx Savings Solutions. Rea, analyzing public disclosures of price increases, said that number also includes price increases for the same drug in different doses and package sizes.

Carlie Waibel, a spokesperson for Klobuchar’s campaign, pointed CNBC to an Op-Ed from former Acting CMS Administrator Andy Slavitt, who linked to a report from industry group Pharmacy Benefit Consultants on price hike increases.

Spending on prescription drugs in the U.S. increased 0.4% in 2017 to $333.4 billion, according to the latest data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. High prescription drug costs have become a rare bipartisan issue with lawmakers on both sides of the aisle demanding changes. Trump has made lowering prices one of the key issues of his administration as health care remains a top issue for voters in the 2020 elections.

During the debate, Democratic candidates also pledged to make opioid companies criminally liable and clashed over “Medicare for All,” which calls for eliminating private health insurance and replacing it with a universal Medicare plan.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
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If you want success, ‘be unapologetic about your ambitions’: Career advice from top marketing chiefs

This approach helped her become chief marketing officer at Mondelez, before joining media and marketing consultancy MediaLink in 2017. Discussing her personal life in the office has only helped her, but like de Pablos, she initially shied away from doing so. “And now I’ve gone completely the other direction, which is to continually refer to my personal life, to reference my home life, the things that I value that matter. Lisa Utzschneider, chief executive officer, Integral Ad Science’Be unapolog


This approach helped her become chief marketing officer at Mondelez, before joining media and marketing consultancy MediaLink in 2017. Discussing her personal life in the office has only helped her, but like de Pablos, she initially shied away from doing so. “And now I’ve gone completely the other direction, which is to continually refer to my personal life, to reference my home life, the things that I value that matter. Lisa Utzschneider, chief executive officer, Integral Ad Science’Be unapolog
If you want success, ‘be unapologetic about your ambitions’: Career advice from top marketing chiefs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26  Authors: lucy handley
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If you want success, 'be unapologetic about your ambitions': Career advice from top marketing chiefs

Dana Anderson, chief transformation officer at MediaLink, speaks at an event in New York in September 2014, in her former role as a senior vice president at Mondelez.

The world’s top marketing executives gathered at the Cannes Lions ad conference last week to discuss where they were spending their advertising dollars and compete to win a coveted Lion award. They also issued a few words of career advice, from the benefits of being yourself at work to showing your ambition off. CNBC took time to talk with some of the world’s leading marketing executives.

Berta de Pablos, chief category officer, Mars Wrigley

‘If everybody else is thinking like you, then they don’t need you’ M&M’s, Snickers and Skittles make up part of the multi-billion-dollar business that Berta de Pablos helps to oversee at Mars. She’s an advocate for bringing her personality to work, having written about how, as a young woman, she hid her Spanish heritage after a manager told her she would never “make it” because of how she spoke and dressed. De Pablos was 25 at the time and took it to heart, changing her appearance and restricting her views because she wanted to fit in. Three years later, a woman she was supposed to be mentoring suggested that she was hard to get to know, causing de Pablos to have a rethink.

Berta de Pablos, chief category officer at Mars Wrigley Mars

“It’s about making sure that you really know yourself … and find your inner strength,” she told CNBC. This links to having a diverse team around you, she added. “The other thing that has worked for me — and when I have not done it, it has gone horribly wrong — is when I don’t listen to others. So when I think that I have all the answers … I actually found that the best answers are from talking to people, from talking to the experts and having a very diverse group of people that are surrounding me, diverse in thinking, diverse in origin, diverse in culture, upbringing.” “So again, just to surround yourself with people that are not like you … If everybody else is thinking like you, then they don’t need you.”

Dana Anderson, chief transformation officer, MediaLink

‘The value of what you bring is not always connected to your billings or your revenue’ Dana Anderson has had “so many different jobs,” from writing scripts for commercials to being a project manager in ad agencies, where she had responsibility for bringing money in. But it was her switch to the role of “planner,” a job that involves thinking about marketing strategy, which set her up for the rest of her career.

Dana Anderson, chief transformation officer at MediaLink, speaks at an event in New York in September 2014, in her former role as a senior vice president at Mondelez. Paul Zimmerman | Getty Images

Working at ad agency J Walter Thompson (now Wunderman Thompson), a colleague convinced her to become a planner, but she was “petrified” because she would no longer have financial responsibility, she told CNBC. “(Strategic) planning … taught me that the value of what you bring is not always connected to your billings or your revenue … you can bring incredible value … if you make your company and your client make strides and have insights,” she said. This approach helped her become chief marketing officer at Mondelez, before joining media and marketing consultancy MediaLink in 2017. Her second piece of advice is to be generous with your time. “A woman came up to me … that I did not remember. And she said I just want to thank you for the time that you spent with me three years ago and you told me, don’t let your job decide if you’re going to have children. She said, I had a child, I’m so happy and I just want you to know … We spent time together and had that conversation (and) I didn’t expect anything back.”

Andrea Mallard, chief marketing officer, Pinterest

‘I continually refer to my personal life and that’s only made me more successful at work’ In 2013, Andrea Mallard posted a very personal essay on Medium, titled “Death. Dying. Design. What I Learned Watching My Mother Die.” In it, she wrote about her mother’s last days and how her care could have been improved. She referred to IDEO, the Palo Alto design consultancy she worked for at the time, and how healthcare could be better designed for the dying and their families.

Andrea Mallard, Chief Marketing Officer at Pinterest Pinterest

Speaking to CNBC about her current role as CMO of Pinterest (she joined in November 2018) Mallard said she increasingly brought her personal self to work. “The decision to take the job at Pinterest was a decision to go even deeper and trying to link my personal life with my work life … The only currency that matters to me — and I think should matter to most people — are time and meaning, ” she said. Discussing her personal life in the office has only helped her, but like de Pablos, she initially shied away from doing so. “And now I’ve gone completely the other direction, which is to continually refer to my personal life, to reference my home life, the things that I value that matter. And that’s only made me more successful at work.”

Lisa Utzschneider, chief executive officer, Integral Ad Science

‘Be unapologetic about your career ambitions and the more success you will have’ Lisa Utzschneider has a tough job. She is the chief executive of Integral Ad Science (IAS), one of the companies tasked with making sure advertising does not appear next to inappropriate content on YouTube and other sites, and that online ads are seen by humans rather than bots.

Lisa Utzschneider, Yahoo’s former chief revenue officer, and current CEO of Integral Ad Science, at an event in New York, September 2016 John Lamparski | Getty Images

Earlier in her career, Utzschneider spent six years at Amazon when advertising on the site was in its infancy. What she learnt at Amazon was to get comfortable with ambiguity, because everything was new. “At IAS … there’s a hunger for being able to build the business together and being comfortable with ambiguity and not having a playbook and comfort with being handed a marker, going to (a) whiteboard and figuring out how to build our verification business together,” she told CNBC. Her advice for someone starting out? “Be unapologetic about your career ambitions and the more success you will have.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, diverse, chiefs, pablos, success, ambitions, officer, chief, marketing, personal, ad, unapologetic, career, advice, told, life, work


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3 lessons boxing legend Muhammad Ali taught daughter Laila about success and money

Muhammad Ali throws a left hook at Trevor Berbick at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre on December 11, 1981 in Nassau, Bahamas. Boxing legend Muhammad Ali reached GOAT status (aka, the greatest of all time) before Michael Jordan could bounce a basketball and before Tom Brady was born. Though Ali wasn’t one to give Laila advice, she says she gleaned a lot from watching him succeed. LOS ANGELES, CA – JULY 18: Former professional boxer Laila Ali attends The 2018 ESPYS at Microsoft Theater on July 1


Muhammad Ali throws a left hook at Trevor Berbick at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre on December 11, 1981 in Nassau, Bahamas. Boxing legend Muhammad Ali reached GOAT status (aka, the greatest of all time) before Michael Jordan could bounce a basketball and before Tom Brady was born. Though Ali wasn’t one to give Laila advice, she says she gleaned a lot from watching him succeed. LOS ANGELES, CA – JULY 18: Former professional boxer Laila Ali attends The 2018 ESPYS at Microsoft Theater on July 1
3 lessons boxing legend Muhammad Ali taught daughter Laila about success and money Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-14  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, success, muhammad, taught, lessons, getty, world, laila, really, million, daughter, money, ali, legend, wasnt, told, boxing


3 lessons boxing legend Muhammad Ali taught daughter Laila about success and money

Muhammad Ali throws a left hook at Trevor Berbick at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre on December 11, 1981 in Nassau, Bahamas.

Boxing legend Muhammad Ali reached GOAT status (aka, the greatest of all time) before Michael Jordan could bounce a basketball and before Tom Brady was born. Ali captured three heavyweight titles over his career and was an Olympic gold medalist, accumulating earnings of around $60 million, which not only changed the economics of the sport but paved the way for other athletes’ earning potential. At the time of his death in 2016 at age 74, Ali had an estimated net worth of $80 million, according to Forbes. But at home with his nine children, Ali was simply known as Dad.

December 19, 1978: Heavyweight boxer Muhammad Ali with his daughters Laila (9 months) and Hanna (2 years 5 months) Frank Tewkesbury | Hulton Archive | Getty Images

Laila Ali, Ali’s eighth child (her mom is Ali’s third wife Veronica Porche Ali), is now 41, a mother of two and a former world champion boxer in her own right. Though Ali wasn’t one to give Laila advice, she says she gleaned a lot from watching him succeed. Here are three lessons she learned from her dad.

LOS ANGELES, CA – JULY 18: Former professional boxer Laila Ali attends The 2018 ESPYS at Microsoft Theater on July 18, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. Axelle/Bauer-Griffin | FilmMagic | Getty Images

You have to follow your passion

Though Muhammad Ali wasn’t the reason Laila became a fighter, he demonstrated to her that it was imperative to go after what felt most natural. “One of the things that I learned [from Dad] early on is that you have to find your passion and you got to follow your heart,” Ali tells CNBC’s Make It. Laila was originally a manicurist, but when she saw a women’s boxing match on television for the first time, something clicked. “I mean, they walked out of the ring with blood all over them and everything, and I was like, ‘That’s for me! I want to do that,” Ali told Oprah.com.

How to be a champion

Laila also learned from her dad that everything you pursue — whether you have a passion for it or not — is going to be a challenge, so embrace it. “You have to be dedicated and consistent because a lot of people say they want this or that but they are not really ready to do the hard work that it takes,” Laila says. For example, Ali actually told Laila that boxing wasn’t for women. He said, “What are you going to do if you get knocked down in the ring and the whole world is watching?” according to an essay Laila wrote for Fatherly in 2017. “I said, ‘I’ll do what you did and get back up.'” Despite his disapproval, Ali still attended most of his daughter’s fights, and Laila retired undefeated in 2007 with a 24-0 record and several of world champion titles of her own. “There’s going to be failures and setbacks,” Laila tells CNBC Make It, “but you have to learn how to push through them because there’s always a lesson in every setback.” “If it was easy to be a champion, everybody would be one,” she says.

What’s really important in life

Ali was born in 1942 to middle-class parents in Louisville, Kentucky, and even with his success, business wasn’t really his thing, according to Laila. “When people who aren’t used to having money, get money, it is important to know the basics like paying your taxes, to who’s on your payroll, to simply knowing the things that are investing your money in,” she says. So even though he wasn’t a keen businessman, he did teach her one important thing about money: “It’s not about how much money you have, it’s thinking about how we can make this world a better place,” she told CNBC last year. In fact, Laila said being inspired by her father’s philanthropy was his greatest gift to her.

Boxing legend Muhammad Ali poses with his daughter, Laila Ali on February 5, 2003 in Harlem, New York City. Ezra Shaw | Getty Images Sport | Getty Images

After his boxing career, Ali became heavily involved in public service traveling the world to help disadvantaged people and promote religious, racial and economic equality. In 1998, Ali, who battled Parkinson’s disease, began working with Michael J. Fox (who also has Parkinson’s) to raise awareness about the disease and to help fund research to find a cure. In 2005, Ali was honored with the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President George W. Bush. Laila says her father’s philanthropy is one of the reasons she has been committed to working with Feeding America and Undeniably Dairy as a spokesperson to fight childhood hunger. Don’t miss: Why NBA star Kawhi Leonard still drove a 20-year-old car after signing a $94 million contract Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-14  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, success, muhammad, taught, lessons, getty, world, laila, really, million, daughter, money, ali, legend, wasnt, told, boxing


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